Clippings:1882

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1882Clippings in 1882

Clippings in 1882 (361 entries)

Contents

'Jim Crow' and a German team

Date Thursday, August 10, 1882
Text

This season, when the base ball fever began to rise, several compositors in the Commercial office were severely attacked. They organized a club, and accepted challenges sent them to play. They played their first game in Harrison, and were defeated by a score of 50 to 7. Their next game was a contest with German printers (the Volksfreund nine) and were defeated by a score of 23 to 9, the German printers playing the pitcher and catcher of the Buckeyes as their battery. Their third game was a contest with the same nine, and the Commercials were defeated by a score of 13 to 8. After thus being thrice defeated the compositors of the Commercial office raised objections to the nine playing as representatives of the Commercial office, and they selected a nine in the office, and proposed, as they said, to “do the original nine up.” They styled themselves the “Jim Crow Nine,” and made arrangements for a game yesterday. The original Commercial nine accepted their challenge, and played the game with them yesterday, the score at the end of the seventh, when the game closed on account of darkness, being 67 to 6 [in favor of the original nine]. The “Jim Crow” nine left the grounds thoroughly convinced that the original Commercial nine could play a fair game of ball, and are willing to back them against any other club in the city composed of compositors.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

A Boston condemnation of revolvers

Date Sunday, January 22, 1882
Text

When a base ball player affixes his signature to a contract to play in a certain city for a certain period, he is in honor bound to keep that contract, regardless of any tempting offers made for his services by other cities. Contract breakers will always be looked upon with suspicion.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a Boston opinion on the Wise case

Date Sunday, March 26, 1882
Text

Competent legal authority in Boston ridicule the idea of the American Base Ball Association, or, what is virtually the same thing, the Cincinnati club, endeavoring to get out of an injunction against the Boston club to prevent the latter from playing Wise. No court in Boston will for a moment entertain an application for an injunction on so trivial a matter—one that involves at the utmost only a few hundred dollars. If such a claim should be allowed, the doors would be open for hundreds of cases of a similar trivial nature, and the business of the court seriously interfered with. The remedy for Cincinnati, if she has one at all, is in an entirely different direction than in any interference with the Boston club. Boston Herald March 26, 1882

season ticket prices; no tickets for stockholders; payments to visiting clubs; Boston Club finances

At a meeting of the directors of the Boston club, held the past week, the price of season tickets was placed at $15 for gentlemen and $10 for ladies, the tickets to be transferable. The old custom of giving a complimentary season ticket to the stockholders will be abolished, and everybody,. Including the president and directors, will be required to purchase their tickets. This decision meets the approbation of nearly all of the stockholders, who, in view of the fact that no partiality is to be shown, but every one is to be placed on an equal footing, see no cause to complain. The tickets can be procured at Wright & Ditson's George Howland's, or of any officer of the club, and already a goodly number have been engaged. Season ticket holders will be admitted to the stockholders' seats. Boston Herald March 26, 1882

...a petition has been drawn up and shown to most of the stockholders, reading a follows: “The the President and Directors of the Boston B. B. Association: The undersigned, stockholders in the Boston B. B. Association, having purchased their shares in said association with the understanding that they thereby became entitled to free admission to all games played on the Boston grounds, hereby respectfully request that the customary season tickets be issued to them as usual, and that no assessment be levied therefor.” It is claimed that every owner of stock considered he was guaranteed a complimentary season ticket, and the original subscribers are said to have fully understood this to be the case. For this reason the petitioners claim that a majority of the whole stock had already signed the above document, and look to the directors for a revocation of their action. Boston Herald April 2, 1882

[a letter to the editor from “Stockholder”] An article in the Sunday Herald in regard to a recent vote of the directors of the Boston Base Ball Association discontinuing the custom of issuing complimentary tickets to stockholders, was evidently written by some disappointed stockholder, who, doubtless, purchased his stock at a round price, perhaps for the purpose of electing himself and friends to office in a corporation he knew to be bankrupt, but, being defeated, now endeavors to make a value for his stock and unload. The stock of the Boston Base Ball Association was subscribed for originally by a few persons, no one taking less than five shares (par value $100) while several of them subscribed for 10 shares. Of the original subscribers there are but four holding stock, in all 11 shares: the balance of the stock is held by persons who have purchased at prices ranging from $15 to $30. the only possible value to the stock was the fact that it had been customary to issue one complimentary ticket to each stockholder, whether owner of one or more shares, and, in some instances, ladies' tickets have been given with the gents' tickets, to a stockholder of a single share. Season tickets for gents being sold at $15 and for ladies at $10, a person buying one share had the equivalent of his stock often in one, but always in two seasons, and, as the club has to pay the visiting club the sum of 15 cents on each person admitted, this tax has been a severe strain on the finances of the club. A question having arisen, on which legal opinion is divided, whether the stockholders are not personally liable for the debts of the corporation, will soon be decided, and if it is found they are, and after all the debts are paid, I can see no objection to issuing complimentary tickets to responsible stockholders, who, at the end of the season, if there is a deficiency in the finances, will gracefully come forward and pay any equitable assessment necessary to liquidate all debts. The public is interested in having a good nine; this can only be done by cutting off all unnecessary expenses, as experience has shown that every year but one out of six has resulted in pecuniary loss. The directors are expected to provide for any deficiency, and, while they furnish us with a first-class nine, let us support them as well as the club, as it is the only way to insure success. Boston Herald April 4, 1882

