Clippings:1889

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Clippings in 1889

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1889Clippings in 1889

Clippings in 1889 (676 entries)

Contents


Pete Browning falls off the wagon

Date Sunday, June 23, 1889
Text

Pete Browning fell by the wayside in Kansas City this week and was left there by the club when it went to Cincinnati. When Francis Murphy was here [Louisville] last spring Pete signed the pledge. He has kept it very well all the season, but last Monday night, at Kansas City, he became very drunk. On Tuesday morning he drank even more, and was soon hopelessly full. It has rained that night and there were large puddles of water in the street. It afforded a golden opportunity for the gladiator to make a spectacle of himself. He went to a store near by and purchased two fishing poles and lines. Armed with these he planted himself in front of the hotel where the club was stopping and proceeded to fish in the water which flowed through the gutters. Tiring of this diversion he went into the hotel and soon had a crowd collected around him. He finally grew so boisterous that he had to be put out and narrowly escaped being arrested. When the club left for Cincinnati Tuesday night he refused to accompany the other players and was left in Kansas City, where he now is. Since then nothing has been heard of him. Cleveland Plain Dealer June 23, 1889

Peter Browning returned Friday night from Kansas City. He reported yesterday morning to President Davidson and was fined $100. Pete pleaded that it was his first backsliding this year, but Mr. Davidson says the fine will have to go. Cleveland Plain Dealer June 26, 1889

Source Cleveland Plain Dealer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no base coaches 2

Date Sunday, June 23, 1889
Text

The Cleveland club could have stood a little coaching on Wednesday with advantage. A game is never lost until the twenty-seventh man has been retired, and until he is it is a duty ball players owe to the public which supports them to make the game as interesting as possible, and that can only be done by the players themselves manifesting some interest in the proceedings. On two occasions when Cleveland runners were on third there was no one on the coaching line. That’s not the way to play wining ball., quoting the Philadelphia North American

Source Cleveland Plain Dealer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a claimed flooding of the infield for a rain out

Date Saturday, June 29, 1889
Text

The versatile romancer who sends the Clipper base ball “news” from St. Louey, Mizzourey, tells this story:

“I recently heard a good one on the Cleveland club. During the last visit of the Browns to Cleveland the weather not particularly bright, and two games were postponed on account of the alleged “bad condition of the grounds.” So the wires informed us here, and the papers also noted it. I learned from several of the players, who happened to be at the Cleveland ball grounds on the days when these games were to have taken place that saw, to their astonishment, the grounds-keeper industriously “hosing” the diamond and forming “pools” around the bases. The stream was a stead one, and it accomplished its purpose admirably. The nefarious work cost St. Louis at least one game and the guarantee. Hereafter Cleveland should be held up to summer guide bookmakers as a delightful and charming watering place, with all the summer comforts, hose and water included. This is one on “Cleveland.

Source ” Cleveland Plain Dealer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a seamless ball to discourage curve pitching

Date Wednesday, January 2, 1889
Text

Al. Reach believes that the only way to bring about more batting is to handicap the pitchers with a ball they cannot curve or command as well as the present one. It is a well-known fact that the pitchers can curve a ball with a rough seam better than one with a smooth edge. By gripping the ball tightly with the front of his fingers and imbedding their nails into the seams they can put more of a twist to it and consequently there will be a shoot or a curve to the ball. Mr. Reach does not believe the pitchers can put much of a twist to the new seamless ball which he has invented and which will probably be given a trial by the Association in the spring games. It is the opinion of all who have seen it that the new ball cannot well be curved and if this proves to be the case there will be lots of batting when the pitchers are forced to throw straight balls over the plate.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player jumps reservation to play in California

Date Wednesday, January 2, 1889
Text

Normal L. Baker, one of the crack twirlers of the Newark Base Ball Club during the past season, has jumped the reservation claim held upon him by the Newark Base Ball And Exhibition Company and has signed a contract to play net season with the Stockton Club of the California League... The Sporting Life January 2, 1889

[editorial matter] There is a break in the stone wall the National Agreement has built around the National game, which should be repaired at once. The California League last season employed three ineligible players—J. J. Smith, Ebright and Whitehead—and is likely to become a refuge for more of that ilk next season. Close upon the announcement that the Newark Club's reserved pitcher, Norman Baker, has signed with the Sacramento Club, comes the news that third baseman Alvord, reserved by Des Moines, has also signed with that club, and that other Des Moines reserved players contemplate doing the same thing. The California League surely needs looking after. It is a prosperous institution, pays good salaries, and is apparently permanently established. Under the circumstances no strong efforts should be spared to make the League an ally, instead of a menace to National Agreement interests. The Sporting Life January 2, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Athletic Club finances 6

Date Wednesday, January 2, 1889
Text

[reporting the Athletic Club meeting 12/27/1888] The report of Treasurer Whitaker showed the finances of the club to be in a healthy condition. The club made money last season, but how much is only known to the stockholders.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

indoor baseball 4

Date Wednesday, January 2, 1889
Text

The experiment of playing base ball indoors was given a trial on Christmas day, and the much-mooted question as to whether a game can be played under roof is settled once for all. The base ball world is indebted to Charley Mason for making the experiment which resulted in demonstrating one things, viz.: that the great game can be made a winter sport and played indoors. The game was played in the main building on the Pennsylvania State Fair grounds and was witnessed by about 2,000 people. The building is about 300 feet long, 125 feet wide and 50 feet high. The structure was never intended for base ball, and owing to the numerous posts scattered all over the floor to support the galleries and roof, it was with great difficulty that a diamond could be laid out and a match played. Despite these drawbacks the game was well played and everybody present enjoyed it very much. All that is necessary to make base ball a winter sport is to erect buildings about 300 x 200 in dimensions and the roof about 75 feet from the ground floor. Of course the structure on the inside wants to be free from supporting posts so as to give the fielders full sway in running after fly balls. In this game a deadened ball was used and the fielders experienced no difficulty in handling it.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

A. J. Reach Co. becomes a stock company

Date Wednesday, January 2, 1889
Text

The business of the A. J. Reach Company, limited, has grown so that it was deemed advisable to enlarge its scope, and the company has accordingly been transformed into a stock company corporation. The new concern, entitled the “A. J. Reach Company of Philadelphia,” capitalized at $100,000, was chartered by the State last week. The company is authorized to manufacture and sell general sporting and athletic goods. Under the articles of incorporation 600 shares are to be issued as full-paid, non-assessable stock to A. J. Reach, and 300 shares to Ben Shibe and Emanual Hoff.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

waste pitches

Date Wednesday, January 2, 1889
Text

It is said of Keefe that he can have four bad balls called on him and then strike the batsman out. He has performed this feat on the Polo Grounds time and again. Some incredulous persons have said that it was more dumb luck than good judgment, and whether they are right is not known, but he has performed the feat so often that people in New York are of the opinion that there is something more than dumb luck back of it. It certainly proves what has so often been said of him, that he has perfect command of the ball, and that he wastes those balls to deceive the batsman, as the latter will not expect the next three balls to come over the home plate. St., quoting the Boston Herald

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early sighting of William Becannon

Date Friday, January 4, 1889
Text

Tim Keefe will have for his partner in the sporting goods business William Becannon, who has been for a long time with A. G. Spalding. Mr. Becannon has been a feature in amateur base ball hereabouts for many years. It will be next to impossible for T. J. Keefe & Co. to get a store before the middle or latter part of March, so that in the mean time they will secure a large down-town office as a starter. New York Sun January 4, 1889

William Becannon is making a strong move to organize a commercial league in this city for next season. Already three clubs have agreed to join the movement. The idea is to secure six clubs to play ten games during June, July, and August. Mr. Becannon will try to secure teams from the largest business houses in town. New York Sun January 11, 1889

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Baltimore Club ownership

Date Saturday, January 5, 1889
Text

Though it has been known for some time that there would be a change in the management of the Baltimore Base Ball Club, the announcement this morning that Mr. Von der Horst had sold out caused considerable surprise. It was expected that additional capital would be invested, and that Von der Horst, who practically owns the franchise, would continue to hold a controlling interest. The disposition he has made of his share leaves Mr. Barnie with about a third interest, Fred Booth and B. F. Farren, wealthy oyster packers, owning the remaining two-thirds. The price paid is said to have been $10,000. The amount is, however, not officially stated. Mr. Von der Horst admits to having sold at a sacrifice, and gives as a reason that base ball interfered with his business. The miserable showing of the club last season had much to do with his withdrawal. Von der Horst is an ardent admirer of the sport, and made a courageous effort to bring the club to the front. … It was officially announced at base ball headquarters this evening that Mr. J. W. Walz was also one of the purchasers of Mr. Vonderhorst's interest in the club. He will probably act as an assistant to Manager Barnie.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

batting practice routines

Date Saturday, January 5, 1889
Text

Manager Dick [of the Brooklyn Athletic Club] proposes to introduce Harry Wright’s plan of training players at the bat at the Athletic Club grounds this season, and that is to have the team do batting practice instead of fungo hitting before the game begins. Harry Wright places the men in their regular positions in the game and then allows each batsman twelve balls to be pitched to him, either incurves, outcurves, down shoots or up shoots, as he may call for, and he is not to retire until twelve balls have been delivered, and if, in the interim he makes a base hit he runs to first base and begins practice in stealing bases. Brooklyn Eagle January 5, 1889

Captain Esterbrook has adopted a new plan of training for the Louisville. Instead of the absurd fungo practice, which only gives the outfielders practice and is death to good batting, his rule is to have the players take their regular positions in the field and one of the batteries officiate at the points. The other pitchers and catchers will take their turn at the bat. The result of this kind of practice is already clearly apparent, for even in one week the boys have shown a decided improvement in their team work. It is to be hoped that other clubs will do something like this and do away with the old fungo rut. Brooklyn Eagle April 1, 1889

This is the way Anson now exercises his team every morning: Each player on entering the field in uniform takes his regular position, as in a game. Then the others go to the bat and practice until they have each been in five time. Then they go to the field and the fielders come in for batting practice. All is done as in a regular game, and this new rule went into operation this month. It takes the place of the old fungo practice, which yields nothing but good practice for the fielders and none for batting or base running. Mr. Spalding has insisted upon this rule being observed daily in future. Brooklyn Eagle June 17, 1889

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a wealthy ballplayer

Date Sunday, January 6, 1889
Text

Pitcher Shreve is at Louisville. He belongs to a Southern family there who think he “degrades himself by playing ball,” just as certain English families think that their sons should do no vulgar work for a living, but simply live idle lives, “like gentlemen.” Shreve, however, has common sense views on the subject, and so plays ball for a good salary. Brooklyn Eagle January 6, 1889 [See also SABR bio of Lev Shreve.]

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

National League umpire retention:

Date Sunday, January 6, 1889
Text

[quoting Nick Young] To remove an umpire at the demand of any single club would be not only grossly unfair to the official thus suffering, but spread demoralization, timidity and time serving among the rest of the staff, where fearlessness and impartiality should rule. My policy will be in the future, as it has been in the past, to assure the members of the corps of umpires that they are fixtures in their positions, to be disturbed only on the most convincing evidence of dishonesty or incompetency and proof of really poor work, attested not by one, but by several clubs.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

position of the third baseman; catcher signals

Date Sunday, January 6, 1889
Text

[quoting George Pinkney] In playing the base, or rather when I take my position on the field, I stand from ten to twelve feet from the base–down the line toward the short stop and about three to five feet behind the line. Of course I vary my position according to the batsman. I take my signs from the catcher, who has signaled the pitcher the kind of a ball he wants delivered to this or that particular batsman. A live third baseman will make many good points during the game which will add to the interest of it. He has many chances for covering second base, which a number of third basemen fail to do. Time and again that base is left vacant by the baseman and short stop, both going after a high fly back of the base. This leaves it unprotected and gives the base runner, who is always ready to take advantage of any points, an opportunity to make an extra base in case the ball should be dropped. A good third baseman should be an accurate throwing, both overhand and underhand, and a sure catch, on account of the peculiar twist on the high balls hit up around third base. These balls must be grabbed and held firmly until they have settled in your hands or they are apt to twist out and shoot away from you in such a manner that you cannot recover them before they reach the ground. A good third baseman should be a wideawake and lively man, because he has little time to consider after a ball is hit to him, for they are of the hot and sharp kind.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catcher signals the pitcher 2

Date Sunday, January 6, 1889
Text

[quoting Bushong] To insure good work at catching there must be between the pitcher and catcher an understanding of what is to be done. What sort of delivery is to be made–high orlow, in or out; the most information that can be given with the fewest signs. It is a good point or an advantage, for the pitcher is thus relieved somewhat of a share of the responsibility if a ball that is asked for is hit. He consoles himself with the thought that it wasn’t all his fault and so perhaps can do his work better. Undoubtedly “team work,” or the “pairing” of pitchers and catchers so they can work steadily together, is always beneficial. One then understands the other in a variety of ways, knows the weak and strong points of each other that are avoided in a match game, and in the end must make them more successful.

The pitcher’s position is the best from from which to note the point, good or bad, of a batsman. Yet it has always been my practice to give the signs, and if satisfactory, the pitcher would deliver the ball as directed. If not, a shake of the head or a hesitation would lead to a change. So, instead of one man’s judgment, it is possible to have two.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an oblique dig at Amos Alonzo Stagg

Date Sunday, January 6, 1889
Text

“They tell me you were one of the famous praying pitchers of last season?

(Modestly,) “I was.”

“And did you always win when you offered up a prayer for victory previous to a game?”

(With injured look.) “Not always. Sometimes the other side bribed the umpire.” Philadelphia Times January 6, 1889, quoting the Chicago Tribune

Baltimore Club ownership

It is announced to-day [1/5] that Henry R. Vonderhorst has sold his interest in the Baltimore Club to Messrs. B. F. Farren and Fred Booth, well-known oyster packers. It is also understood that Vonderhorst disposed of his stock at a sacrifice. Barnie will continue to manage the club. Mr. J. W. Walz will act in behalf of the gentlemen who purchased Mr. Vonderhorst's interest in the club. He is announced as one of the owners of the club and will, in all probability, act as assistant to Manager Barnie.

It was at first thought that the capital stock would be increased by the taking in of other wealthy capitalists and by forming a company. This plan was, however, abandoned, and Mr. Vonderhorst got out of the snap as best he could. He acknowledges he quit a heavy loser.

There is every reason, however, to doubt Mr. Vonderhorst's complete withdrawal from base ball, and there is ample cause for the belief that he still retains an interest in the club, but for business reasons and in deference to his father's wish no longer cares to be publicly identified with the club or base ball in general. The Sporting Life January 9, 1889

Source ” Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a minor league's measures to enforce a salary limit

Date Wednesday, January 9, 1889
Text

[reporting the Middle States League meeting 1/5/1888] Mr. Farrington's motion to amend the salary limit rule so as to read that an affidavit from manager and players in which both are to swear that the limit of $75 per month has in no way been evaded, was unanimously adopted.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The California League and the National Agreement; a refuge from the blacklist

Date Wednesday, January 9, 1889
Text

[from Waller Wallace's column] [reporting the California League convent of 12/13/1888] A very important matter which now arose was the question as to 3whether the League should join the National League Alliance or not. A letter was read from President Young urging the necessity of the League becoming a member and advanced many reasons. All were from an Eastern standpoint, however. After a great deal of discussion the matter was laid over until the spring meeting, when it will be finally acted upon. A good “hit “ was made by Robinson [of the Oaklands] when he said-- “Where one man will go East ten will come out here, so I think it better to remain as we are.” The Sporting Life January 9, 1889

[from the Kansas City correspondent] Your note of alarm, aimed at the California League, is very timely. It is high time that the League and Association were taking some action toward bringing these people under the National Agreement. The California League is certainly proving not only inconvenient but dangerous. This is to be noticed in a hundred ways. The “coast” league is especially disagreeable to Western clubs. For instance, Kansas City is having trouble right now with a lot of its young blood players. For instance, there are Johnson and Hammond, who were sold to St. Joseph, who say they will not go. Each has an offer to play on the “coast,” and insists that he will accept it. … McCarty said that if he jumped the reserve list and played on the “coast,” he had no fear of the blacklist. He talked pretty confidently, and it looks somewhat as if California League managers who had been making offers to reserved players, have been posting them as to the probable consequences of their actions. The Sporting Life January 16, 1889

[editorial matter] Contract-breaking is one of the graver offenses for the perpetration of which ball players rarely escape some degree of punishment. Catcher Ebright, just signed by the Washington Club, however, is an instance of how, through a peculiar construction of base ball law, a contract-breaker can profit by his offense and escape without the slightest punishment. Ebright, together with third baseman Whitehead, last winter signed with the Lynn Club, of the New England League, upon promise of certain sums of advance monies. After their contracts had been signed, however, the Lynn Club refused to pay the promised advance money, and, notwithstanding repeated demands, persisted in such refusal. About this time the case of pitcher Irwin came up before the Board of Arbitration, in which Chairman Rogers decided that the payment of advance money in minor leagues was not illegal, and would have to be taken into consideration in all cases where it entered as a condition of contract. Ebright and Whitehead, misinterpreting this decision, notified the Lynn club of their intention to ignore their contracts for failure to pay the promised advance money. The Lynn Club appealed to the Board of Arbitration and the latter body decided against the players upon the ground that while the club was in honor bound to fulfill its promise of advance money, yet it could not be compelled to pay the same, as the players by signing before receiving the money insisted upon as a condition of signing, had virtually waived their claims. The two players refused to accept this decision as binding, and in violation of their contracts with Lynn, went to California, signed with a California League Club, and played there all of last season at good salaries. The Lynn Club suspended Ebright and Whitehead. Like all minor league club,s however, Lynn had no power to blacklist these men, and the penalty of suspension inflicted, could, under Act III, of the Qualified Articles of the National Agreement then in force, run only to the end of the current season. Secretary Byrne, of the Board of Arbitration, in reply to an inquiry respecting the case, holds, however, that the Lynn Club, having the right to reserve its players under contract, could hold these men as reserved men, and they would have been this year in precisely the same position as blacklisted players. However, the Lynn Club met with disaster last season and disbanded, and having no existence and having failed to send in any list of its reserved players, there can be no doubt that the recent legislation in no way affects these players and that they are, through the death of the Lynn Club, again in good standing, and eligible to play with any National Agreement club, although no atonement has been made by them.

This glaring case serves to accentuate The Sporting Life's remarks as to the necessity of promptly bringing the California League into the National Agreement fold. Under present conditions this League is a menace, and if not absorbed, bids fair to become a refuge for reckless, dissatisfied and rebellious Eastern players, especially those in the minor leagues. The California League is a growing institution of fair financial strength, supports strong teams, pays good, even large, salaries, and receives excellent support. It is, therefore, a tempting field for the operations of contract-breakers, and the cases of Ebright and Whitehead are likely to be duplicated, in view of the apparent impmunity, which even the recent legislation enacted by the Board of Arbitration to specially cover the California League situation cannot counteract half so well as the legislators seem to think. Reserve jumpers cannot be reached at all by base ball law, for the reason that reserve jumping is not an offence punishable by the blacklist and because minor league reservation is not perpet5ual, but in the case of unsigned players falls at the end of a season. Already two players under reservation by National Agreement clubs,--Baker and Alvord—have taken advantage of this peculiar state of affairs and have defiantly signed with California clubs; and, we are reliably informed, many more reserved minor players are even now negotiating with a view to following in the footsteps of the two seceders.

An attempt gas already been made to bring the California League into the National Agreement fold, but the advances of the Board of Arbitration have been received with indifference. It now behooves the Board to act with promptitude and decision in order to check practices which may lead to the demoralization of minor league clubs and players. The National Agreement is essential to the welfare and good conduct of base ball. Every reputable organization now lives, moves and has its being under it, the California League alone being an exception. For the good of the game this League must be put on record promptly as either for or against the National Agreement and treated accordingly. If its officials are wise, hope for permanency for their organization, and have the best interests of the game at hear, they will not delay install the California League as a member of the great family of base ball leagues. The Sporting Life January 16, 1889

[from A. G. Ovens's column] It is quite evident that something must be done to check the dishonorable methods that are being employed by managers on the Pacific coast. The big organizations will probably not suffer much on account of these pirates, but the minor leagues are in danger of being greatly crippled. The California managers cannot offer enough to induce League or American Association players to jump, but this is not the case with the smaller and weaker organizations, especially since they have adopted salary limits. Already several young players have gone to the coast, and others threaten to do so. Of curse this state of affairs cannot exist long without harm to the game generally. The players who are falling into this trap will regret it at no distant day. Sooner or later the California League will be compelled to come under the protection of the National Agreement, and then those rash and misguided young men will realize their mistake. The California managers who engage in this discreditable business will see their error, too, some of these days. The Sporting Life January 23, 1889

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Pittsburgh Club finances 5

Date Wednesday, January 9, 1889
Text

[reporting the Pittsburgh Club annual meeting] The financial statement was such that the three or four present thought it could not have been better. There were already telegraphic messages from the absent directors stating that the “annual report was first class.” The report went on to show that the club was on the wrong side of the ledger for a few thousands of dollars in cash. New players in the way of stock were placed on the other side, and taking everything into consideration the directors were satisfied.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

New York Club ownership

Date Friday, January 11, 1889
Text

Walter Appleton says that he has not sold and will not sell his stock in the New York Club.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Brooklyn Club seeking to buy real estate; finances

Date Sunday, January 13, 1889
Text

The Brooklyn Club is looking for a new ball ground,not to play Sunday games on, but an every-day ground. In a talk with one of the directors of the club the other day he said: “We want a new ball ground, and have a number of agents out looking for it. We don't want to lease one, but to buy it outright, and then construct the finest ball field in the world. We have $200,000 to lay out, and, as we are in the business to stay and to make money, we are willing to put our money in it.”

The city has grown so rapidly since the present Brooklyn ground was constructed that the property has become very valuable. The owners of the land have not been slow in recognizing this fact, and each time the managers of the club have renewed their lease they have been compelled to pay more money for the ground. Then, too, they can only get a short lease, which does not suit them at all. Could they secure a twenty years' lease of the ground there is no doubt but that they would stay just where they are. Their idea is to secure a place on the line of one of the elevated roads, and have a station constructed right at the entrance. They have grown tired of depending on the go-as-you-please street car travel, and want something better. East New York is the place where they are looking for a ground now.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Coogan property and the Metropolitans

Date Sunday, January 13, 1889
Text

In regard to the New York Club and the Coogan property, it has become known that when the old Metropolitan Club was looking for that place, it was offered to them for $6,000, but as the club was shaky the idea was given up. It is now reported that the New York Club has been asked $12,000 for the same property. It looks as though the increase in the value of property in Harlem has increased rapidly in the past two or three years.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Louisville ownership

Date Sunday, January 13, 1889
Text

Mr. Davidson has little money himself, but has the strongest sort of backing in the shape of the firm for which he has been bookkeeper for several years. This is a wealthy auction and commission house, and Mr. Davidson stands very well with his employers. He owned a good block of the club's stock before he bought out the Phelps brothers and W. L. Lyons, then the president. When they made the “give or take” offer to him last spring he bought them at their price, and him employers promised to help him out of a tight place if the club did not pay its way. When he went in there was $5,000 to the credit of the club in the bank, but this rapidly disappeared before the combined effects of wretched work and bad weather. When the club returned from its second Eastern trip the reserve fund had all been wiped out and there was $2,000 more to be raised. A little money was made later in the season, and Mr. Davidson swapped dates to Cincinnati and Philadelphia, realizing a handsome sum from the extra inducements they offered. But there was a considerable deficit, which was provided for later in the season by the sale of Chamberlain, Collins, and Cross. Mr. Davidson then paid up every cent the club owed and has money to being the new year on and buy one or more players if he wants. He can get all the backing he needs, and it is not at all likely that he will quit the business unless luck goes very much against him, in which event any man is liable to give up. These statements may be regarded as authoritative. New York Sun January 13, 1889

Mr. Davidson owns three-fifth of the stock of the club or three hundred shares. For the stock he bought of Mr. Zack Phelps and his brother last spring he paid $5,700, and it is generally understood that this took about all the money he had. He is consequently depending upon his receipts this season to meet expenses and make a support for himself and family. It was thought for a while that he was being backed by the commission house of he has been head bookkeeper for many years, but the bad success of the club last year disheartened the members of the firm, and they gave Mr. Davidson to understand that he would have to run the club himself. This is the reason he sold the three star players, Chamberlain, Collins, and Cross, last season; it was absolutely necessary to raise money. He can continue to run the club if it is self-sustaining, but not otherwise. He thinks it will be so with the present players, but he is almost alone in his opinion. New York Sun February 24, 1889

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a rumor of short accounts by the Indianapolis manager

Date Sunday, January 13, 1889
Text

The New York correspondent of the Philadelphia Sporting Life, in the last issue of that paper, said that ex-manager Harry Spence, of the local team, had employed an attorney and intended to make it very unpleasant for some one, presumably the Indianapolis board of directors. Nothing much has ever been said about the matter, but it is well known that the management charged Spence with being short in his accounts and an effort was made at the League meeting to have him black-listed, though this was not done, because the League officials doubted their authority to act in the matter, for the reason that Spence was not at that time under engagement to the Indianapolis club. The attention of an official of the club was directed to Spence's alleged threat, and he replied that the young man might need the services of an attorney before he got through with the Indianapolis club.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

winter ball in New Orleans

Date Tuesday, January 15, 1889
Text

There are some professional players down here [New Orleans], and semi-professional ball is being played. Billy Smith of the Detroits and other nines, Cartwright, the famous slugger; Phelan of Des Moines, Beban of Lynn, and other winter here, and the climate gives them a chance to keep in good condition. There is an effort being made to get up a regular professional nine to play against visiting combinations that it is proposed to bring South. The Detroit team of the International League have in contemplation a visit to the South. They will spend most of their time in New Orleans practicing, and will go North in time for the opening of the base ball season. Other teams are being corresponded with, and the Baltimores and other teams will probably come down. Manager Mutrie and the colts spent some time in New Orleans last year, and Handsome Jeems may come to the Cresent City again this year. He has many friends down South who would be glad to see the youngsters of the gilt-edge team play ball.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Keefe's wealth; investment; setting up sporting goods store

Date Tuesday, January 15, 1889
Text

The fact that Tim Keefe has not yet signed to pitch for the Giants next season has caused considerable talk of late, although the opinion prevails that he will be on hand when needed. At present he is busy establishing a sporting goods emporium in this city [New York], and is naturally independent. Another cause for this independence, it is said is the sudden increase in value of some property owned by Tim at Cambridge, Mass. A few years ago, so the story runs, Keefe invested in a plot of land near the grounds of Harvard College, paying for it a small price. Recently the town officials of Cambridge decided to erect a public library, and selected as a site for it the ground owned by Tim. The latter heard of these plans, and when offered a fair price for the property refused the offer. He has refused several others since, the last being $30,000. Tim, it is said, holds off for $50,000, and is confident of obtaining that sum. He has also, it is said, a comfortable bank account, and looks hopefully to the time when he can put the name of Timothy J. Keefe to a check for $100,000.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a batting cage at Penn

Date Tuesday, January 15, 1889
Text

The Baseball Committee of the University of Pennsylvania has succeeded in securing a loan of %4,000, with which it is proposed to build a cage immediately. The cage will be 220 feet long by 110 feet wide, and between 40 and 50 feet high. That team will be able to begin practice on or about February 15.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the California League and the National Agreement

Date Wednesday, January 16, 1889
Text

There is a break in the stone wall the national agreement has built around the national game which should be repaired at once. The California League last season employed three ineligible players—J. J. Smith, Ebright, and Whitehead—and is likely to become a refuge for more of that ilk next season. Close upon the announcement that the Newark Club's reserved pitcher, Norman Baker, has signed with the Sacramento Club comes the news that Third Baseman Alvord, reserved by Des Moines, has also signed with that club, and that other Des Moines reserved players contemplate doing the same thing. The California League surely needs looking after. It is a prosperous institution, pays good salaries, and is apparently permanently established. Under the circumstances, no strong efforts should be spared to make the League an ally instead of a menace to national agreement interests. New York Sun January 16, 1889, quoting the San Francisco Chronicle

baseball reporter in Columbus

...the Ohio State Journal's base ball editor, Mr. Ed. K. Rife... The Sporting Life January 16, 1889

Harry Stevens the “prince of hustlers”

[from F. W. Arnold's column] [reporting on the meeting of the Columbus Club] The score card privilege was sold to that prince of hustlers, Harry Stevens. The Sporting Life January 16, 1889

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

season tickets in Columbus

Date Wednesday, January 16, 1889
Text

[from F. W. Arnold's column] [reporting on the meeting of the Columbus Club] It was also agreed by the stockholders that one hundred additional season tickets should be offered to the public at $25 each.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no alcohol sales in Columbus

Date Wednesday, January 16, 1889
Text

[from F. W. Arnold's column] [reporting on the meeting of the Columbus Club] A resolution was adopted that no intoxicating drinks would be sold or allowed on the grounds next season. The directors are determined that Recreation Park shall be a place where gentlemen can take their wives and families with no danger of seeing any brawling or disorder.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

implementing the Brush plan

Date Wednesday, January 16, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] There appears to be no disposition on the part of classified players to grumble at the rating given them, and Mr. Young feels encourages to hope that the new system is going to be carried out in the proper spirit. There would not have been such smooth sailing, however, if an ingenious way had not been found—by Mr. Day, we understand—of evading the rule so far as the highest salaried of the stars are concerned. With them placated there was no room left for serious opposition, as most of the smaller fry which came in for classification did not receive more than, or indeed as much as, the limit set by the League.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jimmy Williams out of baseball

Date Wednesday, January 16, 1889
Text

Jimmy Williams is rid of his Cleveland stock and out of base ball for good. After all the many years of his connection with the game he quits loser on the whole.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

classes of amateur clubs

Date Wednesday, January 16, 1889
Text

[correspondence from Chadwick] There are three distinct class of amateur clubs in the metropolis, viz:--first,, the genuine amateurs, who play their games on free grounds and for recreative exercise only; secondly, the class of legitimate amateurs who are attached to the leading athletic clubs of the metropolis, and who not only play on enclosed grounds but who also employ professional players to occupy their 'battery' positions; thirdly, the so-called semi-professional class, who play for gate money and on any grounds they can procure temporarily or otherwise, and who play either on the co-operative plan or for small salaries, according to circumstances. To these may be added the class of commercial nines, formed from the regular clerks of mercantile houses, or any employees of business firms or manufactories, these latter containing semi-professional players to a considerable extent. Each season finds the genuine amateur class more crowded to the wall than before, while the ranks of the gate-m0ney class increase year after year, the semi-professional clubs forming a reserve corps, from which the teams of the minor leagues are recruited.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Giant's negotiating with Coogan for new grounds; Mets negotiated for the same ground

Date Wednesday, January 16, 1889
Text

[from George Stackhouse's column] ...President John B. Day, of the Giants, had another interview with James J. Coogan, the representative of the Lynch estate, during the week. Mr. Coogan, by the way, is the late defeated labor candidate for Mayor. President Day's interview with Mr. Coogan lasted half an hour, and at its termination Mr. Day said that no arrangements had been arrived at. “In fact,” said Mr. Day, “I don't think we will take the grounds anyway.”

It is whispered in certain circles that the property owners wanted in the neighborhood of $12,000 a year rental for the grounds. This sum brings to mind the efforts of certain American Association men to secure the same grounds about a year ago. At that time, however, the property owners only wanted $6,000 rental for the grounds. Then the Brooklyn Club had the Metropolitan franchise on its hands, and efforts were being made to re-establish the “Indians” in Manhattan Island. The base ball men who were engineering the deal could not get the long lease they wanted, and the poor old “Mets” were allowed to die.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

season tickets in Washington; gate receipt split

Date Sunday, January 20, 1889
Text

The Washington management has concluded to issue season tickets at $25 each, with transferable coupons, which in substance means a return to the old system of two years ago, selling three tickets for one dollar. The League has no right to interfere in this matter so long as the home club continues to pay the visitors at the rate of 12 ½ cents for each single admission to the grounds of $150 guarantee. The season-ticket proposition meets with general favor, and as the number is to be limited to 500, the competition for them promises to be lively.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

California League and reserve jumpers

Date Sunday, January 20, 1889
Text

In view of the recent violations of the reserve rule by several minor league players, who, being dissatisfied with the salaries offered them, jumped to the California League, it is evident that some effective measure must be speedily adopted by national agreement clubs to check the demoralizing methods of the managers of the coast and put a stop to the further interference with the young players of the East, especially those of the minor organizations. Under the present condition of things, the California League is a dangerous enemy to the weaker clubs of the East, particularly since the latter adopted a salary limit. If the California managers persist in their discreditable attempts to cause dissatisfaction among the class of players referred to, the League and American Association should take some action in the matter. The California League refuses to place itself under the protection of the national agreement, and by remaining an independent organization can sign any player who feels disposed to jump the reserve rule or his contract. The club from which the man jumps has a right to black-list him, but it has been decided that the black-list of a minor league club only stands for one year, and under these circumstances, it has but little terror for a player who is dishonorable enough to violate the rule that binds him to another team. The big organizations are not liable to suffer much, as they usually pay larger salaries than the California clubs can afford, and as a consequence the League and American Association have nothing to fear from the managers who encourage this unprofessional business.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

John Corkhill a real estate investor; player finances, salary

Date Monday, January 21, 1889
Text

John [Corkhill] is at this time busy putting up three cottages in Camden, built on his savings of the past three years.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Charlie Pabor a police chief

Date Tuesday, January 22, 1889
Text

Charlie Pabor, the once famous pitcher, is now chief of police in New Haven, and he is still trying to convince Yale students that the pitcher's position is in the center of the diamond.

Source Cleveland Leader and Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

how veterans' salaries decline; a classification system

Date Tuesday, January 22, 1889
Text

[quoting O. P. Caylor] There is something radically wrong with the present system of professional baseball. I wish others could see it as I do. There is no use denying the fact that dissatisfaction of no small or insignificant nature is slowly but surely creeping into the ranks of the best players in the profession. This is bound to bear fruit in time that will not be healthful to the game.

I have touched upon the subject before, but it cannot be too often brought to the attention of the “magnates.” Something must be done or confusion will follow. The way things now stand, the longer a player stays with a club and the more faithful he has been in his work the less he is rewarded; whereas a new man coming in from another association reaps the reward of his own figures. I have in mind three players of a certain club whose releases could not be purchased for $8,000. If they were to be transferred to another club their combined salaries would be nearly $10,000 as salaries go. Yet these men are asked and expected to play for less than $6,500, while newcomers and ordinary outfielders far their inferior are receiving at least from $300 to $600 a year more, whereas they are not worth as much as either of the players named by $500. Take a club like the St. Louis club. There's Boyle—a boy who never got $2,000 a year in his life, I suppose. He is worth three Cudworths to the club, and two Fullers; yet I'm willing to stake my reputation as a prophet that both Fuller and Cudworth are to receive higher salaries by 30 per cent than Boyle. There is King, who practically won the club the championship last year. Suppose King belonged to Louisville and St. Louis wanted. If Louisville would release him St. Louis would willingly agree to pay him $3,500. When tony Mullane was a member of the Toledo club and the Cincinnatis wanted him they paid him $2,000 in spot cash advance and agreed to pay him $3,000 more during the season. Had he played he would have gotten it. Now he is lucky if he gets $2,000.

My argument is not that Mullane was worth $5,000 or that Kind is worth $3,500; nor yet that the three players I have mentioned are worth $9,000. The point I make is against the inequality of the salaries paid as to new players and old and faithful men. It is hurting the reserve rule and I think the time for classification must come. As it now stands, the longer a player stays with a club the less he gains by it, while the opposite should be the case.

And here comes in my old theory—a general classification. Let us make a commission on classification. Let it be composed of Nick Young, Wheeler C. Wikoff, Comiskey, Anson and A. G. Mills, John b. Sage or George Wright. Let these men meet next September and divide up every player in the League or Association into five classes. Make the salaries $3,000, $2,500, $2,000, $1,500 and $1,000. I believe there is just that difference among players. Let long service, good condition and good conduct go with qualifications of play in making up this class.

The players worthy to be classed “A” are not more than two to a club in my opinion, and some clubs have none of that calibre. When you get down to about class C the players might average four to a club. Merit and demerit should have a large influence in putting a player into his class and keeping him there.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the reserve team craze

Date Wednesday, January 23, 1889
Text

The reserve team craze seems to have gone the way of the other base ball fads. Very few major league clubs will sign many more men than they expect to have regular use for, and in the minor leagues, where even more rigid economy is necessary, few extra men will be carried. Retrenchment is the order of the day.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring hits and errors in 1859

Date Wednesday, January 23, 1889
Text

[from Chadwick's column] I...append...the score of a game, the figures of which were taken from my old score book of 1859—thirty years ago—from which it will be seen that I then kept score according to nearly the same data as now. Here is the score in question: [a box score follows, Star v. Excelsior, scoring R., B. O. A. E.] I could not get any of the clubs to recognize base hits until nearly a dozen years afterwards. Indeed, all the reforms I introduced were brought into operation only after years of efforts to get the players out of old ruts.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Baltimore Club ownership 2

Date Wednesday, January 23, 1889
Text

The Sporting Life's intimation that the Messrs. Booth and Farren had not become financially interested in the Baltimore Club is confirmed by both Messrs. Barnie and Waltz. The latter writes to a contemporary that he and a partner have purchased Vonderhorst's interest in the club and the the partner is “a prominent Baltimorean, with plenty of money, who admires the National game, but for business reasons desires that his name be not know in connection with the present deal.” Doesn't that description fit Mr. Vonderhorst exactly? Mr. J. W. Waltz is the traveling representative of a big fancy goods house in Gotham. He is said to have a comfortable bank about, and has the reputation of being a clever man of business.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

status of the Indianapolis franchise; ownership; finances

Date Thursday, January 24, 1889
Text

Mr. Brush says that the club is out of the control of the old organization, and all applications for it must be made to the League. He stated positively to a reporter that the transfer of the franchise was “absolute and unconditioned” and that the only reason for transferring the lease of the grounds, and giving a bill of sale for the grand stand to McCutheon, was to secure him the money he had advanced, and that he would be perfectly willing to transfer all his rights thus obtained to any parties who might operate the club here. The attorney of the syndicate offered $16,000 to-day for the club. New York Sun January 24, 1889

Articles of incorporation of the new Indianapolis Base Ball Club have been filed for record. The capital stock is $30,000, divided into 300 shares of $100 each. The stockholders are: Fred L. Mayer, 20 shares; Ford Woods, 30; R. K. Dryfus, 30; W. S. Schmidt, 40; Henry Jameson, 30; George F. Branham, 30; Charles F. Meyer, 40; J. F. Brush, 40; A. B. Meyer, 30; Tom Taggart, 10. New York Sun January 26, 1889

A detailed statement has been prepared by our base ball club management and will be sent to all stockholders and creditors and all interested in the matter. The financial operations are all set out at length, and the balance on the wrong side amounts to $19,250. With the exception of a few details of minor importance this report closes the work of the Board of Directors of the Indianapolis Base Ball Association. That the :Board could have succeeded in bringing the club out from under the cloud of financial trouble, and eventually have created a value for the original stock if permitted to continue by a few of the creditors, there is no manner of doubt in the minds of six members of the Board, and they tried all means within their power to secure this permission, coupled with an offer to personally carry the bank debt and furnish sufficient additional funds preliminary to the opening of the coming season, which would amount to several thousand dollars more. New York Sun January 27, 1889

The true story, as told by a gentleman in this city who knows what he is talking about, is as follows: “The Indianapolis Club has some 200 stockholders, many of them holding not more than $100 worth of stock. All of these gentlemen were very willing to share the profits, but when it came to making up the losses, they were not there. It was to get rid of these stockholders that the franchise was turned over to the League. The big stockholders have already formed a new company, and when they get the thing in working order, they will get the franchise back from the League and the ground and the grand stand from the gentlemen to whom it was made over, and all will be well.” New York Sun January 28, 1889

Application was made before Judge Walker late this afternoon for the appointment of a receiver for the Indianapolis Base Ball Club. Paul H. Krauss and George Pfingst, guarantors each in the amount of $500, were the plaintiffs. They were assured of fifty cents on the dollar under the present disposition, but were not satisfied. Upon showing made, Judge Walker appointed Charles Dryer receiver, and fixed his bond at $20,000. Mr. Brush received $15,000 from President Young of the League for the base ball franchise, and that money is now being applied to the payment of the club's debts, so far as it will go. The bank debt and the amounts due the directors have already been paid, and the guarantors are being paid $270 each, which is 54 per cent. of their claims without interest. New York Sun February 2, 1889

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

offers for the Indianapolis franchise

Date Thursday, January 24, 1889
Text

Messrs. Dickson & Talbott called at The News office this afternoon and authorized the statement hta tthey will make this offer for the ball club. They will pay all debts, dollar for dollar, amounting in all to over $20,000 providing the franchise, players, lease of the grounds and bill of sale of the grand stand are turned over to them, and they will agree to maintain the club here and strengthen it wherever possible. This is the most liberal proposition made yet and should be accepted, unless a better one should be made. If accepted, it will wipe out all the debts of the club, by paying them off, and place it in the hands of men who will have a great int3resttt in seeing that it is managed properly. The proposition that was sent on to President Young this afternoon, proposes to pay the $10,000 due to the directors and in bank, and $9,250, due the guarantors, and the $1,000, which is Mr. McCutcheon's claim, and any other debts.

Mr. Brush said this afternoon that he and others had formed a stock company to-day and that they would send on to President Young this evening a formal application for the franchise. They have a capital stock of $30,000, and the company is composed of the following gentlemen: Fred Mayer, R. K. Sylers, George Branham, William Schmidt, A. B. Meyer, C. F. Meyer, John T. Brush, Tom Taggart and Ford woods. Mr. Brush says that they stand in exactly the same position as other applicants for the franchise. The company will be formally incorporated this evening.

Source Indianapolis News
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

charges that the fix was in with the Indianapolis deal

Date Thursday, January 24, 1889
Text

New York base ball people are unanimous in the belief that President Brush, of the Indianapolis team, is merely trying to squeeze out the large proportion of stockholders who are willing to share a dividend but unwilling to make up a deficit. There is not a more brainy man in the League than President Brush, and it is safe to say that he will come out on top. Indianapolis News January 24, 1889, quoting the New York World

Thus the farce ends, so far as the League is concerned. The Indianapolis club, minus the seventeen stockholders who contributed $500 apiece, is resurrected, and in the freeze-out and the subsequent rehabilitation the League has taken a part that is not creditable to that organization. The entire proceedings were tricky from the day on which Mr. Brush, acting for the old club, surrendered the franchise, through the farcical repayment of the $15,000 and its subsequent transfer back again to the League, and the reinvestment of the syndicate with League membership, until yesterday's order was promulgated. Nobody who knew anything of base-ball was deceived by the air of apparent sincerity that enveloped the surrender, but a great many have been disappointed to think the League would be a party to such proceedings. If the franchise had to be returned to Indianapolis, it should have been given to Messrs. Dickson & Talbot, whose offer was infinitely better than that of the Brush syndicate. Their price was larger, and they agreed to pay the debts of the old club. They offered $20,000 for the franchise, while the people who obtained it paid much less. President Young refused, last night, to state the price, but it is certain that it did not exceed $15,000, if it reached that amount. The probabilities are the new club paid $13,000 for the franchise and $1,000 guarantee for the first year. Thus, if these figures are correct, the League loses several thou8sand dollars, which, perhaps, they can well afford, but they lose more by not insisting that every cent of the old club's indebtedness should be paid before anyone who was connected with it is allowed to regain co0ntrol of the franchise. The League may learn in time that it has set an example that in the future will return to plague its inventors. Indianapolis Journal February 4, 1889, quoting the Washington Post

Source Indianapolis News
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a Western Pennsylvania semi-pro league

Date Friday, January 25, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Al Pratt] The clubs agreed upon to form the League are Johnstown, Blairsville, Lat4obe, Greenburg, Scottdale and Uniontown. … I want to give people to understand that the league means business. Every club has an inclosed ground,and each has a good team made up now. Of course, I think, the batteries of each team will be paid, but the balance will be made up of home players who play for the honor of playing. As far as can be estimated, about two games per week will be played, but this number may be increased.

Source ” Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

baseball manufacture; automatic winding machines

Date Friday, January 25, 1889
Text

Winding base balls by hand is a thing of the past. Machines have been invented to do the work automatically, consequently every ball is exactly like its fellow. Each machine winds two balls at one time. A little rubber ball, weighing three-quarters of an ounce, around which one turn has been made with an end of a skein of old-fashioned gray stocking yarn, is slipped into the machine. Then another, after which the boy in charge touches a lever, the machine starts and the winding behind. The rubber ball is hidden in a few seconds, and in its place appears a little gray yarn ball that rapidly grows larger and larger. When it appears to be about half the size of a regulation base ball there is a click, the machine stops, the yarn is cut, and the boy picks out the ball and tosses it into a basket. When this basket is full it is passed along to another boy, who runs a similar machine, where a half-ounce layer of worsted yarn is put on.

The next machine adds a layer of strong white cotton thread, and by watching closely as the white appears on the surface of the gray the beauty of the winding-machine can be appreciated. There is perfect regularity, and no place where the thread crosses oftener than in another. A coating of rubber cement is next applied, and a half-ounce layer of the very best fine worsted completes the ball with the exception of the cover. Each ball when completed must weight 5¼ ounces and measure 9 ¼ inches in circumference. The minute differences in the balls are equalized by the thickness of the cover. Every ball and cover is weighted before the ball is sewed on. The cover resembles two figure 8s in shape and is cut from selected and specially prepared horsehides. There is only one kind of professional dead ball made, the supposed differences lying in the cover and stamps only. The patentees of the winding machines employ about 500 hands at their factor and they have about 40,000 dozen balls in stock. Several cheap grades of balls are also manufactured, those retailing for 5 and 10 cents being made from pressed leather shavings. St.

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Ewing’s catcher’s gloves

Date Saturday, January 26, 1889
Text

Last season Buck Ewing had a pair of catcher’s gloves made especially to order. They were made according to Buck’s own ideas, and were so easy and serviceable that he used them throughout the season. Keefe has taken Ewing’s idea and is on the market with a glove which he calls “The Ewing.

Source ” Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the status of the Indianapolis franchise

Date Sunday, January 27, 1889
Text

In the fall of 1886, when the St. Louis Club was about to throw up the sponge and Pittsburg was asking for admission, a resolution was passed at the League meeting on November 18 which exactly meets the case now presented. Under this resolution Messrs. Day, Spalding and Young were appointed a committee and have been re-appointed at each annual meeting since, and still have full authority in the premises. Mr. Young said that “no immediate action would be taken. The League now has a franchise and a complete outfit of players for a club. It is competent for the League to transfer it to any city which will offer sufficient inducements, or it can hold the club under its own control, employ a manager, secure grounds and play the season out in Indianapolis. Under no circumstances will there be less than eight clubs this year, and the present personnel of the Hoosier club will form one of them. There will be no scramble for the stars, for there will be no distribution, and in short there is no vacancy in the League, though some other leaders may direct the organization now located in Indiana. Denny will not be sold to Washington or any other club, but will remain just where he is.

Source ” Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a minor league telegraph deal

Date Wednesday, January 30, 1889
Text

[reporting on the International Association special meeting of 1/20/1889] Secretary White submitted a proposition by the Postal Telegraph Company to allow the various clubs unrestricted use of the wires in return for a frank at the grounds. The Western Union offered to allow each club $100 worth of telegraphing and a half rate for all messages in excess. Detroit and Toledo had already made arrangements with the Western Union, but for the other cities the Postal bid was accepted. The Sporting Life January 30, 1889

minor league salary capitalist

[reporting the International Association special meeting of 1.20.1889] In the evening, after many arguments, the salary limit rule was amended. All sorts of propositions were made for limits, from $14,000 to $18,000, as well as graded limits for certain clubs, but to no purpose, as Rochester, Syracuse and London defeated all amendments. Finally, after a recess of half an hour, a compromise was arrived at and Rochester moved that the limit of salaries be fixed at $13,500 for each club. Syracuse seconded the motion and it was carried unanimously. The Sporting Life January 30, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

baseball manufacture: winding machines

Date Wednesday, January 30, 1889
Text

Winding base balls by hand is a thing of the past. Machines have been invented to do the work automatically, consequently every ball is just like its fellow. Each machine winds two balls at one time. A little para rubber ball, weight three-quarters of an ounce, around which one turn has been made with an end of a skein of old-fashioned gray stocking yarn, is slipped into the machine. Then another, after which the boy in charges touches a lever, the machine starts and the winding begins. The rubber ball is hidden in a few seconds and in its place appears a little gray yarn ball that rapidly grows larger and larger. When it appears to be about half the size of a regulation base ball there is a click, the machine stops, the yarn is cut, and the boy picks out the ball and tosses it into a basket. When this basket is full it is passed along to another boy, who runs a similar machine, where a half-ounce of worsted yarn is put on.