To C. H. Porter and others, Petitioners—Gentlemen: The board of directors of the Boston Base Ball Association has carefully considered your petition, that the customary complimentary season tickets be issued to stockholders, and, after due deliberation, has unanimously decided that the best interests of the association demand that your request be denied, and that for the ensuing season no dead-head tickets be issued to stockholders. Upon investigation nothing is found in the original articles of association, or in the constitution and bylaws of our association, that intimates or implies that stockholders are to receive free admission to witness games of ball or other athletic sport. It is true, in the past, that the unwise custom of giving complimentary season tickets to stockholders has prevailed, greatly to the detriment of the association and to its serious financial loss. Your board, aware that the association is largely in debt, with an empty treasury, feels it incumbent upon it to stop every leak, and to manage all the affairs of the association in such a wise and economical manner as to insure itself support, that there may be no deficiency to report at the close of the year. It would be manifestly unequal to issue a complimentary ticket to each holder of a certificate of stock, for in such an event the stockholder who owned one share of stock would receive exactly the same benefits as the holder of a certificate representing 10 shares of stock. If it was deemed advisable to issue free tickets to stockholders, the only equitable basis of such issue would be to issue a free ticket to each share. Such a course would entail a large expense to the association, and is not favored by your board. A railroad corporation would hardly be expected to give free passage over its roads to each stockholder, and, so far as this board is informed, such a custom does not prevail. Certainly, such a course would be open to severe criticism, and justly merit the condemnation of the public. All corporations divide their benefits, not to each certificate holder alike, but acco4rding to the number of shares which each certificate represents, and any division upon any other basis would be unfair and undoubtedly illegal. No league base ball association issues to its stockholders free tickets of admission, and the past policy of the Boston association of issuing complimentary tickets to stockholders has received the serious condemnation of other league clubs, and been pronounced detrimental to the general good of the game. Your board of directors trusts that this explanation of its action will be satisfactory to all the stockholders of the association, and that it may have the earnest and hearty cooperation of all, to the end that the association may be relieved of its present financial embarrassment, and be placed upon a firm self-supporting basis. Boston Herald April 5,1882

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a baseball storefront diorama

Date Saturday, August 5, 1882
Text

The window of Jordan, Marsh & Co.’s establishment in Boston attracts hosts of spectators daily. A grassplot has been laid in the show-window, in which a miniature baseball field is marked out. The bases, base-lines and positions are accurately placed. The Bostons, represented by nine miniature puppets in full Boston uniform are in the field, while the Chicago White Stockings are at the bat. No detail of the game has been omitted. The pitcher is in the act of delivering the ball, and the catcher, with a genuine mask, stands ready to receive it. Behind the catcher is a diminutive umpires, clad in a natty blue-flannel suit, in an attitude of supreme intention [sic: perhaps “attention”?] The ninety-foot fence may also be seen, behind which is the grand-stand, filled with an interested crowd of spectators. The whole display is at once natural and artistic, and is a credit to the artist of the establishment.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a big crowd expected on Rosh Hashanah

Date Thursday, September 14, 1882
Text

This is the Jewish New Year, or “Good Yondof.” It is the great Jewish holiday, and as the Israelites are most ardent admirers of the game, one may look out for a big attendance. There will be extra street cars put on to-day to accommodate the big crowd expected. Cincinnati Commercial September 14, 1882

[Louisville vs. Cincinnati 9/15/1882] There were 3,412 people on the Cincinnati Base Ball Grounds yesterday to see a great game of ball. It was the largest crowd of spectators seen this season at a championship game save the Fourth of July afternoon. The grand stand was filled before 3 o’clock, and the ticket seller was instructed to quit selling tickets to that place. Every available seat was taken and a few put upon the ground. Cincinnati Commercial September 15, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a broken catcher's mask

Date Friday, September 1, 1882
Text

A foul tip broke Holbert's mask in the game at Detroit on Wednesday, cutting his head severely. A similar accident happened to him the last time he was there.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a bunt hit

Date Saturday, August 26, 1882
Text

[Athletic vs. Cincinnati 8/25/1882] [men on first and second, no outs] Joe Sommer then came up. Joe had all day been hitting to the infield, and feared a double play. Therefore he surprised everyone by blocking the ball toward first base, and succeeded so well that he not only advanced Macculler and White to third and second, but himself reached first in safety, filling the bases, with nobody out.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a calculation of Phillies finances

Date Sunday, January 1, 1882
Text

The Philadelphia club cannot play more than thirty games with League clubs during the season. On an average it cannot draw over 2,500 to a game. This will make a total of 75,000, at 25 cents each, $18,750. of this sum the League club will take one-half, leaving the home club $9,375, out of which to play salaries, field rent, umpires, advertising, etc. this would leave the club behind in finances which it would have to make up with the Metropolitan club, the only other Alliance club. Can it be done? We think not. These figures apply alike to the Metropolitans, and the best thing these clubs do is to shake the League at once and save themselves.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a catcher who doesn't use a mask

Date Sunday, April 30, 1882
Text

[Chicago vs. Philadelphia 4/24/1882] Quinton, the catcher of the Philadelphia Club, met with a painful and perhaps serious accident during the progress of the seventh inning. He never wears a mask over his face while playing behind the bat, and he became a victim of his own recklessness. He was in his usual position close behind the batter, when a foul-tipped ball from Corcoran's bat struck him in the eye and nose. Not being able to finish the game, Quinton's place was taken by McCloskey.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a claim that AA clubs asked to join the NL

Date Sunday, September 24, 1882
Text

[report on the special NL meeting] The secretary then read applications for membership from several of the American association clubs. These were all rejected, however, on the ground that the policy of the league has always been to limit the number of clubs to eight, the present number, and the delegates present could see no reason for departing from this policy. Boston Herald September 24, 1882 [N.B. This does not appear in the official minutes of the meeting.]

Cincinnati sets up a dodge to play NL clubs

The patrons of base ball in Cincinnati have been clamorous for games in October between the Cincinnatis and a few of the best League club teams. The Cincinnati Club have not been able to play such games, because their constitution expressly forbids it. But a certain wealthy admirer of the sport, and a well known citizen of Cincinnati, has made these games possible, and they will be played. The Cincinnati players’ contracts run to October 15. This made two weeks’ salary to be paid by the club, during which time the team could not make half of it by playing local or Association clubs. The aforesaid citizen made an offer to assume the payment of these last half month salaries (amounting to nearly $1,000), if the club would turn over the team to him, and release all the players. As this would be a big saving to the club treasury it was agreed to. The team, were consulted and agreed to take their released October 1, and to remain for two weeks in the employ and at the will of said gentleman. Negotiations were then begun by this gentleman’s agent for a series of League Club visits to Cincinnati. The result was that during the first two weeks in October the Cleveland Club will play three games here, the Chicago two and the Providence Club four. One of the requirements in the agreements between these clubs and the management of the Cincinnatis was that the teams be exactly those as are how playing. Cincinnati Commercial September 24, 1882

They will be the Cincinnati Club only in name. This action was found necessary, as all three teams had competed with the Bostons, who have an expelled player among their men, and the association constitution prohibits one of its clubs from meeting another that has in its nine, or has played with one that has a man thus outlawed. Cincinnati Gazette September 25, 1882

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a club hostler

Date Friday, June 16, 1882
Text

The management being so well please with the large carriage patronage–no less than forty being there yesterday–have employed a hostler to look after and take charge of every team that enters the games. He will wear a club officer’s cap, and the public should know that he is paid by the club for his services. It is not necessary that he should be feed, and the public must know this.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a comparison of the reserve system to slavery

Date Sunday, April 2, 1882
Text

The League managers have about as much respect for its men as a planter had for his slaves. The slaves, however, could run away and work somewhere. With the ball-player it is different—he is chained down and can not.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a complaint about the financial terms imposed by the League

Date Sunday, April 30, 1882
Text

Financially the month has not been as successful as we could have wished for, the cold weather, rain, and exorbitant demands of the League clubs, have made deep inroads into the receipts. For the next two months the “Phillies” will be able to command their own terms and should make money.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a conference committee with the NL

Date Sunday, December 17, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA convention of 12/13 - 12/14/1882] ...there was an animated discussion over the motion to appoint a Committee of Conference to meet with the League Committee, the delegates of the Cincinnati, St. Louis, Columbus, and Athletic clubs being dead against it, while those of Pittsburg, Baltimore, New York, and Louisville favored the appointment of the committee.