The next machine adds a layer of strong white cotton thread, and by watching closely as the white appears on the surface of the gray the beauty of the winding machine can be appreciated. There is perfect regularity, and no point where the thread crosses oftener than in another. A coating of rubber cement is next applied, and a half-ounce layer of the very best fine worsted completes the ball with the exception of the cover. Each ball when completed must weigh 5¼ ounces and measure 9¼ inches in circumference. The minute differences in the balls are equalized by the thickness of the cover. Each ball and cover is weighted before the cover is sewed on. The cover resembled two figure 8s in shape, and is cut from selected and specially prepared horse hides. A.J. Reach & Co, the patentees of the winding machines, employ about 500 hands at their factory in this city, and they about 40,000 balls now in stock. Several cheap grades of ball are also manufactured, those retailing for 5 and 10 cents being made from pressed leather shavings.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a collegiate plays professionally under an assumed name

Date Friday, February 1, 1889
Text

Bingham, the Minneapolis pitcher, was a member of the class of '86 at Harvard, and after pitching for his class nine during the spring of '86 he signed with the Oshkosh team under an assumed name, and was known as the “California wonder.” He was recognized by a fellow student while playing at St. Paul, and was exposed. This prevented his playing in any college team in the future.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an improved batting cage

Date Saturday, February 2, 1889
Text

Jack Lynch is out with another idea. His latest is a cord cage to practice in. he turned a sample of his new idea over to Keefe and Becannon yesterday to have them patent it. Jack says that his cord cage will only cost $50, whereas if it was made of wire it would cost $150.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a college player expelled for academic failure

Date Monday, February 4, 1889
Text

The Faculty of Harvard College had a very horny dilemma to handle this week. It was a question as to whether athletic skill or mental proficiency was the prerequisite to scholarship in the college. The case involved was that of Harry Bates, of Newton, Mass., the popular pitcher of the college baseball team. Harry, while a hero among the athletes, was only a probationary scholar, and in his practice of curves and drops had failed to secure an acquaintance with his studies sufficient to carry him through the final examinations for full admission. The faculty had been considering his case for a long time, withholding his rejection on account of the pressure brought to bear by the athletic enthusiasts who desired to see the crimson pennant carried triumphant through next summer's college contests. It was a close battle between muscle and brains, with the chances in favor of muscle winning, and Bates being retained, when, unfortunately, the condition of affairs got into print. Then the faculty, recognizing the incongruity of their position, acted summarily. Bates' probation was closed, and he returned to his home in Newton this afternoon. His absence will certainly be felt in baseball circles. He improved wonderfully under Clarkson last year, and showed signs o still greater improvement this winter. Clarkson will have a good deal of trouble in bringing out a man who will make even a respectable showing against Yale or Princeton.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a deal blocked in waivers

Date Tuesday, February 5, 1889
Text

President Davidson says that the deal in which he was trying to disposed of Hecker and Cooker, will fall through, probably, owing to Cincinnati's objection. He was not after a fielder, but a young pitcher whom he things would have proved of great value to the Louisvilles. He declined to say what player he intended securing, but intimated that the sale would have been made had the Association clubs waived their claim to Hecker. He received answers from all the clubs excepting Brooklyn, and out of these Cincinnati was the only one which refused to relinquish their rights to Hecker and Cook. The action of the Cincinnati club in declining that request, he said, deserved criticism, for they not only rejected his request, but even went so fqar as to offer the insignificant sum of a “few hundred dollars” for a battery like Hecker and Cook.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

kangaroo court

Date Tuesday, February 5, 1889
Text

There were cliques, rings and back-cappers in the New York club until Day called the players into the club room on one occasion and said: “We will get along better if we have open and mutual daily discussions. I want every one to speak out. I am Chairman. Let me hear from you on O'Rourke's play in the seventh inning yesterday.” This brought O'Rourke to his feet flushed in the face, and he said: “What was the matter with Ward's blunder in the fifth?” and so it went on, till every man had picked out flaws in some one else. Day listened quietly until all had finished, and when he said: “Here is the whole trou8ble. We see the bad plays of each other, but fail to see our own. This has been a good meeting. Come to-morrow at the same time.” The meetings were continued and there was less back-biting each day as they saw how childish their fault-finding was and it ceased altogether. Then they began the team work which gave the club the pennant.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

enforcement of the territorial limit

Date Tuesday, February 5, 1889
Text

President Byrne of the Brooklyn Club promises a revolution in Sunday base ball games. Heretofore there have been many games played at different points on Long Island in addition to those by the Brooklyn Club. Already many minor league clubs have arranged for Sunday games on Long Island, and Mr. Byrne has concluded to enforce his five-mile privilege and is going to stop all these games. From what Mr. Byrne says, he can not only stop all national agreement clubs from playing on his territory, but any club not under its protection that breaks the rule can be barred from playing a national agreement club afterward. Mr. Byrne says that this change was made in the rules at the Pittsburgh meeting. Before the change was made he had control of the territory five miles from the city line; not it is five miles from the county line.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a minor league's salary limit

Date Wednesday, February 6, 1889
Text

[reporting on the meeting of the Tri-State League 1/29/1889] The new salary limit of $750 will cause a lot of trouble. The way the magnates count on it is by having only eleven men for each club. That would mean only one extra battery. The pitchers and catchers would receive $90 each, the infielders $60 each, and the outfielders $50 each.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

changing minor leagues and the reserve

Date Wednesday, February 6, 1889
Text

[reporting on the meeting of the Atlantic Club 1/28/1889] Prior to the meeting a committee visited Mr. Charles H. Byrne, secretary of the Board of Arbitration, and Mr. Day, also a member of the Board, to see if they could hold their players now under reservation in case they withdrew from the Central and New England leagues and formed a new association of their own. They were assured by both that so long as they did not attempt to transfer their players from one city to another they could have full control of their men. A letter was received from Chairman Young, of the Board of Arbitration, to the same effect. The Sporting Life February 6, 1889

a street opened through the Polo Grounds

The New York Supreme Court has decided that One Hundred and Eleventh street is “open” and belongs to the city, and that the Commissioners of Public Works and of Parks have the right to tear dow the fences of the Polo Ground. This closes the ground of the New York Club. President Day will appeal to the Court of Appeals and pending the hearing will get a stay of proceedings for a year. But after that further legal obstructions will not avail. The Sporting Life February 6, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Indianapolis Club finances 3

Date Wednesday, February 6, 1889
Text

The cost and profits of running a League base ball team are prominently brought to light by the financial troubles of the Indianapolis Base Ball Club. Each stockholder and guarantor of that club on Jan. 26 received a very elaborate and exhaustive printed statement of the organization's affairs, covering the entire period since it was bought from St. Louis, in March 1887, up to the time of the surrender of the franchise on January 21. This reveals the following interesting state of affairs briefly told in figures, which we all now never or hardly ever lie:

Receipts

Sale of stock................................................ $17,295.00

Sale of grand stand, personal property

and assignment of lease................... 1.,000.00

Games at home in 1887.............................. $32,496.96

Games at home in 1888............................... 32,791.05

Games away from home in 1887................. 10,809.51

Games away from home in 1888................ 17,628.77

Sale of season tickets from 1887.................. 5,862.50

Sale of season tickets from 1888.................. 7,235.79

Sale of players' releases................................ 2,740.00

All other miscellaneous sources................... 3,243.83 112,808.41

_________

Bank loans.................................................... $42,775.00

Guarantors' loans......................................... 9,250.00

Mortgage loan............................................... 1,000.00 53,025.00

_________ __________

Total $184,128.41

Disbursements

League franchise and annual fees............... $ 15,000.00

Salaries for season of 1887........................ $28,745.94

Salaries for season of 1888........................ 33,898.26

Percentage and guarantees to visiting

clubs in 1887.................................. 10,932.16

Percentage and guarantees to visiting

clubs in 1888.................................. 12,081.68

Purchase players' release............................ 6,126.00

New grand stand in 1888............................ 4,546.08

Expenses to grounds, permanent

improvements, in 1888................... 722.19

Ground expenses, rent, etc., in 1887.......... 4,740.99

Ground expenses, rent, etc., in 1888.......... 4,077.70

Equipments (uniforms, shoes, balls, bats, etc) 2,521.82

General expenses (railroads, hotels, printing,

advertising, etc.)............................. 26,779.07 135,171.89

__________

Payment of bank loans................................ $32,775.00

Payment of mortgage loan............................ 1,000.00 33,775.00

__________

Total................................................... $183,946.89

The indebtedness at this time is as follows:

Amount due directors, secured by first lien on franchise $10,000.00

Amount due guarantors.................................. 9,250.00

__________

Total.................................................... $19,250.00

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player discontented with his rating

Date Wednesday, February 6, 1889
Text

[from R. M. Larner's column] I am very sorry Jim Whitney was allowed to leave the Capital without coming to some definite understanding with Mr. Hewitt for the approaching season. There are several player son the team whom we might dispense with and be benefited thereby, but Jim Whitney is not one of them. I do not know the details of his disagreement with the Washington management, beyond what Jim says himself, but I imagine that he was rated at about class C, at a salary of $2,000. … I don't desire to encourage Jim to hold out, or make a bad break which may prevent him from playing here next season, but in my humble opinion he should be classed higher than either Jerry Denny or Jack Glasscock, and it appears that the former is in class B--$2,250. In classifying the players of the League Mr. Young announced that good deportment would cut a conspicuous figure in rating players. Now I have known Whitney as a player ever since he became identified with the League, and no one can point to an instance where he has been arrested for misconduct in public places, nor has he ever been generally recognized as a dirty ball player. Why he should be rated below Denny reasonable and fair-minded people cannot understand. Denny has played in the League just as long as Whitney has, yet the latter stands even with him in batting. So far as general deportment is concerned, taking together with general usefulness on the field, Jim Whitney should outrank Mike Kelly, Glasscock, Denny, Dunlap, and several others whose moral character might be marked doubtful, yet it is said that all of these men are put in class A. The Sporting Life February 6, 1889

Pitcher Jim Whitney on Friday signed with Indianapolis at classification figures. The Sporting Life April 10, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Indianapolis Club ownership

Date Wednesday, February 6, 1889
Text

[from A. G. Ovens' column] For the last week it has not been a question as to whether or not there would be a club here in 1889, but rather a question as to what syndicate would secure the prize. This seems about settled now... In the light of all the facts, there seems to be no reason to doubt that the combination of which President Brush is at the head will secure the franchise and players of the collapsed organization. In fact this has never been doubted by some, and among these may be found a few kickers, who charge that the whole scheme was pre-arranged and understood from the start. Personally, I do not believe this, and only a limited number do.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

organization of the Chicago Commercial League

Date Wednesday, February 6, 1889
Text

[from a letter from Jno. T. Pope to Chadwick] Last season we rented three of the amateur parks, which are enclosed, charging a small fee, 10 cents, for expenses of umpire and scorer. There were no restrictions placed upon clubs securing players, save that no remuneration must be given in any way for services rendered. A list of 12 players was sent in before the playing season, and only players on that list could play with the club which sent in their names. This brought in our ranks many professional and semi-professional players, who spent most of their time playing through Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Indiana, Michigan, etc., but returned Saturday and Sunday to play in our and the City league. This was, I think, unfair to the mercantile boys, who had no time for practice, only just before the game, and gave some clubs an advantage over others. Almost one-half of our players, too, belonged to the City League, which plays every Sunday afternoon. They received from $2 to #6 per game, according to the crowd.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Phenomenal Smith sues for unpaid wages; defense is he was incompetent

Date Wednesday, February 6, 1889
Text

John F. Smith sued the Baltimore Base Ball Club for wages some time ago, and on Thursday Henry R. Vonderhorst, the president and owner of the club last year, filed his defence. Smith was suspended on the 12 th of last August until the 1 st of october, because “he couldn't play ball,” and it is for the salary for this time that he sued. The defence sets for th that Smith was engaged for the most important position on the base ball team, and that upon his skill and ability depends more than upon anything else the keeping down of the opponents' score, and the consequent opportunity for victory. Smith, from April 1 to August 12, 1888, failed to pitch skillfully, and was totally unfit to fill his position satisfactorily, and the defendant also claims that by virtue of his contract he had a right to suspend him.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

season tickets in Indianapolis 2

Date Sunday, February 10, 1889
Text

The local base-ball people hope to sell a large number of season tickets for 1889, and the work of canvassing the city will be commenced as soon as other matters of importance are arranged. The cou0pon books for gentlemen will be sold, as they were last season, at $25, and an effort to dispose of 500 will be made. A ladies' book will also be put on sale, but what the price of that will be is not yet known, though it will probably be placed at $16. The attendance of ladies is to be encouraged as much as possible, and hopes are entertained that this class of patronage can be greatly increased over what it was last season.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA players with wealth

Date Monday, February 11, 1889
Text

Who is the richest player in the association, do you ask? Well, that question is not a difficult one to answer. Bob Caruthers, the $13,000 beauty of the Brooklyns, has far more wealth than any player in the country. Parisian Bob did not earn his bug lump of United States dollar by the sweat of his brow, however, he came into possession of it through inheritance. Bob is a child of fortune. He belongs to one of the richest families in Chicago. About three years ago he was left $30,000 by a grandfather, and his mother is now worth ten times that amount. Bob is one of three heirs, so that he is rich in prospects. Nat Hudson is another bloated bondholder. Nat has only been in the American Association three seasons, and the $30,000 that he owns was left him by his father. When it comes down to self-made ball-players from a financial point of view, Comiskey may be rated as being possessed of more of this world's goods than any other association players; although if it came to a case of show-down the cash balance of our own Long John Reilly would not be much less than that of the st. Louis captain-manager. Both of these players have earned nearly every dollar they possess by their efforts on the diamond. Both are sav34rs, and are each worth about $15,000. Corkhill is also well off, being worth nearly as much as the two men mentioned. Bill Gleason is another man who looks after the dollars, and does not carry a big bundle when he starts on a trip. He owns two nice pieces of property in St. Louis. McPhee is one of the exemplary men of the profession. He has been a good boy to his mother and the resto fot he family. He has also saved money and has about $7,000 invested in mortgage securities. Little Hugh Nicol was a “spender” until about three seasons ago, when he grew “cold” and began taking care of his money. He has several thousand dollars invested in real estate that is likely to bring him big returns. Carpenter, although possess of no bad habits, is of a happy-go-lucky disposition, and spends his money just about as fast as he makes it. Pete Browning, the gladiator, blows himself on any and all occasions, but he has capital in reserve, as his mother is wealthy. Joe Sommer has taken care of his earnings and is worth $7,000 or $8,000. Harry Stovey has drawn big money since 1874 and has saved quite a pile of his winnings. Mullane is well to do in spite of his numerous bad investments. Bushong, the Brooklyn catcher, is worth $10,000. St., quoting the Cincinnati Enquirer

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Giants fans from Brooklyn

Date Tuesday, February 12, 1889
Text

“It is an ill wind that blows nobody any good,” and the breaking up of the Polo Grounds will cut off the Brooklyn contingent of the New York Club’s patronage, much, of course, to the benefit of the home club. There will be very few likely to take the tedious and hot journey from Brooklyn to the Jersey City Heights grounds to see the New York team play this Summer, especially when better attraction will be afforded at home.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the perpetuity of the reserve

Date Wednesday, February 13, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Deacon White] If we can make a satisfactory deal for our releases we ill do it and then we will play with the buffalo Club, not before. The reserve holds good for only one year, the contract plainly states it, so that if we held off for a year,we would in all fairness be free. But the League claims that the reserve continues in force. This point the Brotherhood of Ballplayers disputes, and I think they would support our position. I am not a member of the Brotherhood, but Rowe is.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reduced minor league salaries

Date Wednesday, February 13, 1889
Text

The testimony of minor league managers everywhere is that many players are singing for from 15 to 25 per cent. less than they signed for last season. This is a most satisfactory and encouraging sign, showing, as it does, that there is really a disposition to live up to salary limit rules.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

score card content

Date Wednesday, February 13, 1889
Text

Eddie Von der Ahe's score card was composed of sixteen pages last season—reading material and “ads.” combined. He now contemplates enlarging it to twenty-four pages and increasing the reading matter. An interesting score card is a good thing to glance over “between the innings, “ and young Von der Ahe says that his score card will be “one of the finest.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

indoor baseball 5

Date Wednesday, February 13, 1889
Text

[from the Boston correspondent] Winter base ball is something we don't have here. The Quakers put us in the shade in that line. But the sport in Philadelphia's big Fair building has been talked over down here, and now some of our local stars are planning to go into Harry Wright's town and try for themselves what indoor playing is like. Arthur Irwin hatched the scheme. He thought there would be a lot of fun and perhaps a few dollars for nine players who are wintering in this locality to go on to Philadelphia for a couple of games in the Fair building. When Arthur hits on any plan he don't lose any time in working it out, and he has rushed things this time. He has picked his team out and the men have all consented to go. The Sporting Life February 13, 1889

Mason's team added another game to its unbroken record of victories on Friday, by defeating Arthur Irwin's nine from Boston, by the one-sided score of 25 to 4. The Sporting Life February 20, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the end of the Polo Grounds

Date Wednesday, February 13, 1889
Text

The decision rendered a week ago to the effect that the Park Commissioners alone had control over the Polo Grounds property in regard to its further use as a ball field, has resulted in a practical notice to quit being served on the new York Club occupants, the said notice coming in the form of the removal of that portion of the fence enclosing the ground which crossed the lines of One Hundred and Eleventh street at Fifth and Sixth avenues. The openings were made on Thursday morning, and before the week expired preparations were being made to run the street through the grounds, this, of course, rendering the place untenable for a ball ground. The sudden action taken by the Park officials comes at a most inopportune time for the New York Club, and it will place them in a very bad situation for the coming season's campaign. It is true that they have the Jersey City Club [illegible] is as a temporary field, but the difficulties patrons of the club will have in reaching it from the city must materially affect the attendance this season, one thing being certain, and that is that the club will lose its large contingent of patrons from Brooklyn. The club can procure the St. George Cricket Grounds a Hoboken, and this field is by far the best in every respect that the club can occupy this season, as it is easily reached from the city, while the cricket field will make a splendid diamond for playing on. What is New York's loss in this matter will undoubtedly Brooklyn's game, for last year hundreds patronized the Polo Grounds from Brooklyn who will not now to to Jersey City to see the Giants play.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Coogan wants stock

Date Thursday, February 14, 1889
Text

It is understood that the owner of the Coogan property at 155 th street would let the club have it at a very reasonable figure if he could secure stock in the club; but the President of the New Yorks has refused to make any such arrangement. However, there is still a slight glimmer of hope that the New Yorks may yet get the Coogan site. This hope comes from the fact that the Coogan property for which $500,000 has been asked, will be sold at auction on Feb. 21, and may be bought up by the elevated railroad in which case it would be to the advantage of the road to have the club play there.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a leaguewide telegraph concession

Date Wednesday, February 20, 1889
Text

[reporting on the Atlantic Association meeting of 2/11/1889] The Postal Telegraph Company was granted the exclusive right to place its instruments in all the grounds of the Association.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

season tickets in Kansas City

Date Wednesday, February 20, 1889
Text

President Speas has decided not to issue more than 100 season tickets to be sold for $25. these were put on the market last week and are being rapidly taken.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

negotiations opened for the New Polo Grounds

Date Wednesday, February 20, 1889
Text

While rumor has been busy with the plans and intentions of the New York Club, the officials of that organization have begun negotiations to acquire a leasehold of property at the upper terminus of the West Side Elevated road. The property in regard to which negotiations have begun is certainly quite as desirable as were the Polo Grounds. It is much more accessible, and it affords infinitely better opportunities for gathering and dispersing crowds of people. It is situated across the Harlem River, at One Hundred and Fifty-fifth street, within about two blocks of the elevated station at that point. It is quite as easily reached by boats on the Harlem River, by trains on the new York and Northern road, and by trains on the New York Central and Harlem roads, the Central Company having promised to run a side track directly to the grounds. Boats by way of the Harlem River can, of course, come from down town, affording quick and easy opportunity for the contingent of base ball enthusiasts in the business centres to reach the grounds with very little trouble. The property is owned by the Astor estate, and those who propose to lease it will take about 10 of the 20 acres in the plot, if the negotiations succeed, as seems now likely. The Sporting Life February 20, 1889

[from an interview of an unidentified director of the New York Club] It looks as if our grounds were gone, and we will have to do the best we can under the circumstance. We will probably play for a month or two at St. George, S.I., and by that time we may have our new grounds ready. They belong to the Lynch estate, but are not on the west side of Eighth avenue. We have not got the pro0perty yet, but I may be able to say something definite in a day or two. The property we want runs from Eighth avenue to the Harlem River at One-hundred-and-fifty-fifth street. If we secure that property, which runs to the river, we will be able to run boats to and from the grounds. The Sporting Life February 27, 1889

[an item from George Stackhouse] While the Giants are satisfied to rally around their pennant flags at St. George this summer, the players don't see to like the idea of making St. George their permanent home. I don't think the team will stay there, in spite of Mr. Day's assertion that in case he likes the place that he “may conclude to make Staten Island the permanent home grounds of the Giants.” I am informed on good authority that the future home grounds of the New York Club will be embraced in the territory bounded by One Hundred and Forty-fifth and One Hundred and Forty-seventh streets and Seventh and Lenox avenues. The grounds are now being filled in, and will be ready for next season's game, I think. Much of the place is marshy, and not only has to be filled in, but innumerable pile drivers will be kept at work for several weeks yet. Standing at the corner of One Hundred and Forty-seventh street and Seventh avenue yesterday, I noticed the work going on, and wondered what it was all about. The contractor approached, and I asked him. “Why, that is the future home ground of the giants,” said he. “The grand stand will be guilt in that corner where the men are sinking so many piles into the soft earth. They propose to put up a monster grand stand there, and they want a sold foundation for it. You don't believe it, do you? Well, I will bet you $100 to $25 that the Giants play right here next year.” I did not take the bet. The man seemed to know what he was talking about. The contractor also told me the reason why the New York Club did not purchase the Lynch property at One Hundred and Fifty-seventh street and Eighth avenue. “That is low, marshy ground,” said he, “and in case the company wanted to sell it for building purposes in a few years they would find they had a white elephant on their hands. That is the reason that a few weeks ago Mr. Day advertised for some persons to purchase that property, agreeing to pay $6000 a year rental for a five or ten years' lease.” The Sporting Life May 1, 1889

the California League on the National Agreement and the reserve

[from a letter from Jas. L. Gillis of the Sacramento Club] [regarding California League clubs making offers to reserved players] ...such a course is not only not dishonorable or in the least indicative of a sneak, but on the contrary simply the exercise of a business right which every employer has the right to exercise in his endeavors to employ competent men to render him service. This practice is recognized by every known rule governing the relationship of employer and employee, in the absence of a special agreement to the contrary, and is well settled by precedents established and followed by the very men who now claim that such a course is not only unbusiness-like but dishonorable. In 1887, when Mr. A. G. Spalding, in the exercise of the very privilege that we of the California League now claim, engaged George Van Haltren to play with the Chicago Club, thereby crippling the Oakland Cub to such an extent as to jeopardize its existence, did Mr. Ovens or an other person affirm either publicly or privately that Mr. Spalding was a sneak, or dishonorable, or that he had been guilty of conduct which should cause him to be held up to the contumely and contempt of his fellow-men? Equally is this true in 1888, when Mr. Spalding took from the California League players George Borchers, and also is the same thing true when W. A. Nimick, of Pittsburg, took Mr. Knell from the same League in the middle of the season. Not a protestation, not even a word from anyone that either of these gentlemen had been guilty of anything that was dishonorable, on the contrary, their efforts in this direction were cited as evidence of their untiring zeal to secure the best talent available for their respective nines. Certainly the example of such men so well and favorably known in connection with the National game is worthy of emulation by us who are as yet but infants in the business, and when we do follow in their footsteps our acts should not be the subject of such reckless and uncalled-for attacks as the one already referred to. As to the merits of the National Agreement, with its reserve rule, and whether it is for the best interests of the California League to become a party to that agreement, I have at this time nothing to say, but I do insist that I shall not be the subject of attack and abuse by those who, when the same thing is done by others, have only words of praise. The Sporting Life February 20, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Billy Sunday's evangelism

Date Wednesday, February 20, 1889
Text

This is the way Sunday talks at the gospel meetings: “Satan don't want to get a young man who after a while may dispute with him the realm of everlastin' meanness. You bet he don't. It is the generous young man, the warm-hearted young man, the ardent young man, the sociable young man who is in danger, my friends. He's the fellow that Satan behind the bat wants to catch napping. He's the chap that the devil in the box wants to pull on with a snake curve. Hold your base. Wait for your ball.

Source ” Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a late game on ice skates

Date Friday, February 22, 1889
Text

The South Park Commissioners have everything ready for the base of ball to-day on ice, at Washington Park, between the Jenney & Graham boys and the professionals (Artics). This is the deciding game and will be hotly contested. Both nines will be in uniforms–the toboggan suits–and a good game is expected. ... The diamond is all laid out, and the regular ice rules will govern the game.

Source Chicago Inter Ocean
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Von der Ahe wants to buy real estate

Date Sunday, February 24, 1889
Text

Some new improvements are being made at Sportsman's Park this month. The grand stand and the fences are being repaired, and additional accommodations constructed for the ladies. The property is still in dispute, and a final adjudication of the case is not expected for several months. Von der Ahe has made a big offer for the ground, but owing to the conflicting interests it is doubtful if a sale can be negotiated. The ground, at a low estimate, is worth $30,000, just double what its value was six years ago. Von der Ahe is anxious to purchase it, and says if he gets possession he will make it the finest base ball park in the country.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

keys to the press box

Date Sunday, February 24, 1889
Text

The Cincinnati club management will not permit anybody other than active members of the press to occupy the press quarters at the Cincinnati park the coming season. The quarters will be put under lock, and the base ball reporters will be furnished keys. They will also be requested not to take outsiders to the box with them. St. Louis Republic February 24, 1889

musings on the legal existence of the League

[writing in reference to the Umpire Decker case] In my way of thinking the League resembles one of the old-fashioned trades unions. These organizations had laws or understandings among themselves. They would agree one with another to carry out certain rules or requirements. Those who broke faith could in many cases not be made responsible to law, but the unions could blacklist them; that is, to a very great extent deprive them of their work. Of course this deprivation had to be skillfully managed. It could be done as follows: A man blacklisted by the unions would secure work at a union concern but the workmen there would refuse to work if he was continued on the premises. There is no law to make a man work where he does not desire, and sooner than have trouble the employers would wash their hands of the non-union men. The National Baseball League is identical to the union above quoted. Those who compose it, whatever it may be, have an understanding one with another that such and such rules and regulations will be carried out. Whoever violates these rules will be blacklisted, be he player or anybody else. The blacklist simply means that those who remain in harmony with the League and its rules refuse to work, that is play, with the blacklisted man or men. Certainly there is no civil law to force one club to play with another, or compel one man to play with or against another. This, then, is just how the League stands to-day. Its officials admit that many things connected with it which would not stand the test of law, but it is only fair to add that if it was carried on in strict accordance with civil law it would not be the League. However, it is to be hoped that before long we will learn definitely what the League is, both for legal and practical purposes. Pittsburgh Dispatch February 24, 1889

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA players with money to spare

Date Monday, February 25, 1889
Text

According to the Cincinnati Enquirer, the American Association players who have money to spare are as follows: Bobby Carruthers, $30,000 and rich prospects; Nat Hudson, $30,000. These players inherited their wealth. Those who have saved money out of their earnings are Charles Comiskey and Long John Reilly, about $15,000 each. The other prudent players are John Corkhill, Bill Gleason, Biddy McPhee, Hugh Nichol, Joe Sommer, Harry Stovey, Tony Mullane, and Dock Bushong. They are worth from $7,000 to $10,000. The most notorious of the improvidents are Ramsey, Latham, Browning, Foutz, and Snyder, the latter now of the League.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a proposal for a single entity league

Date Wednesday, February 27, 1889
Text

[from the Kansas City correspondent] President Speas proposes that the eight clubs of the American Association form a stock company to be called the American Base ball Association. Let this Association be capitalized for a sum of money sufficient to cover the investments in players and in franchises that the eight members have made. The nine incorporators of the American Base Ball Association would be the presiden6t of the American Association and the presidents of the eight individual clubs. Let the incorporators be the directors for the first year. The officers would be the usual corporation officers:-a president, vice president, secretary and treasurer, and their duties, of course, would be similar to the duties of other corporation officers. The business of the Association would be conducted by the nine directors.

There is a plain, simple method of organization, easy of perfection and short of every particle of red tape.

The plan in short is to pool the investment in players and franchises of each club and to issue stock in lieu thereof. The valuation of club properties could be arrived at in this way:--Each club should furnish the directors with a statement showing the actual money it has invested in players and releases, that is to say the amount of money actually paid out. For instance, a player, though a valuable one, whose release had cost nothing, would not figure in this list. Then the directors would take up every player owned by a club and put an estimate on him. In this way the club would receive compensation for players whose releases had not cost anything. While, on the other hand, they might suffer some by having the estimated price fall below what another player's release had cost. Each club would receive stock covering, as near as possible, the actual value of its money invested.

Then come the matter of franchise. Of course, a franchise in Brooklyn is worth more than a franchise in Kansas City. Brooklyn should therefore receive as much more stock than Kansas City in the American Base Ball Association as its franchise is more valuable than the Kansas City franchise. In other words, a club should be paid in stock for its franchise according to the capacity of that franchise for earning money. If Brooklyn pays interest—earns a dividend on $100,000 of stock—it should have stock in the Association accordingly. If Kansas City's club does not earn money, its franchise has no value outside of its players, and as it has already received stock in payment for its players it would receive nothing else.

If this plan were adopted, the Millennium Plan of equalizing strength would then have to be adopted, in order to make each club pay. Brooklyn would then be as much interested in Louisville's earning money as Louisville itself would be.

Source … The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Billy Sunday becomes an evangelist

Date Wednesday, February 27, 1889
Text

“Billy” Sunday, the well-known base ball player, made his first appearance in Chicago as an evangelist last Sunday evening, and met with decided success. He talked at the Farewell Hall to a large audience, making an earnest address. When he had finished, forty-eight young men raised their hands to show that they had been converted, and Mr. Sunday was well pleased. His work had been the most successful of the year. He should now try to reform the members of the Pittsburg team. That is a job compared to which the conversion of the entire city of Chicago would be child's play. The Sporting Life February 27, 1889

[from the Pittsburgh correspondent] Billy Sunday's appearance as an evangelist did not surprise anybody here. Ever since Billy made an address at a revival meeting in the spring, many people realized that the story about his Christianity were true. Many a player who has sworn in the little fellow presence will remember the look and gentle reminder of “Why I didn't think you would say such a thing!” Ned Hanlon one day felt so abashed that he was sad for the rest of the day. The Sporting Life February 27, 1889

intentional walks to load the bases

At Detroit on one occasion last season the score stood 3 to 2 in favor of the visitors. Hanlon was on third base in the last inning, with one out. Irwin knew the captain would take desperate chances to get home on a ground hit, as he was a great slider. The chances were he would get there, as big Dan Brouthers was next at the bat. Irwin instructed his pitcher to give the next two batsmen their bases on balls. This would force Hanlon and the catcher would not have to touch him. The play worked like a charm, for the next batsman hit a bounding ball at the short stop, which was sent to Clements at the home plate just in time to get Hanlon. The next man put up a long fly to the outfield, and the game was won by the Phillies. The Sporting Life February 27, 1889, quoting the Boston Globe

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Phillies buy out Tyng's contract

Date Wednesday, February 27, 1889
Text

The Philadelphia Club and Mr. James A. Tyng have settled all differences and canceled the contract which guaranteed Mr. Tyng a yearly salary as “director of amusements and athletic sports.” This amicable result was brought about by an interview between Mr. Tyng and Secretary Rogers, and the two gentlemen parted with mutual good wishes for each other's welfare. The amount paid Mr. Tyng has not bee made public. Mr. Tyng has for the present abandoned law practice and has become a stock broker, having opened an office at 62 Broadway, room 200, and has been admitted to membership in the Consolidated Stock and Petroleum Exchange.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Metropolitans reorganize

Date Saturday, March 2, 1889
Text

A large number of the old Metropolitan Club players of this city were at the Fifth Avenue Hotel yesterday afternoon, and as many, if not all, of them are not under engagement for next season, they decided to reorganize the old Indians and play their own hook. A meeting looking toward such a move will be held at 21 Park row on Wednesday next. The make-up of the team as it has been suggested is as follows: Holbert, c.; Lynch, p.; Charley Jones, 1st b.; Troy, 2d b.; Nelson, 3d b.; Kennedy, l.f.; Roseman, c. f.; Burdock, r. f.; Sam Crane and Hankinson, substitutes. Three of the players are willing to put up $20,000 to back the team, while outside parties have already offered to p ut up from $10,000 to $15,000. It looks very much as though the team would make it a go, and there is no reason in the world why they should not play good bal, and they will to.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

American Association rumored to plan to classify players

Date Saturday, March 2, 1889
Text

It is officially announced that at the spring meeting of the American Base-Ball Association, to be held in this city [Columbus] next Tuesday, President Byrne will present a plan of classifying the players similar to that in vogue in the league. From the same source it is understood that it will be adopted to take effect at the close of the next playing season. Chicago Tribune March 2, 1889 [N.B. It wasn't.]

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA “blacklist” replaced by “ineligible”

Date Wednesday, March 6, 1889
Text

[reporting the AA special meeting 3/5/1889] The word blacklist is wiped out of the constitution, which now refers to an offending player as being ineligible.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA recognizes ladies' day

Date Wednesday, March 6, 1889
Text

[reporting the AA special meeting 3/5/1889] A provision is made for a ladies' day, which shall not be a Sunday or holiday, and that home clubs shall not pay a percentage for their admission.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a rumor of a Brotherhood strike

Date Wednesday, March 6, 1889
Text

A rumor was current yesterday [3/1] that there is a good prospect of a war this spring between the various clubs of the League and its players. It is known that the classification scheme is highly unsatisfactory to most of the players, and it is said that not a League player will take part in a championship game this season until the trouble is settled. Under the classification Sowders and Glasscock, among others, have been reduced considerably below the salaries they received last year. The rumor said that these two men were to be made test cases, and that no Brotherhood players who have not already done so, will sign contracts until they are settled. The whole story has rather an appearance of improbability, especially as Mr. Blackhurst, who is acting for the Brotherhood, denies that such is the case.

J. F. C. Blackhurst was asked yesterday concerning the report that during the absence of President John M. Ward, of the Base Ball Players' Brotherhood, he is to have charge of the affairs of the Brotherhood and to manage the cases of the Brotherhood players who are dissatisfied with their classification. He said that there was no truth whatever in the statement, that he was not the attorney for the Brotherhood and had no connection whatever with that organization. He said that he was, however, the attorney for short stop Glasscock, of the Indianapolis Club, and will go to Washington to-morrow to see President N. E. Young, of the League, and attempt to settle Glasscock's case with him, without an appeal to law. He thought that difficulties between clubs and their players should be settled between themselves, and that there should be no outside interference. The Sporting Life March 6, 1889

[reporting the NL meeting of 3/5/1889] Mr. J. C. F. Blackhurst requested a hearing and was invited to appear. He stated to the League that hi client, Mr. Glasscock, of the Indianapolis Club, had decided to make no individual complaint, and that in consequence had no case before the meeting, and gracefully retired.

After Mr. Blackhurst's withdrawal, President Brush and Manager Bancroft had a long interview with Glasscock, and finally induced him to sign. He will receive a class “A” salary--$2,500--and $500 extra for captaining the team. The Sporting Life March 13, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a proposal for the League to appoint official scorers

Date Wednesday, March 6, 1889
Text

[quoting Young] I wish the League had given me the power to appoint the official scorers. Under the new classification rules, they will be as important to the success of the game as the umpires. If I had the appointment of them, I would select men and not allow the clubs to know who they were . That is, I would have the League buy the tickets from each club, so the scorer would be independent, and not under obligations to the club he represented. Of course the clubs would eventually find out who was their official scorer, but I think it ought to remain a secret as far as possible. I do not approve of a corps of traveling scorer, although I am aware that each man favors the home time some. That is only natural, and is evened up throughout the season, when the club is away from home.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the tourists learn of the Brush plan

Date Wednesday, March 6, 1889
Text

In Italy the absent ball players for the first time learned of the League's new salary limit and classification rule. As was to be expected, none of the players are in love with it. Still, they probably have no clearer conception of it yet than our home players had when it was first promulgated. When they come to understand it more clearly they may like it better. At any rate their like or dislike of the needed financial safeguard will not affect it one way or the other.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Arthur Irwin's gloves

Date Wednesday, March 6, 1889
Text

Spalding has just closed a contract with Arthur A. Irwin to handle all gloves made by him for the season of 1889. The Sporting Life March 6, 1889

Anson's reason for leading all first basemen last season, July 1:--”I purchased one of Irwin's Improved Fielding Gloves, and after that it was impossible to drop a thrown ball.” The Sporting Life March 6, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Bobby Mathews contract to be a pitching coach

Date Wednesday, March 6, 1889
Text

Bobby Matthews is once more after the Athletic Club with a legal stick. On Thursday last he brought a suit in the common Pleas Court against that corporation to recover $600 wages on a special agreement to act as “coacher” for the club. The contract, as far as the pitching is concerned, is all right, but he says they have not paid him for his coaching.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

revising the AA constitution

Date Wednesday, March 6, 1889
Text

It is well known that Jimmy Williams is doing the heavy work on revising the constitution. He finds in President Wikoff and Manager Schmelz assistants of no mean type, and between the three, the new constitution will come up for adoption with no technical points to bother the delegates. There will be no errors, either, it might be well to add, and it is probable, that for the first time, the constitution of the American Association will go to the market with no excuses of aggravating mistakes.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

spitballs?

Date Friday, March 8, 1889
Text

A gentleman of this city has patented an arrangement for holding a wet sponge to a ball player's belt. It will take more than a sponge to keep balls players from putting their fingers to their mouths.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Spalding ha a new mascot

Date Saturday, March 9, 1889
Text

Walter Pereina, A. G. Spalding's mascot, arrived in this city from Ceylon yesterday. Mr. Spalding met him there, and, as he seemed very bright, shipped him to New York. He is about 19 years old, and speaks four languages. He is a Tintolese.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Diddlebock with the Philadelphia Inquirer

Date Saturday, March 9, 1889
Text

Henry H. Diddlebock, a veteran journalist who has for many years ably edited the baseball and sporting columns of The Times,of Philadelphia, has severed his connection with that establishment and is now engaged in a similar capacity on The Philadelphia Inquirer, which has been improved wonderfully under its new management, and promises to resume its former leading position.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Keefe and Becannon

Date Saturday, March 9, 1889
Text

The old Metropolitan Base-Ball Club of this city [New York] is now on a good way towards reorganization. The meeting was held this afternoon in the office of Keefe & Becannon, No. 149 Broadway, and the old players were well represented...

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player sale

Date Saturday, March 9, 1889
Text

[quoting Brush] We have purchased the release of Getzein from Detroit, and if he plays next season he will play with the Hoosiers. I have had no communication with him since the deal was made, but feel safe in saying he will be one of the local twirlers. St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA umpire committee abolished

Date Sunday, March 10, 1889
Text

The reason for doing away with the Umpire Committee of the American Association was that it placed the members of the committee in a bad position. Every one had the idea that the umpires favored the clubs of the committee, and there was always more or less bad feeling about it. The whole thing is now in the hands of President Wikoff, and he will be held responsible for the umpires hereafter. The umpires' schedule should have been ready before this, but the failure to complete the staff has delayed the work. New York Sun March 10, 1889

All last year Mr. Byrne was charged because of his chairmanship of that committee, with undue influence over the umpire staff. At the annual meeting in St. Louis in December last he positively refused re-election to that committee, as he would not subject himself again to such imputations. The committee this year, therefore, consisted of Baltimore, Kansas City and Columbus, Mr. Byrne, having nothing whatever to do with the action of the committee. The committee selected Messrs. Gaffney, Ferguson, Holland and Sullivan, and their action was ratified at the schedule meeting held in Columbus in March last. At this same meeting it was determined to abolish the Umpire Committee and clothe President Wikoff with full power of appointment and control of umpires. Subsequent to the meeting Mr. Sullivan refused to qualify, and Mr. Wikoff, under the authority given him, appointed Mr. Goldsmith to fill the vacancy. Mr. Wikoff did this without any consultation with or advice from any official of any association club. Brooklyn Eagle September 14, 1889

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

evading the Brush classification plan

Date Sunday, March 10, 1889
Text

How beautifully the case of John Glasscock was arranged despite all the emphatic declarations of President Brush and others to the effect that Glasscock could not possibly get more than $2,500 for the season. The player, accompanied by his lawyer, was at the [NL] meeting to demand, according to contract, the same amount of money for this season as he received last year, viz., $3,000. The sagacious League knew better than to tackle a question of this sort in open hostility, and Glasscock was given his $3,000. But we are told that $500 of this is for Glasscock as captain of the team; this specious arrangement is to give a confiding public to understand that the latest limit of salary, $2,500, has not been tampered with. Common sense will certainly tell us that Glasscock is receiving $3,000 for his services to the Indianapolis club, divide or classify these serves as we will. Pittsburgh Dispatch March 10, 1889

clarifying the ejection rule

The umpire rule has been so defined that an umpire can at his own discretion remove a player, but the captain of a team to which the player belongs can name the substitute to take his place. The Philadelphia Times March 10, 1889

advertising expenses; marketing; travel expenses

The expenses of the local club are to be cut to a very large extent this season. During the last few days Manager Phillips, at the request of President Nimick, has been preparing an estimate of what the season's expenses will be. He has finished his estimate for advertising and figures out that it will be within the $3,000 allowed him by the club. This will reduce the cost of advertising about $2,600 below that of last year. “But,” said Mr. Phillips last evening, “had I been allowed $4,000 for the season I would have turned things over. With that amount I could have had a band engaged to parade the streets and give promenade concerts every day we had a championship game.”

“However, with the $3,000 we will do some great work. I have engaged the Great Western Band for a street parade and concert on the championship opening day. I am also inclined to have silk ribbons of the club's colors, with the name of the club inscribed on them, and present one to each lady present on the opening day. These ladies can, therefore, wear the club's colors at every game they attend during the season.”

Although Mr. Phillps has not completed his other estimates for the season, eh thinks the club's traveling expenses will be about $1,500 less than last year. This will make a total of $4,100. Pittsburgh Dispatch March 11, 1889

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

hot water in the clubhouse

Date Wednesday, March 13, 1889
Text

It is the intention of the management to repair the club-house for the use of the men as soon as it can be done. Natural gas is to be put in so that they can have both hot and cold water, and all other necessary arrangements will be made at an early date.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The Rowe and White cases and the status of the Detroit Club

Date Wednesday, March 13, 1889
Text

[reporting the NL meeting of 3/5/1889] When the League reconvened the Detroit Club matter was taken up. After careful consideration of the case of Rowe and White it was determined not to accept the Detroit Club's resignation but to place the same in President Young's hands, subject to his acceptance at the proper time—which means when Rowe and White come to terms. The Detroit Club then released Jas. L. White, J. C. Rowe, E. Hanlon and C. H. Getzein. Thereupon the Pittsburg Club accepted the services of J. L. White, J. C. Rowe and Edward Hanlon and Indianapolis accepted the services of Getzein. This relieves the Detroit Club of any further trouble about the recalcitrant players and enables the League to hold them in reserve.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the reserve put into the AA constitution

Date Wednesday, March 13, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] The most important piece of work accomplished [at the AA spring meeting], and which is worthy of special mention, was the adoption of the amendment by which reservation of players is recognized by and incorporated in the constitution of the Association independent of the National Agreement. The amendment was conceived by President Byrne and presented by him to the Association, which adopted it unanimously. … Mr. Byrne's idea appears to be to legalize reservation, to make it more binding upon the players, , whom he seeks to make a party thereto, and to devise a means of maintaining it in the event of a collapse of or withdrawal from the National Agreement.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the black list provision for hold outs repealed

Date Wednesday, March 13, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] After defiantly keeping the infamous resolution to blacklist recalcitrant reserved players on the statutes for two years, the American Association finally last week acknowledged the blunder... by repealing the odious, illegal and inoperative resolution.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

interpreting foul bunts

Date Wednesday, March 13, 1889
Text

[reporting on a meeting of the AA officials and umpires] The official definition of the rule, which refers to “an obvious attempt to hit a ball foul,” is that the batsman can only be considered as hitting the ball foul intentionally when such intention is apparent to the umpire. When the game is in such a position as to render the hitting a ball foul as a detriment to the batting side—as in the case of a bunted ball when a runner is on a base—in such case the umpire cannot legally call the bunted ball a strike as was wrongfully done, time and again, last year. In fact to call a strike on a ball hit foul at any time can only be done when the intention to do so is obvious, that is, unmistakeable. The Sporting Life March 13, 1889

[from Chadwick's column] In the case of all bunted balls, when runners are on bases no strike can be called on a ball bunted foul, unless such foul hits are repeatedly made and plainly made for the purpose of hitting them foul. Last year all balls bunted foul after two strikes were called when called a third strike. This is no longer the rule. The Sporting Life March 20, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Metropolitans revived as a cooperative club

Date Wednesday, March 13, 1889
Text

The famous old Mets, who in 1880 helped to bring base ball back into popular favor on Manhattan Island, have been rejuvenated. A year ago the Metropolitan Club died, but the evens of Wednesday brought the old institution back to life again. The team has been reorganized and will play base ball as the game was played ten or more years ago. The club will be run on the co-operative plan and no club owner will get rich while the players get only salaries. What money is made will go to the players themselves in equal proportion. There will be no stars or favorites, and all will share alike, consequently there will be no jealousy among the men.

A meeting was held at the office of Alex. F Blinn, the lawyer, at No. 21 Park row, Wednesday, and all the needed arrangements made. The old “Indians” present were:--”Jack” Lynch, the pitcher; James Roseman, Eddie Kennedy and Jack Nelson, the outfielders; William Holbert and John Hayes, the catchers; Charles Jones, first baseman; Sam Crane, second baseman; John Troy, short stop; and Mell Becannon, third baseman. Hankinson and Reipschlager were not present, but will join their old companions later. Among the others present were:--Rooney Sweeney, John Farrell, William Primrose and James Jackson.

Sam Crane, formerly of the Scranton Club, was chosen manager and secretary. Jack Lynch was elected president and treasurer.

The board of directors chosen were Lynch, Holbert and Jones. The directors are empowered to pick out the players for each game. A committee of three was appointed, consisting of Crane, Jones and Collins, to draft a constitution and by-laws. The official name of the club will be “The Metropolitan Base Ball Club, of New York City.

The club has secured an office at 140 Broadway, where another meeting will be held to-day.

The players hope to make arrangements with the New York Club so that they can play at the Polo Grounds while the Giants are away. They also expect to make arrangements to play Sunday games in Brooklyn when the Brooklyn team is away from home. The players seem to think that the venture will be a success.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Mike Kelly get s stage fright; Casey at the Bat

Date Saturday, March 16, 1889
Text

Nobody ever though it was possible for Mike Kelly to have stage fright, but he had a bad dose of it yesterday when he essayed to recite “Casey at the Bat” before a Boston audience. He couldn't spunk up enough courage to open his mouth, so he was introduced to show that the managers of the performance had not deceived the public, and was bowed off the stage on the threadbare excuse of a bad col. There are two serious rumors afloat in regard to this sudden shyness on the part of the $10,000 beauty. He had never been known to shake when 30,000 eyes were levelled at him on the ball field, but he was keeled over by the audience that attended the Elks' benefit at the Boston Theatre. Kelly told some friends that he was afraid of being hissed, and he knew that would break him up. There were others who openly avow that “the only” was incapable of making a speech.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

day jobs of the Boston triumvirs

Date Sunday, March 17, 1889
Text

Of the Boston triumvirate, Billings is a shoe manufacturer, and his wealth is estimated at $200,000; Soden is in tin roofing, and is worth as much as Billings; Conant is a gossamer-maker, and is worth as much as the other two combined.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early homemade baseballs

Date Monday, March 18, 1889
Text

[from a reminiscence of Charles S. Clampitt, formerly of the Olympics of Philadelphia] [speaking apparently of the early 1860s:] We played for honor, the only trophy being a ball. In our club we made our own balls. Every six months a committee was appointed for this purpose, and the balls were made of a piece of India rubber covered with twine, worsted and a calf skin.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

distinction between manager and captain

Date Tuesday, March 19, 1889
Text

John Morrill signed a Boston classified contract to-day. “He will neither manage nor Captin the team and will most likely play shortstop,” says President Soden. It is well known that Morrill has been put in Class A by Nick Young. Ray has sent word that his classification is satisfactory and he will sign at once.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a minor league no-reserve agreement upheld

Date Wednesday, March 20, 1889
Text

[a ruling of the Arbitration Committee] In the matter of the controversy between the Milwaukee Western Association club and the Rochester International Association club for the services of Ezra B. Sutton, the undersigned find from the evidence that when the Rochester Club arranged for Sutton's services for the balance of the season of 1888, the president of said club agreed that Sutton should not be reserved by said Rochester Club. This agreement is not only proved by what we believe to be credible testimony, but is admitted in the broadest terms in a letter from said president to the secretary of that club directing him to release Sutton accordingly. There are other circumstances strongly corroborating this conclusion. The point now relied on, that the president had no authority to make such an agreement, cannot be upheld. In the absence of some express notice to parties dealing with the chief executive officer of an association that his power are limited, good faith requires that such parties be not prejudiced in assuming that he has the power to claims and which is one usually pertaining to such office. While great care should doubtless be exercised in acting on such verbal agreements, yet where it is one as clearly proven as in this instance, and where the same is embodied in the written admission of the party alleged to have made it, a great wrong would be done should we disregard it. We therefore find that the Rochester Base Ball Association had no right to reserve Sutton in the face of their agreement and he was therefore free to sign with the Milwaukee Base Ball Club.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

substitute player

Date Wednesday, March 20, 1889
Text

[from Chadwick's column] In any part of the game after the first inning and at the close of an inning, the captain of either nine can call for a and place him in the position of any player of the nine he chooses to retire from the field, irrespective of any player being disabled by illness or injury. But the retired player cannot again take part in the game.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

watching the pitcher's grip

Date Wednesday, March 20, 1889
Text

Jack Kerins says that the “only way to get onto the different curves is by watching the grip which the pitcher takes on the ball before it leaves his hand. A smart pitcher will shift his fingers and fool you at the last minute as he draws back his hand; others will give away their trick like children.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Beacon Club continues

Date Wednesday, March 20, 1889
Text

[from the Boston correspondent] I was glad to learn yesterday that the Beacons are not going to drop out of the ring after all. They have decided to put their nine in the field again. Fred Ayer, who has played centre field for several years, will manage the team. He is now making dates for the season's games. I understand the team is in need of a catcher. The Beacons only take the best, but this is a great chance for some good amateur catcher who wants to play one game a week.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

roster makeup

Date Thursday, March 21, 1889
Text

The Baltimore base ball club will open the season with a roster of 15 men. The pitchers are Matthew Kilroy, Edward Cunningham, Frank Foreman and William Whittaker. The catchers are Chris. Fulmer, Edward Tate, Joseph Quinn and Bart Cantz. The first baseman is Thomas Tucker; second baseman, Joseph Mack; third baseman, William Shindle; short stop, Jack Farrell, left fielder, Joseph Hornung; centre fielder, Michael Griffin; right fielders, Joseph Sommer. The captain of the club has not yet been determined upon. It will probably be Mack or Farrell. St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catcher's mitt

Date Wednesday, March 20, 1889
Text

[advertisement] “The Decker Safety Catching Gloves” The Sporting Life March 20, 1889

Inventive genius is constantly at work improving and perfecting that now indispensable base ball implement, the glove. E. Harry Decker, the Philadelphia Club's new catcher, is the latest man to put an improved catcher's glove on the market, and from what we hear about it the Decker glove is really a first class article. The cuts in the advertisement in another column will give our readers an idea of how the glove is made. Mr. Decker has associated himself with Paul Bickley, of Chicago, and the two have started a glove manufactory at No. 68 Monroe street, Chicago, where they will be pleased to hear from their friends, the profession and the trade. The Sporting Life April 3, 1889

Source “The Decker Safety Catching Gloves” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

beer privilege in Louisville; ground rent

Date Sunday, March 24, 1889
Text

Mr. Davidson's determination to have no more beer selling in the grand stand has been generally commended. Beer has never been sold in the ladies' stand, but it has always been on the men's side. The beer privilege has been let this year, as usual, but the front bar will be torn down. The privilege has heretofore sold for $1,400, and this has gone a long way toward paying park expenses. The park rental is only $600 for all except a strip about forty feet in width on the south side, which belongs to a tobacco manufacturer, whose name is Matthews, brought them to time by a threat to file a suit to have a street opened through the grounds. It seems that this can be done if the matter is ever pushed. In consequence, Mr. Matthews gets his rent, exorbitant as it is, in comparison with what is paid for the remainder of the park, and he has never pushed the street matter. In curious contradiction to this is the action of a Mr. Hoertz, who owns another little strip of the park, but who charges no rent at all, though he gets two or three season passes sent him out of pure good will. It will be seen from this that the Louisville Club does not have the big expense in keeping up its grounds that cut down the profits of other clubs. The improvements, grand stand, fences and all, only cost about $12,000.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

shin guards; humor?

Date Sunday, March 24, 1889
Text

...one umpire at least will take more effective measures against the balls and bats of outrageous fortune encountered on the ball field. Sandy McDermott of the Western League is the umpire who will introduce the innovation. Sandy has an excusable regard for Sandy's physiological entirety, and to the end that it shall be safe from the enemy's onslaught has had built for use during the coming season a helmet and cuirass of stout bull's hide, steel-bound and brass-riveted, which shield his head and body. … For his legs Sandy has devised covering somewhat resembling cricketers' foils, but much thicker and stronger, constructed of heavy bull's hide, backed up by hickory broomsticks.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

paired batteries

Date Monday, March 25, 1889
Text

Manager Sharzig [sic] says that he will not pair his batteries this season, but have his catchers play alternately with his pitchers. So much the better for Brooklyn. Brooklyn Eagle March 25, 1889

The Cincinnati management will pair the batteries as follows: Smith and Keenan, Duryea and Earle, Mullane and Baldwin, Viau and Earle. Brooklyn Eagle March 27, 1889

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the mechanics of a player trade

Date Monday, March 25, 1889
Text

...The management of the home team have made arrangements for the exchange of Whitney for Healy, and the League clubs have been requested to waive claim for both men. The deal is practically completed, as is shown by the following telegram to President Young from John T. Brush:

“Whenever the League clubs waive claim to Whitney and Healy, and Washington releases Whitney, Indianapolis will accept his services. At the same time Indianapolis will release Healy.

“It is understood that the trade is made even, no money consideration being paid by either club. While a great many baseball enthusiasts will regret to see Whitney leave the team, many will recognize that Washington gets equally as good a pitcher, if not a better. Whitney's repeated declarations that he would not play here next season, his dissatisfaction with the management, and the uncertainty as to whether he would be able to play any better than last season contributed to make his services very undesirable. On the other hand, Healy is a splendid pitcher, is in excellent health, and has always wanted to play in this city. Washington certainly loses nothing by the trade.” Indianapolis Journal March 25, 1889

It is doubtful if Healy knows anything of the deal yet, but he is not likely to make any objection to the transfer. Even if he did, it would avail him nothing. The clubs have all waived claim to his services, barring New York, and no trouble is anticipated from that source, as President Day has not, and will not, object to the deal. Indianapolis Journal March 31, 1889

Source ” Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

spring training regimen; signs

Date Tuesday, March 26, 1889
Text

Manager Bancroft assumed control of the affairs of the ball club yesterday morning and at once decided upon a definite system of field practice which will go into effect to-day. His plan is to place the men in their regular positions, with a pitcher in the box, and a catcher behind the bat, while each man will take a turn with the stick, and in this way the players will put in four hours a day, an order to that effect having been posted up in the club-house. This was one of Captain Glasscock's ideas and it promises to result in training the men in the best possible manner. A system of signs or signals will also be arranged within a few days, and these will be worked upon until the players are perfectly familiar with them. This will be the first step in the direction of good team work, and will be followed with other measures of a similar character, with a view of securing the full strength of the team in championship games.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the squeeze put on the Huntingdon Street grounds

Date Wednesday, March 27, 1889
Text

The New York Club is not the only club in the League that is troubled by municipal interference, the Philadelphias being placed in a similar position. In Common Council last week John D. Heins, of the Twenty-eighth Ward, introduced an ordinance authorizing the opening of Carlisle street, from Huntingdon street to Lehigh avenue. Carlisle street is now opened as far north as Huntingdon street, and is on a line with the centre of the filed of the grounds of the Phillies. The opening of the street would, therefore, divide the grounds, rendering either half too small for the use to which it is now put. The street would cut through the eastern end of the grand stand and across the diamond to the left field fence, near Lehigh avenue. The grounds were were secured by the Philadelphia Base Ball Club in 1885 on a lease for ten years, and $80,000 was spent in building the grand stand and fitting up the place. Last year the grounds were purchased by the club, and are the finest and most expensive in the country, and perhaps the world. The ordinance was referred to the highway committee.

There is no likelihood, however, of the Phillies submitting to the Councilmanic brace game. Carlisle street was not upon the city plan when the ground was purchased by Reach and Rogers, and to open it now it would be first necessary to prove that it would be for the best interests of the city, which would be a rather difficult undertaking. Col. Rogers says of the matter:

“When we secured the grounds do yo suppose we did it blindly, without thought of the future? We ascertained at the Survey Bureau that Carlisle street was not on the city plan, and so we were safe to go ahead. For Councils to open the street now an ordinance would have to be introduced to put it on the city plan. Then the matter would have to go into the courts, where the necessity of such an opening would have to be shown, and then, mark you, we would have to be paid every cent of damage the destruction of our grounds would entail.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an Olympic Club reunion

Date Wednesday, March 27, 1889
Text

There was a notable reunion of veteran ball players at the Bellevue last Thursday evening, composed of members of the Olympic Base Ball Club, which was first organized in 1833. about twenty members gathered about the festive board and did full justice to the fare provided for their entertainment. The post-prandial exercises consisted of appropriate speeches and reminiscences of the earlier days of our national game, and the former triumphs of the club. Col. Peter Ellmaker, D. M. Zimmerman and James A. Wright were among the speakers, and their efforts received ample encouragement from their auditors. The gentlemen present were :--John P. J. Sensenderfer, Henry Clay, D. M. Zimmerman, Gideon Marsh, G. W. Walton, George Fletcher, James A. Wright, Arthur Thacher, Charles Anspach, M .H. Taber, R. DeB. Richard, William H. Morris, Col. Peter Ellmaker, J. W. Miller, J. M. Wilkins, Charles Lincoln, Charles Boris, George E. Cummings, Robert Lindsay, Robert P. McCullough.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a ball players employment agency

Date Wednesday, March 27, 1889
Text

The “National Ball Players Employment Agency” is the name of the new players' employment bureau recently opened by George H. Geer, at 16 Clinton Block, Syracuse, N. Y. C. S. Rogers is secretary and treasurer. The terms of the agency are as follows:--To clubs, $3; players' engagement fee, $2, and players registration 25 cents. It will thus be seen that clubs in need of players can get them for less money than it would cost them railroad fare to go after the men, and as Mr. Geer is well acquainted with and a good judge of ball players, he can be depended upon to furnish managers with such players as they want to strengthen the weak spots in their teams. Mr. Geer is in the business to stay, and for that reason will do his level best to please and gain the confidence of all managers and players alike. Players out of engagement will find it to their advantage to communicate with Mr. Geer, as it will cost them less to pay his fees than to waste postage tamps writing to all the mangers and the country and after all not getting fixed for the season.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reserved players in the California League

Date Wednesday, March 27, 1889
Text

[from Waller Wallace's column] It is a matter of profound regret to me, and so I am sure it is to the several managers, that there are so many players in the above list [of California League teams] under the reserve rule of Eastern organizations, but the rivalry existing between the four cities is so intense and bitter that each manager has been forced to sign the very best material available, with which to cope successfully against opposing teams. Quite a number of these men were at hand within the confines of our State, and once in California they have found it impossible to “break away” from its genial climate and people. Result--”they've come to stay.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

balk moves 2

Date Saturday, March 30, 1889
Text

[from an article on the new rules by Chadwick] ...whenever [the pitcher] makes a feint to throw to a base other than home base, after making such feint he must resume his original position and make a pause before he can legally deliver the ball to the bat; besides which he also commits a balk if he makes “any motion calculated to deceive a base-runner.” The strict definition of this special clause in the rules governing the pitcher renders it necessary for the pitcher to be careful in his preliminary motions in delivery. In fact, he will find it difficult to avoid making a balk unless he stands still in his position and, looking at the catcher, throws to first base by signal only. The pitcher must bear in mind the fact that the rules make a difference between a balk following the failure of the pitcher to deliver the ball after making any one of the regular preliminary motions he is accustomed to make in throwing the ball to the bat, and the balk—technically known as an “illegal delivery”--which is consequent upon his delivering the ball to the bat while stepping outside his box, or from failing to pause after making a feint to throw to a base. In the first case balks from a failure to deliver give all base-runners a base, but not the batsman; while balks from an illegal delivery give the batsman as well as the base-runners a base.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

intentionally fouling the ball

Date Saturday, March 30, 1889
Text

[from an article on the new rules by Chadwick] A new interpretation has been given the rule which gives a called strike on any ball which the batsman intentionally hits to foul ground. Last year every bunted ball which went foul was declared a called strike, now, under the new interpretation, the attempt to bat a ball foul intentionally must be plainly obvious, and it can only be so when repeatedly done, and not so when it is obvious that it is the reverse of a good batting point to play to hit the ball foul, as in the case in bunting a ball when a runner is on a base.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring a walk-off hit

Date Saturday, March 30, 1889
Text

[from an article on the new rules by Chadwick] In the case of a fair ball to the outer field when a runner is on third base and only one run is required to win the game the new rules now forbid the umpire from calling “game” until the play following the long hit is completed. Last year in such a case the moment the runner reached home and the winning run was scored the game ended then and there, thereby cutting off the credit of the three-bagger or home-run hit which brought in the winning run. Now the game cannot end until the fair hit ball has been fielded in to the pitcher, thereby giving the batsman full credit on the score for his hit.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a preliminary contract

Date Monday, April 1, 1889
Text

Ward wanted to go to Boston and signed a contract with that club, by which he agreed for certain considerations to sign a league base ball contract when Boston should obtain his release from New York. Mr. Day had given his consent to the Boston club to negotiate with Ward.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The Sporting Life's finances

Date Tuesday, April 2, 1889
Text

The Sporting Life is very successful. It declared a semi-annual dividend of four per cent. yesterday. Editor Richter is progressive and is deserving of all the credit for the success of the paper. The Philadelphia Item April 2, 1889

scoring in Boston; sacrifice hits; RBI

The Boston Herald says: “The Boston scorers have decided to score as last season, but will eliminate the stolen base column, substituting the sacrifice hit column. The total base column will be retained.” This is simply offering their accustomed premium for record batting, just as the offering of prizes for the best batting averages. Both are opposed to team work in batting. Suppose a batsman makes three hits in a game, yielding third base each time, when no man is on the bases, and he is left on third each time. In the record he gets the credit of three base hits, with a total of nine. Suppose another batsman makes three sacrifice hits, when a runner is on third base each hit; he makes no base hit and of course no total his, and gets no credit for such on the average. Yet the man who made the base hits and gets the credit does not help the score for his side in a single instance, while the batsman who gets no base hit average brought in three runs. This is a sample of the beauties of the average of base hits, and the publishing of the column of total hits. It is simply offering prizes for record play at the bat. Brooklyn Eagle April 2, 1889

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an injury sliding

Date Wednesday, April 3, 1889
Text

[from an letter from Ned Williamson to the Cincinnati Enquirer] I am now laid up in bed. In sliding into second base last Friday (Paris game) I injured my knee quite severely. Ia collided with a rock and tore considerable flesh from the knee cap, necessitating my having it sewed (four stitches). I was advised to remain in Paris, but , stubborn as a mule, I refused, and left with the boys for London, crossing the channel. Oh, God! what a night I put in. not only did my knee cause me excruciating pain, but I suffered greatly from sea sickness. In moving I tore one of the stitches from my knee. Immediately upon my arrival here I called in another physician and learned that the wound had not bee thoroughly cleaned—result, here I am in bed in a city that I am more anxious to see than any I have yet visited. … I apprehend no permanent inconvenience from the accident, but, of course, cannot tell what the future may have in store for me; however, I pray for the best...

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

notifications on game day in Philly

Date Wednesday, April 3, 1889
Text

The managers of the Philadelphia Club have effected arrangements with the Postal Telegraph Company, and through them with the American District Telegraph Company, by which the patrons of the club can be notified on cloudy days and after a morning's storm as to whether the ground will permit a game or not, thus avoiding a long journey to the ball park at the risk of finding a wet field. Cards announcing either “game” or “no game” will be displayed on such days between the hours of 2:30 and 4 o'clock P.J., at the following places:--Pennsylvania Railroad, Broad Street Station; Philadelphia and Reading Railroad, Columbia Avenue Station, and the following American District Telegraph offices...

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

drainage at the Huntingdon Street grounds 2

Date Wednesday, April 3, 1889
Text

The field has been raised fourteen inches along the pavilion and back of the bat, casting the surface water toward second base. Then the field has been so graded as to throw the field water off from second base and the line, from which it is carried off in an iron pipe to Lehigh avenue. Several large, roomy, underground drains carry the water from the field about the catcher's stand to a point near the home players' bench, from which point an iron pip carries it out to the street.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Philadelphia Scorers' Association; reporters

Date Wednesday, April 3, 1889
Text

The Philadelphia Base Ball Scorers' Association held a meeting last Saturday afternoon at the Inquirer office. A uniform score sheet was adopted and sacrifice hits will be credited in the summary. … The scorers met again on Thursday for the election of officers for 1889 and the following were chosen:--President, Frank Hough, North American; vice president, J. Schriver Murphy, News; secretary, J. P. Campbell, Item; treasurer, S. H. Jones, Associated Press. Directors, A. M. gillam, Record; Phil Nash, News; H. Niles, Bulletin; Edward Cole, Call, and Horace S. Fogel, The Sporting Life and Ledger. The Association has 28 members, and is in a flourishing condition. Three additional names were proposed for membership, viz.:--Daniel Mills, Times; Luther E. Price, Record,and George F. Turner, Item. The board of directors will act on these nominations at its next meeting.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

negotiating with holdouts

Date Wednesday, April 3, 1889
Text

The little office at Sportsman's Park was the scene of a couple of heated interviews yesterday in which the boss president and his “hold-out” players were the principals. Tommy McCarthy put in an appearance yesterday morning and submitted his figures. The boss president gasped for breath when his eye rested on them. Then and there ensued a sulphurous dialogue, which terminated by the withdrawal of McCarthy. Silver King then tried his hand and said he was willing to pitch this season for $3,500, or $600 a month or $150 a week, which equals $50 a game. The boss president looked as if he needed stimulants when King finished. He said he was thinking of offering the big pitcher $2500, but would not cut down on that figure. After the séance he issued an order barring the “hold-outs” from the park. Robinson, Devlin, King, Chamberlin and McCarthy have not signed. St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early use of “ginger”

Date Thursday, April 4, 1889
Text

Galvin, Dunlap, Beckley and Sunday showed up with a full supply of “ginger,” but the others are still short of that article. St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

deadhead tickets; graft

Date Thursday, April 4, 1889
Text

The number of deadhead politicians who find means to get the entree to the grand stand of the professional ball grounds is very large. For instance, the New York Club last season gave out to the officials 400 season books, which if used every day would amount to $52 each, or a total of $20,800 for the whole number during the season. This amount of books would have to be supplied again this season, in addition to the $10,000 offer made to the city to be permitted to stay there until October, making a total of $30,800. It would not be so bad if the crowd in question was anything like a decent one, but the books are lent to the political heeler class when the owners cannot use them, and that is why there was always such a lot of objectionable people on the grand stand last season. All this crowd will be got rid of if the club leaves the Polo Grounds and goes to Staten Island. The worst class and the noisiest of the grand stands are political deadheads. They think they hide their position by their kicking propensities, but they only show their true standing by it.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

gate receipt split and deadheads

Date Thursday, April 4, 1889
Text

The rule of the division of gate receipts of the American Association this season, by which the home club has to pay the visiting club for every person admitted to the grounds except a limited number of representatives of the press, makes deadhead pass books costly to the club management. Under the old rule of the guarantee plan it was different. Now, when the club gives a pass book it makes the party a present of just so many dollars.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Giants consider Hoboken grounds

Date Friday, April 5, 1889
Text

President Day, of the New York Club, went to Hoboken yesterday, and carefully examined the St. George cricket grounds with a view to making it the future home of his club. The inducements which have been offered Mr. Day to locate there are said to be remarkably fine. He cannot only secure a ten-year lease of the grounds, but a well-known real estate dealer said that if the New York managers took the grounds they could secure a percentage on the increase in the value of the surrounding property for the time that they remained there. It is also understood that the ferry companies will help the club as much as possible in the way of transferring the people quickly. The fences and grand stand at the Polo grounds can be moved to Hoboken and put up in about two weeks, and can be made to do for a short time, or until others can be put up at least.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a collegiate professional

Date Saturday, April 6, 1889
Text

The careers of few professional ball players are more interesting than that of Sanders, the strapping Philadelphia pitcher who is paired with Clements. He comes of a highly respectable family and resides at Sudley, Prince William county, Va., where he was born. He graduated from Roanoke College with high honors, and left there with the intention of studying for the ministry. He taught a country school for one year, and joined the Philadelphias in the spring of 1888. Last winter he attended Vanderbilt University, Nashville, where he is studying to become a civil engineer. Sanders, who is 28 years of age, made a phenomenal record as pitcher for the Cartharpins, a Virginia country nine, which defeated some of the best amateur clubs of the country in 1885 and 1886., quoting the Baltimore Herald

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

exchange of score cards; starting gong

Date Sunday, April 7, 1889
Text

[New York vs. Brooklyn 4/6/1889] At 3:30 Umpires Ferguson and Kelly came on the field and the score cards having been compared the gong sounded for the game to begin.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

tie goes to the runner 4

Date Sunday, April 7, 1889
Text

The umpire must bear in mind that the striker, running to the first base, is not out unless the ball is held on the base by the baseman before the striker touches it. If at the same time, the striker is not out; it must be palpable that the ball was held on the base before the striker reached it, or he is not out. It should be remembered that the ball is to be held by the base player with some part of his person touching the base at the same time. Touching the base with the ball in the player’s hand without some part of the player’s person touching the base at the same time does not put the striker out at first base. “Holding the ball on the base” means having the ball in hand whiel standing on the base or touching it.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

quick pitching 2

Date Wednesday, April 10, 1889
Text

[from Chadwick's column] I notice that in the American Association Guide, on pate 139, the “official construction of the playing rules” is given, and on referring to Rule 18 the clause reads: – “No quick delivery will be allowed.” Where did President Wikoff find authority for this construction of the rule? A quick delivery of the ball is a very strong point in strategic pitching, and in no portion of Rule 18 is it prohibited.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chadwick on scoring; RBIs,

Date Wednesday, April 10, 1889
Text

[from Chadwick's column] In making out my scores this season for the Brooklyn Eagle—the only daily paper I now write for regularly—I have prepared a new summary to aid team work in batting. I ignore all extra-base hits credited to the individual batsman, to begin with, giving in their place credit for runs batted in and for sacrifice hits which aid runners to get bases. Then I record the chances given by each side for catches, whether accepted or not; the more such chances are given the weaker the batting. I also give a total record of battery errors for each side, these including bases on balls, wild pitches and balls hitting batsmen. I place no assistances for strikes in the assistance column, merely placing the total struck out by each pitcher in the summary. I give the total base hits on each side in the summary; also first base by fielding errors, earned runs—off the pitching only—and left on bases. Of course in official scores I adhere to the Association rule, but not in my newspaper scores.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an experiment with three pitchers at three innings each

Date Wednesday, April 10, 1889
Text

[from George Stackhouse's column] [Newark vs. Brooklyn 3/28/1889] The Brooklyn Club's plan of having three pitcher and three catchers in these early games does not seem to be producing the good results that was expected by the management. On a warm day this plan might be all right, but in cold weather it may prove more injurious than otherwise. For instance, Hughes and Clarke were the battery for the home team in the first three innings, and then put on their overcoats and sat on the players' bench and got chilled through, while Terry and Bushong took their places for three innings. Then the latter two retired to make room for Lovett and Visner. Hughes and Bushong were just getting warmed up to their work when it was time for them to quit. They went and sat on the players' bend in the cold, and if no ill results have followed it is not the fault of the weather. They could have pitched out the remaining six innings without any bad effect at all. Had they immediately returned to their dressing rooms after they had finished their part of the game, the liability to ill results would have been decreased. The plan of running so many batteries in one game is not only a nuisance to the spectators, a nuisance to the players, but bit confuses the spectators, who half the time do not know who is pitching and catching.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Ward refuses to play in Washington

Date Wednesday, April 10, 1889
Text

The much and long-talked-of Ward deal is finally settled. The great short stop during the past week positively refused to play in Washington, whereupon the latter at once made a deal for Morrill and Wise, of the Boston Club. This move reduces Ward to the alternative of re-signing with New York or in some way securing his transfer to Boston. The Sporting Life April 10, 1889

President Young says of Ward's refusal to go to Washington:-- “I think that Ward has made a big mistake and he will live to regret it. This was a turning point in his career and he was given a grand opportunity to show himself a base ball general. He could have made himself a national reputation as a base ball manager, so that his services would be in demand after his playing days are over, and he could have worked so as to secure a financial interest in the club, I've no doubt.” The Sporting Life April 10, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

minor league umpire salaries

Date Wednesday, April 10, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] The Southern League in its efforts at retrenchment has acted well in every direction but one. The reduction of the umpires' salaries to $125 per month, including expenses, was most unwise, as it will impair the League's service in a most important particular. It will be utterly impossible to secure umpires of even mediocre calibre for that money, and if there is any section where good umpires are needed it is in the fiery South. It would have been far better had the League not reduced the amount from the old figure, $175 per month, and it would be well to reconsider and return to that figure. Better economize at some other point, or if that be impossible, make up the difference somehow and have a decent umpire service—a most essential requisite to good ball playing and popular enjoyment of the game.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

chalk foul lines

Date Wednesday, April 10, 1889
Text

President Wikoff has notified all Association clubs that they must have foul lines so they can be seen by the umpire from his position behind the batter to the extension of the grounds.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

fee passes for New York politicians

Date Wednesday, April 10, 1889
Text

The surprising statement was made last week that the New York Club last season gave out to the officials of New York City 400 season books, which, if used every day, would amount to a total of $52 each, or a total of $20,800 for the whole number during the season. This goes to show how the New York Club has been squeezed for years. Adding to the city officials the newspaper men, actors and other people admitted free to the Polo Grounds, the New York Club seems to be saddled with quite an array of deadheads. In fact, this crowd made quite a goodly base ball audience of itself.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a professional groundskeeper

Date Wednesday, April 10, 1889
Text

William Houston, who formerly lived here, but has been a resident of Detroit for several years, has returned to Indianapolis, and made application for the place of ground-keeper at the ball park. He will probably be engaged. He is said to be an excellent man for the position, as he kept the Detroit grounds, and they were the finest in the League. Indianapolis Journal April 10, 1889

William Houston has been engaged by the local management as ground keeper. He is regarded as a first-class man and an improvement in the field is looked for. He will take charge at once. Indianapolis Journal April 11, 1889

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Frank Ringo commits suicide

Date Saturday, April 13, 1889
Text

Frank Ringo, the well-known base ball player, died at 9 o’clock Friday morning at his mother’s resident... his second attempt at suicide thus proving successful. Ringo began drinking again a few weeks ago, and he so incapacitated himself for work that he was given his release from the American Base Ball Club of this city [Kansas City]. This worked so on his mind that Thursday he took forty grains of morphine.

Source Philadelphia Evening Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

experimental battery in an exhibition game

Date Sunday, April 14, 1889
Text

[Athletic vs. Philadelphia 4/13/1889] The Philadelphias had out their strongest team, while the Athletics were weakened by placing in Smith and Brennan as the battery. … Manager Sharsig was criticized by some for experimenting in a game apparently of so much importance, but he fully justified himself by saying: “If I do not try my batteries in these games which are of over-rated importance how will I know whether they will be good enough for championship games? Better experiment now than do so on games that count.” And Billy was right. It is the championship games we want, not exhibition victories and championship defeats.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a half balk move; modern club name pattern

Date Sunday, April 14, 1889
Text

[from the Harry Weldon's column] ...Elmer smith has this Winter acquired a new motion, which he uses effectually in watching bases. Elmer has a side step when a runner is on first almost equal to Jimmie Galvin's half-balk motion, which is known and spoken about the base ball world over. No one has ever yet succeeded in getting gentle James' exact motion, but Smith has a clever counterfeit. He used it effectively against the Pittsburgs the past week. If Elmer does not lose the art before the season opens the St. Louis Browns, Baltimores, Kansas Citys and other clubs who have daring a quick starters will come to grief by reason of this motion.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

holdouts

Date Sunday, April 14, 1889
Text

[from the St. Louis correspondent] The custom of holding out among the ball players has always been in vogue under a different title, but in the last two seasons it has grown wonderfully popular among the ball tossers. On every hand the ball player is on the “hold out,” whether he is worth 5 cents or $5,000 a season; whether he be a minor leaguer or a major leaguer. In 9 cases out of every 10 in which players hold out for accession to their demands the players sign for the same, or pretty near the same, salary they received the season prior.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

proposals for umpire signals

Date Sunday, April 14, 1889
Text

[a letter to the editor from John J. Rooney, Captain R. F. Downing & Co. B.B. Club.] … Every one who attends professional games, when the crowds are large and noisy, and the umpire is not blessed with a strong voice, understands this difficulty. Frequently three-fourths of the spectators in distant parts of the field, and even the more fortunate holders and grand-stand tickets, do not know until the close of the inning, or at least after a provoking delay, whether a man is “safe” or “out,” or whether a strike or a ball has been called on the batter. …

…I would respectfully suggest a simple expedient—a code of bell signals. Place a man or boy in charge of a pleasantly sounding gong within plain hearing of the umpire's decision. It is evident, first, that the code should be extremely simple; a second, that all professional and crack amateur teams should adopt the same code; otherwise the plan would be worse than useless. May I again presume to make a few suggestions that have privately met the approval of base ball experts and lovers of the game?

First—For all “strikes, “actual or called, one bell. No bell after a pitched ball necessarily means a “ball,” unless otherwise announced.

Second--”Safe” in running bases, one ball: “out,” two bells.

No more is needed. The “one” bell for a strike and the “one” bell for “safe” need not conflict, as the two points of play covered cannot be made at the same time. A quick bell would meet any possible objection.

These signals I offer merely as a suggestion, but I feel certain that many ball players and devotees of the national sport will support me in the claim that in view of the great and fast increasing crowds attending ball games, and the extent of many of the grounds, there is an urgent necessity for a change that will bring every one, even in the remotest back seat, within immediate and distinct reach of the umpire's decision. Let the managers try it, and the base ball public will gratefully respond. New York Sun April 14, 1889

[from a letter to the editor from James Sullivan of New Haven, Conn.] I think a have a little code of base ball signals superior to those advanced by Mr. Rooney in The Sun of yesterday. The use of a gong is beset with difficulties for it would have to be a loud-sounding gong to reach the ears of 10,000 excited spectators, many of whom have imperfect hearing, or the boy in charge may misunderstand the umpire or make a mistake in his excitement. Why not have the umpire himself instantly telegraph his decisions to the anxious spectators? Here is my little code:

For every strike the umpire shall raise one hand straight over his head; for a ball he shall make no significant motion.

Whenever a man is out he shall raise both hands over his head; and if a man is safe, whether at the bat or running bases, he need make no significant motion. What could be more simple? A deaf mute could almost umpire under these rules, and players and spectators would understand him. New York Sun April 16, 1889

[from an anonymous “twenty years' reader of the Sun] As suggestions seem to be in order, permit the undersigned to offer the following signals calculated to benefit the patrons of the national game: First, regulation of balls and strikes—Let each umpire provide himself with a red handkerchief, and wave same when calling a strike on the batter. Second, outs—Wave a rag when man is out between the bases. New York Sun April 17, 1889

[from the reply from John Rooney] ...First of all, the umpire has enough to do in watching a game. He would object or fail to make himself a “jack-in-the-box.” His attention must be centred on the play, and any distraction or unnecessary increase of duties weakens and burdens him. The umpire would be compelled to shout, throw up his hands, and work the hand register at the same time. Secondly, the arm signals are not sufficient emphatic to reach all spectators. The arm could be elevated only for an instant, and would not compel an knowledge of the decision, such as a sharp bell would. The spectators don't want to watch the umpire all the time. A bell would reach them whether they watched or not. Moreover, the signal proposed is not sufficiently distinctive,and would consequently soon fall into disuse. It is not strong enough. A bell demands attention, speaks unmistakably, and at once stamps the decision with authority. Admirers of the game are admitting the necessity for some code of signals, although they may differ on the form. Let the managers give the scheme a trial. New York Sun April 18, 1889

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the color line in Buffalo

Date Monday, April 15, 1889
Text

Mascot Grant, the ebony second baseman, is not likely to play with the Buffalos this year. Manager Rowe has been looking for Grant and Cliff Carroll with a view to signing them. Grant played with the Cuban Giants in Washington yesterday, and in reply to an inquiry said he would sign only for $250 a month. This is considered too high, and the other members of the nine threaten to rebel if he plays. Last year they refused to have their pictures taken on Grant's account, and objected to traveling with him. They boys acknowledge that he is a good player, but they are in rebellion just the same. Their sentiment is that colored men should not play with white men.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Athletics' trainer

Date Wednesday, April 17, 1889
Text

The veteran player, Bill Hague, has become the trainer of the Athletic Club. He has been working on the pitchers' arms for the past week, and Seward, Robinson, Smith and Knouff say their pitching limbs were never before in such excellent condition.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

expenses as a salary limit dodge

Date Wednesday, April 17, 1889
Text

[from Frank Brunell's column] Have youn oticed the latest trick in the salary line? Where leagues and teams are bound down to a limit, the management signs men it needs and rewards them additionally by the payment of “expenses,” which means board, etc. There never was a rule kept to the letter. And it is also a question whether this extra trick is not a violation of the rules.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

St. Louis hold-outs signed

Date Wednesday, April 17, 1889
Text

[from Joe Pritchard's column] The defeat of the Browns by the Pittsburgs, on Monday, by a score of 7 to 3, was the straw that broke the camel's back. The home team played a “don't-care-whether-we-in” kind of a game, and the crowd in attendance, as well as the players of the Browns, left the park after the game was finished with a look of disgust on their faces. Comiskey and his men were guyed unmercifully by the crowd from the time the first ball was pitched until the game was finished. “Comie” can stand guying if his team is ahead, but if the Brows are behind he don't relish it one little bit. After the game on Monday the Browns' manager told President Von der Ahe that he thought that it would be a good idea for some one to see Robinson, Chamberlain, King and McCarthy, and offer to compromise matters. The boss president was slow to give his consent to such an arrangement, but after studying over the matter carefully he told “Comie” to see the boys and compromise with them, if such a thing was possible. The Browns' captain-manager had a short talk with McCarthy, Robinson and Chamberlain on Monday evening, and they arrived at a conclusion in a very short time. The three men were told to report at the park at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning and sign a contract, which they did, and they played in the game against the Pittburgs the same afternoon. Several papers here and elsewhere have stated that the players threw up their hands and asked to be signed at the prices named by Mr. Von der Ahe, but this is not the case. There was a compromise, and it was brought about by Manager Comiskey, who was anxious to have his team in good shape for April 17, when it will go up against Gus Schmelz's Cincinnati team. I have watched the recent “lock-out” with considerable interest, and I will say right here without attempting to injure either the management of the Brown Stockings or the players who saw fit to hold out for what they claimed was just that neither side was very firm. Mr. Von der Ahe was aware of the fact that he would stand a poor show in the championship race without the help of the unsigned players, and the players wanted to get to work because it was a matter of bread and butter with them. Neither the players nor the management has any room or cause to flap their wings and crow, because the fight was ended by a compromise, and all the parties concerned seem to be well satisfied with the turn things took on Tuesday. The Sporting Life April 17, 1889

[from Joe Pritchard's column] [relating a conversation between Von der Ahe and Charley King's father] “Charley is bull-headed,” said Mr. King, “and I have told him that he had better sign with you at the amount you have offered him--$3,200. It seems like some of the other players entered into an agreement with my son not to sign unless their demands were acceded to. When I noticed that Chamberlain, McCarthy and Robinson had had signed, I told my son that he was in the 'nine hold,' and that is the reason I wanted to see you. He has been working at his trade—that of brick-layer—all spring, and he is in good shape to pitch good ball.” Mr. King's story of the combination shows that some kind of an agreement did exist between the players. The Sporting Life April 24, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

division of responsibility between the manager and the captain

Date Wednesday, April 17, 1889
Text

The Boston Herald says that Manager Hart has not the authority to select the team to play from day to day. This power has been delegated to the captain of the club. Mr. Hart, therefore, has no authority at all on the field, as is the case with all the other managers. He controls the team off the field, but not on it. Brooklyn Eagle April 17, 1889

Mike Kelly has been given the bounce by the Boston triumvirate; that is, he is still nominally the captain of the team, but virtually Manager Hart is the boss of the team now. Messrs. Soden, Billings and Conant have plainly seen that Kelly is incompetent to control the team. No man respects him and he lacks every qualification which makes Anson, Harry Wright and comiskey so successful. When Jim Hart was first engaged it was with the understanding that he should have control of the team off the field only. When the club left Boston yesterday morning Manager Hart carried in his pocket a new contract with the Boston Club, which gave him full control of the team, both on and off the field. In fact, the same authority as Harry Wright has. Mr. Hart made his appearance on the players’ bench for the first time yesterday since the club has played hereabouts. Brooklyn Eagle April 24, 1889

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a club trainer

Date Wednesday, April 17, 1889
Text

Bill Hague, the old third baseman of the champion Providence team, has become the trainer of the Athletic club. He has been working on the pitchers' arms, and Seward, Weyhing, Smith and Knouff say their pitching limbs were never before in such excellent condition. St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Keefe holds out

Date Thursday, April 18, 1889
Text

Keefe is indifferent about playing ball this season, as he wants to build up his sporting goods business, and he is, therefore, quite independent as to the salary question. He thinks it worth $5,000 to neglect his business to play ball and, therefore, demands that salary from New York. Day won’t give over $4,000 and so Keefe will not sign. They may compromise at $4,500, the salary paid by Boston to Radbourne in 1887.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a dispute over an exhibition game guarantee

Date Thursday, April 18, 1889
Text

An umpire named Bowman gave the Columbus Club such a roast at Wheeling, W. Va., last Sunday that Captain Dave Orr took his men off the field and refused to continue the game. Manager Buckenberger refused to refund the guarantee and as a result the entire Columbus team was arrested and their baggage, including the trunk of Mrs. Orr, were attached. Arrangements were made to hold the train for ten minutes, a lawyer was engaged, and by paying $30 for settlement and $10 for the lawyer, the baggage was at once released, the team just making the train in time. The Columbus manager got the best of it by $85, as the guarantee was $125.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a history of the A. G. Spalding & Bro. Company

Date Wednesday, April 17, 1889
Text

[See TSL April 17, 1889 p. 10 for a good history of the Spalding Company.]

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ladies admitted free in Louisville

Date Friday, April 19, 1889
Text

President Davidson has decided that ladies shall witness the games free of charge this season. This was settled yesterday, and, beginning with this afternoon, each lady accompanied by a gentleman was admitted to the grounds without price. Mr. Davidson recognizes that the presence of the ladies is very essential, and there are many fair enthusiasts in the city who take a deep interest in the national game. The management will not admit ladies who come unattended.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

paying the umpire of an exhibition game

Date Friday, April 19, 1889
Text

[Toronto vs. Pittsburgh 4/18/1889] The decisions of Umpire Aborgast gave much offense to the visitors, so much so that they refused to contribute their share of his fee. Manager Phillips and Secretary Scandrett each tried to induce the manager of the Torontos to pay, but he claimed that he had not been consulted about his engagement and, therefore, didn't think he was compelled to pay. The debt, for such it is, remains unpaid and its existence is not creditable to the Canadians.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

deeking the catcher on a pop up

Date Saturday, April 20, 1889
Text

[St. Louis vs. Cincinnati 4/19/1889] “Robbie” worked one of his tricks, but it availed him nothing. When he sent up a high foul fly, he whispered into Baldwin's ear: “I've got it,” and the “Kid” thought it was Viau who spoke, and Robinson's life was saved. He sent the “Kid” another that made connections. St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the duties of the manager

Date Saturday, April 20, 1889
Text

This is Ned Hanlon's idea of a manager's duties: “What good are base-ball managers anyhow, except to look after the financial interests of the club? All matters relating tot he team should be left to the captain, who nine times out of ten is much the better qualified to attend to them. So far as my experience goes there is but one exception to this rule, and you have that one right here in Philadelphia. I mean Harry Wright. He has had experience, is cool headed, and can make allowances for a man.

Source ” Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catchers' mitts catching on

Date Wednesday, April 24, 1889
Text

The catchers of the Philadelphia and Athletic clubs are all beginning to wear Decker's catchers' gloves. Clements and Robinson both pronounce it the best they have ever seen. Decker has put the glove on sale with A. J. Reach & Col, who are prepared to promptly fill all orders sent to them. Al Reach, in speaking of the new glove, said the other day:-- “Of course, we have all kinds of gloves in our stock and it is immaterial to me which make we sell, and for that reason I can give an unbiased opinion of Decker's glove, and that is that I consider it the very best in the market. I will stake my reputation on the glove and recommend it to everybody as the best catchers' glove ever made.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scorer, reporter in Columbus

Date Wednesday, April 24, 1889
Text

The Sporting Life's Columbus correspondent, Frank W. Arnold, has resigned the official scoreship of the Columbus Club and the sporting editorship of the Columbus Dispatch. President Wikoff's brother, Charles, is his success on the paper.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a comparison of the Orioles new black and orange uniforms to the Canaries

Date Wednesday, April 24, 1889
Text

[from the Baltimore correspondent] Kiffe, of Brooklyn, had fitted the boys out in new uniforms of the patter of the old Lord Baltimores. The canaries looked like dandies in them yesterday when the came from the club house...

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a steal of home during an argument 2

Date Friday, April 26, 1889
Text

[Chicago vs. Pittsburgh 4/25/1889] Maul was on first base and started for second on a passed ball. Beckley was at bat and was dancing around, evidently trying to lead Flint to believe the ball was under his feet. Flint took the bait, but the ball was two or three yards in an opposite direction. This made Anson indignant, and he came in a kicked to the umpire. Amid the wrangle Maul stole his way home to the plate and scored. Lynch declared the run all right.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a feint to pick off a runner at second

Date Friday, April 26, 1889
Text

The Harvard base ball men have hatched up a trick which they claim will catch nearly every opponent who is lucky enough to steal second base. It is played between the pitcher, third baseman, and short stop, and its object is to confuse the player who may stealing from second to third base. It is, as nearly as can be descried, as follows: The player who has succeeded in reaching second base, on seeing that baseman step back to his usual position, about ten feet back of the base line, steals several feet down the path toward third. When he is about in front of short stop that player makes a dash toward second base, which causes the runner to dart in that direction also; but the short stop's run is only a feint, and the runner, on seeing the short stop stop, also stops before reaching second, and the pitcher throws the ball to the second baseman, who is on base, and whom the runner has entirely forgotten, and the runner is out.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

condition of the St. George grounds

Date Tuesday, April 30, 1889
Text

Tall frames loomed up about the back of the ground, and nearly one-half of the ball field is covered with a great stage. The right field of the ball ground is about the same as it was when the Metropolitans played there, but the left field has been excavated to a depth of some ten feet,and the earth carried up to the centre of the field. The same thing has been done under the stage, so that even the thirty teams at work putting the ball ground in condition will have to keep going night and day to have it ready to play on. Then then the outfielders will have to play on the stage with rubber-soled shoes.

On the first trip of the New Yorks from home work in removing the stage will be begun, but it will be very nearly the middle of the season before the ball ground will look anything as it did two years ago. The Staten Island Ferry Company will run boats every fifteen minutes on days of ball games. New York Sun April, 27, 1889

[Washington vs. New York 4/29/1889] The field was not as perfect as could have been wished for a ball game. Only about half of it was of earth; the other half consisted of the great stage upon which the “Fall of Rome” was exhibited last year. This stage is about 200 feet deep by 300 or more feet long. The outfielders of both teams wore rubber-soled shoes, and although boards do not make the finest kind of a ball ground, the outfielders were better able to play good ball than the infielders, who were darting about in the soft dirt. There were no base runs, and the foul lines only ran as far as the bases on each side. This made it very bad. … The stage on the outfield improved the long hits, for every time the ball struck fairly on the stage, no matter where, it was sure to be no less than a two-base hit. Whitney made a home run by the ball striking the stage and bounding over into the space back of the outfield.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a runner tricks the fielder into throwing away the ball

Date Friday, April 26, 1889
Text
Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

how Kansas City signed Herman Long

Date Friday, April 26, 1889
Text

The report that the Chicago club has offered big money for the release of Long of the Kansas City club is probably based on events of last season. Long is a Chicago boy, who was developed as a professional last summer in Sam Morton's Maroons. His playing in that team was of the most brilliant character. Morton sold him to the Kansas City Western Association Club, managed by Menges, Spalding's agent at Kansas City. That Spalding expected to get him and thought he practically had him, is well known. It is claimed that in part payment of indebtedness of Menges to Spalding Long was to be turned over to Spalding. Manager Watkins of the Kansas City American Association team outwitted both Menges and Spalding.

He waited until the night before Long became eligible to sign, watched him get on a train for Chicago, and boarded the train himself, engaging Long in conversation until after midnight. He then asked him how much he wanted for next season. Long stated his terms, as he says, thinking Watkins would not have any idea of accepting them. The next question was “How much advance money do you want?” Long mentioned the amount, and Watkins, who was prepared for the occasion, went into his pocket, and drew out a roll from which he counted out the money and secured his man. Watkins was accused of all kinds of trickery, even to getting Long drunk in order to obtain his signature, but persons on the inside vouch for the story as it is now related.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring errors

Date Saturday, April 27, 1889
Text

[Cleveland vs. Indianapolis 4/26/1889] Glasscock's error was excusable, as the ball made a very ugly bound just in front of him.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a purported balk move

Date Saturday, April 27, 1889
Text

[Chicago vs. Pittsburgh 4/26/1889] At the commencement Anson began to draw Galvin's attention to a “balk” that Jimmy was making n shrugging his shoulders. Jeems pitched on unheedless of the Chicago Captain's remarks...

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

playing points

Date Sunday, April 28, 1889
Text

This is the way Comiskey sizes up a winning ball club: “There is little difference in the actual playing strength of teams nowadays. Nearly all professional ball players can catch a ball when it is thrown to them, and he is a poor one, incd3eed, who cannot make a safe hit once in a while. When I size up a team I do not look at the players' batting or fielding records. A winning team is made up of men who will 'turn tricks' when they see a chance—men who study points, and work every advantage to win. All is fair in love and war, and the same may be said of baseball.

Source ” Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

deeking a runner at second

Date Sunday, April 28, 1889
Text

The Harvard base-ball men have hatched up a trick which they claim will catch nearly every opponent who is lucky enough to steal second base. The player who has succeeded in reaching second base, on seeing that baseman step back to his usual position, about ten feet back of the base line, steals several feet down the path toward third. When he is about in front of shortstop that player makes a dash toward second base, which causes the runner to dart in that direction also; but the shortstop's run is only a feint, and the runner, on seeing the shortstop stop, also stops before reaching second, and the pitcher throws the ball to the second baseman, who is on base, and whom the runner has entirely forgotten, and the runner is out.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

kangaroo court?

Date Sunday, April 28, 1889
Text

It has now come to that point where something must be done [with regard to the Brooklyns]. Why not try the same plan that the New York team did last season? Each man that did not play was considered one of a committee to criticise the work of the team on the field, not in order to find fault, but merely in a friendly way. The shortcomings of the men could then be talked over before the next game, and an effort could then be made to improve the play. This could be tried, and in case it was not a success it could do no harm.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Australian rules football

Date Sunday, April 28, 1889
Text

[See NYS 4/28/1889 for a description of , as reported by the Spalding tourists.]

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the undesirability of the St. George grounds

Date Sunday, April 28, 1889
Text

The New York Club will have to play on Staten Island this year, and it is going to make a big decrease in the receipts. I cannot imagine a more undesirable spot to play ball on that this place. In the Spring and Fall it is too cold for comfort and in mid-Summer the players will have to devote more time to killing mosquitoes than playing ball.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Bobby Mathews coaching

Date Sunday, April 28, 1889
Text

Bobby Matthews is coaching the Lebanon Club.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the whole team comes in to kick

Date Monday, April 29, 1889
Text

[Cincinnati vs. St. Louis 4/28/1889] After bunting four fair balls foul, Latham obtained his base, but was almost caught napping by Duryea. This little incident showed that the “Nadjys” [i.e the Reds] were ripe for arguments, for at eery close decision the whole team came in from the field. St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

warm up throws by a relief pitcher

Date Tuesday, April 30, 1889
Text

[Chicago vs. Indianapolis 4/29/1889] Beginning the tenth inning Anson relieved Krock and put in Dwyer, who was on the card as tenth man. Before he would let him go into the box he told him to limber up his arm. Glasscock demanded that the game should not be delayed. Barnum commanded Dwyer to play ball. Anson told Dwyer to go ahead. Dwyer continued throwing the ball to Burns [third baseman], and Barnum rushed into the diamond to fine him. Anson said: “Hold on; that man has got to have practice. It would be dangerous to go in there and pitch without a little exercise. You can’t stop him either. You have no right to. There is no rule that I know of which empowers you to stop him. If I delay the game over five minutes you can declare it forfeited; that’s all you can do.” Barnum argued the point with Anson, and the crowd yelled “Fine him.” Glasscock got a chance to hit the ball and knocked it away from Dwyer. Flint threw it back and Glasscock again knocked it away. At this juncture Barnum declared that he would fine Dwyer $10 a ball for every ball he would throw if he continued. Dwyer then got into the box. Anson in backing up to first called to Dwyer to “throw it here,” which was done a couple of times before Anson reached his position. The crowd yelled frantically, and Barnum shouted, “Here, Dwyer,” at the top of his voice. Then Dwyer began pitching to the batsman. After the game Anson said: “I didn’t know of any rule against what I did, and was willing to take a chance that I was right.” Barnum said: “It was one of those cases not covered by the rules, and I couldn’t do anything. But I had fully made up my mind to fine Dwyer $10 a ball and see if the fine would not stand if he didn’t mind me.

Source ” Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire moves behind the pitcher

Date Tuesday, April 30, 1889
Text

Barnum goes behind the pitcher as soon as two balls or three strikes [sic] have been called called, and remains there while men are on bases.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ball ball off a telegraph pole

Date Tuesday, April 30, 1889
Text

[Chicago vs. Indianapolis 4/29/1889] McGeachy came near securing a home run in the first inning. He sent a ball high to right, and it struck near the top of a telegraph pole, rising next to the inside of the fence, and bounded back into the grounds.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Bastian unhappy with his classification

Date Tuesday, April 30, 1889
Text

Charley Bastian is still in this city [Philadelphia], all reports to the contrary notwithstanding. Said he today: “I have heard nothing more from Nick Young and I have not been near the Philadelphia club people. I will call and see some of them pretty soon, however, for I am about ready to play ball. But I won't sign with the Chicago club at my classification figures. I am in Class D (salary $1,750) because I can't bat, I am told. I will show them that I can bat, now that the powder is out of my eye. I don't think there is any justice in the classification system.

Source ” Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Comiskey on the use of trickery

Date Wednesday, May 1, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Comiskey by an unidentified Western reporter] Nearly all professional ball players can catch a ball when it is thrown to them, and he is a por one indeed who cannot get a safe hit once in a while. When I size up a team I do not look at the players' batting or fielding records. A winning team is made up of players who will 'turn trucks' when they see a chance—men who study points and work every advantage to win. All is fair in love and in war, and the same may be said of base ball. It is all right for a player to acquire the reputation of being a gentleman both on and off the field, but you can bet that when he stands ace-high with him opponents he is not giving his club much service. I go on a field to win a game of ball by any hook or crook. It is the game we are after, not reputations as society dudes. Now, understand me, I do not indorse leg-breakers, brutes and ruffians, who expect to win by injuring some one or indulging in profanity. There is nothing in such treatment. The St. Louis team never yet sent any players to the hospital. I do not indorse men of that kind. I instruct my men, however, to turn a trick every time they get a chance. I think that is part of the business. It is not so much in taking advantage of your opponents as it is in getting away with it.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Ward signs

Date Wednesday, May 1, 1889
Text

[from George Stackhouse's column] at the same salary he received last year--$4200.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Sunday games, liquor sales in the League

Date Wednesday, May 1, 1889
Text

The League baby of Cleveland has this spring violated the League constitution by playing a Sunday game, a violation which involved forfeiture of League membership. It is not, however, likely to be severely, if at all, disciplined in view of the fact that the new York Club did the same thing last season and has besides for years openly and brazenly defied the League law relative to selling liquor by running a bar in full blast under the grand stand at the Polo Grounds. If the League could afford to wink at and condone such a flagrant violation of an important League law it will hardly strain much at a mere Sunday exhibition game.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

implementation of the Brush plan

Date Wednesday, May 1, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] The classification system has been generally accepted by the League players, and in spite of the unfavorable comment upon it by certain star players the records at League headquarters will show that out of a list of over seventy men who have been classified by President Young not over five of that number have objected to the rating given them. Wise, O'Day, Farrar and many others have declared their intention to work themselves up to class A during the present season. If all of the graded League players go into the championship contest with that ambition and live up to it, this will be one of the greatest seasons in the history of the National League.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

admission in Washington

Date Wednesday, May 1, 1889
Text

The Washington Club has failed in its effort to gain the consent of the League to a reduction of the admission from fifty to thirty-five cents and the price will remain the same as last season.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a history of the original Polo Grounds

Date Wednesday, May 1, 1889
Text

[from Chadwick's column] So it is good-bye to the Polo Grounds after all. And thereby hangs a tale. The plot of ground bounded by One Hundred and Tenth and One Hundred and Twelfth streets and Fifth and Sixth avenue in this city was enclosed by the Westchester Polo Club in 1879. This club was composed of a choice lot of wealthy representatives of the upper ten—the exclusive “four hundred” were not in existence then—who made a specialty of that very costly sport, polo. They had flourished at Jerome Park, and had created such a stir among New York's fashionable circles that they became ambitious of having a club ground of their own; and so they leased the ground above referred to and it became known as the Westchester Polo Club's grounds and eventually the Polo Grounds. The club opened the grounds in style with a band of music and a crowd of fashionables, with lots of tally-ho coaches and carriages with liveried servants, etc. all in English style, “don't yer know.” As long as the entertainment was free it was crowded by the invited guests, but when half a dollar entrance fee was charged the attendance fell off. In fact, the enterprise as an investment became a pecuniary failure and the club found the grounds an elephant on their hands. Just at this time the Metropolitan Club—a gate-money professional organization which Mr. Day established with his money in September, 1880, and made James Mutrie its manager—finding that it was not profitable to play any more on the old Union grounds, induced the Westchester Polo Club to allow them to use their field on off days, when Polo was not played, and this being agreed to—the Polo people being glad to have a part of their rent paid in this way—the Metropolitan Club began its New York season there on September 15, 1880, and they played their first regular match at the Polo Grounds, on Sept. 29, they having the Nationals as opponents, and they defeated them 4 to 2. the Mets had previously played on the old Union grounds, beginning there on Sept. 15, when they played the Union nine—a picked gate-money team. During their first fall campaign at the Polo Grounds, they played twelve games, of which they won five, including victories over the Chicago, Worcester, Troy, and Cleveland nines, two of their defeats there being at the hands of the Chicago team. [continuing on through 1882]

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a doubleheader due to a rain delay

Date Wednesday, May 1, 1889
Text

[Baltimore vs. Brooklyn 4/30/1889] There was something like 3,795 spectators at the morning game between the Brooklyn and Baltimore clubs at Washington Park yesterday, the game was the one prevented by the bad condition of the grounds at Ridgewood on Sunday.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a celebratory riot following a victory

Date Wednesday, May 1, 1889
Text

[Boston vs. Philadelphia 4/30/1889] Over 12,000 persons saw the Philadelphia Club defeat the Boston yesterday, and those who witnessed the game are not likely to soon forget the occasion. The overflow from the seats took possession of the field, lining the fence from three to six deep all the way round. On the left field terrace the crowd was about twenty deep. It was an enthusiastic assemblage from the start, but good order was preserved until the game was ended, when a wild scene of excitement ensued. Fogarty's catch of the last hit from big Dan Brouthers' bat, which ended the contest, was the signal for a great shout, and in an instant the field was covered with men and boys. They swarmed up to the pavilion in hot pursuit of the retiring ball players, howling and cheering. They occupants of the pavilion began throwing cushions, and those on the field were not slow in returning the compliment. The friendly fight waxed hotter and hotter, and many a hat came to grief. The battle was waxing furious, when Harry Wright rushed to the rescue. Single-handed he advanced on the tumultuous throng, expostulating by word and hand, and admonishing the men and boys to cease their wanton destruction of property. But it was like talking to a whirlwind. To the on-lookers the strangest part of the conflict was that Manager Wright's tall beaver hat escaped injury. It was in the thickest of the fray, and at times the air seemed black with cushions around it, but the hat came out unscathed.