On motion of Mr. Pank, of Louisville, the matter of the appointment of the Conference committee was brought up again in the form of a reconsideration of Wednesday's vote on the subject. In presenting the motion President McKnight remarked that after due reflection on this matter of conference he had come to the conclusion that it involved a question of very serious import, affecting the future welfare of the organization; and he did not think the convention Wednesday had duly considered the importance of it. “One bearing,” he stated, “which would result from a neglect of combined action with the League in the matter of observing the contracts and black-lists of each other's association, would be to open the door to the evil of revolving, and to introduce a phase of crooked work in the association which could not but be damaging to all the clubs of both associations. For his part, although his club has suffered as badly as any from violated contracts, he was willing to let that pass, rather than to bring about a worse complication of troubles by refusing to second the movement made by the League in favor of some compromise.

Mr. Simmons, of the Athletics, seconded these remarks by withdrawing his vote of opposition to the appointment of the committee, and finally, when the matter came to a vote, only two clubs were found opposed to the compromise measures, and those were Cincinnati and St. Louis, and when the matter was finally explained, the Cincinnati delegate had his vote changed, so that Mr. Von der Ahe was left out in the cold on the question, the vote for the appointment of the Committee on Question being seven to one in its favor. The President then appointed Messrs. Pank, Simmons and Barnie as a Conference committee, and the Secretary was requested to notify the President of the League of the action taken by the convention, and that the American Committee was ready to confer with the League Committee on the subject of a compromise of the existing difficulties between the two organizations.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a dilatory pitcher, catcher's signals

Date Saturday, April 22, 1882
Text

[Princeton vs. Metropolitans 5/17/1882] The new pitcher [O’Neil of the Metropolitans] had been spoken of as “a ripper” in regard to his speed, and so he proved to be, and a very damaging one, too. He was tediously slow in delivery, watched the bases in the old way without the least regard to signals from his catcher, and, though Clapp promptly returned balls to him for a quick delivery when the batsman was out of form, he never once took advantage of it. ... What O’Neil might do were he to study the art of pitching we cannot say; but, judging by his exhibition in this game, he has nothing but speed to recommend him. [He lasted two innings giving up four runs.]

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a double fence in Philadelphia; advertising

Date Saturday, April 15, 1882
Text

The Philadelphia Association, in view of the extensive damage done to the fence of the Polo Grounds in this city by the gamins who cut holds for peeping, have wisely put up an inside fence, which is to be used for large advertisements, and this will entirely prevent the cutting process, besides saving all cost for continuous and expensive repairs.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a fine for arguing balls and strikes

Date Sunday, July 30, 1882
Text

McLean was up to his old tricks the other day in Troy, and fined Whitney $10 for questioning one of his decisions on balls and strikes.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a flag signaling game day

Date Sunday, April 9, 1882
Text

By next Saturday, when the Clevelands will open the professional season in Cincinnati, the old-time banner system at Fourth and Vine street will be revived, to give notice at noon of every day whether a game will be played. This year the medium will be a twenty-foot flag, run out on a cable across Vine street, from over Hawleys to the telegraph building. On the banner will be the letters, “Base Ball Park–Game To-day at 3 P.M.”

Anybody down town can then satisfy himself at the noon hour whether or not a game is to be played. Whenever rain interferes during the forenoon so as to postpone a game, the banner will not be there. This system will be commenced next Saturday. The club will try to arrange several other information stations in different parts of this city and Covington, where information on doubtful days can be obtained at the noon hour.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a forfeited game due to foul balks

Date Sunday, April 23, 1882
Text

The umpire forfeited the Tuesday game between the Buffaloes and Alleghenies, to the Allegheny club, on account of three foul balks by Dailey, the Buffaloes pitcher.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a game halted by a tornado

Date Tuesday, July 18, 1882
Text

[Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh 7/17/1882] What promised to be a wretched exhibition of ball playing between the Cicinnatis and Alleghenys was fortunately terminated in the third inning by a small cyclone. .. [in the bottom of] the third inning a furious storm swept up, and there was a panic among the spectators and players to reach the Exposition Building. The grounds had scarcely been cleared when the Directors’ stand was raised from its foundation and thrown several feet forward. The backstop was blown down, and lumber scattered in all directions.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a high delivery by a collegian

Date Sunday, April 16, 1882
Text

The delivery of Jones, the Yale pitcher, is said to have been so unfair in the Metropolitan games as to provoke considerable comment, and it is said that, unless he makes some change in his delivery, the college teams will kick. In view of the futile efforts of the league to enforce legislation on this point, the action of the collegians will be watched with interest.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a joke about calling for judgment

Date Sunday, May 21, 1882
Text

The Boston Post says that Buffalo has got the baseball fever so bad that a man can't catch a baby falling from a second-story window without yelling “Judgment!