Source Philadelphia Record
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

manager, not captain, sets the lineup

Date Wednesday, May 1, 1889
Text

[Chicago vs. Indianapolis 4/30/1889] On account of his indifferent work with the stick in the past few games, Manager Bancroft placed Hines down in the batting order and put Glasscock at the top. Indianapolis Journal May 1, 1889 [N.B. Glasscock was the team captain.]

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

balls hit into the crowd; block ball

Date Thursday, May 2, 1889
Text

[Brooklyn vs. Baltimore 5/1/1889] The rule allowing but two bases for a ball hit past the crowd in the outfield is a good one. Its working yesterday appeared to be rather rough on two of the batsmen, as it robbed Foutz of the credit of a clean home run from the beautiful line hit to right center, and also Sommers of another good hit to left center, which would have given him third base easily, both hits, too, brining in a run for each side which were lost under the rule. But it was as fair for one side as the other. Had Foutz’s hit been made by a Baltimore batsman there would have been no parting of the crowd to let the ball go by, as there was in Foutz’s case. Mr. Holland was quite right in his decision, and the kick against it was unjust. The rule where there is a crowd encircling the outfield should be two bases for a hit which sends the ball past the crowd’s line, no matter whether the crowd left their position or remained there.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

taking an extra base a “steal”

Date Friday, May 3, 1889
Text

[Athletic vs. Brooklyn 5/2/1889] ...O’Brien hit a beautiful bounder to left field... The Collins forwarded O’Brien by a sacrifice, and on Burns’ telling bounder to right field, which sent O’Brien to third easily, the latter ran in, he seeing that Purcell did not handle the ball quick enough for a throw home. It was, in fact, a steal home, O’Brien being quick to take advantage of plays of this kind. Brooklyn Eagle May 3, 1889

a player delegated to call foul balls when umpire behind the pitcher

[Chicago vs. Cleveland 5/3/1889] In the first inning, with Duffy at the plate and Ryan on first [both Chicago players], Barnum, who was behind the pitcher, asked Anson to watch fouls. The Captain took a positition near the batsman and the crowd on the left bleaching boards began shouting: “Get out o'that.” “Sit down.” “See where he is.” The Captain turned round and said: “Gentlemen, I'm put here to watch fouls.” Then they cheered him. When he led off in the second inning he was cheered from every stand. Chicago Tribune May 4, 1889

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the advantage of batting second

Date Saturday, May 4, 1889
Text

Despite the fact that Manager McGunnigle is in favor of placing the opposing team first at the bat in every game he allows his men to overrule him on this point and to still keep in the old rut of having “the first crack at the new ball.” What possible advantage there is in this rule is as much at command of the side last at the bat in the first inning as it is for those who go in first; but under the rule of using two new balls neither party have any advantage. Granting, however, that the rule does work the way the rutty ball captains claim it does, it does not compare with the far more important advantage of being last at the bat, thereby having the benefit of an opportunity for a winning rally. In the large majority of games thus far played in the championship arena this season the teams last at the bat have won. It is a blunder beyond question to give an opposing team the chance for such a rally...

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an early wind-up delivery?

Date Sunday, May 5, 1889
Text

Cunningham, Baltimore's clever little pitcher still does the “wind-the-clock-act” while delivering the ball when none of the bases are occupied.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the effectiveness of four balls for a base on balls

Date Sunday, May 5, 1889
Text

The four balls-three strikes rule has come pretty nearly depopulating the strike-out department in the scores and has increased the batting appreciably. Judging from the few games played so far this season it would seem that the desired object has been attained.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a block ball 4

Date Sunday, May 5, 1889
Text

In the second inning Purcell hit over O’Brien’s head for two bases, and as the ball was blocked by the crowd he took third on the hit.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a failed game due to a large crowd; clearing the field

Date Monday, May 6, 1889
Text

[Athletic vs. Brooklyn May 5, 1889] The fine weather of yesterday was almost perfect for ball playing, and the fact that the Brooklyn and Athletic Clubs were to play at Ridgewood brought out 18,000 base ball enthusiasts to see the game. Hours before the game they began to come. The early comers had no more than selected their choice seats before a crowd of fully five thousand persons was outside the gates clamoring for admission. From 2:30 o'clock to 3:30 o'clock there was a solid mass of people reaching from the gates of the ball grounds along the Manhattan Beach Railroad to Myrtle avenue, a distance of probably half a mile. Near the gates this treat line was broken up into a number of small lines. For the greater portion of the time it was a go-as-you-please, and every man for himself. The one or two constables who tried to make order out of the confusion might just as well have tried to stop the tides.

A thousand or more persons were jammed into the little space leading to the admission gates, and the outside thousands pushing on them prevented their being able to move at times. When the game began, the seats had all been taken, and with one exception there was no place to stand. The picket fences on each side of the ground had a mass of spectators both outside and in, and the only place left unfilled was the space directly back of the field. This space, however, was filling up fast, and as hundreds packed themselves on that part of the field every minute, it became too small to hold them. The crowd then began to push forward. The great high fences surrounding the grounds bore a solid row of men, and the only thing that those on the field could do was to push forward.

Every few minutes there would be a break in the lines and a general move forward. This continued until the Athletics had finished their fifth inning and the Brooklyns were at the bat for their half of the fifth. The crowd by this time had encroached upon the territory of the outfielders. Left-fielder Stovey of the Athletics called Umpire Holland's attention to the fact, and asked to have the ground cleared. Holland requested the manager of the Brooklyn Club to see that the spectators were moved back. President Byrne, Umpire Holland, and several of the Brooklyn and Athletic players tried to assist the four lone constables in clearing the field. They failed in doing so. Those on the front of the crowd could not get back, and those on the back would not.

Then began one of the finest scenes ever presented on a ball field. The attempt to get the right field side of the crowd back resulted in a break in the centre, and a thousand men moved forward a few steps and then wheeled to the right in a solid body and completely surrounded the men and players who were trying to put the crowd back. For a moment the left field crowd remained on a grassy incline. Then one man in the front jumped up and started across for the right field. This was a signal for another break, and two thousand men reinforced the the right field crowd. The attempt to clear the ground was then given up, and with one grand rush five thousand spectators rushed down upon the diamond, and in a minute the whole ball field was a mass of human beings.

Ball playing was now out of the question, and Umpire Holland called the game back to the even fifth inning, and the players all went home. It is quite likely that this contest will be heard from again, and it may prove no end of trouble for both sides. President Byrne says that Stovey and Larkin incited the crowd to move forward on the field. This may be so, but the players deny it. Mr. Byrne also said that the actions of these two men caused the breaking up of the game, and that he would refuse to pay the managers the usual 20 per cent. due them as the visiting club. On the other hand, the Athletic managers insist that as the Brooklyn managers had failed to provide a sufficient number of police with which to keep the field clear, they should be awarded the game. They say that the umpire should have demanded that the field be cleared in a specified time, as called for in the rules, and if this was not done they should have been awarded the game by 9 to 0...

When asked whether it was true that Stovey and Larkin had made any move toward inciting the crowd to break in on the field, they said that it was nonsense and that the circumstances of the case showed that they had nothing to gain by such a move. They had just a lead in the game but the inning had not been finished by the Brooklyn Club, so that any attempt to to break up the game would have done them no good as far as winning was concerned.

It is certain that they w ill make a fight to have the game awarded them and the money also. If they don't get the money it is not quite plain who will get it unless it goes to the Brooklyn Club it certainly would not be fair for the home club to have it, either, because it was by their failure to have sufficient police to keep back the crowds that the game was not finished.

A walk among the crowd while the diamond was still overrun showed quite plainly the cause of the game being broken up. The great crowd seemed to have made up its mind to get even with Stovey for his kicking in days gone by, and determined that he and his team should not win this game. New York Sun May 6, 1889

The Brooklyn team now went to the bat and Burns opened with a hit to Fennelly, who threw him out. At this juncture a movement of the crowd in on the right center field, back of where Welch was standing, was noticed, and while Foutz was at the bat the umpire called time and notified the Brooklyn officials that the field must be cleared. The ground officers went down to induce the crowd to stand bac, while Stovey and Welch–as dozens of men were ready to testify–told the crowd they could move in if they liked, and they did so, and soon the Athletic players, who had gathered back of second base in a bunch, were surrounded, and it became impossible to place the crowd back in their former position. Umpire Holland , seeing that the ground officials and Mr. Byrne had done their best to clear the field, and also that there was no possibility of having the contest resumed, called the game back to the last even five innings played, which left the game a draw, 1 to 1. ... Under the circumstances no claim of forfeit will hold good, especially in view of the fact that Stovey and Welch encouraged the crowd to break in. They were in a hurry to close the game, so as to catch the train, and they knew that if the crowd broke in it would likely end in a forfeit. That it was their game because of the lead they had secured was a nonsensical claim. Brooklyn Eagle May 6, 1889 [The game was in fact forfeited to the Athletics.]

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an amateur umpire is given a beating

Date Tuesday, May 7, 1889
Text

A game of ball was played at Winfield, L.I., on Sunday between the Athletics of Long Island City and the Excelsiors of Winfield. The Athletics won. The defeated club took exception to the rulings of the umpire, Robert Doyle, and as he was about leaving the grounds one of the Excelsior Club players struck him over the head with a base ball bat, knocking him down. Before his friends could interfere the rest of the defeated club joined in beating him. He attempted to defend himself and during the fight was stabbed below the left eye and through the right hand. The Athletics finally succeeded in driving his assailants away. Doyle was picked up and hurried off. The refractory members of the Excelsior Club waited for him at the depot thinking he would take the train from there to Long Island City. His friends took him home in another direction. He is seriously hurt.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the comparative strength of the League and the Association

Date Tuesday, May 7, 1889
Text

The Clevelands are making a much better showing in the League than they did in the Association, and yet some people would have us believe that the League puts up a much better game than the Association.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Thomas Fitzgerald the son of an Irish revolutionary

Date Tuesday, May 7, 1889
Text

[reporting Thomas Fitzgerald on an extended visit to Europe] The Colonel has just visited the ducal house, whose family name he bears, and his father, Gerald Fitzgerald, stood bravely by the side of the unfortunate Lord Edward Fitzgerald in 1798.

The elder Fitzgerald escaped the fate of his associates, and fled to the United States. He settled in the city of New York, where his eldest son was born, when the century was very young indeed.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Brotherhood grievances

Date Wednesday, May 8, 1889
Text

Events have so shaped themselves during the past month that makes it very probable that the League will have considerable difficulty with players during the coming season. The classification rule passed last winter, instead of allaying the discontent, was regarded by the men as a move on the part of the League to break faith with them, and take advantage of their leader's absence. The manner in which the New York Club has treated several of its players is another cause for dissatisfaction, and since Ward's return several secret conferences have been held by the Brotherhood for the purpose of formulating a programme for action.

The action of the Chicago Club, in releasing players at a late day without previous warning, after taking them around the world, and then making them continue the trip in this country in order to make what they could out of it, is severely condemned by members of the Brotherhood. If Spalding had released them as soon as he landed, it would not have been thought so much of, but to give them an absolute release at the end of the tour contributed in a great measure to precipitate the present proceedings of the Brotherhood.

It is known that the members of the different clubs have held several conferences within the past few days, and at a meeting of the New York and Boston members in New York on Thursday a plan of action was laid out and will be submitted to the other chapters. It is probable that the Washington and Philadelphia members have talked over the proposed plan, but if so they are very secretive in reference to what it is. They will not discuss the matter for publication, but it is evident that the Brotherhood feels itself in a position capable of demanding of the League an explanation of several instances of alleged bad faith on its part. They are taking the bull by the horns, and instead of waiting until the season is over, and their services are not needed until the following summer, they propose to make their demands and carry them through at this time, when it would be practically useless for the League to attempt to fill their places.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

effects of the minor league reserve

Date Wednesday, May 8, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] One result of minor league reservation is that the young blood craze has been effectually checked in the National League at least, and with the exception of Cleveland and Philadelphia none of the League clubs will present many new faces. To stock clubs with youngsters, who, though men of fame in minor leagues are at best but experiments in the faster major league class, now entails greater expense than even big clubs can afford to indulge in, as all minor league young blood now commands a price. And all things considered this state of affairs is a good thing for the old players and the new, and the clubs as well, as the former are more certain of their positions, the youngsters are less liable to be shuffled around from town to town and clubs are saved the expense of generally wasteful and useless experimenting.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring sacrifice hits 7

Date Wednesday, May 8, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] Scorers everywhere are neglecting to record sacrifice hits. The rules call for the scoring of such hits and the rules should be followed, despite individual opinion as to their value. Only self-opinionated or incompetent scorers will furnish incomplete scores, as without sacrifice hits, which go to make up official records, no score is complete. Eliminate the particularization of the errors and such other nonsense and score the sacrifice hits, and the scores will be just as compact and far more valuable for analysis and reference.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no screen at the Staten Island grounds

Date Wednesday, May 8, 1889
Text

Staten Island's grand stand has no wire screen, which makes foul balls dangerous for ladies.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

foul tip double plays

Date Wednesday, May 8, 1889
Text

The abolishment of the foul tip helps not only batting, but also base-running. A runner can now make a break or play off base without that former constant fear of a sudden foul tip or double play.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reporter for the Chicago Tribune

Date Wednesday, May 8, 1889
Text

Harry Palmer, The Sporting Life's Chicago correspondent and special commissioner upon the recent Spalding tour of the world, has accepted the position of base ball editor of the Chicago Tribune. Tom Gallagher, who, as sporting editor of the paper, has looked after base ball as well as the other branches of sport in the Tribune's columns, will in future look after the turf column of the paper exclusively, while Mr. Palmer will handle the base ball news exclusively. He will accompany the Chicago team upon its trips to other League cities and will in fact write up every championship game played by Anson's gentlemen from this time forth.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Bobby Mathews coaching semi-pro

Date Wednesday, May 8, 1889
Text

Bob Mathews is coaching two railroad ball teams at Lebanon, Pa.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

New York Club attendance

Date Wednesday, May 8, 1889
Text

The Giants have made a start in their new home at St. George, and considering the strong attraction offered by the magnificent Centennial procession,s have done fairly well in the way of attendance. The three games played on Centennial days, drew 9181 spectators. There was a steady increase each day, as the figures 2795, 2967 and 3419 show. This would indicate an attendance for the season at Staten Island of 200,000, about 80,000 less than the number that visited the Polo Grounds last year. The Sporting Life May 8, 1889

[from W. I. Harris's column] There is no doubt that the New York Club's tenancy of the ST. George grounds will, in any event, end with the present season. The Chicago series satisfied me of that. There was 2585 people at the first game, but the weather was bad. There were 1926 at the second game; weather fair. Friday was a base ball day—as perfect as it is possible to get—yet only 2009 people were in attendance. This afternoon was also a good day. Being Saturday, the attendance was about doubled, say 3500. say 10,000 people for the four games, and the Chicago Club is one of the greatest attractions we have. This is just about one-half of what the four games would have drawn if played somewhere up town. It is obvious, therefore, that the New York Club will get out of Staten Island as soon as it is possible for them to do so. The Sporting Life May 29, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a critique of sacrifice hitting

Date Wednesday, May 8, 1889
Text

[from Ren Mulford's column] The sacrifice hit craze has had its day. In their places sacrifice hits are all right, but to begin in the first inning to try to “go out,” in order to send a runner forward a base, seems absolute folly without an excuse for its practice. The element of uncertainty and possibility in a game of ball is so great that it appears to be bad policy to send a man to absolute destruction. Just in illustration and I'm done. In the last St. Louis game here Nicol led off in the first inning with a hit and stole second. Then McPhee, instead of trying to hit the ball safely was ordered to sacrifice, and he did. Nicol gained third on his out, but Reilly's attempt to sacrifice resulted in a bunted fly to Comiskey, and Carpenter sent Boyle a foul. With the auspicious opening not a semblance of a tally was made. McPhee certainly had a chance to make a hit which would have sent Nicol home, but under this new craze he was allowed to be offered up as a sacrifice—a dead sure out exchanged for a chance for a possible hit, a tally and another runner on base! Was the advancement of Nicol one base worth the loss of all those other chances? I say not.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

exaggerated attendance figures

Date Wednesday, May 8, 1889
Text

President Byrne, in speaking of the exaggeration indulged in by the Philadelphians about the crowds at their grounds, says of the large attendance the Brooklyns had in one game there: “There was an exceptionally large crowd on the Athletics’ ground in our game. Ropes were stretched all around the field and we were compelled to make special ground rules. There was a gib crowd there, and the lowest number I have heard estimated is 12,000, and I am informed that the Athletic management gave out 15,000 as the figure. As a matter of fact there were about 10,000 people on the ground. This much I am certain of, and that is that the Brooklyn Club was paid for 9.935 admissions at the three gates. It is these false reports about the sizes of crowds,” continued Mr. Byrne, “that sets the ball players crazy and makes the jump up in salaries. Now, over in Brooklyn we never lie about our crowds. There are the turnstiles, and the exact number of persons passing through them are given to the press and the public. That is what the turnstiles are for.

Source ” Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

placement of the umpire

Date Wednesday, May 8, 1889
Text

A St. Louis exchange says that “Umpire Lynch positively refuses to go behind the pitcher when man are on bases, and insists on umpiring from behind the plate. This is contrary to the written law. Other umpires follow the rules in this respect.” It is entirely optional with the umpire. The rules say not a word on the subject of his umpiring from behind the pitcher or behind the bat. The former is the safest and likely, therefore, to be the most correct as regards judging the ball.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoreboard on a string?

Date Thursday, May 9, 1889
Text

[New York vs. Boston 5/8/1889] For nine innings the champions swung their bats and strained their eyes trying to see the home plate around the remaining three corners of the diamond, but they were doomed to disappointment, and saw the scorer hang up goose eggs until he had nine of them on the string.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Keefe wins his hold out

Date Sunday, May 12, 1889
Text

The signing of Keefe was a necessity on the part of the New York Club. They held out as long as they could, almost too long, before they gave in. Had the other pitchers of the club remained in condition it is quite likely that Keefe would not have been signed yet. The giving out of the young pitchers settled the question, and President Day was not long in making up his mind in saying so. He found that one Keefe was better than two colts who were not in condition one-half the time. The knowing ones knew from the start that it was only a question of time before the New York Club would sign Keefe.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a partial implementation of the two umpire system

Date Sunday, May 12, 1889
Text

[from Charles Foley's column] By ordering McQuade and Curry to umpire the Boston-New York series in Jersey City, Nick Young has declared himself in favor of the double umpire system in all important games. This is as it should be, for it is only a matter of time when the League and Association will adopt the system. There is only one reason why the League people are opposed to double umpiring, and that is the expense incurred. We need the double umpire system more than ever before, because there is more batting under the new rules; because there are more men than ever taking their bases on balls; and the more the bases are occupied, the more arduous becomes the umpire's task.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

dirty play

Date Sunday, May 12, 1889
Text

President Byrne, of the Brooklyns, will encourage his team in rough playing every time an opposing team begins such tactics. He says he does not intend to have his men injured without doing anything to prevent it, and the only way for the players to defend themselves is to fight fire with fire.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an ugly uniform

Date Sunday, May 12, 1889
Text

The modest gray shirt and trousers worn by “The Zulus” [i.e. Pittsburgh] yesterday toned down the Dime Museum style of their regulation costume a trifle, but the yellow stockings and cap still remained an eyesore to every spectator not afflicted with color blindness. Chicago Tribune May 12, 1889

mask on the base line; character of AA players; awning over players bench; destroying a catcher's mask

The following paragraph will convey a fair idea of the character of the average American Association ball-player and the degree of control exercised by the average association team manager over his players. “Quite a little excitement,” says the paragraph, “was caused in the fifth inning of last Wednesday's game between the Cincinnati and Athletic teams at Cincinnati. Duryea was on first when Holliday hit to deep left for a home run. Robinson, the catcher, took off his mask and laid it directly on the third base path, about four feet from home, and then stood on the plate. Baldwin, who was on the bench, sa the movement, and became possessed of the idea that it was an exhibition of dirty ball—that Robinson had placed the mask there so that Holliday could not slide in case of a close play. Quick as a flash Baldwin came out from under the awning, the, running up with bat in hand, hit Robinson's mask a hard blow, knocking it off the path. As soon as Robinson realized what he had done he looked around for Kid's mask. It was on the ground not far from the plate. Robinson jumped onto the mask with both feet and smashed it out of shape. It was completely collapsed. Baldwin had to use Earle's mask the rest of the game, his own being destroyed completely. Hot words followed and the audience hissed Robinson. Baldwin wanted Goldsmith to fine Robinson enough to pay for the mask. He would take no action in the matter. Robinson's trick in laying the mask on the third-base line is one originated by Jack Boyle, and by this obstruction the base-runner is prevented from sliding home unless he takes chances of being injured by the mask. Chicago Tribune May 12, 1889

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

semi-professional ball

Date Sunday, May 12, 1889
Text

In your issue of to-day [5/11] I notice an article that intimates that the McKeesport club is composed of players who are salaried men, and as this is not the case I would like if you would make a contradiction of the article, as there is only one man in our club who gets anything for his playing, and he gets $3 per game; all the rest play for nothing, except that they are to share half the profits (if there is any) at the end of the season, which sis something the other clubs also do, if there is any balance. There has been about $1,300 spent on our grounds, and as that amount will hardly be made this season, you will see that the players are really playing for nothing. Four of our players have played in minor leagues, but three of them graduated from out club, and there is no reason that some people should be jealous of our club because it has been a success so far this season. Hoping you will place us before the public in our true light, I remain, Yours very truly, Frank W. Torreyson, Mgr.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

defining a sacrifice hit; scoring; RBIs

Date Monday, May 13, 1889
Text

[quoting Chadwick from an unidentified source] ...what is a real sacrifice hit? and the answer is that it is a hit which obliges the fielder fielding the hit ball to put the runner out at first base, thereby enabling the runner on first or second to secure a base on the hit or to score a run if on third base. There are hits made to the field which result in putting the striker out on which runners on base are forwarded, which are not sacrifice hits, and should not be recorded as such; and these include hits to the infield, which but for errors of judgment in throwing to first, would have resulted in putting the runner out whom the hit had forced off, as in the case of a ball hit to short field when no man is out, or only one man, and the ball is sent to the first baseman either through lack of judgment or from the fact hat the second base was not properly covered at the time. Also in the case of a lunge hit to short outfield, which, while putting the striker out, allowed the runner to steal a base on the catch. These are not sacrifice hits, but hits no batsman should be given any form of credit for. But when a batsman, when he goes to the bat, finds a runner on a base with no one out, and one run in the game is likely to decide I, and he goes in with the effort to make a safe hit—a tap to short right field for instance—and in trying for the hit gives a chance for a throw-out from right short, he has made a creditable effort in batting—done team work, in fact—and merits a record for the effort. Also in the case of two or three men on bases, with but one man out, he tries to sent them all in by a hard hit ball to the outfield, which gives a fine outfielder a chance for a splendid catch and affords no opportunity for a long throwin [sic] to cut off a runner at the home plate, such a hit is a creditable sacrifice, and deserves records as team work at the bat.

Though the official rule governing the record of sacrifice hits is not to my liking, still I am glad to see it there, if only as an entering wedge to a scoring system which will give due credit to team workers at the bat and take off the premium now offered for record batting. What does a batsman see when he looks at a newspaper score this season? 'Two-base hits—Jones, 1; Brown, 2. Three-base hits—Robinson, 1; White, 1,' etc. Is there any record showing how many runners a batsman forwarded by clean hits, or how many runs he similarly batted in? Not a record. All the credit is given to the slugger, who reaches third base by his hits three times in a game, and neither forwards a single runner or bats in a single run.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

wire fence at Ridgewood

Date Monday, May 13, 1889
Text

But few improvements will be made on the ball grounds at Ridgewood this season, other than to put up a wire fence around the outfield to keep the crowd off the diamond. Manager Wallace says that only a part of the ball ground belongs to the Ridgewood Exhibition Company, and that the lease for that part which does not belong to them will run out next season. In case it can be renewed, then the grounds will be reconstructed. The grand stand will be moved to the other side of the field, and the whole ground surrounded with free seats.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Hatfield's delivery

Date Tuesday, May 14, 1889
Text

Hatfield has a very peculiar delivery. It is of the same style that characterizes that of Chamberlain of St. Louis and Weyhing of the Athletics. He brings his arm far back behind him, and after a kind of hang lets the ball fly. He has considerable speed and remarkably good command for one not a regular pitcher., quoting the Boston Herald

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

baseball, bat sales and manufacture

Date Tuesday, May 14, 1889
Text

“The number of base-balls used in this country must be something enormous,” said a dealer in the popular spheres yesterday. “Since the 1 st of April we have sold more than 150 gross, or 21,600 balls of various sizes and makes. Of course, this is all a jobbing trade, but the balls have been sold within thirty miles of Troy. It is a small estimate when I say that in the city of Troy, between May 1 and Ot. 1, more than 60,000 balls are used up every year, while in the country supplies by Troy three times as many are sold. The balls run in price from 5 cents to $1.50; the former are merely lumps of leather soaked in water and pressed by machinery into shape. The latter are carefully built from the very start, and represent the acme of ball-9making. They are used by the professional ball-players and by many of the amateur leagues in the field. The best bat is known as the 'wagon-tongue' bat. The makes say that they send out agents and buy up all the wagon tongues that have been worn out or broken during the year. The tongues are turned into bats, and the seasoned ash, hardened by use, makes the best bat known. Last year we sold out or stock of wagon-tongue bats in the middle of the season. We could not replenish the stock for love or money, and the bat-makers told us the above story and added that they had used up all the old wagon-tongues they could find., quoting the Troy Times

Source ” Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

inconvenience of getting to the Staten Island grounds

Date Wednesday, May 15, 1889
Text

[from J. F. Donnolly's column] The truth about St. George is that unless a man means to take a day and a night off, there is little use of him going there. The brokers and office men who in year's past have simply skipped from their places of business into an elevated train, and were whirled uptown and almost dumped at the gates of the ball ground, and then after the game found themselves within easy distance of home and dinner, will not take kindly to Wyman's [sic: should be Wiman] resort on the bay. To reach there means a walk or a short ride to the ferry, then a half-hour's sail at the very least across the bay, and then a nine-inning battle with the mosquitoes. And then coming home—there's the rub, indeed. For nine-tenths of the patrons of the Giants it means a return journey in a overpacked ferry boat, a long ride up town home and dinner somewhere about eight o'clock. How many times a week will a man risk that? Then again, if a man misses a boat going to the game it means the loss of probably an inning or two. There is very little figuring required to get at the bottom of the present difficulty. The Sporting Life May 15, 1889

It is an ill wind that blows nobody good, and therefore the Brooklyn Club is benefited directly by the New Yorks' loss, as many New Yorkers prefer going to the Brooklyn games to taking the long ride to Staten Island. The Sporting Life May 15, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an endorsement of the two umpire system

Date Wednesday, May 15, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] Only a spirit of cheese-paring economy in this one direction has hitherto prevented the adoption of the double umpire system, and this spirit must ultimately yield to pressure of public opinion, even if the reform be not quickened by some deplorable occurrence. Give us double umpires for all championship games, for it is more than ever needed this season, because under the new rules there is more batting and more bases on balls, thus keeping the bases occupied very much oftener and adding correspondingly to the number of decisions and to the great labor of the umpire's never easy task.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

official attendance record

Date Wednesday, May 15, 1889
Text

Secretary Young's official League score blanks contain in the summary, besides the usual items, “attendance” and “umpire hit by thrown ball.” The second item was suggested by Secretary Hawley, of Cleveland.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Young does not credit earned runs on bases on balls

Date Wednesday, May 15, 1889
Text

[from R. M. Larner's column] Many of the official and unofficial scorers are laboring under the impression that a base on balls is a factor in securing an earned run. The President of the League decided otherwise, although he admits that there is no specific mention of the fact in the proceedings of the League meetings of 1888-89. I had quite a long talk with Mr. Young on this point, and he states that when a base on balls was credited as a base hit, it was necessary that a base on balls should be given in an earned run. By abolishing the base-on-balls-a-hit rule, it was generally understood by the playing rules committee that a base on balls figured no longer as a factor in an earned run. The Sporting Life May 15, 1889 [N.B. The rules don't support Young's interpretation.]

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitching rotation 8

Date Friday, May 17, 1889
Text

[Cleveland vs. New York 5/16/1889] Manager Loftus continued his plan of putting in his pitchers in turn. It was Gruber's day, and he went in and did his work like a veteran.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the condition of the St. George grounds field; Staten Island

Date Friday, May 17, 1889
Text

The club has decided to allow the boarded outfield to remain, also the skin diamond. The infield is very rough at present and when the clayey surface becomes baked by the sun it will be a hard field to play ball on. There is nothing like turf. Mr. Wiman is ready to make the field perfect if the club would stay, but it is not worth his while for a single season. The club’s team will not win the pennant on the ground as it is.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

critique of the player substitution rule

Date Sunday, May 19, 1889
Text

Manager Loftus does not think much of the rule which allows a new pitcher to be brought in at the end of an even inning. His opinion is worth something in these days. He thinks that the way to bring on new men is to put plenty of responsibility on them and not build up quitting notions. In very few games this season will the Cleveland pitchers be changed.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Keefe signs without Brush plan classification

Date Sunday, May 19, 1889
Text

Nearly a month and a half of the base ball season has gone by, and, for about five months' work, Tim Keefe will receive $4,500, which is $500 less than he originally held out for. John B. Day said, before knuckling down to Keefe: “Time wanted $5,000 for the season, then he was willing to compromise and sign for $4,500.

Source ” The Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire calls “not out”

Date Sunday, May 19, 1889
Text

[Chicago vs. Washington 5/18/1889] Anson waxes wroth in the ninth when Hoy hit a grounder just off first and Barnum permitted the base runner to hold the base on Anson's error. Pfeffer and Gumbert were both at the bag, but Anson wanted the put-out himself, and so, holding the ball, he did a foot-race with Hoy for the bag. The deaf one took first money and Anson turned three shades of red when the umpire said “Not out.

Source ” Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring assists 2

Date Monday, May 20, 1889
Text

The score of Saturday’s game sent from St. Louis was made out in violation of the new scoring rules, which throw out all assistances for strikes from the assistance column, which can now only contain the record of fielding assistances. Terry is credited with ten assistances, eight of which were on strikes, and Chamberlain with seven, of which five were from strikes.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

riot and revelry of Sunday baseball

Date Monday, May 20, 1889
Text

[reporting a meeting of the Sunday Observance Association of Kings County] Very careful attention has been given to the subject of Sunday base ball games. No regular games of base ball are played in Kings County on Sunday, but at Ridgewood Park, just over the line, in Queens County, games are played regularly. However, all the demoralizing effects and influences of this fact are visited upon our people as well. The law and order societies of Queens county and the New York Sabbath Committee joined forces with this association and visited the law officers of that county. Some redress was promised but none has as yet come. Sunday, in the neighborhood of Ridgewood Park, has become a day of riot and revelry. The persistence with which the local base ball club managers continue to defy the laws of the State, public sentiment and the moral and religious rights of the people, and interests of the community, reflects great discredit upon them. The neglect of the officials of Queens County to arrest these law breakers and punish them ought to be sufficient to rouse the law and order elements of that county to support only such candidates for district attorney and sheriff as will stamp out this defiance of law. Efforts will be made to rouse such public sentiment in that direction. Public meetings will be held throughout that county on this subject. ... While expressing no opinion upon base ball as a sport, we desire in all candor to ask the patrons of this sport in this city whether they should continue their patronage of a club the managers of which so wantonly and openly continue to knowingly violate the laws of the commonwealth. Your patronage of the sport on week days the managers doubtless consider an indorsement of the general management of club interests. Those who believe in maintaining Sunday and have respect for law should refuse their patronage to the local club until the management rectify this public abuse. Brooklyn Eagle May 20, 1889

By the way, the Mail and Express recently stated that “Sunday in the neighborhood of Ridgewood Park has become a day of riot and revelry.” There never was a greater falsehood uttered by that paper. During the past two seasons the immense base ball gatherings at Ridgewood Park have been as orderly as any seen either at the Polo Grounds or Washington Park. The patrons of Ridgewood know well enough that any disorder there by the crowd would cause the Brooklyn Club to stop their games there, and in self protection and to insure the continuance of their Sunday recreation in watching these contests they form themselves into a sort of committee of the whole on police and keep excellent order. Not even under the exciting conditions of the Athletic row last month at the park was there either rioting or disorder, the vast assemblage being a model one in the good humor they preserved under the circumstances. ... In its rabid partisanship the Mail and Express goes beyond the bounds of truth. Whatever may be the opinion of Sunday ball playing in general, there is neither truth nor justice in the Mail’s charge about riot and disorder, as the Brooklyn Club would not countenance it for a moment. Brooklyn Eagle June 1, 1889

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Brooklyn grandstand burns down;

Date Monday, May 20, 1889
Text

[reporting on the burning of the Brooklyn grandstand] The total loss to Messrs. C. H. Byrne & Co. is at least $18,000, upon which there is an insurance of $7,000 in the Phenix Company, of Brooklyn. ... The stand was well built and cost $17,000 i9n round numbers. It was built by D. E. Harris, of Third avenue and Third street, and was looked upon as one of the best in the country. Mr. Ebbets said that the work of rebuilding would be begun at once and that the new structure would certainly be ready for the game between the Brooklyn and St. Louis clubs on Decoration day. Brooklyn Eagle May 20, 1889

The new stand will be similar in form to the grand stand which was back of third base, and it will extend around to where the players’ bench is, thereby cutting off sight of the field from the willow tree seats. This will give the grand stand a seating capacity of $3,000. The press box will be located back of the wire screen facing the home base, and it will be only for the regular reporters and telegraph operators, other press members having seats elsewhere. There will be no private boxes or gallery seats, as before, and consequently fewer posts will be in the way of the grand stand occupants. Brooklyn Eagle May 21, 1889

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player objects to being sold

Date Monday, May 20, 1889
Text

Ed Andrews is indignant at being sold “like a slave.” He says: “If the Philadelphia management does not want my services let them give me my release. I have been to considerable expense fitting up a comfortable home and I don’t like the idea of leaving it. I like Boston and the Boston players, and if I was unencumbered I think I would rather play with the Boston Club than anywhere else, but I hate these sudden changes. Brooklyn Eagle May 20, 1889

Boston purchased Andrews' release Saturday, and Manager Hart wired Andrews to report in Boston at once. But Andrews didn't go, and it is hardly probable that he will unless the Philadelphia management agree to give him a big slice of the money they obtained for his release. Andrews is indignant at being sold. “I don't like being sold like a nigger,” said he. “If the Philadelphia management does not want my services let them give me my release outright. What have I done that I should be sold?” Chicago Tribune May 22, 1889

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Louisville Club ownership

Date Tuesday, May 21, 1889
Text

...President Davidson had again reconsidered his intention not to sell, and was anxious to dispose of the club. He owns 307 shares of stock, the par value of which is $10 each, making a total of $3,070. The price offered for the stock was just double its face value, and Mr. Davidson's price was $1,500 more. It was stated this morning that he had come down $500 in his valuation, and there was now only a difference of $1,000 between them. This may be split or compromised in some way before the club leaves.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

unreliable attendance estimates

Date Tuesday, May 21, 1889
Text

Charley Byrne is preaching against over-estimating attendance at ball games. This is a case of glass house, s there are no cities in the country where crowds are over-estimated oftener than in New York and Brooklyn. The trouble is these cities cannot bear to have Philadelphia over-top them, and that is just what it does when it comes to base ball crowds.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

disputed area of responsibility in the two umpire system

Date Wednesday, May 22, 1889
Text

To-day [5/21] a Washington crowd was permitted to see the double umpire act. Fessenden presided behind the bat and curry judged the base plays. Had the game been close the home club would have had cause to protest several of Fessenden's decisions, for he deliberately showed to the players and the spectators that he lacked confidence in his own judgment. On one occasion Hoy made a clean bunt and took first base by fast running. It suddenly occurred to Capt. Anson that the ball struck the batsman. He appealed to Fessenden, who decided the runner safe. Anson then appealed to Curry, who was standing over near first base, and the latter said he thought the ball had struck the batsman, whereupon, to the disgust of the spectators, including the President of the League, Mr. Young, Fessenden reversed his decision and called Hoy to bat again.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the California League joins the National Agreement

Date Wednesday, May 22, 1889
Text

From the secretary of the Board of Arbitration, Mr. Charles H. Byrne, comes the pleasing news that, after holding out for two years, the California League has at last come to a realizing sense of the necessity of entering the great family of base ball organizations, and accordingly applied, through its president, John J. Morse, for the protection of the National Agreement. This protection has been accorded, and the California League is now safely anchored in the base ball harbor of refuge. The California League was the only base ball organization of any importance outside of the great national alliance. With her admission the last resort of contract-breakers and reserve-jumpers is cut off. This will be a good thing for the national game in general and the California League in particular, as the latter will now be secure from the invasion of outside disturbing influences and will have a chance to develop her own players and profit thereby accordingly.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

foul tips

Date Wednesday, May 22, 1889
Text

[from Questions Answered] Foul tips do no longer count as outs when caught by the catcher while under the bat. They are out, however, when caught while the catcher is playing back, or when he is behind the ten-foot line. Foul flies are out the same as heretofore.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

errors on foul balls

Date Wednesday, May 22, 1889
Text

[from Questions Answered] It matters not what happens afterwards, whether the batter reaches first or not it is an error. All muffs of foul flies are scored as errors when made, and they are not erased afterwards in case the batsman does not reach first. A muff is a muff whether made on fair or foul ground, and must be scored as an error as soon as it is made.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early use of Cleveland “Spiders”

Date Wednesday, May 22, 1889
Text

The Cleveland Spiders—so called on account of their peculiar appearance in their suits of black and blue...

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

manufacture of baseballs

Date Wednesday, May 22, 1889
Text

J. D. Shibe & Co., the well-known Philadelphia manufacturers of base balls and base ball goods exclusively, have by reason of increased business found it necessary to build a new factory which is one of the largest in the country. The main building is 100 x 40 feet in extent and consists of five floors. This is supplemented by a large warehouse for the storage of goods. In the basement of the main building will be found the engine room and packing department, on the first floor the office and pressing and winding machinery as well as the immense drying room, capable of holding 2000 dozen balls. On the second floor is the sewing department for the fine grades of balls. In the later department skilled men only are employed, this firm being the first to originate this feature, the only successful system we believe, of placing on balls covers that will not rip or loosen in batting. The third floor contains the sewing department for medium grades, retailing for twenty-five cents and fifty cents; here some fifty or sixty girls are employed. Altogether the factory gives work to about 250 hands, who actually turn out daily 1500 dozen balls. The cheapest grades are given out for sewing to married women who return them to the factory when finished.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring stolen base on a base on balls

Date Wednesday, May 22, 1889
Text

President Young decides that a base-runner should be credited with a stolen base under the following circumstances: For instance, Quinn was on first base and Ganzel at bat with two strikes and three balls called. As the next ball is pitched Quinn makes a dive for second, without knowing whether the umpire would call a ball or a strike. He took the chances and should be rewarded accordingly. As it turned out, the umpire called four balls, but Quinn gets a stolen base all the same.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catcher mistakes the umpire for the second baseman

Date Friday, May 24, 1889
Text

[Pittsburgh vs. Washington 5/23/1889] Pittsburg scored its only run in the second inning, when Carroll and Maul were sent to base on balls . Carroll played well away from second base, and Umpire Fessenden, who was judging the base players, stood immediately behind the bag. Connie Mack mistook the umpire for a Senator, and threw the ball to second, hoping to catch Carroll napping. The result was the ball went out to center field and Carroll scored.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

it ain't over till it's over

Date Friday, May 24, 1889
Text

[Chicago vs. New York 5/23/1889] The truth of the old saying that a ball game is not ended until the last man is out was fully shown in the second game between the Chicago and New York Clubs at Staten Island yesterday.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a dispute over the dropped third strike rule

Date Saturday, May 25, 1889
Text

[Pittsburgh vs. Washington 5/24/1889] There was a long and tedious delay in the sixth. Morrill and Haddock were on second and first and Hoy struck out, Lauer dropping the ball. Hoy was out at first under the rules, but Morrill and Haddock went ahead a base each. Fessenden was included to acceded to Dunlap's claim and sent them back, but Honest John talked loud and long, and finally sent to the clubhouse for the rules. After much reading Fessenden allowed the runners to remain in their places.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

praise for the double umpire system

Date Sunday, May 26, 1889
Text

Those who witnessed the games of base ball last week, on the Boston grounds, can hardly fail to have been struck with the great success of the double-umpire system as there practiced. There has been no improvement in the regulations of the games of a long time that equaled it in importance. It was made evident to the eyes of the observing spectator that here must have been constantly wrong decisions upon the bases under the old system, scarcely a game occurring without them, and balls and strikes were far better decided under the new arrangement than under that of inspecting them from behind the pitcher, which has lately been practised. Umpire Lynch, who is acting alone this week, is one of the most satisfactory men in the business, but he ought to have an aid; indeed, he is reported to have said himself that the double-umpire system was a necessity.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

contemplating an iron grand stand in Brooklyn

Date Sunday, May 26, 1889
Text

The burning of the stand at the Brooklyn base ball grounds on Sunday morning last was a sad blow to the club; still it was not nearly so bad as it might have been. The fact that the club was on the road and that no games or loss or attendance was caused by the fire is a source of satisfaction to the managers of the club. The directors have in mind the building of an iron grand stand, but that will not be done for some years yet. In the mean time the new stand now building on the grounds will be finished as soon as possible, probably by Thursday, and this will answer all requirements for the time being.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a late use of “How's that?”

Date Sunday, May 26, 1889
Text

[Chicago vs. New York 5/25/1889] Anson was jeered whenever he raised his hand and asked “How's that?”...

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

crackdown on Sunday baseball in Cincinnati

Date Sunday, May 26, 1889
Text

[dateline Cincinnati 5/25] The Police Commissioners yesterday issued an order to police lieutenants to arrest all violators of the Sunday law to-morrow. They were also instructed to stop Sunday base ball. There is much excitement among saloon keepers, who are at a loss what to do. The Cincinnati club has two games for Sunday. President Stern of the Cincinnati Base Ball club said to-day, when asked what he proposed to do to-morrow if his players were arrested, as proposed by the orders given to the police by the Police Commissioner:

“We shall be prepared to give bond and go on with the play. We expect to play both games set for to-morrow with the Louisvilles and to have our usual large attendance. If Sunday games are prohibited I will abandon base ball, as it cannot live without them; there are so many people who cannot attend on any other day.” St. Louis Republic May 26, 1889 [N.B. The games were played.]

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early talk of the Players League; and of Day favoring the Brotherhood; League delaying tactics

Date Monday, May 27, 1889
Text

The opinions of the different league club Presidents upon the situation, as published in a New York paper, show the league magnates, with the single exception of John B. Day, to be united in support of the classification rule. Mr. Day, however, seems disposed to mouth matters, a thing he can but ill afford to do at the present time, as he and his lieutenant, James Mutrie, are none too popular with the rest of the league Presidents. Judging from Mr. Day's published views he would be as likely to stick to the players as the league in case of a rupture between the two, and it is almost certain that the first manifestation of any such spirit upon his part would be the signal for the forfeiture of the present New York club's franchise.

In case of a break between clubs and players it might at first seem a good play—and it would certainly betw quite a feather in the cap of the brotherhood—to have the New York club bolt the league and openly cast its fortunes with the players' organization. The end of the fight, however, if a fight there should be, would be apt to find Day, Mutrie & Co. in the soup; as a fight between the league—with its organized circuit, its money, its systematic management, its experience in base-ball legislation, and its long established name—and the brotherhood would presumably bring about the latter's ultimate def3eat or result in a compromise. In either event Mutrie & Co. would be out in the cold.

There will probably be no fight, for the at the November meeting of the league a committee composed of representatives of each brotherhood chapter will be asked to confer with the league and offer some better rule, if they can, than the classification rule for the protection of clubs in the smaller league cities. In other words, the league will endeavor by arbitration, by diplomacy, by amicable discussion, by every peaceable means in its power, to arrange a form of agreement that will be mutually acceptable to clubs and players. Failing in this, however, the league, to use a prominent league magnate's expression, “will throw weak-kneed league members and unreasonable players out of the grounds and continue the game.” Chicago Tribune May 27, 1889

comparing the Polo and the Staten Island grounds

The Polo Grounds made a model base ball field. Located in the heart of the city they were easy of access and were patronized by many thousands of business men who would otherwise have been compelled to remain away from the games. The seating capacity of the place was large, the arrangements for viewing the field were excellent, and all the accommodations necessary to please and attract patrons of the national sport were amply provided.

Now this is greatly changed. A visit to the Staten Island grounds entails a long, though pleasant, journey on water which business men, however much inclined, are not at all at liberty to take. To miss a boat means a monstrous delay of twenty minutes or half an hour, which is quite a consideration when time is precious. Arrived at the grounds, the spectators are well accommodated, but the filed being yet new, the playing must necessarily be inferior to what could be done at the Polo grounds, and they are, therefore, subject to much disappointment.

Staten Island is frequently invaded by hosts of mosquitoes in Summer, which fact is in itself a great drawback to enjoyment, and at this particular season fogs are also apt to hang over the field and obscure players. Storms sometimes interfere with the games, and Staten Island is not a pleasant place when it rains.

These at least are a few objections to the new grounds, gathered by a reporter last week. They originated from the grand stand as well as from the white benches, and were the free expressions of men who would follow a favorite base ball team to Hellsville if fate decreed that they should play nowhere else. They conceded that every thing that could be done to make the place attractive and enjoyable has been done, but nevertheless they condemned it. The Philadelphia Item May 27, 1889

Source ” Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Erastus Wiman; early rumor of the Players' League

Date Tuesday, May 28, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Wiman] Now, in talking about baseball, let me explain a matter to the public which concerns me considerably there have been reports in circulation to the effect that I was inclined to back up the Ball Players' Brotherhood in their proposed fight with the National League. The rumor definitely was that I would find money and help to organize another league or association. Now, stories like these are wrong. When the brotherhood was first formed there was a prospect of a conflict between it and the League. I was asked what I would do for the players, and I stated that I could only allow them the use of my grounds. This I would do for anybody, because it is to my benefit to have people visiting my grounds. But to offer to set up a rival to the National League would be folly.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Brotherhood membership

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[reporting the Brotherhood meeting of 5/19/1889] Reports from the various Chapters showed them to be in a flourishing condition, and that every League player, with a few exceptions, is now a member of the Brotherhood or an applicant for membership. Those who are still out are Ed Williamson, Frank Flint, Arthur Whitney, Charley Smith, and one or two others. The Cleveland players were admitted in a body to membership.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player grievance for being fined for illness

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[reporting the Brotherhood meeting of 5/19/1889] Henry Boyle, of the Indianapolis Club, was the only player to present a grievance. The League rules say that a player can be laid off without pay by reason of sickness from natural causes. Boyle was sick and was laid off under these rules, to which he does not object. But the Indianapolis Club not only deducted his salary, but it fined him $100 for being sick, which he claims they had no right to do. He was suffering from fever and ague, and presented a physician's certificate and testimony of players that he was unable to report. The Brotherhood will present this case to the Indianapolis Club and insist that the $100 be refunded.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Brotherhood and the Brush plan, player sales

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[reporting the Brotherhood meeting of 5/19/1889] Those...who predicted a strike during the playing season will be disappointed, as nothing positive will be done until the next League meeting. It is well understood, however, that then the Brotherhood will ask the League to abolish or greatly modify the classification rule, and to do away with the selling of ball players unless the player sold receives a portion of the purchase money. Not a contract for 1890 will be signed before the League's annual meeting, at which action will be asked upon the Brotherhood's suggestions whatever plan the executive council outlines at Sunday's meeting must be presented to and agreed upon by the various chapters before definite action can be taken by the delegates. There is little doubt, however, that the council's recommendations will be unanimously approved.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the League reaction to the Brotherhood

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Soden] You don't think the Brotherhood would be foolish enough to make any bad break on the classification law, do you? If the players in the Brotherhood have any grievances, individual cases, I should favor giving them a hearing and think matters could be arranged satisfactorily. But as for anticipating that they would demand an abolishment of the classification or would think of striking, why, I think that is absurd.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Soden pleads poverty

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Soden] I do no think there are three League teams who will make a cent this season. New York certainly will not, and I don't think Chicago will make a great deal of money. The whole amount of it will be that the ball players will keep agitating until there will not be four cities in the country which can pay the salaries and retain a team in the League.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Spalding's response to the Brotherhood meeting

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

President Spalding, of the Chicago Club, was nailed as soon as he reached home. When told that the Brotherhood had a secret meeting at New York Sunday, that every club in the League was represented, and that the object was to formulate a plan of action looking toward rebellion, the president of the Chicago Club professed ignorance of any such meeting. “I didn't hear anything about it. What does the Brotherhood want?” he asked, and when told that the ball players' organization felt aggrieved over the adoption of the classification rule, in that the League magnates had violated their agreement with the Brotherhood, and that the National Agreement had been used for purposed for which it was never designed, Mr. Spalding said:-- “Oh, pshaw! The players won't do anything. It's all talk. What will we do if the players rebel? Why, we'll go right along just as we have for the last thirteen years. But there is nothing in it. The players have too much sense to attempt anything of the kind.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Detroit Club affairs wrapped up; finances; Rowe-White

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Fred Stearns] “I have just made my final report to a meeting of the directors of the old Detroit Base Ball Club; it was very favorably received, and the affairs of the old club, with the exception of the Rowe-White matter, are wound up.”

“And what is the amount of the assessment the stockholders are called on to pay?”

“Assessment! Ha! Not much. We declared a dividend of $54,000, and there is still more money in bank to be divided.”

“What! A dividend of $54,000?”

“Exactly. It is payable June 1, and the holders of the shares, the par value of each being $50, will receive $135 each. Of course, four-fifth of the shares are held by the directors,” and Mr. Stearns smiled softly.

The largest portion of the sum to be divided was derived from the sale of star players. There is $7000 still due for Row and White, if these players will consent to go to Pittsburg. They want $4000 of the $7000 which Pittsburg agrees to pay Detroit for their release. The Detroit people are willing to give the players $2000 of the release money, and as Pittsburg agreed to pay each a salary of $35000 for the season it is seen that these players are throwing $9000 in cold cash for their pig-headedness.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

recruiting a player

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[from the Pittsburgh correspondent] Al Scandrett isn't through smiling yet over the way he captured young Beam. … ...there weren't so many clubs after Beam, but the base ball people of the town brought a terrible pressure to bear on the young man with side whiskers. Al, however, after winning over his father by asserting that Billy Sunday was an Evangelist, and would take good care of his boy, gave his terms and left. The next day he gave it out that he wanted Milbee, of Scottdale, a better man than Beam, and had it printed afar and wide that he had gone to Scottdale for this phenomenon. Beam was in town the next day and attached his John Hancock to the contract. The bluff worked.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

dismissing the possibility of a Players League

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[from R. M. Larner's column] While at League headquarters last Monday I had a chat with Nick Young about the Sunday meeting of the Brotherhood. Our talk was of an informal nature, and as Mr. Young is the head of the League it would hardly be proper to quote him on this subject. It is sufficient to say that there is but little danger of a strike among the leading ball players of the country for the reason that they have no just grounds for complaint, besides they would find it a very difficult matter to obtain similar employment elsewhere at the same rates they are now receiving. It is all rot to talk about the capitalists who are ready to come forward and supply the funds necessary to maintain an anti-League Association. I have some personal experience with captalistic ball cranks, but they do not materialize when they are called to the scratch. Besides, where would the strikers obtain a play ground in New York, Boston, Washington and in other League cities? It is surprising that intelligent men take stock in such fairy stories.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a strike out on a quick pitch; batter leaving the box

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[from R. M. Larner's column] Manager Crothers, of the Dallas, Tex., Club, writes Mr. Young to know if a batter can be called out on the strikes under the following circumstances:--The batsman has three balls called and the fourth ball he strikes at. The fifth ball seems to be off the plate, and the batsman takes it for granted that the umpire will call four balls. He drops his bat and starts for first base. Contrary to his expectation the umpire calls two strikes before the batsman can resume his position at the plate. The pitcher delivers a good ball, and the batter is declared out on three strikes. Mr. Young decides that the umpire was correct, as the player had no right to leave the batter's box until the umpire had decided whether the fifth ball was a strike of a bad ball.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring a stolen base on a base on balls

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[from Chadwick's column] I notice that President Young decides that a base-runner should be credited with a stolen base under the following circumstances:--For instance, Quinn was on first base and Ganzel at bat with two strikes and three balls called. As the next ball is pitched, Quinn makes a dive for second without knowing whether the umpire would call a ball or a strike. It turned out that the umpire called four balls, but Quinn gets credit for a stolen base. This is a correct decision. In estimating stolen bases, there cannot well be any arbitrary rule to govern every case, as circumstances so frequently alter cases. The effort to steal must go into the calculation largely. For intsance, the moment the runner at first sees the pitcher's arm move to pitch, and he starts for second, he has attempted a steal without regard to the action of the catcher or the batsman; and if he reaches the base safely, he is entitled to the credit of the steal, irrespective of a wide throw, a muffed ball, a passed ball, a called ball or a wild pitch; as the very effort to steal may help to cause either the wild throw or the passed ball, as also the muff at second. There are ordinary steals and clean steals, and the latter comprise the minority. But no base can be justly credited as stolen, where the runner at first is induced to start for second after seeing the error made by the pitcher or catcher. To limit the credit of a stolen base to clean steals, would be discouraging to base stealing. A runner will not take the risks under such circumstances that he will when he is given credit for his effort to steal irrespective of the fielding errors the effort may have led to. In order to encourage base-running, I think, a latitude should be allowed, which may justly be reduced hereafter.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a proposed expansion of the substitute rule; pitching rotation

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[from Chadwick's column] As far as the tenth man rule has been tested it has worked satisfactorily, and it is now proposed to extend it so as to include the power to replace men in any innings, and so as to sue all the players on a team in a game if necessary or advisable. Anson favors this latter plan. He says:-- “Here I have a team of fifteen men and I want the right to use all of them in a match game if I find it advantageous to do so, putting four pitchers in a game if I like.” If this privilege was given a captain there would undoubtedly be fewer pitchers laid up with sore arms, while they would have daily practice for a short time in the box, instead of as now, having to wait their turn to go in once or twice a week. It would save catchers' hands, too. This rule would give a new interest to each contest. It might be tried in '90 to advantage.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

nearly the modern position scoring numbering

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[from Chadwick's column] A writer in the New York Mail and Express advocates a new way of numbering the players on the score sheets. He says:

“The pitcher is numbered 1 in all cases, catcher 2, first base 3, second base 4, short stop 5, third base 6, right field 7, centre field 8, and left field 9. For example, if a ball is hit to third base and the runner is thrown out at first base, without looking at the score card it is known that the numbers to be recorded are 6-3, the former getting the assist, and the first baseman the put-out. If from short stop to first, it is 5-3. If from the second baseman, it is 4=3. If a dropped third strike, and the runner is thrown out a first, it is K 1-2-3-K, indicating the strike out.”

This is a faulty method, and in no respect is it an improvement on the plan which has been in vogue since the National League was organized, and that is the method used in Beadle's Dime Book of Base Ball in 1860. This plan numbers the players in their striking order, and not by their positions, for instance, take the New York order of striking Gore Tiernan and Richardson 1, 2, 3. No matter what position these players take in the field the figures always indicate them. But if you name the players by their positions, and these happen to be changed in a game, then you are all in a fog on how to change them.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

why the California League joined the National Agreement

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[from Waller Wallace's column] Some of the local managers are now beginning to realize that a mistake was made when they refused to enter the National Agreement. The Eastern ball magnates are closely watching the work of California League players, and when they see a man worth taking negotiations are entered into with him, and the chances are ten to one that the player leaves the Coast. Fudger, it is believed, is now on his way to a Southern League club; Indianapolis wants Coughlin; Veach and Hapeman are offered terms by Milwaukee, and “Peek-a-boo” will certainly not be in Sacramento last month. It does not injure a ball tosser to be blacklisted by the local League, as he may immediately play elsewhere; but if the National Agreement embraced the Pacific Slope, the result would be different, as the man's chances of obtaining a living on the diamond w3ould be at an end. The Sacramento managers are in favor of joining hands with the majority, and surely Robinson has suffered enough to agree with them on this proposition. It is possible that a meeting of the League directors will be held soon to consider the matter., quoting the San Francisco Call

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Ridgewood Park finances

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[from W. I. Harris's column] Chris Von der Ahe is said to be the luckiest man in base ball, and in some respects he is, but there are others quite as lucky, if not more so, so far as money-making is concerned, than the German magnate of the St. Louis Club. Among them may be counted four young men in this locality. They are William W. Wallace, W. A. Mayer, H. F. Rueger and J. G. O'Keefe, respectively, president, treasurer, secretary and stockholders in the Ridgewood Park Exhibition Company. These gentlemen way back in '85 conceived the idea that a ball park at Ridgewood would prove a paying investment. Wallace was a ball crank, and so was O'Keefe, and they talked the other two into the scheme, and the company was formed. Wallace was the prime mover. None of them had over $300 apiece when they leased some building lots at Ridgewood, just across the Kings county line. The grounds were small, but they did a good business, and when the first season was over it was found to have amounted to something like $25,000. The company then increased its capital stock to $15,000, two-thirds of it being retained by the originators of the scheme. The excess of profits and additional stock was used to buy land and to build proper stands and bleachers. Up to this time the Brooklyn Club had not used the Ridgewood grounds, although other professional and semi-professional clubs were playing there and drawing good crowds, particularly on Sunday, no matter what the attraction was. The privileges of the grounds also brought a handsome return. Little by little the company added to its holding, and finally when the Kings county officials stopped Sunday base ball at Washington Park the Brooklyns went to Ridgewood. At first they did not play at the Ridgewood Park, but finally made an arrangement with Wallace and his partner, which has proved a bonanza for all parties. The exhibition company is now endeavoring to purchase that part of the property they hold by lease. They already own three-fifths of the park, and good judges say that the entire property is worth at least $100,000. If this is true, the men who commenced four years ago on less than $1200, have now $60,000 worth of property that is paying them handsome dividends. There are games at Ridgewood nearly every day, and on Sundays always. The Ridgewood people have made a contract by which the Newark Club is the home club on all Sundays, on which the Brooklyns are away from home. The Newarks are paid $200 a game, and play against whatever club the management produces. There is seldom less than 2500 people at these Sunday games, and generally more. President Wallace is a hard working compositor in the office of the Press, and Mr. O'Keefe is in the same line. Mr. Mayer is a Brooklyn baker, and Mr. Rueger is an engraver.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a foul flag

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[Athletic vs. Baltimore 5/28/1889] ...Stovey was on the coaching line at third base when Larkin cracked out what appeared to be a hit directly over third base, but the ball bounded foul just beyond the flag. Gaffney did not give any sign of life until Larkin was near second. Stovey was so intensely disgusted that he that he turned toward the umpire and with face turned away expressed his feelings by turning the palms of his hands towards Gaffney and waving him off. This was too much for the umpire. “Ten dollars for that,” he called out.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

fielders gloves left on the field

Date Wednesday, May 29, 1889
Text

[Chicago vs. Boston 5/28/1889] Johnston next hit to Burns. It was a hot one, but he stopped it, and Anson [first baseman] made a pretty pick up for a ball thrown a trifle low. The man was clearly out. Anson threw his gloves on the grass, as did the whole Chicago team. Even Bennett had his body protector unbuckled and Jonston had really turned to go to his position in the field when to everybody's surprise Barnum gave Johnston safe, and Bennett again resumed his mask and gloves.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Hub Collins “interested” in Anheuser Busch

Date Thursday, May 30, 1889
Text

Hub Collins, who is interested in the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Company, of St. Louis, sports a handsome new gold and silver watch charm in the form of the company’s emblem–the A and the eagle.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a batter refuses to take first on a hit by pitch

Date Friday, May 31, 1889
Text

[Pittsburg vs. Philadelphia 5/30/1889] In the eighth inning Thompson was hit by a pitched ball. It was scratchy, but he would not take his base, that is he did not appear anxious. The next ball he put over center field for a home run.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

increased scoring under the new rules

Date Saturday, June 1, 1889
Text

Plenty of batting and big scores are generally the outcome of the changes in the base ball rules, which have also been the means of bringing to grief many a good pitcher. Four balls and three strikes, with foul tips not out, seems to be the toughest problem the pitchers have yet tackled. Nearly every club in the country is now carrying a number of men who under last year’s rules were first-class pitchers, but who so far this year have proved rank failures.

Source ~
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

barbed wire fence at Ridgewood

Date Sunday, June 2, 1889
Text

[St. Louis vs. Brooklyn 6/2/1889] This great crowd was handled better than any crowd was ever handled at Ridgewood before, and not even ground rules were needed, as has been the custom heretofore. The six-foot barbed wire fence which has been constructed around the whole outfield since the breaking up of the Brooklyn-Athletic game was more effective than a solid like of policemen and but few attempts were made by the spectators to scale the wire fence. However, an improvement can be made to the fence; that is, it can be brought in some distance, so that more standing room can be had. During the game yesterday every foot of seating and standing room was occupied, as well as the tops of the high board fences that surround the grounds.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

player sales and the Brotherhood contract; the $2,000 limit

Date Sunday, June 2, 1889
Text

[from an open letter by John Ward] [discussing the contract negotiated by the NL and Brotherhood 11/87] One of the principal grievances presented was that in several instances clubs had used the power of the reserve rule to force the consent of players to be sold, regardless of any preferences the latter might otherwise have had. For example, the Boston club said to Buffinton and Gunning, whom it held on its reserve list: “We have sold you to Philadelphia.” But,” they replied, “we don’t want to go to Philadelphia. Our homes are here and we prefer to remain, or, if we must leave, we expect to have a voice in the choice of a new home.” To which the club answered: “You will go to Philadelphia a we direct, or, if you refuse, we will hold you at the minimum of $1,000.” And so, with the prospect of being held at a big reduction of salary and at $1,000 to $1,500 less than Philadelphia would pay, the players were forced to consent, and the Boston club pocketed a price for two players it did not itself care to keep. Realizing the danger of allowing such an arbitrary power to remain in the hands of the clubs the players’ committee insisted that the new contract provide that no player be reserved at a reduction of salary.

...

... At the meeting of the committees the obsolete $2,000 limit rule was not mentioned, because as it never had had an existence except on paper, and was violated openly by every league club from the time of its adoption, no one of the players’ committee ever dreamed that such a thing could be offered by the league as an excuse for not keeping its entire agreement. Before the joint meeting of the league and American association, held several months later, at a time when the players had gone to their homes, it seems to have occurred to the league magnates that the limit rule would prevent writing more than that amount in the contract and upon the refusal of the association to agree to strike the lie out of the national agreement the league decided to repudiate its agreement with the players. That is, in order to keep up the pretense of observing a rule which everyone knew never had been observed, whose continuance had been a disgrace to its makers and a standing evidence of their own bad faith, the league violated an important agreement, deliberately entered into with its players.... The brotherhood committee, having notified all players that the new contract was satisfactory, many went ahead and signed, and, relying upon the assurance of their committee and the faith of the league, they accepted side contracts for any amount in excess of the limit. Not until many players had already signed and when it was too late to do anything, did the brotherhood committee learn the true state of affairs.

Source Cleveland Plain Dealer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Harwood & Sons baseball manufacture

Date Sunday, June 2, 1889
Text

The base-ball of today, as produced at Natick... is made by hand. The laborers employed in the work are nearly all girls. The spherical core, of best rubber, is first carefully wrapped with a given amount of the most costly yarn. When the ball has thus grown to about two-thirds of the size it is to be a leather cover is stitched on with a needle and waxed thread. This cover has the effect of keeping the ball compact and in shape and of regulating its elasticity. Then more yarn is wound upon it, until it is found to turn the scales at precisely the right point. Finally the outer cover of horsehide is sewn on, and the ball, after being stamped and again weighed to make sure that it is just five ounces, is wrapped in tin foil, put into a box with five more like it, and declared ready for sale. The cover, as an examination of a base-ball will show you, is stamped out of the leather in but two curiously shaped pieces, which, sewn on the ball, together exactly cover it. This device was not invented until 1865. The cheaper grades of base-balls are made of poorer yarn and rubber scraps, the latter pressed into a pulp by powerful machinery. T he less expensive the ball the less yarn and more scraps will be sued in its manufacture until, when you get to the “Small Boy's Own,” price five cents, there is nothing to be found inside the flimsy cover but melted remnants of rubber shoes.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

gamesmanship about switching in a new ball

Date Sunday, June 2, 1889
Text

In the ninth inning in one of the New York games Glasscock tried to play one of his famous tricks, but was nipped in the bud; with two men out and Hines and Seer on the bases, the foul ball that was knocked over the fence had been returned. At first Umpire Lynch did not see it, but the Hoosier captain slyly walked over, and while pretending to scratch his leg, picked up the ball and put in his pocket. The ball then in play was knocked out of the lot, and a call for a new one was made. The New Yorks objected, but the old sphere could not be found. One of the crowd then informed Lynch where it was, and Glasscock was compelled to hand it over after a dispute. He then turned to the informer and said: “You came in here to see the game, not to interfere in it,” but the crowd laughed at him.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an objection to umpires behind the pitcher

Date Wednesday, June 5, 1889
Text

[a letter from John I. Rogers to Nick Young] “I desire to enter my protest against umpires standing inside the diamond, unless in case of double umpires. They are so afraid of the balls hit that they stand within ten feet of second base and think they can umpire balls and strikes from that distance. It is utterly impossible for them to do so, and I see no warrant in the rules permitting them to umpire anywhere except behind the home plate. The diagram of a ball ground attached to our rules, and which we have by repeated publications approved, puts the umpire back of the catcher. It is impossible also for the umpire, standing in the diamond, to tell whether the ball is hit fair or foul, if a grounder close to the line. To get around this difficulty umpires have been appointing one of the players at the bat as a substitute, to tell them whether the ball is fair or foul. This is a severe test to a man if the ball be close to the line, and the man waiting his turn to bat should not be led into such temptation. Umpires, of course, will take instructions only from you, and I therefore most respectfully, but earnestly, request you to instruct all umpires to umpire behind the bat and to run down as far as they can when bases are being stolen. The present system is the laziest and saves the umpires using his legs, but it is destructive to all satisfactory systems for fairly calling balls and strikes and deciding foul balls.” President Young says there is much wisdom in the above suggestions and he has accordingly instructed the various League umpires to render their decisions from behind the plate and move around in the vicinity of the bases when base plays are being made. The Sporting Life June 5, 1889

[editorial matter] One of Umpire Gaffney's innovations has been discarded by the League umpires by order of President Young, who has instructed them to hereafter umpire from behind the plate altogether. This order is due to the many complaints received about the impossibility of judging fair and foul hits correctly from behind the pitcher, and was really inspired by Col. Rogers' argument for it in a letter to President Young. Under the new order, of course, fair and foul hits will be somewhat better gauged, while close points at second base will have to take care of themselves. Of course, some games are won and lost by decisions at second base, but that is nothing compared with the importance of having the records of the players in the matter of hits which may decide games, as well as the important matter of properly calling balls and strikes, well looked after. All things considered, the change is a good one, although the better and more lasting improvement would be the double umpire system, which would enable all points of play to be well covered, but that's too expensive, you know. The poor and struggling major leagues would rather have the everlasting umpire troubles, with undoubted loss of some patronage, than put their hands into their pockets and provide the panacea—the double umpire system. The Sporting Life June 5, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player ejected

Date Wednesday, June 5, 1889
Text

[Brooklyn vs. Columbus 5/25/1889] At the last meeting of the joint committee on rules it was unanimously resolved to give the umpire the protective power of removing any player from the field and the game who, after being fined for violating the rule against disputing an umpire's decision, should continue to repeat the offense. In the case in question, Orr offensively disputed Umpire Goldsmith's decision, and he was justly punished for it by a fine. He again offended, and when threatened with the more costly penalty he impudently defied the umpire to do his duty and enforce the law to the full extent, threatening personal injury if he did so. Goldsmith then did his duty manfully and kept to his decision, Orr being put out of the game.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

side contracts and the Brush plan

Date Wednesday, June 5, 1889
Text

[from Questions Answered] The classification rule did not affect certain players who had side contracts with League clubs for a certain number of years. Keefe is said to have had a special contract with New York for a number of years and no subsequent legislation could invalidate it.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

talk of the Giants returning to the Polo Grounds

Date Wednesday, June 5, 1889
Text

[from W. I. Harris's column] Will they get back to the Polo Grounds? It is a hard question to decide. The situation is simply this. The aldermen have not ordered the grading of the street through the grounds and show no disposition to do so. The fences being down the grounds are occupied by amateur ball clubs and loafers of both sexes all day, and at night the grand stand forms a cheap and luxurious lodging for all the tramps in Harlem, male and female. Such a state of affairs has called forth a protest and a petition from the abutting residents to Commissioner Gilroy to erect a fence across the street on both sides. The commissioner has ordered an inspection of the premises and seems inclined to put the fence up and probably will. The question arises as to the kind of fence. A four-foot palling fence would e ample protection to the public, but would not be of much service to the New York Club, but if the four-foot fence is put up the club will try and devise some means of shutting off the view of the grounds from the street that will not subject it to the charge of closing up a public highway. Some think this can be done with canvas or by drawing a few trucks up by the fence and building high canvas coverings to them. This is not very feasible, as there is a descent of sixteen feet from the sidewalk to the grounds. Mr. Day expresses his confidence that the Giants will return to the Polo Grounds and play the Bostons there June 10. Senator Jacob Canter is of the same opinion. We hope so at any rate. If the club stays at St. George, it will not make much of a profit for its stockholders. Think of 520 people to see a morning holiday game, and only 5970 to see the afternoon contest. The nineteen games to date have attracted about 43,000 people. At this rate I figure out that the New York Club would be in luck to close the season $10,000 ahead.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

boys switching cheap balls for home runs

Date Saturday, June 8, 1889
Text

The London (Canada) Advertiser says: “The small boys now linger outside the fence with a new 5 cent or 10 cent ball in their pocket. When a ball is batted over the fence they throw the cheap one back into the grounds and hang on to the good one. Score another for the small boy.

Source ” Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Clarence Duval hoodoos the Chicago Club

Date Sunday, June 9, 1889
Text

Clarence Duval declares that he is the [Chicago] Club's evil genius. The little colored boy still wears the cap, blue suit, and brass buttons that denoted his connection with the Spalding party abroad, but the buttons are tarnished, the rim of the cap broken, and altogether his appearance is in strong contrast to that which he presented in the banquet ahll the night of the party's arrival.

“I tole 'em,” siad he, “I tole 'em afore ever we done got half way home dat I'd queer 'em when dey got back.”

“Told who?”

“Dat ole Baldwin, and Daly, and Pettit, and de rest ob dem aih fellahs wot trun me down de steps and held me undah the hydrant on de ship. I tole 'em I'd get even wid 'em, and now I'm doing' it. You know wot I went and done afore dem fellahs got to New Yorak? Well, I jist put de rabbit fut on em, and ebery one ob 'em got de bounce wen dey got back.”

“But those men are not with the team now. Why are you continuing to 'hoodoo' the club?”

“Well, I'll too yo', sah. W'en we done got back heah I ask Cap'n Anson to let me take de team on de field and he wouldn't hab it at all. Dat made me mad an' I jes' sock de rabbit fut to de hull crowd. De nespapers keep on a askin' every day, “How come it Chicago's playing in' sich poah ball?' Well, dey's 'hoodooed,' and dey's gwine ter stay 'hoodooed' till I gets ready ter take de chawn off.”

Notwithstanding these utterances Clarence politely doffed his cap and looked repentant when he stood in President Spalding's office a few moments later and took his dose of good advice.

“We have a five years' contract with you, sir, and we could black-list you for deserting us if we so desires,” said A.G., “but I have made up my mind to release you unconditionally and to give you a chance to do better elsewhere. Here is $10. The Chicago club is through with you and you will have to shift for yourself. Good-morning.”

Clarence is now posing and swinging his baton among his acquaintances in the vicinity of Third avenue and Harrison street. He never fails to express his contempt for a team “that would let demsleves get done 'foah straight' by sich a 'no' count team as Boston.

Source ” Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

base coach deeking the fielders a dirty play

Date Sunday, June 9, 1889
Text

[Louisville vs. Brooklyn 6/8/1889] Smith ran home from the coacher’s position to induce the Louisvilles to make a misplay. This is dirty ball playing.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a game prearranged to play five innings

Date Sunday, June 9, 1889
Text

[Pittsburgh vs. Cleveland 6/8/1889] The Pittsburghs did not want to play the second game. They had had enough. The local management couldn't see it in that light. Many people had come late, only to see the one game. Finally it was decided to play five innings and the game began.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rumor of Louisville preparing to sell out

Date Tuesday, June 11, 1889
Text

A special meeting of the American Association of Ball Clubs has been called for Friday in New York to consider the status of the Louisville Club, which is reported to be in a bad way. The charge is being made that President Davidson is trying to dispose of his best players and then let the club shift for itself. To prevent the team from going to pieces and thereby losing the eighth club in the Association it is proposed to put a stop to the sale and President Wickoff has been requested not to ratify the sales of any players until after the meeting of the Association.

Von der Ahe, the president of the St. Louis Club, was the first to have his suspicions aroused and after consultation with Manager Barnie and some wiring to Eastern managers it was decided to settle the business in a special meeting. President Stern is now said to be negotiating for the release of Hecker, Stratton and Shannon. It is claimed that with these players out the Louisville will be only an amateur club, certainly not better. Davidson has lost heavily right along, and it is thought he wants to get out of the hole as best he can.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Ward denounced the Brush plan

Date Wednesday, June 12, 1889
Text

Johm M. Ward, president of the Ball Players' Brotherhood, is outspoken in his denunciation of the classification rule, and says that it “is in spirit of a nullification of every benefit derived by the player, and, in its practical application, the National League has practically violated its promise not to reserve at a less salary. Of those classified the great majority have been held at a figure less than that received last season, and the fact that wo or three have been given an advance is a blind too transparent to deceive anyone as to the true character of the steal. The rule was passed, it is claimed, in order to allow several of the weaker cities to at least clear expenses. To the average mind the conclusion would be that if Indianapolis and Washington cannot afford the rate of salaries their associate clubs pay, then they are not entitled to the same class at ball. They are in too fast company, and they ought to get out. They have no right to stay in at the expense of their players. But if it is objected that the that the success of the National League demands the continued existence of these clubs, the fair reply is that the League then should stand the expense. Indianapolis has about as much right in the National League as Oshkosh. Yet if the League admitted the latter city, would it be fair to ask Denny, Myers, Boyle, Glasscock, etc., to play there at figures which would allow Oshkosh to clear their expenses? … It is a fact which cannot bainsaid that taking all the clubs together there is a great deal of money made each year from base ball. The Boston, New York and Chicago clubs pay immense dividends. The low-salaried Philadelphia Club, notwithstanding the wails of its owners, pays largely. Pittsburg makes something, and Detroit, which was said to have lost last season, is now settling up its affairs and publicly chuckling over the division of $54,000 profit derived from somewhere. It would not be exaggerating to say that the aggregate annual profit from the eight League clubs amounts to from $200,000 to $300,000. Now, if the National League wishes to carry several weak cities along, why did I not devise some scheme by which the deficiencies in those clubs sould be made up out of this enormous profit, instead of taking it out of the pockets of the players in those clubs? If, for instance, the League, instead of attempting the unjust and impossible classification scheme, had simply voted to pay the visiting club 50 per cent. instead of 25 per cent., as at present, the alleged losses of the Indianapolis and Washington clubs would have been made up out of the general profit, and there would still be sufficient left to more than compensate the magnates for the capital invested and the risk incurred.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

attendance in Boston and Brooklyn

Date Wednesday, June 12, 1889
Text

[a breakdown of attendance figures, followed by] Boston's average attendance, according to the figures given, was 5,395 per game, while that at Brooklyn was a fraction over 7,544. Had not rain prevented last Saturday's game the latter would have been still larger. The attendance at Brooklyn's exhibition games was fully 25,000 more.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the effect of the four ball base on balls

Date Wednesday, June 12, 1889
Text

[from Chadwick's column] The four-ball rule has transformed the successful, swift pitchers of 1888 into decided failures in the box in 1889, while the strategic class of headwork pitchers have become strikingly prominent from their effectiveness. Look at Clarkson and Radbourn, for instance, of the Boston team, the latter especially, and contrast their box work under the new rules with that of Krock, of Chicago, who made such a hit in 1888, not to mention others of the class of pitchers who have hitherto depended on mere speed alone for their success.

To strike out eight or ten players a game last season was an ordinary result with some of the “lightning twirlers” of 1888, while this season the strike-out records are remarkably small in comparison. All this is to the advantage of scientific work in the box, and to team work at the bat, both of which develop the beauties of the game to the point approaching perfection...

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring errors on foul balls

Date Wednesday, June 12, 1889
Text

[from Chadwick's column] Ren Mulford...says: “Don't give a fielder an error for a muffed foul fly unless the batsman reaches first base after such misplay has been made. Under the strict interpretation of the rules an error 'is a misplay which allows the striker or base-runner to make one or more bases when perfect play would have insured his being put out.'” This is a mistake. A fielder who drops a foul fly commits an error just as much as when he drops a fair fly ball, inasmuch as he thereby gives the batsman a life.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a trainer in Brooklyn

Date Wednesday, June 12, 1889
Text

[Kansas City vs. Brooklyn 6/6/1889] Long, of Kansas City...ran into O'Brien at second base in an attempt to crowd the latter out, and Darby's right No. 12 landed plump on Long's left foot. The latter was on his back in a minute rolling over apparently in a mortal agony. There was a rush of all the players to his side. Umpire Gaffney and Manager Watkins raced to the spot. Dr. McLean, the physician to the Bridgrooms, hastened from the grand stand and big Jack McMaster, the trainer, ran from the club house with a lot of plaster, lint and several other things.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring RBIs, OBA

Date Wednesday, June 12, 1889
Text

[from Ren Mulford's column] That idea of the Wilkes-barre official scorer in summarizing the hits that net runs is a good one. I have accepted Manager Hart's “reached base” column for the Times-Star's individual score... Tebeau has not been making many hits, but he reaches first base pretty often on balls and errors, and is the best waiter in the club.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Louisville record, transferring home games

Date Wednesday, June 12, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] It has been for some time an open secret that the Louisville Club was in a straitened situation. Its support at home has fallen off, for the reason that the patrons of base ball in Louisville—and they are numbered by thousands—lost interest in the club after the management, for money consideration, disposed of such men as Chamberlain, Collins and Cross, and apparently made no effort to strengthen the team. The poor success of the club naturally had its effect, and patronage fell off. … Instead of playing his [Davidson's] scheduled games at home, he is making efforts to have games scheduled to be played in Louisville transferred to other cities. He has already had four transferred to Cincinnati, everyone of which the latter, of course, won. He is now trying to have the series of games scheduled between the Athletics and Louisvilles at Louisville, transferred to Philadelphia. The result is, the press and public of Louisville are up in arms and denouncing the course pursued by the club's management. To keep on changing these games means simply and clearly the breaking up of the Louisville Club... … There is no telling where the demoralizing practice would stop or how it would end, and it is therefore well to call a halt right now... Much to their credit three clubs—Brooklyn, Kansas City and St. Louis—have refused consent to any further changes in the schedule. This whole business is another evidence of the narrow, selfish methods which govern a number of the Association clubs, who never seem to be able to see anything beyond their gate receipts and the fences enclosing their grounds or to realize that a championship won or a place in the race secured under such methods will redound but little to the credit of the club securing either in the estimation of the base ball world, and therefore at the next annual meeting of the Association the constitution should be amended to absolutely prohibit the transfer of scheduled games except in the case of single postponed games which it may be impossible to play off in any other way.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a claim that the Brush plan is being evaded

Date Wednesday, June 12, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Frank Bancroft, Pittsburgh manager] ...[the classification scheme is] a fraud as at present obeyed, for New York, Boston and Philadelphia [are] paying the men as they pleased and [will] do it next year. They say Mr. Day told Roger Connor as long as he played ball for him he would give him the same wages. Now I think the plan is a good one if lived up to by all. But now we have some men who are classified, and it riles them to have players in other teams who are lucky to give them the laugh. It makes the classified men careless, and I wouldn't wonder if we lost many a game this way. Something like it must be enforced for Indianapolis, Washington and Cleveland. Even Pittsburg can't pay the salaries the other clubs can.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring a wild pitch on the third strike-out

Date Wednesday, June 12, 1889
Text

[from Questions Answered] According to rules, yes, but in this respect we do not go by the rules in scoring. If the third strike is a wild pitch it would be manifestly unjust to give the catcher a missed third strike on it. In all such cases we give the error to the pitcher and not credit him with a strike-out.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

defining an earned run 2

Date Wednesday, June 12, 1889
Text

[from Questions Answered] All runs cored before three chances have been offered to retire the side are earned excepting those made on runners reaching first on errors, bases on balls, illegal deliveries or hit by pitched balls. A man cannot earn a run unless he reaches first base on a hit.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Day sells the Jersey City Club

Date Wednesday, June 12, 1889
Text

The Jersey City Club was sold yesterday by John B. Day to a couple of well-known Jersey City residents. Pat Powers has been elected President as well as manager. The price paid and the names of the buyers are not yet known. Jerseyites need have no fear now that any of the crack players of their team will be transferred to the New York Club. Now that the club is owned by Jersey people the residents should give the club better support.

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the potato trick 2

Date Wednesday, June 12, 1889
Text

[Yale vs. Staten Island Athletic Club 6/5/1889] Yale was at the bat, and taking advantage of the rattled condition of the Staten Island pitcher had put three men on bases. Third base was covered by L. Small, conceded to be one of the best basemen in the amateur field, but slightly given to a fondness for pranks and horse play. Bates had placed himself in position to pitch the ball when his attention was attracted by a loud “Hist” from Small, followed by “Quick! Give me the ball.” Believe that the third baseman had a chance to make a point Bates let drive at him. Small caught the ball, touched the man on the base, and then pretended to toss the ball to the pitcher, but instead of doing so he put it in the hollow of his right arm. The movement was executed so slowly and awkwardly that the spectators laughed and the man on the base smiled disdainfully. He was not to be caught by such a clumsy maneuvre.

Suddenly Small reached under his left arm with his right hand and then threw swiftly to the pitcher; but he did not throw the ball. With a quick and almost imperceptible movement he took from the left breast pocket of his shirt a round potato and tossed that. Bates caught it, looked at it for a second, and then with a gesture of annoyance threw it down towards centre field. Of course the man on the base thought the ball had been thrown, and he started for the home plate. Instantly Small took the ball from under his arm, touched the runner, and called for judgment. The umpire could give only one decision and that was “Out.”

The trick was not discovered for half a minute at least, but when it was then came the uproar. A chorus of hisses came from the ladies in the grand stand and the men groaned in unison. Manager Thomas J. Conroy was in the clubhouse at the time and was called up by the furious ringing of the telephone, followed by an angry inquiry as to whether he intended to permit Small to continue playing. Although perfectly innocent of any knowledge of what had been done, Mr. Conroy was treated to the same goosey disapproval as soon as he appeared. Mr. Small did not appear to consider that he had done anything calling for censure and felt rather proud of his achievement. He continued playing to the end of the game. Staten Island was beaten, being genuinely outplayed. Had the substitution of the potato resulted in defeating the Yale men there would have been serious trouble. At least this is the opinion of a majority of the members of the home team. quoting the New York World

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Clarence Duvall removes the hoodoo

Date Friday, June 14, 1889
Text

[Pittsburgh vs. Chicago 6/13/1889] With a negro boy as a mascot, the Chicago team won an exciting, but poorly played, game from Pittsburg to-day. Early in the morning Clarence Duvall, the hearse colored lad who accompanied Anson around the world and who was summarily dismissed six weeks ago, consented to remove the “hoodoo” he had placed on his late colleagues. He sat on the bench all through the game. It is evident from his work to-day that he is the most valuable player in the club.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the gong; pregame practice

Date Sunday, June 16, 1889
Text

[St. Louis vs. Athletic 6/15/1889] As soon as the visitors had doffed their jackets Manager Sharsig range the bell for practice and the Browns scampered on the field for the usual unlimbering. As on everything else they do, the visitors entered on the practice with a dash and vim that frequently called out applause.

At 3:30 the gong again sounded and a second later the Athletics, led by stalwart Captain Stovey, emerged from the dressing room, and there given a hearty cheer as they arranged themselves along the line preparatory to scampering off for their positions.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

confusion implementing substitute rule

Date Tuesday, June 18, 1889
Text
Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a relief pitching scheme by innings

Date Tuesday, June 18, 1889
Text

[Pittsburgh vs. Indianapolis 6/17/1889] It was a hard game to lose because it looked like a sure victory up to the sixth inning, and would have been had not Manager Bancroft, acting upon a standing order to do so daily, changed the pitchers and turned the tide in favor of the visitors. The opening game with Pittsburg was lost on the same account—the absurd plan of changing pitchers in the middle of every game, no matter how well the man who starts in is doing. That this plan caused yesterday's defeat cannot be doubted for a moment. It may be well enough to take a man out of the box if he is being hit freely, but to do so when he is pitching remarkably well, as was the case with G3tzein yesterday, is, to express it mildly, stupid direction. The German was doing great work, and expressed a desire to remain in the box, but was not allowed to do so. The visitors earned one run in the second inning, but after that they could not touch his delivery with any success, only four hits being made up to the time he retired. The team was supporting him in fine form and was hitting Galvin with great freedom. It was almost a sure thing that the Hoosiers would win until Burdick went into the box, at the opening of the sixth, when he was hit for three singles, a double, a triple and a home run in quick order. This, with an error by Glassock allowed five men to cross the plate.

...Just where the home management discovered this new plan is not very clear, and it is altogether probable that it will be abandoned; at least it should be. The players do not like it, and Manager Bancroft is also strongly opposed to it. He very sensibly argues that if a pitcher cannot hold up through nine innings when he is in good condition, he is of no account and does not earn his salary. If a man weakens and the opposing batters hit his delivery hard and often, then and only then, is there any sense in making a change. The Indianapolis team would have won three games instead of one from Pittsburg, had it not been for this new idea. In the case of Rusie it was a wise move to take him out, for the reason that he was being hit hard and was nervous and wild. But Getzein was doing the best work he has done this season, and the change was a great mistake. It is true, many games have been lost after the sixth inning when the pitcher has done good work up to that point ,and President Brush, hoping to turn the current, concluded to try this plan. It is a failure. The best managers in the country say it is an unwise thing to take a pitcher out in the middle of a game when he is doing even average work.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Louisville Club on strike; Davidson loses it

Date Wednesday, June 19, 1889
Text

There is a crisis in the affairs of the Louisville Club. If Manager Davidson is not an insane man his actions would indicate it. He fined Shannon, Cook and Raymond $25 each for errors made in Thursday's game. Each one of these men played an earnest game to win. In addition, Davidson gave the team notice that if they did not win Friday's game every man of them would receive a find of $25 more. Very naturally the men protested, but owing to the excited talk and frantic actions of Davidson, did it in a neat and novel manner, and in such a way that he could not distinguish the order of signing the document, which was the regular form of a sailor's “round robin,” signed by the entire team of ten men.

This mild and respectful protest only served to agitate Davidson all the more, and he became furious, threatening to fine each player $100. This brought matters to a climax, and the players absolutely are on a strike. In the game started yesterday only six Louisville players appeared, and Gaul, Fisher and John Traffley, three Baltimore semi-professionals, played the outfield for Louisville until rain ended the farce at the close of the second inning. Davidson left town with the avowed intention of attending the Association meeting in New York. The Louisville players telegraphed President Wikoff for advice, but had not received a reply last night [6/14]

[a supplement later the same day] The strike of the Louisville players continues. Two games are to be played this afternoon, and one of them is now in progress with but six of the Louisville players, viz:--Wolf, Weaver, Stratton, Gleason, Vaughn and Ramsey. Three amateurs make up the nine. President Wikoff and Mr. Waltz were to-day closeted with the strikers, but they refused to be moved from the stand which they have taken unless the fines already imposed are remitted and the threats withdrawn. Manager Davidson refuses to do either. President Wikoff says he is powerless to do more than advise, and leaves for his home in Columbus to-morrow. The Sporting Life June 19, 1889

[reporting the AA special meeting of 6/14/1889] The purpose for which the meeting was called was well known, to wit: to ascertain the exact status of the Louisville Club, a member of the Association, the poor work of the club, and its straitened financial condition warranting the other clubs in taking steps to protect their mutual interests. … ...Mr. Davidson, on behalf of the Louisville Club, had made some propositions to the Association, admitting he was in trouble, which were not favorably entertained, and that, therefore, he was placed in a position where he must carry out his games as scheduled or suffer the consequences. … It appears that Mr. Davidson owns, on behalf of himself and others, whom he represents, merely a controlling interest of the Louisville Club stock, and he being desirous of holding on to his stock urged the Association, while admitting to his inability perhaps to pull through to protect him financially to enable him to meet his obligations. This he stated openly to all with whom he talked at the hotel. The other clubs of the Association, it leaked out, were willing to advance a liberal amount of money, enough to work out the season, providing some security was given or good faith was shown in the matter of carrying out all obligations. No positive assurance could be given, and the only alternative left was to insist on the Louisville Club fulfilling its obligations.

It was reported subsequently that Mr. Davidson was asked to name a figure at which he would dispose of the controlling interest in the club to the Association, the latter to accept the same as an option, and to make efforts to sell the club to Louisville parties who had expressed a willingness to purchase, run the club, and spend money to put new life and vigor into the organization. No terms could be agreed upon and Mr. Davidson determined that he could better protect his interests after he reached home.

The desire to keep Louisville a member of the Association was unanimous, and such it will remain if thre are any enterprising men in that city to assume a reasonable risk. No player will be released or sold until ample time has been given for property national for sale of the club, and in the event of the club not fulfilling all its obligations its disbandment naturally follows, and the players revert to the Association. If this emergency arises, it is safe to assume from newspaper reports and telegrams sent to a number of the prominent men in the Association little difficulty will be experienced in placing the club in responsible hands and on a substantial basis. The Sporting Life June 19, 1889

[from the Louisville correspondent] If Manager Charley Byrne and his Brooklyn team were to appear on the Louisville grounds this afternoon they would receive a royal welcome. Mr. Bryne has made himself a perpetual favorite in Louisville by the emphatic manner in which he informed Mr. Davidson that he could not sell off the team piece-meal. That he would do so was the result eared by all enthusiasts here, notwithstanding his frequent assertions to the contrary. The Sporting Life June 26, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Clarence Duval released

Date Wednesday, June 19, 1889
Text

Spalding handed mascot Clarence Duval a $10 note last Saturday, and released him from his five years' contract. Clarence says that he has queered the Chicagos because Baldwin and Daly put him under the hydraulic on board the return steamer.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

morning versus afternoon newspapers

Date Wednesday, June 19, 1889
Text

In the new Brooklyn grand stand the morning newspaper men are separated from the reporters of the afternoon papers. This is a happy thought and merits the attention of all clubs in cities where large numbers of the journalistic fraternity turn out to witness the games, because the average newspaper pen is anything but a comfortable place to work in; not because of lack of room, but because, as a rule, the morning paper contingent are present to work while the rest of the newspaper men gather simply to have a good view of the game, talk shop and exchange views with more or less emphasis.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a late fair-foul

Date Wednesday, June 19, 1889
Text

[St. Louis vs. Brooklyn 6/18/1889] Now came a play which puzzled the crowd–grandstand occupants as well as the bleachers. Collins bunted a ball high enough in the air to prevent it being a hit direct to the ground, and, as it fell on fair ground and then rolled on foul ground–Collins ran to first on the hit... and everyone expected to hear the umpire call foul. But he apparently was the only one to see the point of the play, and when he decided it a fair ball there was a dispute. ... Of course when the point taken was explained there was prompt acquiescence, but the crowd could not understand it a bit.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early use of “high sky”

Date Thursday, June 20, 1889
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Chicago 6/19/1889] A “high sky” rendered the judging of fly balls a difficult matter, yet there was some pretty work done by the outfield, Farrell, Wood, and Fogarty each making one or more clever catches of hard hit balls.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring mental errors

Date Friday, June 21, 1889
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Chicago 6/20/1889] Under the present system of scoring Van has no errors charged to his account on the score. If errors of judgment could be scored, however, Van's name would be supplemented with two black marks in the fifth column.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Young instructs close calls should go to the home team

Date Friday, June 21, 1889
Text

In extenuation of his wretched work as an umpire Barnum declares that, under President Young's instructions, all close decisions should be given to the home club. Judging from the gentleman's umpiring, he must have mistaken the word “decisions” in Mr. Young's instructions for the word “games.

Source ” Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an infield fly triple play

Date Friday, June 21, 1889
Text

[Washington vs. Indianapolis 6/20/1889] Again, when the visitors accomplished a triple play in the eighth Lynch displayed an utter lack of ability. Any one could see that Irwin dropped the pop fly of Hines purposely, and under the rules the batter alone should have been called out. Instead, [umpire] Lynch stood like a wooden Indian, leaving three runners on base helpless on account of his stupidity in failing to make his decision promptly and giving the men a chance to run. As they all knew that Hines was the only man who could be called out under the rules, they remained in their places until it was too late to save themselves.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

gate receipt split and the classification rule; grandstand

Date Monday, June 24, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Hewitt] He says there are five members of the League who favor the equal division of the gate receipts, and only one vote is needed to carry the point. If such a modification in the rules can be effect he will be willing to abolish the classification rule and make his own terms with his players. Mr. Hewitt says he believes the day is not far distant when there will be a general demand for an equal division of the receipts. He says the attendance at Capital Park so far this season, has exceeded that at Staten Island. In Philadelphia a club has to draw about 2,400 people to get more than the guarantee. The grand-stand there is the most profitable part of the Philadelphia enterprise. People there kick about paying 50 cents to go in at the gate, the yet majority of them put up an additional 25 cents to get into the grand stand. This of course operates to the disadvantage of the visiting clubs. All of these matters have to be considered in connection with the classification rule, in the interest of promoting meritorious players and giving them reasonable compensation for their services. Mr. Hewitt insists that the life and elevation of the game demands the continuance of the classification rule or a similar provision.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reporters touring with the club

Date Tuesday, June 25, 1889
Text

Tim Murnane, of the Boston Globe, and Edward Stevens, of the Herald, are with the Boston club, and will make the tour through the West.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

mimic games telegraphed to an auditorium

Date Wednesday, June 26, 1889
Text

An ingenious Bostonian is coining money by means of a device which he has duly copyrighted, whereby the ball cranks of the Hub can be given almost as good an exhibition of the games played by their club abroad as they could from their own grand-stand were the games played at home. He has rented Music Hall, and on a huge blackboard, covering a large portion of one end of the auditorium, the ball field is represented. The players are represented by pins placed in the positions the men occupy. An operator sits in the Indianapolis grand-stand, for instance, and as each man steps to the plate the result of his effort is promptly wired, and the pin so moved as to indicate exactly what has happened. Base hits, errors, runs, fly catches, assists—everything, in short, is exactly reproduced. Five thousand people in Boston witnessed the Boston-Indianapolis game by this means yesterday and day before at 10 cents a head. Indianapolis Journal June 26, 1889

The game of the Philadelphia and Indianapolis teams yesterday [played in Philadelphia] was shown on McDaniel's black-board at Tomlinson Hall to about 500 people. That of to-day will be presented with the little annoyances that attended the first presentation wholly overcome. Ladies are admitted free. Indianapolis Journal July 9, 1889

The Philadelphia-Indianapolis game at Tomlinson Hall, yesterday afternoon, was witnessed by a much larger crowd than the opening game, and the apparatus worked more perfectly, very few mistakes occurring. To-day's game will be called at 3 o'clock prompt, Indianapolis time. Beside the game played on the black-board, showing the plays as they occur, two large score-boards have been placed on the stage, to be sued in scoring all the games. Indianapolis Journal July 10, 1889

The base-ball games at Tomlinson Hall are attracting large crowds, and the thorough manner in which they are given makes them very interesting. Every detail of the contest is shown as it occurs, even down to the number of balls, strikes, fouls, and all other minor incidents of that character, as rapidly as they take place. Men are seen on the bases, and every movement is noted with accuracy. When a hit is made it is known to what part of the field the ball went, and how it was handled. A new feature has been added to the system in the way of two large score boards, one for the Hoosiers and the other for their opponents, on which a complete score of the game is kept, showing just how every play is made. In this way the contest can be followed from start to finish. When a brilliant play is made it is so announced, even to the extent of telling with what hand the fielder picked up the ball. In short, the game is as complete as one could wish. Indianapolis Journal July 12, 1889

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an upcoming conference between the Brotherhood and the League; the Brush plan

Date Wednesday, June 26, 1889
Text

The Brotherhood's demands will be discussed by the League and Brotherhood committee at Chicago next week. The demands are:

Abolition of classification and re-imbursement for all loss by its operation covered by contract.

No reservation for a salary less than previous year.

Absolute abolition of the practice of selling players.

If no agreement is reached a strike may come. The Sporting Life June 26, 1889

Before starting for Cleveland Monday night short stop Ward, president of the Ball Player's Brotherhood, said that a conference will be held shortly, probably at Chicago, between committees representing the Brotherhood and League. Ward, of New York, Hanlon, of Pittsburg, and Brouthers, of Boston, will look after the interest of the players, and Day, of New York; Rogers, of Philadelphia, and Spalding, of Chicago, the League's. The object of the conference is to take definite action in regard to the classification system, which the Brotherhood has resolved to fight to the end. “Salary limits and classification systems,” said an officer of the Brotherhood... “will be knocked in the head altogether. A ball player is worth all a club can afford to give him, and he will get it. These schemes are devised by mean managers who want to keep the men down to rock-bottom prices in order to enable them to pocket big dividends. On account of the reserve rule, which is a necessity, we cannot play where we please, but we can and will defeat schemes of the classification order.” The Sporting Life June 26, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Caylor sells the Carthage Democrat

Date Wednesday, June 26, 1889
Text

[from Caylor's column] I have sold the Democrat for nearly twice what I paid for it a little over a year ago, and consider my fifteen months spent in this section a pretty good thing for myself. How it has appeared to some of the people who live here I will not venture to say.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Day opposed to the Brush plan; it is being evaded?

Date Wednesday, June 26, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] President Day, of the New York Club, comes out plump against the classification rule. He opposed its adoption in the first place and has been sore against it ever since, because he was badly used up in the debate upon it at the League meeting and utterly routed when it came to a vote; and his present stand will therefore create no surprise among his colleagues. Of course he has a right to his opinion, but he has no right to publicly inveigh against the rule on the ground that in its application it has been a failure, and that it has been evaded. A penalty of two thousand dollars is attached for violation of the rule, and if Mr. Day, or any member of the Brotherhood, know of any violation of the rule it is their duty to bring such violation to the attention of the League, in order that the dignity of the law, so long as it is a law, may be upheld and the offenders duly punished. It is a very easy matter to charge evasion, (which, by the way, involves rank perjury); the thing is to particularize and made the charge good. Let us have hard facts instead of vague innuendo.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

baseball finances and the gate receipt split

Date Wednesday, June 26, 1889
Text

[from Frank Brunell's column] The most novel point in sight is the proposition of President John B. Day, of the New York,s who offers to divide the gate receipts with the visiting club as a remedy for unequal financial ability of the clubs. It is a fair proposition. Mr. Day is a fair man with a strong leaning to League support rather than club support—the fundamental idea in the business department of the game. But it would not equalize. Here is a little tabl3 with illustrates this fact:

Expenses, New York team..................................... $70,000.00

Seventy games at $2000—each one half................ $70,000.00

Home profit.............................................. $00,000.00

Seventy games foreign $1500, each one half …... $52,500.00

This represents say New York profits—a pretty little sum, but less than usual.

Now turn the figures on Cleveland and show its income at an average of $1800 per home game and its team nearly as good a drawing car away from home as New York, but costing $15,000 less.

Expenses, Cleveland team.................................... $55.000

Seventy home games, $900, each half................. $34,500

Loss on home series................................ $23,500

Seventy foreign games, $1000, each half............. $35,000

Profit on season....................................... $11,500

Look at the difference. And it is increased when one considers the grad stand profits in New York, Boston and Chicago, as against those of Cleveland, Indianapolis and Washington. I have given nearly actual figures, and they do not give the fair view of things, because the Cleveland team's success this year is phenomenal and the expenses light. With such a team another year it will cost $65,000 for salaries, grounds, general expenses, offices, etc., and there is a profit of $1500 left—not enough to cause such an investment to be made. May Day's principle in eye is ruinous. He would buy all the talent of the land, pay it high prices, and make a lot of money yearly. That's wise and good—fro Mr. Day. But his prices are standard price, and set the price pace for Cleveland, who, if it gets in $70,000 at the gate in one season, is doing better than New York if it takes in $200,000. This is the point to keep in eye. It is a geographical handicap which cannot be wiped out by division of the gate receipts.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

attendance in Philadelphia

Date Wednesday, June 26, 1889
Text

The attendance at the Athletic-St. Louis games in this city [Philadelphia] was:-- Thursday, 9081; Friday, 6194; Saturday, 10,714; Sunday (estimate) 12,000, and Monday, 8461; total, 46,450. The Quaker City is somewhat of a ball town, eh?

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

elevated pitcher's box; mound

Date Thursday, June 27, 1889
Text

Manager Phillips has discovered why all pitchers who come here are more effective on these grounds than they are on their own respective grounds. He states that this is caused by the rear part of the box being elevated a little. He will have it leveled down to-day.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a botched infield fly play; early use of “trap”

Date Friday, June 28, 1889
Text

[Washington vs. Pittsburgh 6/27/1889] [bases loaded with no outs] Wise then knocked an easy one into short right field. Dunlap ran for it and “trapped” it, expecting to make a double or triple play. Beckley, however, was away from first and failed to catch Dunlap's throw. As a result Hoy scored and three men were still left on bases. The mistake caused animated comment, some people blaming Beckley and others blaming Dunlap. The latter claimed that he shouted to Beckley to get on his base, and if this was so Dunlap's play was a very wise one. Manager Phillips states that Dunlap did just as he ought to have done. It is probable that Beckley did not hear Dunlap, and was not expecting a play of the kind. Dunlap, however, was exceedingly indignant.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

mimic games telegraphed to the music hall

Date Sunday, June 30, 1889
Text

Immense crowds have attended the mimic games played by electricity here [Boston] in Music Hall daily, and the enterprise has been crowned with the greatest success. There is great applause at every successful play of the Bostons. All of the Western games of the Bostons will be reported in this way. Chicago Tribune June 30, 1889 [See also CT 890707c]

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Harry Wright on the American Association

Date Monday, July 1, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Wright] There is always considerable distrust in that organization [the AA], as one club is invariably suspecting another making a move to join the League. This proves that the Association members themselves look to the League as a superior organization. However, there is plenty of room in the country for both, and if Brooklyn were to take Washington's place in the League there is no reason why Washington should not become an Association. City. There are plenty second-class cities that could be secured which would still keep the Association ahead of all the minor leagues.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Kelly cutting corners

Date Wednesday, July 3, 1889
Text

[Boston vs. Chicago 7/2/1889] Kelly cut third fully six feet yesterday in the third innings on Brouthers' drive to right, but Lynch did not see it and would not allow it when Dwyer ran to the plate, took the ball from Farrell, and tossed it to Burns. This is an old trick of Kell's. Many is the time he has worked it successfully for Chicago.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Spalding puts off the Brotherhood

Date Wednesday, July 3, 1889
Text

While the New Yorks were in Chicago last week President Ward, of the Brotherhood of Ball Players, as chairman of the committee representing his organization, called upon President Spalding and laid before him the questions for the consideration of which President Young has appointed Messrs. Spalding, Day and Rogers a League committee. The details of the conference are not know, as it was conducted privately. It lasted for fully two hours, however, and the questions at issue—the existing classification rule and the proposed abolition of the sales system—were, it is understood, freely discussed.

This much has been learned definitely. President Ward is desirous of arranging a meeting between the two committees at once and President Spalding has not fully made up his mind that the questions at issue are of sufficiently urgent nature to warrant such action. Mr. Spalding, as chairman of the League committee, has taken the matter under advisement, however, and will confer further with the Brotherhood committee. The Sporting Life July 3, 1889

[Spalding’s reply to Ward] “Since my conversation with you on the 24 th ult. I have been in communication with Messrs. Rogers and Day, the other members of the committee appointed by the League to consider all grievances of League players not especially provided for by the League constitution. It is the unanimous opinion of this committee that it is inadvisable to hold a meeting with the Brotherhood Committee at present for the reason that no material interests will suffer by postponing this meeting and for the principal reason that all this committee could do would be to report the result of the conference with recommendation to the League at a special or at the annual meeting. It is contrary to the past policy of the League to call a special meeting in mid-season except for some extraordinary emergency, and we fail to discovery any necessity for immediate action in the points you raise. If it shall appear upon investigation that any wrong has been done any player, whether a member of the Brotherhood or not, it can and will be righted at the annual meeting of the League. Therefore, as chairman of the League Committee, I would suggest that the meeting of the committee be deferred until after the close of the championship season, or until the annual meeting of the League, the exact time and place of such meeting to be decided upon as the time approaches.” The Philadelphia Item July 5, 1889

There will not be any meeting of the League and Brotherhood committees in the near future if the League has its way, as Chairman Spalding, after his long interview with Chairman Ward and due consideration with his fellow committeemen, has concluded that there is no urgent necessity for a mid-summer meeting. The Sporting Life July 10, 1889

[editorial matter] From a League standpoint, in dealing with an organization like the Brotherhood one of two courses must inevitably be pursued. It must be crushed or conciliated. As the League cannot afford, and also has not the nerve, to attempt the crushing-out task, it is surely poor policy to widen the breach and make conciliation more difficult and submission by the players less probable by assuming an attitude of indifference. It would be far better for the League to quit temporizing; meet the issue squarely and at one; to reason with the players; to convince them by irrefutable arguments of the supreme necessity for the classification rule or some similar preservative measure, and having thus made clear its position to leave the alternative or future peace or war to the Brotherhood. A conference at this time would give the latter ample time between now and next fall to consider the situation and to come to a realizing sense of the exigencies and necessities of professional base ball, which so often compel seemingly harsh legislation; and a mutual exchange of views right now may lead to some measure far better than could be evolved in the hurry of an annual meeting. The Sporting Life July10, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Brotherhood's grievances

Date Wednesday, July 3, 1889
Text

There has been much speculation as to the exact nature of the Brotherhood's recent communication to the League. This letter both President Young and the Brotherhood have persistently refused to make public, but is herewith given in full:

New York, May 24-- N. E. Young, President—My Dear Sir:-- At a meeting between the League and Brotherhood committees in the fall of 1887 the former agreed for the League that players should not be reserved at a reduction of salary. In pursuance of this agreement the new contract was made to read that the player could not be reserved at a salary less than that mentioned in paragraph 20 of the contract, the understanding being that the full salary would be inserted. This last the League claimed to be unable to do because of the refusal of the American Association to agree to the repeal of the obsolete $2000 limit rule. But this need not have interfered in any way with its fulfillment of the agreement itself—not to reserve at a reduction of salary. In the application of the classification scheme the League has violated its promise by holding men at a reduced salary. At the annual meeting of the representative body of the Brotherhood last week it was resolved to insist upon a fulfillment by the League of its agreement, and to respectfully but firmly ask that justice be done in the case of those players who have been injured by this default. The evil of the “sales system” was also earnestly considered. The sentiment of the players was that it is unjust, unnecessary, never contemplated by the reserve rule, a crying disgrace to clubs and players and a blot upon the national game, which, it was decided, the Brotherhood would all in its power to wipe out. A committee, consisting of Messrs. Hanlon, Brouthers and Ward, was appointed to communicate with the League and lay before it the sentiments of the players. This committee will be pleased to present the case in its entirety, either by letter or in person as you may suggest, advising only that the players desire to see the matter settled at the earliest possible day. Yours respectfully, Edward Hanlon, D. J. Brouthers, John M. Ward, Committee.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

talk of an Association brotherhood

Date Wednesday, July 3, 1889
Text

[from the Louisville correspondent] The St. Louis men being here to play their series, they and the Louisville men held several conferences Saturday evening and night, and the news got out that they had organized an Association Brotherhood of Base Ball Players, patterned after that of the League. All the players of each club joined it. They were very secret about the affair and refused absolutely to talk to any reporters concerning it. I asked several of them if such an association had been formed, but they politely refused to say yes or no and walked away. That such a society has been formed there is no doubt, but the exact nature of its regulations and aims cannot be defined. A paper was drawn up and all the men signed it. A copy of this paper was taken away by the St. Louis men when they left and the original was carried with the Louisvilles when they went to Kansas City, so I am informed. For some time it had been intended to take such a step as this by the Association players and the plan had been hurried up by the treatment of the Louisville players at Baltimore. They and St. Louis will carry the articles of agreements to all the other clubs to sign.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a rumor of a planned July 4 strike

Date Wednesday, July 3, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] The air is full of rumors of an impending strike by the League players, unless their demand for a hearing is promptly acceded to, and some of the know-alls even fix upon July Fourth as the precise date for this portentous event. If the Brotherhood really contemplates such a move it should take grave counsel with itself. Such a step at this time would inevitably defeat all the ends the players have in view. It would mean temporary disorganization for the League and grave financial consequences to the various clubs, which would surely be shared by the players; public opinion would be turned against the players who would place themselves in a false position as contract breakers and thereby render themselves liable to various harassing legal proceedings; and finally any triumph achieved or concessions gained by means of a mid-season strike would be but short-lived, and any obligations assumed by the League under such conditions would be inevitably repudiated at the earliest possible moment. The value and efficacy of strikes as a means of redressing grievances and forcing concessions depend altogether upon the conditions governing the case, and in this instance the conditions are altogether unfavorable to the hopes and chances of the players. Unlike manufacturers, base ball clubs are not in position to be materially or permanently damaged, they have no valuable plant or vast capital to lie idle at great loss; no product subject to damage; there is not a single official connected with any club in any manner dependent upon base ball for subsistence; and, finally, base ball is not a necessary of life, but a luxury, and the laws of supply and demand affect it but little. So it will be seen that a base ball strike will only, in the end, inflict serious injury upon those having most at stake in the matter—the players, whose livelihood depends altogether upon the game, and whose interests are therefore too inextricably bound up with those of the League to make a strike either desirable or profitable. Let us have no more talk of a strike.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no alcohol sold on Sunday in Cincinnati

Date Wednesday, July 3, 1889
Text

The best behaved crowds at the Cincinnati park are the Sunday crowds, for the reason that not a drop of liquor is sold on that day. The reform is a good one to work seven days in seven. The thirsty can find relief in “pop,” lemonade and ginger ale at least two hours out of twenty-four.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

collegians travel to England

Date Wednesday, July 3, 1889
Text

Mr. Chadwick's pet notion that the proper way to introduce base ball into England would be through gentleman amateur channels apparently has fallen into fruitful ground, and is to receive a practical trial, judging from a despatch to this effect:

New Haven, Ct., June 28.--Some time ago the ball players on the Harvard and Yale College teams conceived the idea of making a trip to Europe. The plans for such a trip have now been completed, and they are to sail on July 6 by the Cunard steamship Umbria, so the report states, and are to be gone for the summer months. It is said that the boys are to be paid for their services at the rate of $20 per week, although to avoid the taint of professionalism, this is to be paid for personal expenses. …

There is no truth in the report that Al Spalding has a hand in or is backing the trip, although he will doubtless watch the matter with keenest interest. Captain Noyes, of the Yale nine, said of the matter to-day:-- “We will start for England July 6, but we are not going over under the direction of an English syndicate. We intend going for the fun there is in it and also to learn to play cricket. We will join some cricket club near London, probably, and while there we will instruct the English cricketers how to play our national game, while they instruct us in the rudiments of theirs.” The Sporting Life July 3, 1889

The base ball team, composed of the best players from Yale, Harvard and Princeton Universities, which will show the English cricketers how to play America's game, sails for Europe to-day [7/6], on the steam Umbria. The team is under the management of J. W. Curtis, an old graduate of Yale University, and goes to Europe in response to an invitation from several English gentlemen who are desirous of having the game introduced in that country. It has been arranged for the team to play with the cricketers of Oxford and Cambridge universities and several cricket elevens in and around London. The Sporting Life July 10, 1889

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the New Polo Grounds

Date Wednesday, July 3, 1889
Text

The new grounds, as The Sporting Life readers have already heard, are situated at One Hundred and Fifty-fifth street and Eighth avenue, and take in two blocks. The contractors are hard at work getting it in shape, and if they keep their contracts the Giants will open , as the park will be called, July 8, A large force of men are at work and much progress has been made. In between the two blocks, which are, perhaps, twenty feet below the street level, Mr. Coogan had built a street. This street must be dug away and the whole field graded evenly. It was at first thought that this work could be done very quickly, but experience shows it to be a tremendous job. However, sixty carts and 500 men can make things hum, and the embankment is rapidly disappearing. The outside fences are all up and the place really begins to look like a ball ground.

The grand stand, of course, is the main point of interest, and if promises go for anything it will be the largest and best in the country, although not so elaborate in architectural design as the grand stands are in Boston and Philadelphia. It will be 410 feet in length extending on the line of One Hundred and Fifty-fifth street, and 320 feet on the front line. The stand in shape will be a large segment of a circle with straight sides, having an average depth of fifty feet with a second tier or balcony having an average dept of 31 feet. The seating capacity will be 5500. This together with the bleachery accommodations will enable the club to seat 15,000 people. The stand will be substantial, but will be built on framed trusses, bolted together so that in case of necessity the whole business can be taken down and put up elsewhere.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

throwing firecrackers onto the field

Date Friday, July 5, 1889
Text

[Washington vs. Chicago 7/4/1889] The “bleachers” had any amount of fun throwing “crackers” at the old man while he stood at first. One “giant” cracker almost scared him into dropping a fly ball, but he took it good naturedly. He had to.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an AA two umpire game

Date Friday, July 5, 1889
Text

[Brooklyn vs. St. Louis 7/4/1889] The double umpire system was given a trial and worked fairly well. Jack Kerins took care of the bases while Gaffney judged the balls and strikes. St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the defunct Detroit Club attaches Boston Club’s receipts

Date Saturday, July 6, 1889
Text

Late on Thursday evening the old Detroit League Club sued the Boston Club for $500 and interest, and attached the receipts of the games on that day in the hands of the Cleveland Club. They cover the claim, amounting to about $4,700 in all. It is a move that the old Detroit Club has been contemplating all the year, only waiting for the Boston Club to get here [Cleveland] to take action. The suit is one of the side issues of the Detroit sell out. Boston agreed to take Brouthers, Bennett, Richardson, Ganzel and White. It don’t [sic] want White, but agreed to take him for the moral effect it had on th other men. When they signed and White grew obstreperous it gave Boston a chance to get out, and it agreed to pay Detroit $500 to take him off its hands. He secured the League’s consent and transferred White to Pittsburgh.

This was in March. After it was done Boston coolly repudiated the deal, and Stearns brought suit. The base ball contract and its peculiar relations to law will not come into court by way of this suit. It is on a side contract only. When the receipts for the Thursday games were all footed up it was found that the amounted to about $11,000. This was the best attendance in the country.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Saturday half day for baseball; labor history

Date Saturday, July 6, 1889
Text

Secretary Douglass, of the Young Men's Christian Association, thinks the solution of the Sunday base-ball question can be found in the athletic park it is proposed to open within a few weeks. But to make the enterprise a success in that respect, he says a half-holiday will be necessary. If all the time of young men is used in business during the week days they cannot get the full benefit of the park, and, therefore, he urges a half holiday for the summer months. He has already a list of 600 young men who will make use of the grounds, provided their employers give them the time for recreation desired. More than one thousand, he says, can be induced to go to the park, and forgo Sunday ball-playing if the half holiday is obtained. Beginning to-day Saturday afternoon, recreation is to be given to the employees of W. B. Burford.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scientific batting 4

Date Sunday, July 7, 1889
Text

[New York vs. Pittsburgh 7/5/1889] Dunlap's hitting was of the scientific kind, because every time he went to bat there were men on bases, and Fred just placed hits in nice comfortable localities.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the White and Rowe settlement

Date Sunday, July 7, 1889
Text

It will doubtless be interesting to patrons of the local club to know that the White and Rowe difficulty has finally been settled, and that the two players named will joint the Pittsburg team at New York tomorrow or Tuesday.

Manager Phillips stated last evening that since White was here negotiations have been going on with ex-President Stearns, of Detroit, and that everything has been satisfactorily arranged. At any rate, Messrs. White and Rose wired to President Nimick yesterday to the effect that they will join the club at New York as stated above.

The local officials refuse to state what the terms of settlement are, but it is understood that both this club and Mr. Stearns have made concessions to the players. The principal concession, it is stated, has been made by Mr. Stearns, who has given the players half of their purchase money. The price of each player was reduced, that is the local club has not paid as much for the releases as was originally bargained for. Part of this difference has been given to the players by the Pittsburg club, and Stearns has given the balance. At any rate the players have carried their point by getting half of their purchase money, although the amount is not as big as it was intended to be.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Harry Wright on pitchers on the roster

Date Sunday, July 7, 1889
Text

That veteran, Harry Wright, told me the other day that three good pitchers are plenty for a club to carry, and, he added, that he can always get along best when he has only the three, providing they are in form.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Boston stiffs the Detroit Club

Date Sunday, July 7, 1889
Text

Late Thursday evening [7/4] the old Detroit League Club sued the Boston Club for $500 and interest, and attached the receipts of the games of the Fourth in the hands of the Cleveland Club. They cover the claim amounting to about $4,700 in all. It is a move that the old Detroit Club has been contemplating all the year, only waiting for Boston to get here to move. The suit is one of the side issues of the Detroit sell-out. Boston agreed to take Brouthers, Bennett, Richardson, Ganzel, and White. It didn't want White, but agreed to take him for the moral effect it had on the other men. When they signed, and White grew obstreperous, it gave Boson a chance to get out and it agreed to pay Detroit $500 to take him off its hands. They secured the league's consent, and transferred White to Pittsburg. This was in March. After it was done Boston coolly repudiated the deal, and Stearns sues for its fulfillment. The baseball contract and its peculiar relations to law will not come into the courts by way of this suit. It is on a side contract only.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

proportion of grandstand to general admission tickets

Date Sunday, July 7, 1889
Text

When the receipts for the Thursday [7/4] games [Boston vs. Cleveland] it was found that the attendance was 19,600 and the receipts about $11,600.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the financial failure of the Louisville Club

Date Wednesday, July 10, 1889
Text

On Wednesday, no avenue of escape having meantime opened itself, and the wherewithal to pay the salaries—aggregating $3200 per month—not being forthcoming, Mr. Davidson pursued the only other course open to him—that is, place the club in the hands of the Association. He wrote a letter to President Wikoff explaining the situation, and directed him to sell the club for him. Mr. Davidson will, of course, get what it brings, and will settle with the other shareholders upon that basis should the club franchise be sold.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a description of Coogan's Bluff

Date Wednesday, July 10, 1889
Text

[from J. F. Donnolly's column] Another circumstance in connection with the [new Polo] ground is that it is below the level of the street, while overhanging it on the west is a big bluff from which a good-sized audience can view the game most comfortably. In addition, the bluf throws a deep shadow over the diamond, and as the sun gets behind it about 5 o'clock every evening it may possibly be necessary to commence the game some thirty minutes earlier than the two hours before sun-set prescribed by the rules. … I must confess that I cannot see anything peculiarly bright in the prospects of the club at the new location.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the duration of the reserve

Date Wednesday, July 10, 1889
Text

[from the Pittsburgh correspondent] I may be giving a little of the inside, when I say that the Brotherhood has discovered a flaw in the contract by which any man, it seems, can get his release after laying off a year. Does not the contract say the party of the second part agrees to be reserved the following year? “now,” as Deacon put it, “this means one year, and not years, and the Brotherhood decided that Rowe's case should be made the test case of this defect. They got good lawyers to examine it, who decided that there was nothing to prevent him from getting his release this way.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

baseball shoes

Date Wednesday, July 10, 1889
Text

No department in base ball has made greater progress in late years than base-running and incidentally fielding, and yet one of the underlying causes is overlooked by the critics of the game and onlookers. It is a fact that the speed of our modern base-runners, and the celerity of movement of the fielders, in the major leagues, at least, is due to the modern base ball shoe, more than any other single cause. Everybody knows how much freedom of movement depends upon the foot covering. If this is so in every walk of life how much more must it apply to athletics. It is a fact that weight added to shoes impedes and reduces the speed of spring runners, and this is equally true of ball players. In former years the base ball shoe was a clumsy article of canvas and sole leather, heavy and ill-fitting. Now the base ball shoe worn by the major league players fits like a glove and is as light as human ingenuity can make it. In fact, the base ball shoe has kept up in line of progress with the ball, which is now perfect. The man who has brought about this revolution in base ball shoes is Waldo M. Claffin, of this city, whose advertisement appears in another column. Mr. Claffin, who is personally known to us as an expert in his line, is the pioneer in the improvement of base ball shoes. He made a specialty of this one article, and for years labored and experimented, until, at great expense, the shoe was brought to its present perfect condition. He expended nearly $600 alone for dies to make the shoe plates, which add so vastly to the value of this shoe, and in the direction of other improvements, too, he spent considerable money; so much in fact, that although he enjoys the sole custom of every player in the League and Association, with but three exceptions, as well be seen by the correct list of noted wearers published in another column by Mr. Claffin, he has not yet gotten back his original outlay. Mr. Claffin has been handicapped somewhat by the high price of his shoes, made necessary by the fine quality of the goods and the great care taken in their manufacture, which has enabled inferior imitations to undersell him. The superior and unrivaled Claffin shoe, however, is forcing its way into general recognition and coming into universal use. There is no good reason why major league players should monopolize these shoes. True, their large salaries enable them to pay the high price of the Claffin shoe with less concern than the lower salaried minor league players, but the latter should not let a matter of a dollar or two weight with them in the purchase of an article so necessary to their comfort and so conducive to better work in their profession, and by means of which their records and reputations can be materially bettered. In this case the best is the cheapest in the long run. All players ought to wear the Claffin shoe.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

beer at the Polo Grounds

Date Friday, July 12, 1889
Text

Beer is openly sold on the New York grounds. Let us hear no more about the sale of beer on Association grounds.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player loan

Date Friday, July 12, 1889
Text

The Cleveland Club to-day released catcher Joseph Lohback to the Milwaukee team of the Western Association. He agreed on terms, and started for Milwaukee. A side agreement binds the Milwaukee Club to return him to Cleveland at the end of the season. The man will be a great catcher with a little more experience, and is a throwing wonder.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a block ball candidate

Date Saturday, July 13, 1889
Text

[Chicago vs. Philadelphia 7/12/1889] Wood, the Phillies’ first batsman, in the sixth hit an easy grounder to Dwyer, and the latter threw it over Anson’s head into the right-field seats, Wood coming all the way home on the error.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

dirty tricks

Date Sunday, July 14, 1889
Text

The Boston Globe scores Curry for his umpiring on Wednesday; says the crowd sympathized with the Spiders; declares that Tebeau prevented Richardson from scoring by holding him at third and that Stricker tripped Kelly and made him “sprawl on his hands for twenty feet.” Poor things. Yet the same failed to condemn Kelly’s mas on the line trick last Saturday, and the same writer excused Kelly by saying that “all catchers work that trick.” Boston is evidently not fair.

Source Cleveland Plain Dealer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

interpreting the substitute player rule

Date Sunday, July 14, 1889
Text

To-day [7/13] President Wikoff placed an official construction upon the rule regarding the time an extra player may be substituted. He says: “Any team desiring to put in an extra player must notify the umpire of their intention at the close of even innings and before the beginning of a succeeding inning.” St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a proposal for league classes, player draft; Brush plan

Date Wednesday, July 17, 1889
Text

[from a letter from Spalding to Young] The National League and American Association to continue as they are now, the governing power in professional base ball. They jointly to make the playing rules and to furnish the system, means and power for carrying out the laws as provided for in the National Agreement and Articles of Qualified Admission. All other professional leagues and associations to be divided into say four classes to be known as Class A, B, C and D.

Class A would probably include such associations as the International and the Western associations, California League and others of about the same grade.

Class B to include associations whose draing power would be about 25 per cent. less than Class A.

Class C to include associations whose drawing powers would be about 50 per cent. less than Class A.

Class D to be the lowest, including clubs that cannot afford to pay over $50 or $60 per month salaries.

Continue the present plan of protection to minor leagues with a right to reserve with the following modifications:

Class D to be obligated not to pay salaries aggregating over $600 per month, and no individual player over $60 per month. All players in this class subject to requisition from any club of a higher class on, say, one week's notice, upon payment of a fixed bonus of, say $250, to be paid to the club releasing the player.

Class C to pay salaries aggregating not over $100 per month, and no individual player to receive over $100 per month. All players in this class subject to requisition from any club in a higher class upon a payment of a bonus of $500.

Class B to pay salaries aggregating not over $1500 per month, and no individual player to receive over $150 per month. All players in this class subject to requisition from clubs in Class A and the League and American Association clubs upon payment of a bonus of $100.

Class A to pay salaries aggregating not over $100 per month, and no individual player to receive over $200 per month. All players in this class subject to requisition from League and American Association clubs upon the payment of a bonus of $1500, reserve system.

Modify the classification salary limit by making it non-operative on players whose habits are exemplary and who shall have completed a service of three years in the League or American Association.

To discourage the present sales system in the League and American Association, I would suggest that only one-half of the bonus paid for the release of a player shall go to the club releasing him, one-fourth to the player and one-fourth to the League or Association of which the releasing club is a member. The Sporting Life July 17, 1889 [See also TSL 7/24/1889 editorial for a long critique.]

President Reach in speaking of it yesterday said: “Some such plan is necessary to stop this high salary evil which is slowly but surely killing the game. Such a scheme as Mr. Spalding suggests would work to the advantage of all parties concerned, for it would cut down expenses all round and without injuring ball players either. The pay in the smaller leagues would be less, but there would be fewer collapses of clubs.

“Every young ball player would be continually striving by his play to attract the attention of managers in higher-grade leagues where the pay was better. The pay of men in National League and American Association Clubs would not be affected, but with good minor league clubs to draw upon the managers would not think of carrying more than thirteen players on the pay roll instead of fifteen to twenty as they do now.

“If that system had been in operation it would not have taken us a month to have found a second baseman when Delahanty was hurt. We would simply have taken our pick of all the second basemen in the minor leagues, planked down the special amount of money and taken the man. The club thus weakened would have looked over the lists in clubs of the leagues below it and done likewise, and so on. Minor league clubs would not be likely to carry more than eleven or twelve players.” The Philadelphia Item July 16, 1889

...Manager James. A. Hart, of the Boston Club, has formulated a plan which is given in full below. Mr. hart forwarded his scheme to Mr. Spalding, and shortly after he did so, Mr. Spalding's plan appeared in print with his name attached. An analysis of the two schemes will reveal a very close similarity in many respects, except that Mr. Hart's production is accompanied by elaborate tables that must have required a thorough knowledge of the subject, years of practical experience in base ball, and many hours of hard and studious labor to prepare. Mr. Hart's plan is submitted to public consideration for the first tame...

A board of control should be created. This board should have full and supreme power, and its ruling in all cases should be final. The board should be clothed with power to discipline any league, club, player or umpire. It should consist of three members (a chairman and two associates); they should be amply paid, and should be supplied with a good office centrally located, also with a stenographer and clerk if necessary. … The board should name the limits of salary for each league, and have power to rigidly enforce the compliance of all clubs. It should have reports sent it of each game, stating the exact number of persons present at said game, together with the gross receipts thereof. All contracts between clubs and players and between leagues and umpires should be approved by the board. The board should be the tribunal to try and decide all disputes between leagues or clubs, or clubs and players, or leagues and umpires, and in all instances the decision rendered by the board should be final. The expense of the board would be met by dues from all leagues...

All clubs under the control of the board should be allowed to reserve players under contract on a certain date, say Oct. 2, at a price not less than that received by the player under the existing contract. All players who do not receive the full amount of salary called for in their contracts should be granted a release if their claim to that effect is sustained by the board. Any club under control should be compelled to release to any other club under control, when paid a certain price (as shown later) as a bonus, provided said player desires to change his place of service. The bonus should be uniform in each league, but may be changed from year to year by the board. The matter of releasing and signing of players should be done wholly by the board.

A very desirable grouping and grading of cities would be as follows: [Tables of cities follow, with an eight club National League and cities divided into groups rated A through G.]

The league first named [i.e. the National League] should be granted the right of reservation, but a player, upon being in one club's employ three years, should, if he desires, be granted his unconditional release. This league should have no salary limit law. The other leagues should be graded according to the drawing power of the league, but in no instance should a league be regraded during a playing season. A reasonable grading would be as follows: [A table of salary limits follows, by league level, giving both team and individual player limits, price paid for release, and length of contract.] [Tables of estimated expenses for clubs and leagues, and required attendance to meet expenses, and additional details follow.] The Sporting Life July 31, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

loaning out players

Date Wednesday, July 17, 1889
Text

The Cleveland Club is also in the farming-out business, having loaned catcher Lohbeck to Milwaukee for the season. The Cleveland Club evidently believes in “doing as the Romans do when in Rome.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

beer sales at the Polo Grounds 2

Date Wednesday, July 17, 1889
Text

“Beer was sold on the ground yesterday, Mr. Day. Has the League submitted to this?”--New York Telegram. Where, oh where, have you been? The New York Club has fir six years openly violated the League rules relative to the sale of liquor on League grounds.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Louisville blocked from selling its players

Date Wednesday, July 17, 1889
Text

Davidson, of Louisville, is very violent in his abuse of Mr. Byrne, of Brooklyn. If it had not been for the prompt work put in by the latter, Davidson would have disposed of his best players, pocketed the proceeds, and left the Association in the lurch. He got tripped up and is naturally bitter on the man from Brooklyn.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a home run trophy ball

Date Wednesday, July 17, 1889
Text

The first ball to be knocked over the New Polo Grounds fence was returned to the batter, Connor, by a policeman. Connor presented it to De Wolf Hopper, who will have it gilded, appropriately inscribed and hung up in the club house of the Actors' Amateur Athletic Association. To what lengths will not cranks of the Hopper stripe go?

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Ward's response to the League putting off the Brotherhood

Date Wednesday, July 17, 1889
Text

[from W. I. Harris's column] I had an interesting talk with John Ward a day or two ago on the status of the Brotherhood. Mr. Ward had a great deal to say, but much of it was to the point and was said in very plain language. I asked him what he thought of the refusal of the League committee to meet the players and the reasons which Mr. Spalding gave for not doing so. Ward mused a few moments and then said with deliberation and emphasis, which showed that he had thought the matter over very carefully, and had prepared himself to meet just such a question: “The whole truth of the matter is that they were afraid to meet us and discuss the points which were to have been raised that's the size of it.”

“You don't really mean, John, that you believe the League are afraid to talk over the grievances of the players?”

“That is exactly what I mean. Nothing more and nothing less. They knew what the points were to be discussed and do not relish them overmuch. They know that they have broken faith with their players, and dared not face the issue. Moreover they have no intention of conceding anything they may have gained by their action, and consequently are anxious to dispose of the matter with as little discussion as is possible.

“The reasons given by Mr. Spalding for not meeting the Brotherhood committee at this time are amusing and simply absurd in the eyes of every man in this country who knows anything about base ball legislation. Everybody knows that the League held a special meeting at Asbury Grove to decide the question of a forfeited game, and it was one, too, which had very little bearing on the championship question. It is true that other business was transacted at that meeting, but it was called primarily for the purpose I have stated. Certainly, if such a matter was of sufficient importance for a special meeting this Brotherhood matter is far away more imperative because it affects the rights of the players and is considered by them to be a question of pressing moment. Naturally enough it is not so important a question for the League, for at present they have all the best of it and have, as they think, nothing to lose by delay. But it seems to me, and I think it must appear so to every fair man, that as the players are the real cause of the prosperity of the club,s they have a right to be heard at the time which is mos convenient to them. If they think their business is of importance enough to merit an immediate consideration they ought to be heard and the League will stand before the public in a very bad light and be open to the charge of unfairness by their refusal to meet the players.”

“Well, now that Mr. Spalding has refused, what is the Brotherhood going to do about it?”

The Brotherhood's president thought a moment and then said:-- “On that question just at the present time I am neither able nor at liberty to say. There is one thing, however, of which you may be certain. The players have asked only what is right and they will not rest until they get it. The men who are playing ball nowadays are not of the calibre to be hoodwinked or talked out of their rights.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

League violation of the Brotherhood contract

Date Wednesday, July 17, 1889
Text

[from W. I. Harris's column]”It has been asserted, Mr. Ward, that there has been no violation of the letter of the agreement made by the League with the Brotherhood when it accepted the contract prepared by the Brotherhood and amended by the League. Is that a fact?”

“No, it is not. There have been instances where it was not observed.”

“Well, for instance?”

“Why, there is the case of Sutcliffe of the Cleveland Club. Sutcliffe was reserved and transferred without his consent, and was then classified at a figure less than that contained in paragraph twenty of the 1888 contract, when in the contract it especially provides that the salary of Sutcliffe, if he was reserved, should not be less than the amount named in paragraph 20. This was not only a violation of the spirit, but of the very letter of the agreement with him. Sutcliffe assented, of course, but he did not assent willingly. He did so because there was nothing else for him to do. He had to assent or quit ball playing.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chadwick critiques the ERA rule

Date Wednesday, July 17, 1889
Text

[from Chadwick's column] The existing scoring rule governing earned runs says:-- “An earned run shall be scored every time the player (of the batting side) reaches the home base, unaided by errors, before chances have been offered to retire the side.” The rule should read:-- “an earned run shall be charged against a pitcher every time a runner reaches home base by the aid of base hits only, before chances have been offered off the pitching to retire the batting side for a blank.” As it is now, everything counts as ending in earning a run except positive fielding errors, such as a wild throw, a dropped fly ball or a muffed ground ball or thrown ball, wild pitches and base on balls, together with unaccepted chances, not being counted in the error column. Under such an erroneous code of scoring rules is it surprising that the existing pitchers' averages of earned runs should be entirely worthless as a criterion of a pitcher's skill?

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring errors on foul balls 2

Date Wednesday, July 17, 1889
Text

[from Frank Brunell's column] There is a clear necessity for some agreement among League scorers as to the scoring of a foul fly error. I have always set it down as an error if the man subsequently reached first, but taken no notice of it if he is subsequently retired. Other scorers oppose this plan and some of the reasons for the opposition are good. But if the error is scored why not score an error against a man who misses a ball subsequently handled by another fielder before the runner reaches first? This isn't done. Let us agree on a plan at once. I am not wedded to my plan. But I am stuck on the idea of uniformity.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

salary payments on the road

Date Wednesday, July 17, 1889
Text

Some one telegraphed from Boston last night that there was a great row among the members of the Indianapolis ball team because they had not been paid off in that city on the 15th. President Brush was seen by a reporter and asked regarding the matter. He said there was no trouble whatever, and if any member of the club wanted money all he had to do was to ask Manager Bancroft for it. “It has been our custom this season,” he continued, “to pay our men on the 1 st and 15th of each month, no matter whether they are at home or abroad. There is probably not another club in the League that does this, as it is not required, and we only did it to accommodate the players. The contracts of the men specify that they are to be paid on the dates named when they are at home, but not while they are away on their trips. We intended to pay off in Boston on the 15th, as usual, but as the club is to be at home on the 25th we concluded to wait until that time. We telegraphed this to Manager Bancroft with instructions to advance the men any amounts they might want. I think no one can complain of this and it is probable that the report is simply the work of some sensational idiot who wants to get into the papers.” Indianapolis Journal July 17, 1889

a ground rule for a puddle

[Indianapolis vs. New York 7/20/1889] The final ball game of the New York-Indianapolis series was played under very discouraging circumstances at the Polo grounds this afternoon. There was a heavy rain-fall last night, and the ball field was in a very bad condition in consequence. There was a small lake in left field, and on that account a ground rule was made, under which a hit to that territory, no matter how long, could only yield two bases. Boys, with trousers rolled up, were engaged to fish the ball out when it went into the miniature lake. In trying to get a fly ball, Sullivan went into the water once nearly up to his knees. Indianapolis Journal July 21, 1889

Source ” Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Giants' alcohol policy

Date Sunday, July 21, 1889
Text

Manager Mutrie has this to say about his management of the New Yorks: “I lay no restrictions whatever on the drinking, the outgoing or the incoming of my team. If I were to attempt to control them in the matter of drink, I should be forced to the necessity of dogging them eternally and forcing them up back alleys into speak easies. My men will come into a saloon while I am there, step up to the bar, take a drink, and act as if I were in no way concerned in them. I find the plan an admirable one, as I have yet to reprimand a man for either drinking to excess or remaining out at night beyond reasonable hours.

Source ” Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Nat Hudson insubordinate because he has outside money

Date Thursday, July 18, 1889
Text

...[Nat Hudson] has given the Browns a great deal of trouble by insubordination. He has been away from the St. Louis team for some time resting at his home in Chicago and under suspension.

His is a capable young player, and the change to Louisville may be beneficial to him. The chief trouble with him seems to be that he has some money, and is independent of ball playing.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a charge of game throwing in St. Louis

Date Thursday, July 18, 1889
Text

The Post-Dispatch here [St. Louis] to-day published a sensation story that the Browns are putting up a game for the pool rooms and that two members have thrown games. It seems that Latham and King have been putting up such uniformly bad ball that it created suspicion and was some nasty talk. After the second Athletic-Brown game, in which King was knocked out of the box, there was a howl from all over the country. Letters were received by the club management from pool-room keepers and Kansas City and Omaha complaining that certain members of the Browns were throwing games. The Omaha letter stated that a man had entered the pool-room there and offered to bet $100 to $50 against the Browns. This was considered the stronger club, had the advantage of playing on their home grounds, and had in one of their strongest batteries. When King was removed from the box, so the letter stated, the man who was backing the Athletics immediately began to hedge, and the odds veered around from $100 to $60 on the, despite the fact that Stivetts, a green pitcher, was substituted.

The Kansas City letter was to the same effect. A man had entered a pool-room there and bet similarly against the Browns, and then commenced to hedge when King was taken out of the box. It was also said that a man had bet $150 against them here and proceeded to hedge at the same point of the game. This information looked so badly for the players that Mr. Von der Ahe immediately placed the matter in the hands of one of the largest detective agencies in the world and had them place officers to watch the pool-rooms, and Kansas City and Omaha especially, and to keep a general lookout at other points. He called King and Latham up before him and charged them with having thrown games. Both men denied it, and he warned them that if he learned that they were guilty of such an offense he would expel them for life...

... It is said that he...expressed himself to them very plainly. Mr. Von der Ahe is busily engaged in investigating the charges.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a straight up player trade, a player not consulted

Date Thursday, July 18, 1889
Text

President Von der Ahe received a telegram from President Lawrence Parsons of the Louisville club yesterday asking if he would exchange Nat Hudson for Tom Ramsey. President Von der Ahe replied that he would, and the deal so far a the clubs are concerned was closed. Ramsey, under proper training, will prove a valuable man for the Browns. He demonstrated when last here a couple of weeks ago that he has regained his skilful drop ball. Ramsey will report to President Von der Ahe this week. St. Louis Republic July 18, 1889

When the St. Louis and Louisville management exchanged Hudson and Ramsey, one little factor in the success of the scheme was overlooked. The clubs forgot to ask Hudson's consent to the transfer. Louisville was on the point of releasing Ramsey, when one of the directors, hearing of the trouble in which Hudson was involved with the St. Louis club, sent a dispatch to Von der Ahe asking him how he would trade Hudson for Ramsey. Before the deal was consummated Ramsey was called up by the Louisville directors and asked if he would consent to play in St. Louis. He replied in the affirmative. Hudson was not consulted at all, and he has ignored the Louisville club and repudiated the deal. Ramsey was regularly released by Louisville, and last Wednesday he signed a Brown Stocking contract and accompanied by President von der Ahe started to join the team. St. Louis did not release Hudson and he has not signed a Louisville contract, therefore under existing base ball law he is still a member of the champion team. Hudson is not probably caring a continental about the affair, but the Louisville club has received very much the worst of it all around. St. Louis Republic July 28, 1889

Nat Hudson has signed with Minneapolis, $1,000 being given for his release. He will be in Minneapolis for the opening home game with St. Paul August 24. Hudson was formerly with St. Louis,but refused to play with that team and was traded with Louisville for Ramsey. Hudson never went to Louisville, however, and the latter team, after much wiring, consented to part with him. St. Louis Republic August 18, 1889

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

dueling interpretations when a substitution can be made

Date Thursday, July 18, 1889
Text

[discussing a circular from Wikoff] Mr. Wikoff in this last circular of his defines the words, “completed inning,” contained in the rule itself, to mean an even inning, including the first and second part. In this he differs from President Young, of the league, who defines completed inning to mean the one inning played by the side at the bat, and not the two inning played by each nine comprising the first inning of the game on each side. The question is, which president is right?

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a rumor of game throwing

Date Friday, July 19, 1889
Text

There has been another crazy explosion over in St. Louis and it has turned the Browns' crowd from a happy family into an aggregation of players who are fighting mad. No more absurd charge was ever coined than that fathered by the Post Dispatch last night, in which Arlie Latham and Charley King were accused of throwing games in the interest of the pool-rooms.

Not since the days of Devlin and Hall have any bolder accusations been made. “Ribbie,” the wide awake second baseman of the Browns, is also made a party to the alleged crookedness.

The story with all its wild improbabilities came out on the eve of the Browns' departure for Cincinnati, and a more incensed lot of players never registered at a hotel than those who arrived at the Palace this morning. Indignation was not confined to those whose reputations the Post Dispatch seeks to sully... St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

collegiate professional baseball players

Date Friday, July 19, 1889
Text

The college men in the base ball profession are beginning to make a mark. It offers them congenial occupation and large pay. Of the players in the various prominent nines many are undergraduates who pursue their studies in winter and play ball in the summer, thereby earning enough to defray all the expenses of their education. Sanders of the Philadelphia Club took a course in civil engineering last winter. Gunning of the Athletics was in attendance at the medical school of the University of Pennsylvania; Knowlton of the Eastern Club is a member of the Harvard Medical School; Garfield of the Pittsburgh Club is studying at Oberlin University; Mead and Cahill of the New Haven team are graduates of Holy Cross College in Worcester. Tyng is a Harvard graduates. Wagenhurst comes from Princeton and many other instances could be mentioned. Nor must the cases of John M. Ward and James. H. O’Rourke of the New York club be forgotten. The former took the course of political science in Columbia College, and with the latter attended the lectures in the Yale Law School, where they received their degrees of L L. B. And were afterward admitted to practise before the bar of Connecticut., quoting the Minneapolis Tribune

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Spalding's plan to classify minor leagues; draft

Date Sunday, July 21, 1889
Text

Clubs are not to be classified arbitrarily. There will be four classes of minor leagues and each minor league can apply for admission to that class in which they can pay the salaries and live. If a league is once classified and afterwards finds it cannot support itself in its classification it can be reclassified in a lower class, or if it finds that it can well afford to do so it can be admitted to a higher classification. There are to be four classifications.

Class A will be permitted to pay salaries not to exceed $200 a month for a player or over $2,000 per month for a team. For the purpose of illustration, suppose we classify the present organization. Class A would include the International Association, Western Association, and California League.

Class B, to pay not over $150 per man and $1,500 per team, would include the Atlantic Association and Tri-State League.

Class C, to pay not over $100 per man and $1,000 per team, would include the Central State League and the Texas League.

Class D would include the Middle States League, New York State League, Michigan State League, and Delaware State League. Leagues in this classification would not be permitted to pay their players more than $60 per month salary, or $600 per team.

The price per league for protection under the National agreement would be as follows: Class A, $2,000; Class B, $1,000; Class C, $500; Class D, $250. This tax, understand, would be not on each club, but on each organization. Thus, a Class D club would pay $31.25 in an eight club league and $41.67 in a six club league, and if a player was taken from one of these clubs by a club in a higher classification the club would receive $125 for him, the player would receive $62.50, and the league from which he was taken would get $62.40. These figures would increase pro rata in the higher organizations. The major leagues would pay $1,500 for players taken from Class A leagues, of which half would go to the club, one-quarter to the player, and one-quarter to the league from which he was taken. The price for Class B would be $1,000, and for Class C players it would be $500.

The major leagues would be permitted to take players from any of the minor leagues upon payment of the stipulated bonus. The Class A clubs would be permitted to take players from any league in a lower classification, and so on down the scale. It will thus be seen that the minor league clubs would be training schools for leagues of higher classification, and could not be robbed by each other, and when a player whom they had developed was taken by requisition to a higher class league they would receive a bonus for their trouble in developing him, and the player himself would receive a premium for his ability.

There is one point in Mr. Spalding's scheme which must be carefully arranged else it will lead to endless trouble, and possibly spoil the whole plan. This matter was particularly called to my attention in a long argument with Mr. James O'Rourke of the New York club. That gentleman very ably dissected the scheme, so far as he knew it, and undertook to show that it would be opposed by the minor league clubs. One of his strongest points was the right that clubs in higher classifications and in the major leagues would have to take players from lower grade clubs, and trouble would be occasioned thereby. The strength of Mr. O'Rourke's argument was mainly due to Mr. Spalding's proposition that players could be taken on a week's notice.

It is claimed that a minor league club might be winning the championship in its association by reason of the superiority of one or two of its players and some association of a higher class could swoop down upon them and take these players, and so knock the team out of its well-won honors. This objection could be met by a rule that would require at least a month's notice before a player can be taken from any club which holds the lead in any league, or, as has been suggested by The Tribune, it might be wise to prohibit the taking of any player until the season following that in which notice should be given that he was wanted. This matter will need to be given careful study in perfecting the details of the plan.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

minor league pay scales

Date Sunday, July 21, 1889
Text

It is true that some of the minor leagues pay as large salaries to good men as the major organizations, but the leagues which are doing so are losing money by the thousands, and are slowly fading away, and in the opinion of shrewd observers it is only a question of time when baseball in the minor leagues will get down to hard pan, and the number of such organizations will fall away to almost nothing.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a ground rule for a puddle

Date Sunday, July 21, 1889
Text

[Indianapolis vs. New York 7/20/1889] The final ball game of the New York-Indianapolis series was played under very discouraging circumstances at the Polo grounds this afternoon. There was a heavy rain-fall last night, and the ball field was in a very bad condition in consequence. There was a small lake in left field, and on that account a ground rule was made, under which a hit to that territory, no matter how long, could only yield two bases. Boys, with trousers rolled up, were engaged to fish the ball out when it went into the miniature lake. In trying to get a fly ball, Sullivan went into the water once nearly up to his knees.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Giants' alcohol policy 2

Date Sunday, July 21, 1889
Text

Manager Mutrie has this to say about his management of the New Yorks: “I lay no restrictions whatever on the drinking, the outgoing or the incoming of my team. If I were to attempt to control them in the matter of drink, I should be forced to the necessity of dogging them eternally and forcing them up back alleys into speak easies. My men will come into a saloon while I am there, step up to the bar, take a drink, and act as if I were in no way concerned in them. I find the plan an admirable one, as I have yet to reprimand a man for either drinking to excess or remaining out at night beyond reasonable hours.

Source ” Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

purported offers for Comiskey

Date Monday, July 22, 1889
Text

At the conclusion of to-day's [7/21] game President Stern wired President Von der Ahe of the Browns, offering $10,000 for Comiskey. It is the intention, if secured, to make him manager of the Cincinnati team, playing him occasionally. Comiskey said he would be glad to come. Several members of the club say they have good reason to believe that Von der Ahe will accept Stern's offer. St. Louis Republic July 22, 1889

President Von der Ahe says that he received no telegram from President Stern of the Cincinnati club, making him an offer of $10,000 for Comiskey's release. He also states that he would not accept the offer if made. St. Louis Republic July 22, 1889

“Is it true, Mr. Byrne, that you offered and St. Louis refused $12,000 for Comiskey?” The St. Louis Republic reported asked the president of the Brooklyn base ball club to-day [8/3]

“Not quite true. The price we finally offered was $15,000 for Comiskey and Mr. Von der Ahe refused that.”

“Is that not the biggest price ever offered for a ball player?”

“Yes, far the biggest.”

“What makes Comiskey so mighty valuable?”

“Oh, everybody knows why Comiskey is valuable. It is his ability to handle men and make them play ball. If a man has got base ball in him at all Comiskey gets it out of him. He handles his men as a good officer handles a body of soldiers. He is a wonderfully good judge of the capabilities of players, and he has them playing up to the top not every time. Milligan was rejected by Philadelphia, and Comiskey took him and made him a magnificent catcher. Boyle was an unknown when Comiskey picked him up and put him in Bushong's place. His phenomenal record last year shows how good the judgment of the St. Louis captain is. Duffee, the centre fielder, is a boy who did not cost the club a cent. see what a player Comiskey has made of him. McCarthy is another man whom Comiskey has made in the same way, and his spirit is the motive power of the team. He is worth $15,000 to us. You see he is not only a captain, he is also the finest kind of a manager on and off the field.” St. Louis Republic August 4, 1889

W.H. Voltz of Philadelphia is still in town. He is not here for the purpose of hustling votes for the association presidency. He is here on a bigger mission. He is after Capt. Comiskey for the Philadelphias. He made an offer of $15,000 to President Von der Ahe for Comiskey's release. His offer was refused and Voltz was informed that under no circumstances would Comiskey be released from the St. Louis club. This is the biggest sum ever offered for a player in the history of the national game. Pittsburg made a big bluff to “borrow” Anson for a season for $15,000 several years ago, but when it came to a show down the Pittsburg club wilted. The Philadelphia club wanted the Browns' famous general to captain the team and play first base. Harry Wright would still be manager, but Comiskey would have supreme control over the players. St. Louis Republic October 3, 1889[John Rogers admitted to trying to buy Comiskey, but not for that much. SLR 10/8/1889]

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Anson managing the Chicagos

Date Wednesday, July 24, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Spalding by Chadwick] “I see by this week's papers...that I am 'running the Chicago team again,'... Now there is not a word of truth in any one of these statements. Anson is managing the team and doing it as well as ever.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

interpreting the substitute player rule 2

Date Wednesday, July 24, 1889
Text

[a circular from Wikoff] To managers, captains and umpires—The question of the construction of Rule 28, Section 2, of the joint playing rules, having been raised by Umpire Robert Ferguson, and in order that said rule may be understood alike by all, the following construction is placed on the same.-- “In order to take a player out of a game the captain must notify the umpire of his intention to put in the substitute at the close of an even inning and before the succeeding inning is begun. An 'even inning' is held to be a turn both at the bat and in the field by each team. If no notice is given the umpire of intention to make a change at the end of an even inning, before the succeeding inning is begun, then the change shall not be made during that inning. Those interested will take notice and be governed accordingly.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a single-admission double header

Date Sunday, July 28, 1889
Text

[St. Louis vs. Baltimore 7/27/1889] Baltimore and St. Louis played two games this afternoon and broke even. The home club won the first by a score of 4 to 2 and the visitors the second by a score of 3 to 1. Both were pitchers' games, neither side being able to do any work with the stick. Owing to the rain in the morning the attendance was only fair, about 5,253 people passing the turnstile. Had the weather not been threatening the grounds would have been packed. St. Louis Republic July 28, 1889

[from Chadwick's column] On reading this circular I sent a note to President Young, as follows:

“Did you see Wikoff's latest circular? He decides that a complete inning is an even inning for each side. I contend that a complete inning is accomplished when the side first at the bat is put out and the other side goes in to complete their inning. It seems to me that Wikoff is wrong in his interpretation. How say you?”

Mr. Young's reply was: “I take your view of it.”

I took the document to Mr. Byrne, and I had a full discussion with him on the subject. Mr. Byrne was one of the workers of the joint committee, and he is thoroughly versed on the question of what the committee's intentions were in amending the rule, and it was to get at their intentions as regards this particular rule that I consulted him. He said the Walter Spalding was the urgent advocate of the rule, and it was his and Spalding's plain understanding that the words “completed innings” meant the innings played by each side constituting the first and second half of each of the nine innings which constitutes a game. This being so, of course that settled it, for it is what the committee intended a rule should mean, and not any special interpretation placed upon it through incorrect wording, which should govern each rule's interpretation. The Sporting Life July 31, 1889

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Phillies official scorer

Date Wednesday, July 24, 1889
Text

Ever since his connection with the Philadelphia Club Harry Wright has acted as official scorer of the club, but pennant winning is no easy task, and Harry has his hands so full in handling the “coming champions” that he has determined to confine himself altogether when on the bench to directing the team's field work and leave the scoring to Horace S. Fogel, of The Sporting Life and Public Ledger. Fogel accepted the position and entered upon his duties on Thursday last. A better man could not have been selected, as he is not only expert and well posted on the rules but thoroughly impartial—a most important requisite for an official scorer.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the meaning of ‘to root’

Date Thursday, July 25, 1889
Text

The verb “to root”... is entirely modern and is limited in circulation. It concerns an art invented by and practised chiefly by sporting men. This is the concentration of individual or aggregate psychic force upon the accomplishment of some particular effect desired by the rooter.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Byrne denies any intention of jumping to the League; comparative strength of the AA and NL

Date Wednesday, July 31, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Bryne] “Will you join the League if you win the Association pennant?”

“I cannot understand what relationship our sinning the pennant has with our joining the League,” he replied. “We would joint the League just as quick if we finished third or fourth as if we won the pennant. That has nothing to do with the case whatever.”

“Then there is some truth in the report that you will go into the older organization?”

“Not in the slightest. Myself and partners have never discussed the situation. In the first place, the Brooklyn Club has never been asked to become a League member, and I assure you once and for all that we will never appear in the role of supplicants for the place. We have a strong club, a good city and plenty of resources. This the League knows, and if it wants us it will have to ask us. Even then I do not say we would accept, for we are well contented where we are. We have always done well in the Association, and it might not be a business policy to change our base of operations.”

“Do you think the League is stronger in the matter of playing strength than the American Association?”

“Not in the slightest particular. There is no difference in the strength of the two bodies. The Association is just as strong as the League, and I am free to say that I think the present Brooklyn team would stand as high, if not higher, in the League than it does in the Association., quoting the Cincinnati Enquirer

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a raffle for a released player

Date Friday, July 26, 1889
Text

“It is quite likely that I will be called upon to draw lots,” said President Young of the league, “to decide who is entitle to the services of Krock, recently released by the Chicagos. Both Philadelphia and Indianapolis have accepted the services of this pitcher, and in the case of the latter organization Sommers is desired also. Ten days will have elapsed the 28th inst. since these men were released, and at the expiration of that time they will be eligible to sign with clubs outside the league if they are not secured by one of our own teams. Every club in the league may put in a bid for this battery the evening of the 27th inst. and each organization would have an equal claim upon the services of the men. To obviate any future trouble, however, I will place the names of each club on a piece of paper, put them in my hat, and give them a good shaking up. Some one will then be requested to draw a slip of paper from the hat, and the club which is lucky enough to be drawn first will secure Krock. If Philadelphia comes out of the hat first Krock alone will be turned over to Manager Wright.

Source ” Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a game halted to catch a train; beer selling at the Polo Grounds

Date Sunday, July 28, 1889
Text

President Soden says that the game of six innings played between Boston and Indianapolis would go on record and be counted. “Why,” said he, “it is a common occurrence for teams to stop games to catch trains.” “I don't think a team that is breaking the rules every day, as they do in New York by selling beer on the grounds, will make much of a kick in a case of this kind,” said Director Billings.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catcher's mask interfering with the runner

Date Wednesday, July 31, 1889
Text

Ewing's trick of laying his mask on the base line will create a corner in the mask market if continued. Paul Hines jumped on one last week in New York and smashed it and Thompson did the same thing in Philadelphia.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catchers not as tough as in the old days; put on equipment when they move under the bat; cup

Date Wednesday, July 31, 1889
Text

[from Caylor's column][from a reminiscence about the old Cincinnati Club] I have seen [Doug] Allison stand up behind the bat and catch Brainard's cannon shots without mask, chest-protector or gloves, with the blood dripping from his wounded hand and one eye in chancery from a foul tip. But there are no Allisons catching now. Snyder comes the nearest to Dug in their day and generation. In Allison's day, when it became necessary for the catcher to come up behind the bat after two strikes or when a man reached the bases it didn't require five minutes of time for him to get on his armor. He did not have his head encased in a barbed-wire balloon; he didn't tie himself behind a stuffed mattress; neither did he wear a wire cage to interfere with his running or stick his hand into a stuffed glove the size of an elephant's cheek.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a suggestion that a foul tip count as a strike

Date Wednesday, July 31, 1889
Text

[from R. M. Larner's column] It is interesting to hear the various schemes proposed in the grand stand by enthusiasts who want to improve the national game according to their ideas, and the latest craze is in regard to foul tips.

During a recent contest at Capitol Park a trio of regular attendants at the games were discussing this feature, and their suggestions were to the effect that a foul tip should be counted against the batsman as a strike. It is not a bad idea, and is started out upon a cold and possibly unfriendly world of sports for discussion before the meeting of the League magnates. Of course there will be a chorus of chestnuts, rats, come offs and similar choice expressions, but I am going to claim the credit of originating the topic though the heavens fall. I will be glad to hear from some of my companions in misery who are compelled to overhear numerous plans, any one of which in the estimation of the originator will be sure to revolutionize the game we all love so dearly. The Sporting Life July 31, 1889

[from W. I Harris's column] I notice in Brother Larner's notes a suggestion about foul tips which is claimed a new idea. Whether new or old it is a good one. The suggestion has been made over and over again that a foul tip should be called a strike, and in bringing the point up again Brother Larner is on the right tack. The present plan of calling tips nil is one of the most illogical rules the League ever made. It is inconsistent and it is unfair to the pitcher. It certainly ought to be a strike. This point will be a good one to push during the winter. The Sporting Life August 14, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a substitute umpire a former club employee

Date Thursday, August 1, 1889
Text

Frequent complaints have been made at League headquarters... regarding Weeden, substitute umpire at Boston, and the burden of the cry has been that he is an employee of the Boston Club. As far as can be learned, Weeden has had the score card and other privileges at the Boston Club grounds until recently, when he was made a substitute umpire of the League and assigned to duty at Boston. This has had a tendency to create dissatisfaction among visiting clubs, and President Young, in deference to the demands, declined to allow him to umpire Tuesday’s game between the Bostons and Philadelphias. There was some curiosity manifested to know the reason for such action, and it is thought that the foregoing explanation will suffice the satisfy the citizens of the Hub.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a claim of an illicitly substituted ball

Date Thursday, August 1, 1889
Text

Captain Farrar did a great deal of unnecessary kicking. His worst ebullition was in the fifth inning, when, with two men on bases, Thompson placed the ball against the slats of the right field fence. Thinking that the ball would easily be a home run, the runners, Haliman and Meyers, began to make the round of the bases at their leisure. Kelly stood watching the ball, evidently of the same idea as the runners, but the ball struck the slats, which in that portion are constructed so that a ball cannot go through them, and they allow a ball to bound well away from them. The ball dropped back in the field and Kelly made a run for it. He fumbled the ball, else he would have been able to capture Haliman at the plate. The runners had been going so very slowly that Myers managed not to get beyond third and Thompson made second. Here Farrar made a great bluff about the ball having gone clear over the seats and then having been thrown back again, but he was unable to persuade Umpire Powers of this fact, though he stood arguing and expostulating for quite a number of minutes. All sorts of rumors went the rounds of the grounds about this ball. Some people, however, said that the ball was thrown back; and others claimed that the ball cleared the fence, and that Kelly had another ball concealed about his person and threw it in. The writing visited the bleaching boards at the end of the game, and found several persons who saw the ball hit the top of the slats and bound back onto the field. A moment’s reflection will convince any one that it was simply impossible for Kelly to have a ball concealed about his person from the way that he ran for the ball after it dropped to the ground.

Such a hypothesis is simply ludicrous. Then it is scarcely within the bounds of possibility that any person could have thrown the ball back into the field as quickly as it came back from the slats. With any other man but Kelly in right field it is hardly probable that so many people could have been found who were so positive that they saw the ball go over the fence., quoting the Boston Herald

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player suit for pennant share

Date Friday, August 2, 1889
Text

Harry Lyons, the ballplayer, to-day [8/1] won his suit against President Von der Ahe of the St. Louis base ball club and received judgment for $71.40. The suit was the outgrowth of the race for the championship of the American Association last year. A prize of $1,000 in addition to the pennant was offered to the team that should win the championship. Von der Ahe paid 12 of his 13 players but refused to pay Lyons and Short-stop White.

In response to a summons President Von der Ahe appeared before Magistrate Durham to-day. He said that the prize was offered to the managers of the various clubs and not to the individual players. He thought it was entirely optional with him whether he should divide the money with the players or should keep it himself. He thought Lyons and White did not play good ball during the season.

Ex Manager Sullivan and Player McCarthy were called to substantiate Mr. Von der Ahe. They said they thought the prize was given to the management of the championship club. They both thought, however, that Lyons did play good ball.

The magistrate gave judgment for Lyons. St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an extra ball in the pocket?

Date Friday, August 2, 1889
Text

The press reports from Boston all agree that Thompson's hit went over the fence and that Kelly had an extra ball in his pocket, which he threw against the fence, making it appear that the one Thompson hit struck there. The players and spectators saw it, but Powers did not. All umpires make mistakes, but Powers seems to make all his on one side, and they are invariably in favor of Boston. St., quoting the Philadelphia Ledger

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

coaching chatter

Date Saturday, August 3, 1889
Text

[St. Louis vs. Brooklyn 8/2/1889] Arlie Latham was in a particularly good humor and kept up a steady chatter. He and Comiskey discussed the points of the play across the diamond while the St. Louis boys were in the field, or else Latham would invite discussion with Burns, who was coaching the team from the captain's lines. He was highly amusing and largely dulled the sting of defeat for the spectators. St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Brunell to Chicago; Cleveland Club scorer

Date Monday, August 5, 1889
Text

F. H. Brunell, so long connected with the Cleveland Club as official scorer, goes to the Chicago Tribune sporting staff, and John B. Foster succeeds him as scorer. St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips insane

Date Wednesday, August 7, 1889
Text

The long siege of serious sickness last winter, coupled with the vexatious worries and harassments inevitable to the management of a losing ball team, has been too much for Manager Horace Phillips, and he has succumbed to the most dreadful of human afflictions—mental derangement. [The details of his delusions follow.]

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

stashing an extra ball under the bleachers

Date Wednesday, August 7, 1889
Text

[from Joe Pritchard's column] The New York papers are now boasting of the movement that Lawyer O'Rourke “gets on himself” whenever a ball is knocked under the bleachers of the New York grounds in O'Rourke's territory. It is said that Jim skins under the seats and gets the ball in time to hold the man on third base. This is good for O'Rourke, but when Hugh Nicol's fast feats are considered, Jim is laid in the shade. Probably Jim can't remember just where he placed the extra ball. In an “under-the-seats play” a good memory is essential. While Hugh Nicol was a member of the St. Louis team he threw out several batsmen on hits under the right field bleachers, but he could not work the trick successfully unless the ball in play had been in use long enough to become dirty. Hugh would report for duty every morning, and before he left the park for his dinner he would place a couple, and sometimes three balls under the right field seats, and he knew just where to find them, too, when necessity demanded it. When a batsman of an opposing nine knocked the ball under the right field seats Hugh would go over the inside fence in a twinkle, grasp the hidden ball, and before the runner could reach second, “Robbie” would be waiting on the line, ball in hand, to retire him. Of course Captain Comiskey was not on to the scheme, and he has often purchased Nicol a good cigar after the game on account of his quick movements in returning the ball to the diamond. When Nicol played here there was no ground rule allowing a home run for a ball hit under the seats. Nicol will probably deny having practiced this little trick on the boys, but it is true nevertheless, because Dave Foutz whispered the story into my ear the last time the Brooklyns visiting St. Louis. Fact!

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Brunell moves to the Chicago Tribune; Cleveland official scorer

Date Wednesday, August 7, 1889
Text

[from Frank Brunell's letter] This is the last letter I shall indite to The Sporting Life from Cleveland and perhaps the last from anywhere. I leave the city with regret, but for business reasons, and go on the sporting staff of the Chicago Tribune to do work congenial to me and to better myself generally. Mr. J. B. Foster will succeed me as official scorer of the club. The Sporting Life August 7, 1889

[from the Cleveland correspondent] Mr. John B. Foster, base ball editor of the Leader, succeeds MR. Brunell as official scorer of the Cleveland Club. The Sporting Life August 14, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ejections

Date Wednesday, August 7, 1889
Text

Buck Ewing says that he does not care for fines, and does not have to pay them, but he does care when he is ordered off the field. That is giving umpires a very strong tip. The Sporting Life August 7, 1889

Captain Ewing has now twice been suspended from games, and speculation is rife as to when that will happen to Captains Comiskey and Anson and who will be the umpire that will do it. The Sporting Life August 7, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

drainage at the New Polo Grounds; proto-mound

Date Wednesday, August 7, 1889
Text

Another defect at the New Polo Grounds has revealed itself. When the grounds were constructed the north side of the field was left almost on a level with the meadow beyond. The drainage of the new ground was made as nearly perfect as possible, but President Day has made the discovery that all the sewers or blind ditches that he could put in the new ball grounds would not carry off the great body of water that flows down the high bluff back of the grounds and overflows the low lands. As soon as the water settles somewhat an embankment is to be thrown up along the west fence of the grounds to keep out the overflow, after which the sewers will be able to keep the grounds and the diamond free from water at all times. The Sporting Life August 7, 1889

The diamond at the Polo Grounds has been raised eight inches and resodded, so that it will be impossible for the rain to settle in or around it. The Sporting Life August 28, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rising salaries 6

Date Wednesday, August 7, 1889
Text

As a sample of the expenses of a ball team it may be stated that Cleveland's 1883, in which were McCormick, Dunlap, Glasscock, Bushong, Daily, and other stars, cost for salaries less than $16,000, and the present team, in which there are no stars, costs $31,000. With the same men under contract this season as played in Cleveland during 1883, the salary list would be $50,000. And yet the tendency is to increase still more, because the pace for $50,000 towns is set by $150,000 towns., quoting the Boston Globe

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a newspaper bulletin board

Date Wednesday, August 7, 1889
Text

The largest crowd of spectators attracted by base ball yesterday in the Metropolis was that gathered in front of the World office to see the machine exhibition of the contest which was then taking place 900 miles distant, at Chicago, between the nines under those boss kickers, Anson and Ewing. Every point of the game was shown by the patent bulletin machine, and Park row, from Beekman street to the Mail office was crowded by over a thousand spectators. Up to the ninth inning all the bulletins which came in were in favor of New York, and the gamins were in ecstacies, the score standing at 7 to 1 at the end of the eighth inning in favor of New York. When the eighth inning began and the New York got in a single the boys yelled. Run after run, however, was then recorded in favor of Chicago, and the gamins almost broke their hears. At last came the record of seven runs for Chicago in their eighth [sic: should be ninth] inning, with the result of a tie game, and then the crowd was hushed to silence in suspense awaiting the record of the tenth inning. It came, and two runs were set down for New York, making the total 10 to 8. Would Chicago score? was the next question, and the bulletin was watched with intense interest. One man out and no runs, and the crowd yelled. Two men out and Anson at the bat. But “the might Casey” struck out, and then there was a rush of the crowd to get the extras giving the particulars.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Brush proposes pooling receipts

Date Friday, August 9, 1889
Text

[from an interview of John Brush in the Boston Globe] “I will tell you what is sure to come,” continued Mr. Brush,”and that is a pooling of all the receipts of the League clubs. This is the only way to keep the League up, as it should be. For instance, the Indianapolis team has furnished the patrons of the game in Boston with an article of ball that they are willing to pay to see. It's a poor business concern where one partner isn't entitled to just as much of the profits as the other. The home team should be entitled to all they can make on the extras, such as receipts from the grand stand, score cards and other privileges. Now take the Boston club alone. It is likely they take in, say over $40,000 each season for seats in the pavilion. This would be quite a large amount that the League would not have to divide. If the whole business was put into the hands of one concern, you would not hear so much about umpires and dissatisfied players, and the game would be much benefited thereby. Either pooling the whole receipts or an equal division of receipts will have to come, and that, too., very soon.” Indianapolis Journal August 9, 1889 [N.B. IJ following day Brush disclaimed most of the interview, but kept to this portion.]

Source ” Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

base coach when no one on base

Date Saturday, August 10, 1889
Text

[Boston vs. Chicago 8/9/1889] There was no one on first, but Kelly sent Ganzel to the coachers' line opposite that bag. Anson objected, and Kelly arose to discuss the point. Time was called, Powers read the rules, and Anson was sustained. Powers handed the book of rules to Kelly, who walked to the bench and handed the volume to Hart, saying: “We don't want anybody there. We can beat them without.

Source ” Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Washington Club ownership; finances, Washington Club ownership; finances

Date Error: Invalid time.
Text

The Washington stockholders have been called on to pay about $500 per share assessment on fifteen shares of stock. Walter Hewitt holds nine and is soon likely to have all the rest. The club has lost $23,000 in three seasons.

,

There is a growing impression among the patrons of the national game that Walter Hewitt is growing weary of being a baseball magnate and is systematically unloading his interest in the senatorial combination. The late R. C. Hewitt was a baseball “crank” in the fullest meaning of the term. The result was that he put his boat into the league and never lived to realize a single dollar on his thousands expended. His son Walter is made of different material and only looks at baseball with business eyes.

The elder Hewitt was unusually successful in many of his business ventures and Walter is now reaping the benefits from them. Since the latter succeeded his father as the leading and producing spirit of the Washington club, his sole ambition has been to get back some of the money his father invested in the sport. By judicious management, coupled with several brilliant bursts of enterprise, the younger Hewitt is now in a position to retire from the ballfield nearly $50,000 ahead of all outlays. At the present writing he declines to go into details as to his future intentions further than to smile knowingly and say that he has no idea of leaving the league. He insists that because he disposed of Capitol part to a good advantage it does not necessarily follow that he contemplates disposing of his franchise. He says he is well satisfied with the present condition of his team, and predicts that he will put even a stronger combination in the field next season. Chicago Tribune August 11, 1889

Source Cleveland Plain Dealer, Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

bunting the ball foul

Date Sunday, August 11, 1889
Text

[St. Louis vs. Brooklyn 8/10/1889] McCarthy opened up the tenth by several times. Carruthers kicked, but in vain. McCarthy then lined out a three bagger to center...

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

James Hart Spalding's private secretary

Date Wednesday, August 14, 1889
Text

Manager Jas. Hart, of Boston, on Friday signed a contract with A. G. Spalding to act as his private secretary, at $3000 per annum. The contract goes into effect Nov. 5. Spalding wanted Hart last spring, but consented to wait to give Boston a chance to profit by Hart's experience.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Hewitt disposes of his option on Capitol Park real estate; prospects of staying in the League

Date Wednesday, August 14, 1889
Text

[from R. M. Larner's column] The leading topic in base ball circles here is the announcement that MR. Hewitt has disposed of the option he has held for several years on Capital Park. … The next question to be considered is:--Does Mr. Hewitt intend to remain in the League, and , if so, where does he propose to locate the new home for the Senatorial combination? He says he is in the base ball business to stay, and he shrewdly evades inquiries which he regards as to [sic] penetrating, leaving the questioner in a haze of doubt as to the young magnate's intentions for the future. The Sporting Life August 14, 1889

The facts of the sale of the Washington Club's grounds are stated as follows:-- “More than four years ago R. C. Hewitt secured an option from Wm. M. Galt and Thomas W. Smith, on square 678, the term of the agreement running for five years and the price to be paid by Mr. Hewitt at the conclusion of that term being fixed at fifty cents per square foot. Not it is said that President Walter Hewitt has sold the option to C. A Snow for the moderate price of seventy cents per square foot, and Mr. Snow can have possession as soon as he wants to after November. The amount of ground involved in the transfer is about 325,000 feet, and the profit, as can be readily calculated, will foot up somewhere in the vicinity of $65,000. The Sporting Life August 14, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

foul flags 2

Date Wednesday, August 14, 1889
Text

[from J. F. Donnally's column] The Brooklyn Club was presented with two magnificent on Saturday last. They are of heavy crimson silk, with the word “Brooklyn” in raised gold embroidered letters, and are mounted on ebony poles and surmounted by eagles of heavy gold plate. The gift was a generous one, the donors being true and tried friends of base ball and “rooters” for the Brooklyn Club.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Brooklyn and Cincinnati prospects of jumping to the NL

Date Wednesday, August 14, 1889
Text

[from Frank Brunell's column] Where are the usual loud and affidavit-flanked expressions of loyalty to the Association usually issued about this season of the year from Brooklyn, N.Y., and Cincinnati, O.? Gone are their bombast and hushed and ringing eloquence of the tongues of Byrne and Stern. I can see the model League not far away and think that silence and some side ear marks point toward the coming of Brooklyn and Cincinnati to the place of prosperity and peace—the National League. The Sporting Life August 14, 1889

[from Joe Pritchard] “Will Cincinnati desert the Association next November? Said President Stern to me to-day. “Well, that is a question that I cannot answer just at present. Great influence is being brought to bear upon the officers of the Cincinnati Club to make the change.”

“By whom? The League officials?”
 “No, by the people of Cincinnati. They want to see the League clubs.”

“You have not made up your mind as to what course you will pursue at the season's end? Was asked by your correspondent.

“No. Sunday ball in Cincinnati is a thing of the past, and I will finish the season's Sunday games over in Kentucky; and if I am in the Association next season, I will have everything fixed so that our regular schedule can be played out by playing Sunday games in Kentucky, as everything can be run wide open over there.”

Mr. Stern said a great deal more about the League and Association, and from the general drift of his conversation it will be safe to bank on the Cincinnati Club remaining right where they are. Stern is out for the stuff, and while it can be said that Cincinnati is a fair 50 cent town, he can make more money remaining in the Association, charging 25 cents, and playing his Sunday games in Kentucky.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The position of the field umpire; two umpire system

Date Wednesday, August 14, 1889
Text

Captain Stovey objected to Goldmsith umpiring from the centre of the diamond last Monday, claiming that with two umpires it was not necessary to run any risk of blocking the players. Goldsmith umpired from that position only when there was a man on second base, but it was quite evident that he interfered with the throwing of both Cross and Weyhing to second. With two men umpiring no standing in the infield should be permitted.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

cracking down on Sunday baseball in Cincinnati

Date Thursday, August 15, 1889
Text

[dateline Cincinnati] The Superintendent of Police having notified theatrical and base ball managers that Sunday performances and base ball games will not hereafter be permitted, Manager Stern to day [8/14] called on Mayor Mosby to ask permission to play the remaining four games that are scheduled here for Sundays. The Mayor made a positive refusal and told him that real bona fide arrests of managers and players would be made on the sport if games were attempted. The theatrical managers all say they will not oppose the law, and most of them are glad of its enforcement. They say they can make more money by six days performances during the week than by seven. All they want is assurance that all will be served alike. St. Louis Republic August 15, 1889 [The game was attempted, stopped in the fourth inning by the police. SLR 8/26/1889]

The law which prohibits Sunday ball here is a state enactment, and the announcement that Brooklyn and Cincinnati would play at Hamilton next Sunday has stirred up some of the inhabitants of that place. The Tri State League club has played there all the year on Sundays without interruption from the police authorities, but the announcement of the invasion of the association clubs has created, in the language of a special telegram from that place, “general indignation that butler County should be selected as a county where the law can be violated with impunity,” and it may be that the authorities will interfere with the game and prevent it from taking place. The Sheriff is being urged to use his authority and call out a posse, if necessary, to prevent the game. Taken altogether the situation looks rather squally for the crowd of Cincinnatians who are going to Hamilton to violate a law that they are compelled to obey in their own city. The base ball park is out of the city limits and this prevents the city authorities from taking cognizance of the matter. Just how mad the Sheriff is cannot be told at this writing. St. Louis Republic August 22, 1889

Two more Sunday games are scheduled to be played here [Cincinnati]. This week President Stern said that he would transfer the St. Louis contest booked for October 13 here to the Mound City for half the gate receipts. The other game on the 6th belongs to Louisville, and it may be played there also. There is nothing new in the Sunday question. Amateur games are permitted, and a collection is taken up at the Cincinnati Park. The liberality of a Sunday ball crowd is illustrated by the fact that at the last game $311 in coppers was taken in. St. Louis Republic August 22, 1889

The Cincinnati and Louisville base ball game scheduled here [Cincinnati] for Sunday was not played, the municipal authorities forbidding. There was an effort yesterday to secure an order from the courts forbidding the Mayor and the Chief of Police from interfering with the players, but it was refused. St. Louis Republic October 7, 1889

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the use of courtesy runners

Date Friday, August 16, 1889
Text

[Washington vs. Chicago 8/15/1889] Although Mr. Williamson is “weak on his pins,” [following an extended illness] with the aid of a base runner he is able to render valuable assistance to the Chicago team. Yesterday he hit the ball safely four times out of five that he was at the plate, and his last hit brought in the winning run.

Anson did Williamson's running in the second, fourth, seventh, and ninth. In the fifth the captain was at second when Ed went to the plate and Tener had to do the sprinting act.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Buck Ewing's mask obstructing the plate

Date Sunday, August 18, 1889
Text

[New York vs. Pittsburgh 8/17/1889] ...an act of Buck Ewing's. He, when men were run bases, laid his mask on the home plate, and Miller ran on to it, injuring himself so much that he had to retire, and Sunday took his place. Ewing was hooted extremely for this, and he foolishly enough returned the compliment to the people who had no more sense than to do it. As a result there were yells sufficient tot urn the hairs of a young man gray during the balance of the game. In the sixth inning Ewing repeated the act when Beckley was running home, and again there was pandemonium.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a block ball 5

Date Tuesday, August 20, 1889
Text

[Pittsburgh vs. Cleveland 8/19/1889] Tebeau batted a swift grounder to Rose which the short stop juggled and then threw over Beckley's head into the pavilion. Tebeau continued in his chase around the bases, and crossed the plate before the ball was fielded back to Morris.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

talk of moving the pitcher back

Date Wednesday, August 21, 1889
Text

In common with many other players, John Morrill thinks the pitchers ought to be put back five feet. That is only a question of time. The pitcher's overshadowing importance must be reduced, and an increased pitching distance is the only thing that will do it without giving the batsman undue advantage.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Sunday baseball outlawed in Cincinnati

Date Wednesday, August 21, 1889
Text

[from Ren Mulford's column] The superintendent of police having notified theatrical and base ball managers that Sunday performances and base ball games will not hereafter be permitted, Manager Stern to-day called on Mayor Mosby to ask permission to play the remaining four games that are scheduled here for Sundays. The Mayor made a positive refusal, and told him that a real, bona fide arrest of managers and players would be made on the sport if games were attempted. The club has four more Sunday games to play, and has arranged to play Sunday's scheduled game with the Columbus team, on the grounds in Ludlow, In Kentucky, on the line of the Cincinnati, New Orleans and Texas Pacific Railway. The stands will not hold more than 1000 people, and the grounds can only be reached by train. Three specials will be run over the road that day. The grounds are a pretty poor apology for the present park. New stands may be built, but that is a question for adjustment later on. The Sporting Life August 21, 1889

[from Ren Mulford's column] The suppression of Sunday ball, while feared, was rather unexpected, and it was the result of a demand that the Owen law be enforced without favor. One of its provisions brings Sunday theatricals and base ball on the same ground with the Sunday saloon. Theatricals and the saloons were abated, but base ball continued to be played, and the only disagreeable feature was the regular Sunday night arrest of Manager Scnmelz and his Monday morning appearance in the police court. A double-leaded “defi” that Heuck's intended to ignore the Sunday law is generally charged as being responsible for the screws which the Mayor has put on both the theatres and base ball. It has been years since these sleeping laws have been enforced in this erstwhile “wide-open” city, and under the new regime Cincinnati joins New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Cleveland, Baltimore, and other cities—quite as prosperous—in reserving the first day of the week for rest, without accompanying fire works, beer and other etceteras of an amusement line. If Cincinnati—no one doubts its ability to shine in such society—is debarred from wearing a League crown, then it is absolutely certain that new grounds will be opened for Sunday games in Kentucky. Cincinnati, with League ball and advanced prices, can live without Sunday games and make just as much money as the Association team does now. The Sporting Life August 28, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Athletics go drinking

Date Wednesday, August 21, 1889
Text

[Athletic vs. St. Louis 8/20/1889] There were a number of ugly rumors current yesterday reflecting seriously on the reputation of the Athletic team for sobriety. It was said that the surplus beer in one of the famous breweries of the city had been materially reduced by a visit from several of the prominent members of the team. However true the charge, it is quite certain that the team player very beery ball. There was a lack of life and ambition about their work that soon set the spectators yawning. Seward was pounded constantly and his support was vile. “Curt” Welch was way off and his work was a disagreeable surprise to his admirers. Fennelly dropped a fly and Larkin gave a wretched exhibition of base-running. Add to this their weak exhibition at the bat and it appear as if the “jag” story was not altogether improbable. St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a tie game ended for dinner

Date Friday, August 23, 1889
Text

[Cleveland vs. Indianapolis 8/22/1889] [the first game of a double-admission double header] The first contest opened at 10 o'clock in the morning, and at the end of the ninth inning the score stood 1 to 1, with no prospects of a change. As the players had to get their dinners and arrange for the second game, Captains Glasscock and Faatz agreed to call it a draw, with the understanding that the game will be played off on Saturday.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitcher covering first on a ground ball to the right side

Date Sunday, August 25, 1889
Text

Among the prettiest plays in a contest are the grounders to first where the pitcher covers the base. They are also the hardest plays, for the stop must be well made, the throw must be accurate, and the pitcher must time himself so as to capture the ball and touch the base.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

antedate of “double steal”

Date Sunday, August 25, 1889
Text

[Brooklyn vs. Cincinnati 8/24/1889] A double steal was attempted, but Reilly was nailed at third.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a proposal for post-season interleague play

Date Sunday, August 25, 1889
Text

A few days ago Al Pratt, the well-known dealer in sporting goods in this city, and also a veteran in baseball affairs, suggested to me a plan by which League and Association clubs could contest against each other at the end of the season. Mr. Pratt's plan is to the effect that the first, second, third and so on in the League race play a series of games with the first, second, third and so on of the Association. Mr. Pratt was enthusiastic about the idea, and was thoroughly convinced that it would be a great success. Doubtless at first sight there are attractive features about the plan, but I fear that those features belong almost entirely to the clubs that stand well in the respective associations. For instance, what great interest would there be in a series of games between Louisville and Washington? I refer to the interest at the respective cities of these two clubs. I venture to say that there would be a certain amount of general interest merely prompted by the desire to see which organization had the worst club. But citizens nowadays are not inclined to knowingly put up their money for a bad article. However, as we ascent eh list, that is, the list of clubs in the League and Association, the chances of financial success become better. I have no doubt whatever but what the eight series would generally be a great success, providing the weather was all right. This thought prompts the idea that if all the clubs cannot profitably make the venture, let as many as can do so.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the soaking the field trick

Date Monday, August 26, 1889
Text

Manager Mutrie tells a story of how, in order to avoid a game with the Giants on a wet day, to make things worse, the Hoosier groundkeeper had brought out a hose and sprinkled the base lines, pitcher's box, and home plate to such an extent as to make a game wholly impossible. Jim insisted on a game, as it was not raining. The Hoosier people hummed and hawed, and finally agreed to play at 4:35. They did play and defeated the Giants, much to Mutrie's chagrin.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a foreshadowing of Merkle’s Boner

Date Tuesday, August 27, 1889
Text

[Boston vs. Philadelphia 8/26/1889] [bottom of the 12th inning, tie score, Boston at bat, two outs, Kelly at second and Brouthers on first] Johnston followed with a solid crack to centre and ran leisurely to first, bat in hand. When within ten feet of the base, seeing that Kelly had scored, he turned towards the right and ran over towards the stand. Fogarty made a wild throw in, the ball getting away from Farrar. It was finally secured by one of the Boston players, who passed it to Kelly. Farrar, Delahanty and Sanders ran after Kelly and tried to wrest the ball from him, but he would not give it up. The crowd then surged into the field and several passes were made at the “only,” but none of them landed. Finally, with the aid of the officers, he was hustled into the dressing-room. Johnston did not touch first base. In fact, he stopped within ten feet of it; but even if Farrar had secured the ball and made the claim it would not have been allowed, as neither [umpires] Curry nor McQuade saw the play.

Kelly when seen said that he supposed Farrar wanted to substitute an old ball for a new one, as he did not tell him that he wanted the ball to make a play. Farrar admitted that in the excitement he did not tell Kelly what he wanted the ball for, but supposed that Kelly knew. The excitement was intense for a half hour, a great crowd being assembled on the outside of the grounds. The Philadelphia Item August 27, 1889

President Young yesterday [9/16] telegraphed Director Soden that the Boston-Philadelphia game had been declared by the League directors a victory for the Bostons. Three out of four members of the Board of Directors of the League voted for Boston, and it was not necessary for President Young, as chairman ex-officio, to cast his vote. President John B. Day stated in his communication to President Young

“To all practical intents and purposes the game in dispute was won for Boston on Johnston’s hit, which, having passed the centrefielder, permitted Kelly to score the winning run.” Mr. Hewett when the case was presented to him concurred in the opinion of Mr. Day and cast his vote accordingly. His opinion was not given, however, until yesterday and was a verbal reply to President Young’s message. For the Indianapolis Club President Brush decided: “The umpire is sole judge of the game, and if he did not declare Johnston out for not running to first it must be presumed that he did reach there safely, in which case the run counted.”

Messrs. Day, Brush and Hewett, it will be seen favored the award of the game to the Bostons, while President Nimick, of Pittsburg, was the only director opposed to the leaders. This effectually disposed of the story that Mr. Day is inimical to the Bostons, and speaks well for the fair minded New Yorker. The Philadelphia Item September 27, 1889

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Al Nichols on an amateur team

Date Wednesday, August 28, 1889
Text

Outfielder Ben Cake and pitcher Hart, of the Rivertons, had quite an unusual experience a week ago. These two well-iknown and popular amateurs were invited to make up a team to represent Pennington, N.J., in a contest against the Flemington Club. When they arrived at the latter's ground, where the game was to be played, they recognized among the Flemington players the notorious Al Nichols, who was blacklisted years ago along with Devlin and Hall by the Louisville Club for selling games. He was down on the card as third baseman “Williams.” When they discovered Nichols' identity, which was not denied, Cake and hart promptly refused to contaminate themselves by playing a game agaisnt a man who was debarred even from the professional field, and therefore should be the last to be allowed to compete with amateurs. The Flemington people, though aware of Nichols' character and history, positively refused to play without him, and Hart and Cake thereupon left the grounds amid the hooting and abuse of the goodly crowd assembled, which was, however, ignorant of the real reason for the withdrawal of the Philadelphians. After Cake and Hart left the Flemington Club claimed the game by default, but the Penningtons afterwards with the aid of two local players played the game. It is said to be a fact that Nichols plays right along with the so-called “amateur” teams in the vicinity of New York, Brooklyn and in various parts of New Jersey, and is making a living out of it. Though he plays under the name of Williams, his identify is no secret, and yet our Philadelphia players are, we believe, to refuse to play with or against him. This is a fine commentary on the “amateurism” that prevails in and around the metropolis and of the moral tone of these misnamed amateur players.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

courtesy runner refused

Date Wednesday, August 28, 1889
Text

“To-night Captain Glasscock called at the Bates House and informed Anson that the Indianapolis Club would insist upon Williamson running his own bases or remaining out of the game. “It's a mean trick,” said Williamson to-night. “They are simply forcing me to sit on the bench or risk straining my leg, which is not strong enough to do hard base-running.” It certainly does look to be a small piece of business.” – Chicago Tribune. Glassock's act was undoubtedly not due to any desire to injure genial Ned, but to concede nothing to the man who never concedes anything to anybody else—Captain Anson. The latter has more than once declined to allow badly injured men substitutes, and his treatment of catcher McGuire some years ago is still fresh in mind.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chicago Club finances; grounds

Date Thursday, August 29, 1889
Text

Mr. Spalding is a big loser, personally, thus far through poor attendance, but takes his loss as a man should. He says he supposes it is Chicago's turn to have a bad year; that, while the present season is not remunerative, the club will not be in the hold it was in in 1884, when it closed the season without a dollar in the treasury. Such a statement may not be credited, but it is a fact nevertheless. When the club left the lakefront grounds all the assets it had was its charter and the old wood from the stands and fences. Its surplus had been given away to the stockholders, and the treasury was bare, but it hasn't been since and won't be again, for the directors in 1885 instituted a sinking fund and have it today. The fund, it is said, at present amounts to nearly $100,000, so there is no immediate danger of the club's throwing up its charter. That a good deal, if not all, and more, too, will be expended by the directors in the next two years is by no means uncertain, for the club proposes to spend a vast sum on the new park. Boston and Philadelphia have beautiful stands, but, according to Mr. Spalding, the new grand stand and park will be the best in the world. The ground is 650 feet long by 632 wide. Where is the batter that can hit a ball out of such an inclosure?, quoting the Boston Herald

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a proposal to abolish the foul fly out

Date Saturday, August 31, 1889
Text

President Spalding goes on record in the east as favoring the abolition of the foul catch. Such a change will come this season. The way for it was paved when the foul tip out behind the bat was abolished. With no foul catches allows one more of the elements of “luck” will be removed from the game.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

bulldozing by Comiskey

Date Saturday, August 31, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Byrne] “An idea can be had of what I mean from the following incident: On the occasion of the second game played at St. Louis, which took place on a Sunday afternoon before 13,000 people, Mr. Comiskey made a ground rule, which allowed only two bases for a ball batted or thrown into the crowd. In the early part of the game, after the rule had been made, one of the St. Louis team batted a ball into the crowd and it was some time before it was recovered. One of the umpires, who had charge of balls and strikes, gave the batsman his base, according to the rule agreed upon. Comiskey at once protested against the decision, and claimed a home run. He indulged in his usual blustering and kicking, and on this occasion was especially objectionable. He utterly refused to obey the umpires al5though both of them decided against him.

“There was a scene of wild excitement on the grounds, the crowd broke into the field, and the game was delayed for five minutes, as the record will show. Under the rule the game should have been forfeited to Brooklyn by a score of 9 to 0, said rule providing that unless the field is cleared the game is forfeited. But Comiskey bulldozed the umpires and terrorized them so that they ordered the game to proceed. It was played out in the midst of a perfect pandemonium. The play became a farce, our players became disheartened and the game went against them. This is only one of several disgraceful experience we had on our trip.” St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

resistance to Sunday games in Queens; single admission double header

Date Saturday, August 31, 1889
Text

There will be no Sunday games at the Queens County ball grounds to-morrow, not even at Ridgewood, and to-day’s games with the Kansas City team will be the last appearance of that well managed team in Brooklyn this season. At the close of yesterday’s game Sheriff Goldner, of Queens County, had an interview with Messrs. Byrne and Doyle and informed them that the law against Sunday ball playing in that county would hereafter be strictly enforced, beginning with to-morrow, and he suggested the withdrawal of the Brooklyn Club’s games, which Mr. Byrne promptly acceded to. There has been no desire on the part of the Brooklyn Club’s management to work in opposition to the proper enforcement of the law against all the clubs in Queens County: but as long as other grounds were allowed to be used they wanted to play at Ridgewood. This sudden change of base obliged the hurried arrangement of two games at Washington Park to-day, the first beginning at 2 P.M. promptly and the second within ten minutes after the close of the first contest, to allow time to remark the position lines. Only one admission will be charged for the two games.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a failed hidden ball trick

Date Sunday, September 1, 1889
Text

Patsy Tebeau has captured the heart of the town [Cleveland] by his tricks and antics. He plays to win games, and that's the kind of playing that pays. In last Monday's game he taught that big Chicagoan, van Haltren, a lesson which he'll not soon forget. Van was on third and pat had the ball. He made a motion to throw it to the pitcher, but deftly hid it in his hip pocket instead. Van, who wasn't watching the ball, led off the base and Tebeau stepped between him and the bag. Then he began to tug at the ball in the hip pocket, but it wouldn't budge. The harder he pulled the closer the ball stuck, until at length the runner noticed what he was doing and ran to his base. Then the unaccommodating sphere slipped out ot he pocket, but too late. Loftus says he'll have the pockets made larger after this.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the coach asks for the ball trick

Date Sunday, September 1, 1889
Text

The other day Worcester scored a funny run. Capt. Cudworth of the team was coacher at the first base line and Jones was on second base. The ball was in the hands of Smith, the Norwalk pitcher. Suddenly Cudworth shouted to Smith: “Say, old man, isn't that ball ripped?” “No,” said Smith, holding the ball to view. “Let's see it,” persisted Cudworth. Smith, without thinking, threw the ball at him. Cudworth dodged the ball, and it rolled clear to the bleaching boards. Johnson meantime scored, and the crowd howled.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

courtesy runner 2

Date Sunday, September 1, 1889
Text

[Chicago vs. Pittsburgh 8/31/1889] William surprised the crowd by running his own bases as far as first, and did well, although he favored his injured leg with every stride.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

sliding to evade the tag

Date Sunday, September 1, 1889
Text

[Chicago vs. Pittsburgh 8/31/1889] Duffy gave the crowd an exhibition of baserunning and sliding in the third. He was on first when Anson hit a hard one to center. Hanlon got it and threw to Kuehne to stop Duffy at second, but to the surprise of the Pittsburgh fielders Duffy did not stop there. He kept right on running, and when he got within ten feet of the bag launched himself into the air, throwing out his right hand as he did so, and using it as a means to check his head and body, while the impetus of his dive carried his legs and hips ahead, and the result was that he made a complete circle around the legs of the “good deacon,” who, although he received the ball from Kuehne in ample time, was too bewildered by Duffy's gymnastic effort to put the ball on him. Lovers of the game at home have seen him so the same thing upon the Chicago grounds.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an infield fly double play; baserunner's dilemma

Date Sunday, September 1, 1889
Text

Pop Smith worked an old trick in a very slick way Tuesday. In the eighth inning, with one our and Hallman and Fogarty on second and third, respectively, Farrar popped up a fly to short left, which Smith permitted to drop safely in front of him. He then quickly gathered it in, ran over and touched Hallman and then threw to Quinn, forcing out Fogarty and retiring the side. There is no possible way of beating this trick by legitimate play. The rules committee should make a cast-iron rule declaring the batter out whenever an infielder could, by purposely muffing a ball, effect a double play., quoting the Philadelphia North American

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

balk rule not enforced

Date Monday, September 2, 1889
Text

During the progress of the second Kansas City game at Brooklyn on Saturday attention was called to the peculiar delivery of Pitcher Sowders, the left handed exponent of the art. Several times he made palpable balks in his endeavors to hold the runners on the bases, but the umpire did not penalize him, as the rules demand. When Bushong, who acted as the umpire, was asked his reasons for not enforcing the balk rules he said the regular umpires were allowing such balks and he therefore did the same.

Kilroy continually makes similar players, but is never called down. President Byrne was in the reporters’ box at the time and discussed the subject freely and to the point. The balk rule said he “should be struck out entirely, for it is never observed. You cannot get an umpire to award a runner with a base when a balk is made no matter how definite the instructions. Pitchers are continually violating this rule, but when do you hear of one being penalized? If the rule is good enough to stand it should be lived up to, but if the umpires won’t enforce it what is the use of it?

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the crowd assists on a block ball

Date Tuesday, September 3, 1889
Text

[Chicago vs. Philadelphia 9/2/1889] In the third inning, with Ryan on first, Van Haltern hit a hard one to right, which Thompson let go by him into the crowd. A spectator, however, promptly fielded the ball into the diamond and Ryan was held on third, while Van got no further than second. Had Thompson been compelled to field the ball both men would probably have scored.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

stealing signs 2

Date Tuesday, September 3, 1889
Text

The Philadelphia club has suddenly discovered what several league clubs have known all season, that the sign batteries of the club's batteries are generally known. Buffinton's are with his mouth and Sanders' with his foot.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

dirty ball playing, Dirty ball playing

Date Error: Invalid time.
Text

Manager McGunigle told a Sun reporter yesterday that the Brooklyns had to play roughly in the Baltimore series in self-defence. Said he: “From the very start the Baltimores began the 'dirty' playing, Tate laying his mask in the base path and in other ways trying to obstruct runners, and Tucker trying his best to hurt every runner that came near him at first base. Under these circumstances our boys had to be rough in order to keep from getting hurt.” The Baltimores were rough, 'tis true, but two wrongs never make a right.

,

[Chicago vs. Pittsburgh 8/30/1889] ...there was considerable dirty ball playing. Carroll collided with Pfeffer in stealing second in the third, and Anson called for a fine. In the next inning Pfeffer ran into Dunlap in a similar way, but it looked very much as if it was done on purpose. Lynch refused to fine him, but a moment later Dunlap made a frightful lunge at the Chicago second baseman with his right, which was very cleverly “ducked.” Lynch saw the move and promptly fined Dunlap $25 for the “pass.

Source New York Sun, ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Nick Young comes out in favor of the strike on a caught foul tip

Date Wednesday, September 4, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Young] There is just one change I think out to be made before the beginning of another season. Under the present rule a foul tip taken by the catcher standing within ten feet of the home plate is not out. This is as it should be, but I would not have this very pretty play go for nothing. A hot foul tip neatly taken from the bat is one of the prettiest plays to be seen in the game. I remember well when Doug Allison introduced the play. He was the first catcher to successfully hold these foul tips, and the play made a great sensation. I would amend the present rule so that a foul tip if caught should count as a strike. There is reason in this. Nine times in ten a ball that is fouled would have been s strike if the batsman had missed it. If it is a foul and can not be caught out neither pitcher nor catche4r gets credit for it. Certainly the pitcher should profit in some small degree by every ball that goes over the plate that is not fairly hit. On long foul flies the catcher and fielders have a chance, and on hot foul tips at least a third as much credit should go to the pitcher as for striking a man out. Let a foul tip caught count as a strike and I am satisfied the change will be accepted by the profession and public alike as an improvement. The Sporting Life September 4, 1889

a protested game, premonition of Merkle's boner; trophy ball; two umpire failure; when the game ends

[Boston vs. Philadelphia 8/26/1889] The row at the Philadelphia ground last Monday is to be exceedingly regretted, because it is the first time such a thing happened at the Philadelphia ball park, and also because it brought the game to an unsatisfactory conclusion and necessitated a protest from the Philadelphia Club, which was drawn up by Colonel Rogers and forwarded to President Young on the following day. A good deal of undeserved censure was heaped upon Mike Kelly, whereas only the umpires and the crowd were to blame—the former for failing to remain at their places to watch the play and see that the game was brought to a proper conclusion, and the people for not remaining in their seats. Kelly was not to be blamed for holding on to the ball, which action started the row, as he was entirely ignorant of Johnston's failure tot ouch first bas, and according to custom was entitled to the ball last in use. Farrar has been censured for attempting to take the ball from Kelly, it being held that he did not need the ball in order to make a claim, but he did. According to the rules Johnston was out for not running to first base, but the umpirew had to decide whether he was or not, and even if they did not see the play, by admitting that much they would have given a decision which would have ended the game properly. …

[from the Phillies' protest] “The Philadelphia Club had completed its twelfth inning with a score of four runs. The Boston Club, with a similar score, had two men out and two players, Kelly and Brouthers, occupying respectively second and first bases, with Johnston at the bat. The latter made a base hit to centre field, upon which Kelly ran home. Johnston, who made the hit, ran about two-thirds of the way towards first base, then turned to the right, walked outside of the 'three feet line' and over to the players' bench and did not afterwards touch first base or make any attempt to do so.

“In the meantime the ball was thrown in from the field, but not to the Philadelphia pitcher. It was picked up by a Boston player and given to Mr. Kelly, captain of the Boston team.

“Captain Farrar, of the Philadelphia team, demanded the surrender of the ball from Captain Kelly, but the latter refused to give it up, claiming that the game was over and the ball belonged to the victors.

“The game not being legally completed this refusal to surrender the ball was an obstruction to its fielding, and under the rules put Mr. Johnston out.

“Unfortunately, neither of the two umpires was on the field to decide the point, they having run under the pavilion to avoid the crowd which had occupied the infield immediately upon Mr. Kelly's refusal to surrender the ball.

“Although their powers as umpires ceased the momement they left the field, sill, in justice to Messrs. Curry and McQuaid, they now maintain that they were so interested in watching the ball when hit safely to centre field that neither saw what Johnston did nor where he ran. In other words, they did not obey the plain mandate of rule 52, which makes them remain 'masters of the field from the commencement to the termination of the game,' and the game could not terminate, under rule 22, section 2, paragraph B, until 'the return of the ball to the pitcher.' In point of fact, the game never legally terminated, because the ball was never so returned to the pitcher, and for that reason along must be set aside as irregular....” The Sporting Life September 4, 1889

The protested Philadelphia-Boston game of Aug. 26 has been decided adversely to the Philadelphia Club by the League board of directors, Messrs. Day, Brush and Hewitt voting to count the game for Boston and Mr. Nimick for a draw. Such a result was to have been expected; but if the Philadelphia Club's protest served no other purpose it at least called attention to the fact that the law which provides for the legal termination of game is virtually a dead letter and that the rule ordering the return of the ball to the pitcher in his position after the winning run has been scored in the last inning before the third man is out is not observed at all. In fact, the rule seems superfluous, it being almost impossible to enforce it, as the moment the winning run is made the crowd surges upon the field and surrounds the players without waiting to see what becomes of the ball. The Sporting Life September 25, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

player advocacy by the Brotherhood

Date Wednesday, September 4, 1889
Text

In speaking of the League Brotherhood the other day a prominent member of the order and noted player said:-- “I notice they are talking about classification and many other schemes, but you can rest assured that the Brotherhood will demand their rights at all times. The Brotherhood has done an immense amount of good. There is less drinking in the ranks than ever before, and this encourages President Ward more than anything else. See what we have accomplished. Detroit had to pay Thompson, and how they did squeal. And perhaps big Sam doesn't love the Brotherhood? We also went to the front for Hardie Richardson and Dunlap when their ankles were broken. But this is not all by a long shot. Did you hear of Casey's case with the Phillies? You didn't, eh? Well, Casey was practicing one morning on the Philadelphia grounds, and himself and Hallman collided, which injured Casey's arm so much that he was laid up for a couple of weeks without pay. Casey appealed to the Brotherhood and Al Reach will have to pay Casey, as he was injured while in the employ of the club and on the ball field. There has been a great deal of lying about Sutcliffe, who originally received $2250 from the Detroit Club. The contract said $2000 and the magnates claimed that Sutcliffe was receiving what his literal contract called for when he was obliged to take a reduction from Cleveland. This is not so, for Sutcliffe received but $1750 from the Cleveland Club. It has been given out that the Brotherhood would fight the Pittsburg Club for Pete Conway's salary when the season is ended, but such a fight will never occur, and Conway knows the reason why. The Brotherhood is not a beneficial association, but will help anybody in need who has been a member of the organization. Our aim is to have all men treated alike, and I am happy to say that we have been very successful in our undertaking.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

dirty ball play

Date Wednesday, September 4, 1889
Text

Pitcher Billy Blair, of Hamilton, was angry at Rochester Friday week, and claimed that W. O'Brien stood too near the plate, but Umpire Emslie said that he was in a proper position. There was quite a dispute, and finally Emslie threatened to find Blair if he did not pitch. Blair then deliberately threw the ball at O'Briedn but O'Brien dodged it. Blair threw at O'Brien again, but the ball just missing his head. Then O'Brien started out on the diamond with uplifted club, but thought better of it and came back to his position. Blair threw another ball, though that almost hit O'Brien. The big first baseman started out toward Blair again, and the crowd yelled “kill him!” O'Brien did not molest Blair, however, and went to first on balls. Blair then lost control of the ball, and two bases on balls, three singles and a home run brought in five runs.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Spalding buys out Reach's sporting goods retail business

Date Wednesday, September 4, 1889
Text

The biggest sporting deal of the season, and, in its way, the biggest on record, was quietly consummated in Philadelphia during the week. On that day Messrs. A. G. Spalding and Brown, of the Chicago branch of the great sporting goods house of Spalding Bros., and Manager J. W. Curtis, of the New York branch, arrived in Philadelphia simultaneously, and before the shades of evening fell their mission was accomplished, and with one bold stroke Spalding Bros. had absorbed their great rival, the A. J. Reach Company, lock, stock and barrel, and made themselves supreme in American, and, in fact, the chief sporting goods house in the world.

The deal goes into effect November 1, when the Reach Company goes out of existence and Spalding Bros. Enter into possession of the great store at 10-22 Market St. By the terms of the deal they secure that store, all its stock and fixtures, the good will of the company, which gives to Spalding Bros. Exclusive control of a great, valuable, and widely extended business, all the patents, patterns and tools for the manufacture of the elaborate and unequaled gymnasium apparatus, of which the Reach Company had a monopoly, and which cannot be duplicated anywhere in the world, and a number of other patents and other rights in various sporting lines. The price paid for this great plant and business is something over $100,000. The members of the Reach Company retire permanently from the retail and general sporting goods business, leaving Spalding Bros. in undisputed control for all time, and retain only their wholesale base ball supply business, confining themselves solely to the manufacture of base ball supplies and of the famous Reach balls, at the big Frankford factory, so the American Association is in no danger of losing its splendid ball.

For Spalding Bros. this great deal means practical control of the world in their line, as, with houses located in New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Melbourne and London,and with minor branches in nearly every important city in the United States and Canada, and with vast capital at its command, the firm is now in position to easily maintain its supremacy indefinitely.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

stealing signs 3

Date Wednesday, September 4, 1889
Text

[from an interview of an unidentified Boston player] “Now, I'll tell you why the Phillies' pitchers are being hit so hard lately. The secret lies in the fact that about every club in the League is onto their signs. Take Buffinton for example, he signs with his mouth. If you see him press his lips close together you expect a fast straight ball and that is what we are laying back for. When he stands in the box with his mouth open it means that he will put one of his drop balls over the plate, and we simply leave that go as it is hard to hit, and besides generally drops so low as to be nothing but a 'ball' anyhow. Thus you see by not going after his drop balls we get him into a hole, and he must then put them over straight, and those are the ones we lace out. Sanders signs with his left foot. If he has it turned to the left it is a curve ball. Casey and Gleason are also doing their own signing, and we are dead onto them.” In using the above we are not betraying any confidence, as the Boston-Philadelphia series is now practically over, and the Bostons can no longer lose anything by the Philadelphia batters getting up new signs. “Indeed,” said one of the Boston men last Tuesday night, “I hope the Phillies will change their signs now before they meet New York again and thus down the latter, as that is the 0only club we have to fight for the pennant.” In this connection it may be added that it is poor policy for the pitcher to give the signs, as nine out of ten times the opposing team get onto them in a very short time and then it means almost certain defeat for that side. If the catcher asks for the sign so he can hide it that the coachers will scarcely get onto it, while the batsman must depend on the men in the coachers' box to give him the cue, as he dare not look around else he is not ready to bat, pitchers being always on the watch to catch batters napping. The combination sign, i.e., giving two or three at once, is the only safe one, as then the opposing side never knows which one is meant, though the battery understands it. Welch, Keefe and Ewing, Clarkson and Bennett, Seward and Robinson and several other batteries we know of use the combination sign with marked success, and they frequently change it in the middle of a game when the opposing side makes a number of safe hits in succession and they get suspicious that the other side is onto them.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

opposition to double headers

Date Wednesday, September 4, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] The practice of playing two games in one afternoon for one admission fee has been run into the ground this season and should receive the attention of the law makers next winter. Double games are excusable late in the season, when it is impossible to play off postponed games in any other way, but this year the practice was started early in the season and has been going on here and there ever since. The chief objection to double games is that the public is given far more than its money's worth and will gradually come to look upon a single game as either worth only half the present admission fee or to demand longer games or double games as a regular thing, even to the extend of playing these games by schedule. At any rate, by occasional double games for one admission the regularly scheduled games are cheapened by comparison, and this should not be encouraged by club owners. Far better to play postponed games in the forenoons, even to the smallest number of paying spectators, or else not play them at all.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitching records

Date Wednesday, September 4, 1889
Text

John Clarkson, of the Boston Club, who is this season easily the star pitcher of the National League, says he shall by the end of the season have broken League in four particulars, namely: – Number of games pitched,number of games won, number of men struck out and number of bases on balls. Now let the cranks overhaul their records and keep note of the great twirler's work for the rest of the season.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Spalding against the foul fly out

Date Wednesday, September 4, 1889
Text

A. G. Spalding favors doing away altogether with the foul catch, and he is on the right tack.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a critique of the umpire behind the pitcher; umpire looking over the catcher's shoulder

Date Wednesday, September 4, 1889
Text

[from Joe Pritchard's column] On more occasions than one during the present season have I noticed the fact that umpires who make their decisions from a position behind the pitcher are a source of considerable annoyance to the man who fills the hardest position on a team. In last Tuesday's game, while Stivetts was in the box and Milligan was up behind the bat, the former was given the “cue” two or three times to throw to second to catch a base-runner, but owing the the presence of the umpire between the pitcher and second Stivets was forced to hold the ball, as the base-runner was able to get back to second during the time consumed by Goldsmith in attempting to get out of the pitcher's way. Team work should not receive a black eye from the position occupied by the umpire, and I know it would be more satisfactory to all pitcher for umpires to return to their position behind the plate just as soon as second is reached by the runner. The proper position of the umpire is behind the plate, as he cant hen know just what is is doing on balls and strikes. Gaffney's position is the only correct one. He stands up close enough to the catcher to be able to look over his shoulder, and his position commands full view of the plate. He can tell beyond a doubt whether the pitcher is entitled to a strike or the batsman to a ball. Gaffney's position is certainly more dangerous than the other umpires' but he is well protected by several pasteboard patents, and is seldom injured.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

batter taking a break while in the box; quick pitch

Date Wednesday, September 4, 1889
Text

[Indianapolis vs. Boston 9/3/1889] The Boston game is likely to be protested. It was won by an illegal decision, so the Boston papers claim. In the ninth Daly was at the bat and two strikes had been called on him. He stooped to rub his hands in the dust, and while he was doing this Madden pitched a ball directly over the plate and claimed the third strike. Umpire McQuaid refused to call either a ball or a strike and ordered another ball pitched. This ball Daly sent out into right field and brought in the two runs which won the game. It is a new point to settle. If batsmen are allowed to do what Daly did the door would be open to an endless number of tricks to bother the pitcher. The decision was illegal on the face of the Boston description of the play.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitching the ball while the batter is unprepared; quick pitch

Date Wednesday, September 4, 1889
Text

[Indianapolis vs. Boston 9/3/1889] Singles by Denny and Hines filled the bases, with two men out, when Daily came to the bat. Two strikes were called on him in short order,w hen the errors referred to occurred. Seeing the necessity for a great strike, the latter left the plate and stepping about a yard away stooped down to get some dust to rub on his hands to keep the bat from slipping. This was wrong, and Bennett called to Madden to send the ball over the plate. This he did, and there being no man there, of course the ball was safely caught, and Kelly demanded that the umpire call it a third strike and out. This McQuaid refused to do, saying he was not sure of the correctness of such a judgment, as he never heard of such a case before. The home club should here have refused to play, but Kelly said he would appeal if they lost the game, and, despite the murmurs of the players, the game proceeded, with the result of Daily knocking the ball for a good two-bagger. The ball few flew over Richardson's head, and before he could get his hand on it two men scored, and the game was won and lost. After it was over McQuaid came in for a lot of personal advice, and everybody is demanding that the Bostons protest the game.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early Players League rumor

Date Sunday, September 8, 1889
Text

A wild and woolly rumor has reached here from Cleveland that Albert Johnson, a street car man of that city, is at the head of a scheme to corner the baseball market this fall and control the whole business next season. It is said that Johnson's scheme is to sign agreements with all of the league players and place clubs in Boston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Chicago, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and one other city not yet named, ignoring the league altogether. A gentleman who has just returned from Cleveland says that Johnson, who is a man of means and the wildest kind of a crank on baseball, has actually secured the names of several prominent brotherhood layers, and is now in the east working on his ponderous scheme. It is further claimed that John Ward, the New York shortstop, is giving the Cleveland man his assistance. The gentleman from Cleveland asserts that this is the mysterious business on which the brotherhood has been working for several months, which has been referred to in some of the metropolitan papers.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a college player with the Chicagos

Date Tuesday, September 10, 1889
Text

...the old Yale player, Hutchinson, who pitched the game of his life...

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a rumor of the Players League

Date Wednesday, September 11, 1889
Text

[from A. G. Ovens] While in Cleveland with the Hoosiers last month I hard a vague rumor in regard to a great scheme that a gentleman of that city was trying to work, by which he hopes to control the base ball market within the next sixty days. I chased the fleeing item for some time, but could not get close enough to it to locate the source from whence it came. It related to the intentions of the base ball “Brotherhood,” but no one seemed disposed to talk on the subject. Finally I concluded it was the idle dream of some visionary individual and dropped the matter. I did not think much more about it until last night, when I met a ball-player just from Cleveland, and as he appeared to be willing to talk I touched upon the alleged scheme of the Cleveland management. Had he heard of it? Well, yes, he had, but didn't care to say much about it. In the course of a long conversation, however, I learned that the Cleveland man who is supposed to be at the head of the business is Albert Johnson, who owns a street car line in that city. Mr. Johnson formerly lived in Indianapolis, and is a confirmed base ball crank. He has some money and an unlimited amount of nerve. The scheme will strike the average reader as rather a wild one, but my informant claims that it will be tried. As the story goes, Mr. Johnson has been working on the matter for some time, and has been ably assisted by John M. Ward. The great schemer's plan is to sign a contract with every ball player in the League and form a trust by which the base ball business is to be controlled. It is claimed that quite a number of the players have signed the agreement, and that Mr. Johnson is now in the East working on the scheme and securing more signatures. His plan is to get as many men to sign the agreement as possible, and when the managers of the present league clubs come to make terms with their players they will be informed that they have made other arrangements. This scheme contemplates the placing of clubs in Boston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago and some other city yet to be selected. It is positively asserted that Ward and Johnson have been looking into this matter for several months and the latter has had an office in Cleveland, where he met the various players who went to that city. Ward seems to be acting in good faith and hopes to see the plan work out, but it is equally well known, so my informant says, that Johnson realizes that such a great scheme can never be carried through successfully, but he hopes to make something out of it by selling the releases of the players back to the clubs from which they jumped, the players being given a percentage of the purchase money. The Boston, New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and the players of all other big clubs are to be drawn into the trust, and it is said, that an effort will be made to get Comiskey and several more of the prominent players of the American Association into the scheme. The gentleman who gave me these facts, if they are facts, was in a position to know, and although I laughed at him and tried to show him how absurd such a move would be, he said he got his information from a source that could not be questioned. He maintained that, whether the scheme was ever carried through or not, it was now under consideration and would be attempted. Johnson left Cleveland some time in the early part of last week, and the gentleman who was in that city say that he is now in New York or Boston conferring with some of the leading Brotherhood men, and at the same time getting contracts with as many players as possible. This is said to be the mysterious business in which the Brotherhood has been engaged for several months. Mr. Johnson will probably find such an undertaking quite a risky business, but he is a man who has nerve enough to do anything to carry a point. Of course, the scheme will never work, and it only remains to be seen if it will be attempted.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Nick Young affirms the two umpire system

Date Wednesday, September 11, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Young] There is no doubt in my mind that the patrons of the game would be better pleased with two umpires than one, and the experience of this season has demonstrated this fact to my entire satisfaction. Not that there is any objection to the staff of League umpires as it exists to-day, so far as the officials of the League are concerned, for we think our selections for these trying places have all endeavored to do their duty conscientiously and without favor to home or visiting clubs, as often alleged. But there is a demand for two umpires which cannot be ignored, and for my part I shall favor eight good men being chosen for these places next year. It will not do to have home umpires. That experiment has been tried too often and invariably resulted in more evil than good. What is required is to have an octette of umpires who shall be subject to orders as at present, and thus all talk of favoritism will be reduced to a minimum.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Boston purportedly threatens to jump to the AA

Date Wednesday, September 11, 1889
Text

[from W. I. Harris's column] What a funny bluff the Boston Club is making through Ed Stevens. They filled Stevens to the brim and he fired off a screed to the Philadelphia Press, in which he makes the threat that Boston will flop into the American Association should the League decide to throw out that disputed Philadelphia game. Such talk, is silly. The triumvirs would no more leave the League than they would jump off Bunker Hill monument. If that game doesn't belong to them, and the League so decides, the Boston Club will make the best of it. They will not jump.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Harry Stevens a hustler

Date Wednesday, September 11, 1889
Text

[from F. W. Arnold's column] Col. Harry Stevens, who has charge of the score cards at the ball park, seems to catch the eye of nearly all the managers who come here, and it's quite a compliment to the hustling young fellow to say that he has offers to sell cards in nearly every Association park in the country. He has also the privilege for the Ohio State Fair and the Tri-State Fair at Toledo, also tilting tournament to come off here this fall. Cincinnati and Cleveland have made him flattering offers. No class wishes Harry any better luck than the press boys, who are treated like princes by the Colonel.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

batter stepping out of the box

Date Wednesday, September 11, 1889
Text

[from Chadwick's column] I note the fact of an illegal decision rendered by Umpire McQuaid at Boston. I say “illegal” on the basis of the report of the case which I read in the New York papers on Wednesday morning, in which it is stated that “in the ninth inning when Daily, of the Indianapolis team, went to the bat he had had two strikes called on him when he stepped away from the plate to rub his hands in the dirt. Madden saw his chance, and sent the ball straight as a die for the plate. It sailed over the spot waist high as fine a ball as any batsman could desire. Umpire McQuaid could not call it a 'ball,' for to all in the grand stand it was evident that the ball was squarely over the plate. He refused to give any decision and told Madden to pitch another ball. Daily had not asked permission to step from the plate and Madden was justified in pitching the ball. The umpir4e was bound by the rules to call it either a ball or a strike. He couldn't call it a ball and eh wouldn't call it a strike. Madden pitched another ball and that one Daily met squarely, and before Captain Kelly could return it from right field Glasscock and Hines had crossed the plate with the tieing and winning runs respectively and the game was over.” If this is a true report of the case the decision was illegal. It would open the door to an endless series of disputes to allow a batsman to do what Daily did.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

accessibility of the New Polo Grounds

Date Wednesday, September 11, 1889
Text

[from Caylor's column] [The New Polo Grounds] has a number of advantages over the old Polo Grounds. One, and the most striking, is the fact that the elevated railroad lands visitors right across the street from the entrance gates, and in going home after a game is concluded you have to make but two steps to pass from the exit gate to the foot of the elevated railroad stairs. It requires no more time to go from the One Hundred and Sixteenth Street Station (the old station at the Polo Grounds) to One Hundred and Fifty-fifth street, the new landing place, four stations beyond, than it formerly required to take the visitors from the One Hundred and Sixteenth Street Station to the Polo Grounds. Moreover, you do not have to spend that time walking across from the railroad to the grounds, or pay a hackman fifteen cents extra for a carriage ride between points; nor do you have to descend or ascend half so many steps getting to a from the trains—the elevation at One Hundred and Fifty-fifth street being only one-thi5rd what it is at One Hundred and Sixteenth street.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

proportion of ladies at the New Polo Grounds

Date Wednesday, September 11, 1889
Text

[from Caylor's column] There is no game played at the New York grounds which does not have from 100 to 200 ladies in attendance. I mean all that the word implies; ladies from the best class of people many of them high up in the world of society. It is not necessary to make “ladies' days” to get them out. They are of that class who call it a pleasure to go or be taken by husband, brother and friend, and pay fifty cents for the privilege.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

knocking the ball out of the baseman's hand

Date Wednesday, September 11, 1889
Text

[from R. M. Larner's column] [The Cleveland Club] were unsuccessful in their efforts to trick the Senators while here, and on one occasion Hoy, our deaf and dumb centre fielder, outwitted Tebeau, McKean, Stricker and McAleer at their own game. They mute had reached second base on a passed ball. The ball was thrown down to second, and McKean, McAleer and Stricker handled the ball alternately until Stricker got hold of it and crept up behind Hoy, hoping that the latter would step off the base. The mute was onto the little game, and when Stricker stood beside him he smacked the hand that hld the ball, and the dogskin rolled several feet away. Before Stricker realized what had happened Hoy was safe on third base. Captain Faatz made a vigorous kick, but Umpire Knight held that there was no rule to cover such a play. It was simply a case of dog eat dog. Tebau captured the ball during the dispute and concealed it under his arm with the intention of getting even with the mute. The latter was wide awake as usual, and deliberately squatted down on the base and would not move until he saw the ball returned to Gruber, who was pitching.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Von der Ahe reportedly accuses Byrne of bribing umpires

Date Wednesday, September 11, 1889
Text

In an interview with a New York World reporter on Monday Von der Ahe used these costly words:

“Mr. Byrne cannot bluff me. He has been running the association to suit himself and now I’m going to put a stop to it. I’ve had enough of his bribing umpires and won’t stand it any more.”

“What umpires do you refer to when you say Mr. Byrne has bribed umpires?”

“Mr. Byrne knows the umpires I refer to, and sooner than have him continue this sort of business I will give up base ball forever.”

Von der Ahe will have to retract these words before the month expires. It is an imputation Mr. Byrne cannot and will not let go by without a strict accountability. When a man’s temper gets the best of his, brains go out of the business.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

winter baseball in Florida

Date Thursday, September 12, 1889
Text

Florida is rapidly coming to the front as a rival of California in thew inter base ball business. Mr. H. M. Flagler, proprietor of the famous Ponce de Leon Hotel, St. Augustine, has decided to fit up a winter ball park at St. Augustine that, in appointments and accommodations, will be second to none in the country. The contract has already been let for the construction of a magnificent grandstand, and by the time the regular season in the North is at end the St. Augustine Park will be ready to welcome the strong Northern teams. Mr. Flagler is determined to have the best, and his agents will engage the best base ball talent in the market. Offers will be made to leading league and association teams to spend the winter in Florida and make St. Augustine their headquarters. It is safe to say that the offers will be accepted, for there are few men in the base ball business who will refuse a life of ease and comfort in a beautiful climate with expenses guaranteed and a good profit assured. Besides base ball, the park will be used for bicycle, foot ball and tennis contests. St.

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

seeking financial incentives to play off postponed games

Date Friday, September 13, 1889
Text

In explanation of his failure to play off a postpone game in Boston Captain Hanlon says he at first declined to play because his men were in poor shape, but he was afterward willing to accept a proposition providing extra financial inducements were offered. He informed that they they were looking for the championship, while the Pittsburgs looked at the matter from a purely business standpoint. Manager Hart declined to offer anything beyond the usual rates so the game was not played. Captain Hanlon is not stuck on the double game business, especially while traveling.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

sign stealing; pitcher signs the catcher

Date Sunday, September 15, 1889
Text

[Pittsburgh vs. Washington 9/14/1889] Owing to the absence of his brother, John Irwin was captain for the day, and he claimed to have discovered Staley's signs to his catcher and he was not slow to give his men the benefit of his acquisition. Brother John, however, could not master the puzzle himself, and out of his five times at bat did not a hit mark his stick work.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

cutting corners, scoring during an argument

Date Sunday, September 15, 1889
Text

[Indianapolis vs. Philadelphia 9/14/1889] Fogarty’s cut across the diamond was phenomenal in its cheekiness. Not satisfied with that effort, while Glasscock was kicking to Knight he cooly walked home as though to join in the argument, tagged home and claimed a run.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

base straps

Date Tuesday, September 17, 1889
Text

A dozen clubs have been crippled because of their best men catching their feet or shoe spikes in the or under the bags. McAleer was crippled in this way. If the bases were all like the home plate—flat and flush with the ground—and the runners allowed to overrun all bases just as they now do first base, the chances for such injuries would be reduced to a minimum. The sawdust base-bags should be shelved at once. Besides hurting the players who slide into them, they spoil pretty plays by reason of the ball striking them and bounding awkwardly. The flat rubber base would remedy this falut also. St., quoting the Chicago Tribune

Source St. Louis Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an ejection; an attempted steal during the argument

Date Monday, September 16, 1889
Text

[Louisville vs. Brooklyn 9/15/1889] Then ensued a regular Comiskey kick by Shannon, who, like many other captains, imagines the disputing of decisions which cannot be reversed the sole duty of captains. This fellow, however, acted like a regular loafer. He told Goldmsith that he had better go and put on a Brooklyn uniform, as he was working for them all the while. Mr. Goldsmith could not stand that. He had fined Shannon $20 for his insulting disputing of his decision, and after his second and worse offense he ordered him off the field. Shannon went to the bend and declined to go off the ground. “I’m off the field, ain’t I?” he said, but Goldsmith insisted upon his going off the grounds and threatened forfeiture of the game if his decision was not obeyed, and so the Newark rough had to leave and take off his uniform. ... While Shannon was kicking about the decision at the home base Foutz tried to steal third, but he was thrown out there by Tomney and Raymond.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an umpire said to be fired for ejecting a player

Date Wednesday, September 18, 1889
Text

Umpire Curry received notification from President Young, yesterday, that his services as a League umpire were no longer desired. The general belief is that his action in fining Faatz and ordering his removal from the field had much to do with his release. The public sympathy is with Curry for all who saw Faatz’s disgraceful actions [game of 9/14] know that Curry would have been justified in imposing even a heavier fine. They look upon President Young’s dismissal of Curry just at this time as an indorsement of the dirty conduct of Faatz. The Philadelphia Item September 18, 1889

[quoting Nick Young] “...the facts in the case are these: For some time past Curry has been expecting to secure some position in Philadelphia, and, during a series of games when he was stationed here [Washington] he was in the habit of going over to Philadelphia every day to see about it. On one occasion he missed a game, and there was no valid excuse for his absence, so I decided to lecture him and endeavor to prevent a repetition of the offense, but he did not take kindly to what I said to him, but was inclined to think that I was reading the riot act to him for a very trifling affair. Numerous complaints were also filed against him at League headquarters, but I was inclined to deal as leniently with him as possible, and, as a matter of fact, he has not yet severed his connection with the league. Still it is quite likely that his successor will be named this week... The Philadelphia Item September 20, 1889

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

crackdown on Sunday ball at Ridgewood

Date Tuesday, September 17, 1889
Text

The Grand Jury, which has been investigating Sunday base ball at Ridgewood, closed its session this afternoon [9/17] and handed in a large number if indictments. One of these is reported to be against the Ridgewood Amusement Company and Ridgewood Park, where base ball is played on Sunday. The attempt to have Mr. Charles H. Byrne and the members of the Brooklyn base ball team indicted individually did not find favor with the Grand Jury. Brooklyn Eagle September 17, 1889

A plea of not guilty was entered before Judge Cullen in the Supreme Court, Long Island City, yesterday, by the Ridgewood Exhibition Company, in answer to the indictment found against the company by the Queens County Grand Jury for Sunday base ball playing at Ridgewood Park. The case was set down for trial on Oct. 21. The Philadelphia Item October 10, 1889

[following a detailed description of the court proceedings] The jury retired at 4:30 o’clock under a charge from Judge Cullen, which was virtually a direction to convect. Nevertheless the jury had views of its own which were kept in heated debate for six hours without an agreement being reached and at 10:10 o’clock they were discharged. The vote stood nine for acquittal and three for conviction. Brooklyn Eagle October 23, 1889

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a condemnation of Wikoff's leadership

Date Wednesday, September 18, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] The Brooklyn-St. Louis row is but the culmination of a long series of complaints and troubles directly traceable to the umpires themselves and to their handling. In his direction of the corps President Wikoff, who was last spring entrusted with exclusive control of the umpires, has shown himself utterly incompetent. Although regularly scheduled, no attempt has been made by him to keep the men up to their work, they have reported for duty or not, as they pleased, excuses of all sorts for non-performance of duty have been accepted as valid, the substitute system has been abused; in fact, a general demoralization was allowed to creep in unchecked. With five well-paid men on the staff, it was an almost daily occurrence throughout the season to find local substitutes, players and all sorts of irresponsible people umpiring important games with consequent dissatisfaction to the contesting clubs, the public, and the other clubs in the race all more or less affected in position thereby. In fact, a goodly portion of the rows of the season were directly due to this hap-hazard system of umpiring.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cricketers wearing baseball gloves

Date Friday, September 20, 1889
Text

[New Jersey Athletic Club vs. Staten Island Cricket Club 9/19/1889] When the visitors had been at bat for some time they discovered that two of the Staten Island fielders wore base ball gloves against which the captain of the Jersey men protested. The home players refused to remove the obnoxious hand protectors, and the match was continued under protest.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

collegiate players in England

Date Saturday, September 21, 1889
Text

Pitcher King of Princeton College is back from England, and this is his testimony in regard to the attempt to introduce base ball into England. “Our mission has achieved only a modicum of success, as we have made, so far, no startling strikes toward making the game universal. Yet something has been done: the seeds have been sown, and the Briton’s inherent love for cricket has been supplanted in some few cases. Our main point of attack has been toward giving the foot ball players, whose numbers are legion here, something to do during the Summer months when they would otherwise be idle, as the English foot ball season begins in September and extends to late April.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

word of the Players League in New York; projection for the Polo Grounds

Date Wednesday, September 25, 1889
Text

[quoting an unidentified New York afternoon paper] “A syndicate had been formed in this city with a view to running a club in opposition to the New Yorks, and that it was after the plot of ground on Eighth avenue, from One Hundred and Fifty-seventh to One Hundred and Fifty-ninth street, just above the Polo Grounds, and also wanted to take the latter on rental at the expiration of John B. Day's lease. One member of this syndicate has offered to get $1,000,000 to back the Brotherhood, he offering $200,000 himself. … “

President Day, of the Metropolitan Exhibition Company, leased the Polo Grounds from the Lynch estate for two years. This lease will expire next year. The syndicate could then, it is said, lease these grounds, as well as the lot above, and turn the whole into one of the finest base ball fields in the country. The projectors of the new deal say that there is a mint of money in base ball in New York, and that, as the Manhattan elevated railroad is to to build a line from the Third avenue terminus at One Hundred and Twenty-eighth street to One Hundred and fifty-fifth street, there will henceforth be many thousand more people attend the games than the Polo Ground can accommodate. A hotel is to be erected inside the grounds and plenty of room given for spectators and players.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Players League plans in Boston; disgruntled Boston minority shareholders

Date Wednesday, September 25, 1889
Text

“With all the star players,” said A Boston gentleman who has promised to put big money into the scheme, “I can't see why it will not be a success. The people go to see the actors and not the theatre. What do the public care who runs the sport so long as it is honestly carried on. I am sure that the base ball public of Boston would rather like to see the players get some of the immense profits made by the triumvirs and would support them. The players will all be guaranteed good salaries, with a part of the profits.

“Mr. Ward is positive that the game is on the increase, and most of the men figure that they can make considerable more money. Men are working quietly in each of the League cities, and the League can rest assured that they have a fight before them of immense proportions.

“The old stockholders of the Boston Club are working hard to bring around the rupture, as it will give them a chance to settle old grievances. Several of the best men in the Boston team have already promised to work hard for the new deal.

Source ” The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Brooklyn and Cincinnati invite an invitation to jump to the NL

Date Wednesday, September 25, 1889
Text

[from an interview of Charles Byrne] We have not been invited into the League and don't propose to invite ourselves. Brooklyn is a great ball town, and we owe it to our patrons and ourselves in such a matter as this to stand on our dignity. If we were invited I don't know what we might do. That is another question. … And let me add one thing more. I would not be human if I did not feel hurt at the slanderous things that have been going the rounds of the press the country over and about me of late. People read them and read them again and think, seeing them so much, that there must be something in them. As they are untrue and unjust, they hurt me, and I intend to stand it no longer. The Sporting Life September 25, 1889

[from an interview of Aaron Stern] I am preparing to remain in the Association, though I will frankly acknowledge that if the League were to offer me a franchise I would take it. The Sporting Life September 25, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ejections 2

Date Wednesday, September 25, 1889
Text

[from Chadwick's column] Never was a rule made which is more necessary to the welfare of the game than that empowering the umpire to order from the field a player or captain of a team who offensively disputes his decisions. The only fault in connection with it is that it has not been enforced often enough. The Sporting Life September 25, 1889

[editorial matter] How potent for good the rule empowering the umpires to suspend obstreperous players from the field can be made was illustrated on last Sunday in Brooklyn. Had Captain Shannon, of the Louisvilles, not been removed from the game for his insolence to Umpire Goldsmith, his club would undoubtedly have won the game, as his substitute's errors lost it. With a little more backbone in the enforcement of this rule, clubs will soon tire of losing games by means of suspensions, and themselves take offending players in hand. The Sporting Life September 25, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

boys' admission rate 2

Date Wednesday, September 25, 1889
Text

[from the Boston correspondent] I am told by those closely connected with the Bostons Club's bank account,that ten per cent. of the aggregate attendance is made up of boys, who only pay 25 cents admission.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Boston Club finances 12

Date Wednesday, September 25, 1889
Text

[from the Boston correspondent] ...Boston's “Three Graces” get the whole of almost $150,000 for home games. As they have drawn so well away from home this year that their receipts have been far in excess of their expenses on the trips, they have brought back money to add to this $140,000. In fact they will increase it by enough to leave over $100,000 as net profit after all salaries and other expenses have been settled. Not a bad season's income.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Boston attendance

Date Wednesday, September 25, 1889
Text

[from the Boston correspondent] Following is a table showing the attendance at each series:

Chicago......................... 9 games............... 49,252

Cleveland...................... 9 games................ 39,538

Indianapolis................... 9 games................ 41,495

New York...................... 9 games................ 70,299

Philadelphia.................... 9 games................. 35,229

Pittsburg...................... 9 games.................. 28,094

Washington.................. 9 games................. 28,470

_______ ______

Total........................... 65 games.............. 295,377

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an example of kicking

Date Thursday, September 26, 1889
Text

[New York vs. Indianapolis 9/26/1889] The more Buck kicked, the worse grew McQuaid’s decisions, and Glasscock did not mend matters by trying to outtalk both the others. At last a ten-dollar climax was reached. Buck had begged McQuaid to act like a man as follows: “Put your eyes in the front of your head. Be a man or a monkey: don’t be a cross between the two.” “For heaven’s sake if you’re dumb say so, but don’t stand there like a mummy and say ‘a ball’ when you know it’s a strike.” “I don’t think you’re a robber, old man, but if this isn’t a case of petty larceny I never was out of jail.” Such remarks as these the umpire has listened to without a murmur, but later, when he told Andrews to sit down and the latter had proved that as one of two coachers he had a right to stand, Ewing said: “That’s right, Ed.: you don’t know much, but you’ve got more sense than this fellow.” This was too much even for the meek and mistaken McQuaid and he promptly stuffed a $10 fine into Ewing’s mouth, and the latter, in a measure, subsided.

Source New York World
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Brooklyn and New York the same market

Date Wednesday, October 2, 1889
Text

As the Brooklyn grounds can be reached from the bridge in about fifteen minutes, and it takes more than twice that time to go to the Polo Grounds, it very naturally follows that with a League Club for its opponent the Brooklyns would come pretty close to dividing the League patronage with New York..., quoting the New York Press

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a journalist-player-manager; reporter for the Courier-Journal

Date Wednesday, October 2, 1889
Text

[from the Louisville correspondent] The team on its present trip is under the charge of probably the youngest manager who was ever placed in such a responsible position. Rosy-faced, red-headed harry Means, who is not yet quite old enough to vote, is piloting the the Kentuckians in their rambles through Kansas City, Cincinnati and St. Louis. Harry is the base ball editor of the Courier-Journal. The present owners of the Louisville Club seem to have a partiality for newspaper men, since Brown and Means, its last two managers, are both members of the Courier-Journal staff. Young Means is himself something of a pitcher, and three seasons ago, when the Athletics came here and got very hard up for pitchers, he twirled in one game for them against the Louisville team. He was not a winner, but he did very well. He has been practicing with the Louisvilles nearly all season, and may yet joint them as a regular pitcher. The Sporting Life October 2, 1889 [N.B. The A's game was probably an exhibition]

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Brotherhood's plans leaked

Date Wednesday, October 2, 1889
Text

It is first stated that a temporary organization has been formally effected with John M. Ward as its president, Dennis Brouthers, vice president, and Timonty J. Keefe as secretary.

It is to be made up of eight clubs, as follows:--Boston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Cleveland, Buffalo, Chicago. Of these two are new clubs and not in the present National League. They are Brooklyn and Buffalo. The present Indianapolis team is to be dropped bodily into Brooklyn, where Association ball and Sunday games are said to be unpopular. The present Washington team is to be transferred to Buffalo and strengthened by the addition of Rowe, White and Myers, late of Indianapolis. In each city local capitalists are to operate teams formed and placed there by the Brotherhood, giving a bond of $25,000 for the performance of their part of the work. Albert L. Johnson, is the Cleveland capitalist, and his active participation in the deal as a missionary caused him to be mistaken for its national head. It has no national head at this time outside of the officers of the Brotherhood. The Association's officials are to be elected this fall.

The players are guaranteed their salaries at the 1889 rate for 1890, and a share of the profits. All expenses and receipts are to be pooled for the general benefit, and the gate receipts divided equally between the clubs. The first $10,000 profit is to go into a prize, and be distributed among the clubs as playing prizes--$5000 to first, $2500 to second, $1500 to third, $1000 to fourth. Of the first $80,000 after this, $10,000 goes to the capitalists, and $10,000 to those of each club. The next $80,000 goes to the players, and all other profits are pooled half and half. Each player shares equally with the others.

Each club is to be governed by a board made up of eight men, four capitalists and four players, and the main body by a senate of sixteen, each club having two representatives, one a player and the other a capitalist.

Each club is stocked for $20,000, half of which can be had by the players. The $20,000 is in two hundred shares of $100 each. No known gamblers are allowed to hold stock. Of course the classification and reserve rules go with the present management, but the 1889—or classification—figures are taken as the basis for 1890.

Score cards and general privileges are to be considered as profits and pooled as such. The Association is to make and sell its own ball.

Nearly all the work of rearing the fabric as it stands to-day has been done at Cleveland this summer. The papers were sent to each League club and signed by the players. Anson, Burns and Williamson have not signed the Chicago agreement. In each city capitalists are at work over grounds and plans for next season....

The players are united and present a strong front. They number about 130. The League expect that only part of each team will go out. In this they are mistaken. All are in with this play, and in all the eight League clubs not ten men will be left. In connection with this story it may be said that the Brotherhood figures and estimates are all the result of calculations and figures made by players appointed for the purpose in each League town last spring. There was talk last June of a general strike in the League cities before the morning game of July 4, as a means of forcing the club managers to wipe out the grievances about which the Brotherhood had complained. Each chapter of the Brotherhood—each League club is a chapter in itself—voted on the question of “strike” or “reorganization” on the plan outlined above, and laid before the Brotherhood early in the year. The vote was overwhelmingly in favor of reorganization. This serves to show how long the plan has been discussed by the Brotherhood.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Richter on the Players League, player sales

Date Wednesday, October 2, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] There can be but little doubt that the movement of the Ball Players' Brotherhood to form an organization independent of and rival to the National League has assumed practical form and has been definitely decided upon, and the National League may as well prepare itself to reap the fruits of the miserable coddling policy it has pursued for years towards its stars, for whom it has sacrificed much in money, comfort, and sometimes principle, with the usual return of ever-increasing exaction, coupled with base ingratitude, and prepare itself for the greatest battle for supremacy, nay, for existence, base ball has ever witnessed.

...The fact, however, is that all the stated grievances of the Brotherhood are summarized in alleged breach of faith by the League, the adoption of the classification rule, and the perpetuation of the sales system. These are all the weighty causes for such supreme universal dissatisfaction as is stated to exist in the Brotherhood ranks. Now, why not be frank and admit that the chief basis for the revolt is in plain, unvarnished words—greed; a desire to absorb the supposed enormous profits of the business along with the salaries. There can be no other more potent ground for the rebellion, as the given reasons are not sufficiently weighty to induce such a radical step as the Brotherhood contemplates. First—the alleged breach of faith consists simply in a failure to write the full amount of salary in the contract, and that failure has been explained time and again. Second—The classification rule, which had become necessary for the preservation of the League, inflicted no hardships and did not conflict with the Brotherhood contracts, inasmuch as every star player was taken care of, not a single salary was shaved down except in the case of Sutcliffe, which case would have been, or will be, righted upon appeal, and the law was only designed for the future to put a check on the exactions of incoming new players. Surely this rule cannot be so very bad when the Brotherhood proposes to pay its players under their present classification figures, for the first season, at least, under the new order. Third—The sales “evil,” of which the players complain is no evil at all, but is a necessary part of the business which cannot be eliminated.... A club's chief assets are its players; outside of these it has really nothing to represent the money invested and the risks assumed except a ground and a lot of useless lumber. Under the sales system that club which has or secures the best players has the best assets, and is therefore strong financially, as it can show something of market value. The sales system is a necessary concomitant of the reserve rule and both are essential to the professional game. They add stability to the business and give clubs a financial standing and value that it was impossible to attain under the old wild-cat system, when at the end of a season a club not only had nothing to show in the way of assets except a lot of expired contracts and a grand stand, but had no certainty that it would be able to put any sort of team in the field in the following season. … take it as you will, the sales system is not an unmitigated evil (except inasmuch as it leads clubs into extravagance in purchasing and remunerating players), and the Brotherhood recognizes this fact in that it does not demand the abolition of the system, but simply a share in the proceeds of it; it merely insist upon a slice of the purchase money, thus showing conclusively that it is not a question of principle so much as a matter of personal gain.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

League signing minor leaguers, buying minor league clubs to counter the Players League

Date Wednesday, October 2, 1889
Text

There is no doubt that steps are being taken by the League to fill up its clubs from the minor leagues when the Brotherhood men go out. But the move is being made as a bluff to meet a bluff. This is a mistake. The players' move is past the bluff stage, and when met must be met by a lasting and business arrangement. No move by the League clubs will be likely to turn the Brotherhood's mission aside. The Sporting Life October 2, 1889

At a secret meeting of the president and directors of the Omaha Base Ball Association to-day [9/24] it was decided to accept the proposition of Messrs. Soden, Conant and Billings, of Boston, for the sale of the entire Omaha team to that city. The probable result will be that Omaha will have no team in the field next year. Whether she does or not will depend on the concession to be obtained in the way of new grounds, cable privileges, etc. For a handsome sum, running up into the thousands Boston virtually agrees to take the entire team, but after selecting as many of them as they deem of use to them out of the thirteen now on Omaha's roster, the balance are to remain the property of the Omaha Club to form a nucleus of a team for next year, if the management here [Omaha] sees proper to continue the venture. Further, out of the thirteen men constituting the Omaha Club the Boston parties agree to hold out eight, leaving Omaha a balance of five without cost. At the close of the Western Association championship season at Milwaukee last Sunday, the proposition further specifies, Manager Selee is to take the entire team to the Hub, and the selections will then be made after the boys have been sized up on the field. The price offered by Conant & Co. could not be ascertained, but it is of such tempting dimensions that the Omaha contingent deemed it foolhardy to ignore it... The Sporting Life October 2, 1889

Manager Morton, of the Minneapolis Club, has sold Elmer Forster and Martin Duke, the pitcher, to A. G. Spalding, for the Chicago League team, the price paid being $4000. Right fielder Carroll, of St. Paul, has been sold to Minneapolis for $1000. The Sporting Life October 9, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an early identification of the New York/Troy and Philadelphia/Worcester franchises

Date Wednesday, October 2, 1889
Text

New York came in [to the NL] on the death of Troy in 1883, and Philadelphia supplanted Worcester the same year.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a quadruple header

Date Wednesday, October 2, 1889
Text

Umpire Briody says the St. Joseph Club did the only thing it could in playing four games with Sioux City on Sunday, Sept. 15. If the St. Joseph team had not played, he argued, the club would have owed Sioux City $100. By playing the four games the Sioux Citys owed the St. Josephs $200. The Misourrians played the games, too their $200, paid their board bills and got out of town. Briody saw the games and considered them on the square. The St. Joseph Club, he remarked, had only eight men, seven of them pitchers and catchers, the vacancy being filly by an amateur, and under the circumstances the team could not win.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

players betting on their own teams

Date Wednesday, October 2, 1889
Text

There has been too much betting by players on the success of their club team in match games this season to make success possible. It is in direct violation of the constitutional law of the association. But that fact that has been apparently ignored by the club players interested. No player should be allowed to be interested in any bet on a game in which he is a participant. And yet hundreds of dollars have been invested in this way this season, causing the loss of many a game from their anxiety to win.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a runaway horse on the field

Date Wednesday, October 2, 1889
Text

[New York vs. Pittsburgh 10/01/1889] To add to the fun of the third inning, an affrighted horse attached to a buggy, appeared on the ball field, causing the players to scamper in all directions. The run-away animal took a wild gallop round the field amid the deafening yells of the bleaching-board occupants. Even the rigid discipline of Umpire Lynch had no effect whatever on the wild steed. The horse, however, soon retraced his steps to where he had come from, and made a costly smash up there. This novel performance was taken as an omen of good for the home team, and such it turned out to be.

Source Pittsburgh Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Mike Kelly is ejected from the game

Date Thursday, October 3, 1889
Text

[Boston vs. Cleveland 10/2/1889] The most notable occurrence in connection with the last game between the Bostons and Clevelands to-day was the ejection of Capt. Kelly, who was not in the game, from the grounds in compliance with the order of Umpire McQuaid, whom he had insulted. The disturbance occurred in the seventh inning when the Spiders had scored five runs. Bennett had retired on a chance to the outfield and Clarkson got his base on balls. Richardson hit for two bases and tried to score when Nash hit to right. He was declared out and Kelly came up from the visiting players’ bench wildly gesticulating and declaring that the decision was wrong. “You came West to beat Boston out of the championship so that you could umpire in the world’s series for New York,” he said, and the umpire ordered him removed from the grounds. Kelly resisted the officer and two more policemen came to the latter’s assistance. No player was ever before ejected from the Payne Avenue Grounds. The Boston captain was exasperated at the decision of McQuaid and was also slightly under the influence of liquor, the result of the preceding night.

Source New York World
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

clubs incorporate to protect their names

Date Friday, October 4, 1889
Text

The incorporated name of the champions was changed from the Metropolitan Exhibition Company to the New York Baseball Club, for the reason that the Club desired to secure a name similar to the titles of other League clubs and hereafter confine its scope to the national game. So says Director Charles T. Dillingham. New York World October 4, 1889

President Day states that the object of having the New York Club incorporated twice under similar names is to prevent any other parties from suing either of the titles “The New York Base Ball Club” or “The New York Ball Club.” The fact that different incorporators are named in each certificate is explained by the law, which so demands. The Philadelphia Item October 11, 1889

The managers of the Chicago League Ball Club have followed the plan of the New Yorkers to protect the name from the brotherhood players. Articles of incorporation were issued yesterday to the Chicago League Ball Club and the Chicago Base Ball Club, both with the old managers as incorporators. Brooklyn Eagle October 17, 1889

A certificate of incorporation of the Brooklyn Ball Club was filed to-day [12/7] with the Secretary of State. The trustees who shall manage its affairs for the first year are Charles H. Byrne, Ferdinand A. Abell and Joseph J. Doyle, of New York, and Frank Kelly and John M. Kelly, of Brooklyn. The club’s objects are set forth as follows: “To engage in and promote the game of base ball and athletic sport in the City of Brooklyn and to exercise and enjoy all rights and privileges conferred by the act of incorporation.” Brooklyn Eagle November 7, 1889

Source New York World
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a broken mask 6

Date Saturday, October 5, 1889
Text

[Louisville vs. Cincinnati 10/4/1889] Umpire Gaffney was struck on the mask with a foul tip in the second inning and one of the wires cut a deep gash over his left eye.

Source New York World
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rule changes increase batting

Date Sunday, October 6, 1889
Text

The changes in the playing rules have operated so as to increase the batting, and heavy batting and brilliant fielding have been the rule in a very large majority of the games. With the abolition of the foul tip, and the reduction of the number of balls allowable, the pitcher has not had the batsman so completely at his mercy, and the hitting, which is, after all, the most enjoyable feature of the game, has been by far the best seen in any season since the curve ball came into use.

Source Indianapolis Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

“We are the People”

Date Monday, October 7, 1889
Text

The train from the West over the New York, Lake Erie and Western Railway yesterday afternoon brought to this city [New York] the champion New York base ball team. The club traveled in a special car, on each side of which were long white strips of muslin, bearing the legend in red letters: WE ARE THE PEOPLE. At every station along the road the train was met with crowds, who cheered the champions time and again. In fact, it was almost one continual ring of cheers all day yesterday for the boys, but their reception at the depot in Jersey City and at the ferries in this city capped the climax.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a late use of “chicago”

Date Monday, October 7, 1889
Text

[Athletics vs. Brooklyn 10/6/1889] ...nearly three thousand of these enthusiasts were there and saw the home team “chicago” their opponents...

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an assessment of Wheeler Wikoff

Date Tuesday, October 8, 1889
Text

There has been a big howl raised against Wheeler Wikoff not exercising the proper authority as the President of the Association. It was never intended that he should do so. The title was conferred on him, it is true, but it was only a case of bluff. It was intended that he should be President only in name, not in fact. The men who now howl at him understood the situation when they elected him. Wheeler, as a non-committal-never-tell-any-news sort of official, outclasses any body ever mentioned for the position. It is a question, though, whether this is the proper kind of man for the place., quoting the Cincinnati Enquirer

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a proposal to move the pitcher back, five balls for a walk; overrunning bases

Date Wednesday, October 9, 1889
Text

John F. Morrill, talking about the rules for next season, says:-- “I am strongly of the opinion that the game would be helped materially by putting the pitcher back five feet and giving him five balls. I do not think that it would be too great a strain. It would help batting a great deal, and, at the same time, I do not think the games would be lengthened materially thereby. There would be very few games that could last over two hours. The objection has been made that such a rule would hurt the base-running, but I fail to see how. While the pitcher would be able to hold the base-runner more closely to his base, the latter would be able to watch the pitcher better and would also have the five feet advantage, so that I think that these two facts would counter-balance one another. I think that the foul tip rule is good as it stands. Then I fail to see what good it would be to make a rule allowing the over-running of bases. That is all right for the bases where the player does not have to be touched. Players always slide to the home plate, and there are no more close plays there than on second. If you should allow the players to over-run the bases you would find that they would slide just as they are doing now.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the League asks to meet with the Brotherhood

Date Wednesday, October 9, 1889
Text

In reply to President Spalding's letter to John M. Ward relative to the appointment of a date for a meeting between the League and Brotherhood, Ward wrote Mr. Spalding as follows on Saturday last:

“Last May the Brotherhood appointed a committee to present all grievances to the League and made an attempt to have them righted. The committee was, however, unable to obtain a hearing from the League, and it so reported at a subsequent meeting of the Brotherhood held July 14, and was accordingly discharged, as it was not a standing committee. I will refer your communication, therefore, to the entire Brotherhood. The Sporting Life October 9, 1889

[editorial matter] A sudden silence has fallen over the League and Brotherhood, and the members and adherents of the latter organization have, since the untimely expose of their alleged plans, come to realize the importance of future secrecy, and the order has probably gone forth to keep mem. But this sudden subsidence of news relative to the Brotherhood's hopes and plans should not, and probably does not, delude the League people, in the face of President Ward's evasive and crafty reply to President Spalding's request for a date for the conference asked for by the Brotherhood and refused by the League committee earlier in the season. If Ward's answer signifies anything it means one of two things—either the Brotherhood is in no mood now for compromise or it has so far committed itself to new connections that retreat with honor or safety is impossible.

It has been held that Mr. Spalding's request for a conference was ill-advised at this stage, and showed weakness. The time for a conference was when the Brotherhood committee asked for a meeting for that purpose. As The Sporting Life pointed out at that time, that refusal was a mistake. Though not so intended, probably, it looked like an intentional slap at the players, and simply increased the already existing irritation. Mr. Spalding's recent request, however, for such a conference was probably only extended with a view to placing the onus for refusal upon the Brotherhood and putting it in a position to make any future overtures for conference come from it instead of the League. If that was Mr. Spalding's purpose, it succeeded admirably. The Sporting Life October 9, 1889

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Brotherhood contract and the Brush plan

Date Wednesday, October 9, 1889
Text

[editorial matter] The general feeling is that the battle for supremacy—to decide whether the club organization or the players' organizations shall rule—must come sooner or later, and it might just as well come now as a year later. Indeed, that much might have been expected when the League recognized the Brotherhood and treated with it as with a co-equal power. Ever since that time the issue has been sharpening, and it has now narrowed itself to this alternative: Either the classification law or the Brotherhood contract must go, as the two are so utterly at variance and so conflicting as to be absolutely irreconcilable. The classification rule is regarded as essential to the League's existence, because it seeks to establish a limit to the never-ending demands of the players, to check financial extravagance and to enable clubs to live and realize something for the capital involved and the risk assumed. The Brotherhood contract practically nullifies all that the classification rule seeks to establish, inasmuch as its fundamental principal is a perpetuation of existing salaries, and the clause which binds a club not to reserve a player at less salary than his contract had called for, virtually making the classification and salary limit rule a dead letter, as under that clause a player who for any cause fails to maintain his standing in the class to which he was assigned originally cannot be graded into a lower class with reduced salary. That clause in the contract forbids reduction of previous salary and virtually makes a Class A player always a Class A player so long as his club considers him necessary enough to reserve, no matter how much he may deteriorate in skill and value.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger
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