Source The Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a late announcement of a game to take place

Date Sunday, June 18, 1882
Text

[Athletic vs. Cincinnati 6/17/1882] [The field is in poor shape after a heavy rain] ‘When was their [the Cincinnati Club] surprise, at 1:15 o’clock, to hear that Manager Simmons insisted on playing the game. The sun had but a little before burst through the clouds, and there was no certainty that it would not rain more before night; still Manager Simmons said he guessed the game must be played so, mud or no mud. It was whispered around that he understood White could not pitch a wet ball, and he thought the Athletics had one chance to down the Cincinnatis. Manager Snyder finally agreed to play, against his will, however.

It was now nearly 2 o’clock, and the news of the game must be gotten over town some way, and that right soon. The banner at Hawley’s was run out across Vine street. A bulletin was put up at this place also, announcing the game would be called at 4 o’clock, Manager Simmons consenting to this to give an extra hour to the grounds to dry up. An express wagon was called into use and sided with muslin placards announcing “game at 4 o’clock.” A band of music was an impossibility in the short time required to make the announcement, and by hard labor a drum and fife quartette were at last secured, put into the wagon, and the news was in this way run around town between 3 and 4 o’clock. It was the best that could be done, and even under these discouragements every body was surprised to see the attendance so large. Fifteen hundred and twenty-five people paid to enter the grounds, which the guarantors made fully sixteen hundred. The grounds were very soggy, and made running an uncertain amusement.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a late assessment of cricket as a threat to baseball

Date Saturday, January 28, 1882
Text

The St. Louis Western Sporting Life speaks of the sport of cricket as “one which is in America rapidly closing in final struggle with base ball. That the latter still prevails in West cannot be held to eclipse the fact that cricket threatens, and dangerously threatens, its supremacy in the country.

Source Cincinnati Daily Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a late question on force plays

Date Saturday, April 15, 1882
Text

[from answers to correspondents] A is on third, B is on second, an dC is on first base. The ball is not hit. C leaves first base and touches second. Are b and C forced at third? ... No. No runner can be forced from a base except by the act of the batsman in hitting a fair ball.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a marketing department

Date Sunday, December 24, 1882
Text

The management intend to extensively advertise their games, and make them attractive to people living outside of Cincinnati. For this purpose the services of Manager Harry Lewis, of the Grand Opera-house, have been secured to procure excursion trains on different roads on days of attractive games. Mr. Lewis will superintend the advertising of the club, and will also control whatever Sunday games may be played on the grounds.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a new Baltimore Club 2

Date Sunday, December 17, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA convention] The resignation of the old Baltimore club was accepted, and the new club fully installed in its place. The Philadelphia Item

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a new ball can be brought in during the inning

Date Friday, December 8, 1882
Text

[reporting on the NL convention] Rule 13 was amended so that a new ball must be immediately brought into requisition when the ball in play is useless, without waiting for even innings.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a peace conference between the AA and NL

Date Sunday, December 17, 1882
Text

An unofficial invitation from the League to the American Association to appoint a conference committee to meet a similar committee from the League for the purpose of trying to adjust difficulties, was properly rejected. The Association would consider nothing of the kind which bore no official mark about it. Thus forced to show their hand, the League did the manly thing, and next day laid the proposition before the Convention in an official form. Even then we are sorry to say the plan had its opponents and bitter adversaries. It looked at one time as though the Association was bound to make a crowning and fatal mistake in snubbing the League in turn, and as the word goes, “Declaring war to the knife.” It had been represented by the telegraph that the proposed conference had been defeated on Wednesday by a tie vote and that the Cincinnati Club voted against the conference. Immediately on Thursday morning the Directors in this city got together and sent a telegram to their New York Delegate begging him to throw the vote of the club in favor of the conference. This telegram reached New York as the reconsideration was being voted upon, and the Cincinnati Club's vote was recorded with the majority—St. Louis alone, with its persistent obstinacy standing out against it. Cincinnati Commercial December 17, 1882 [A long discussion of the obstacles facing the committee follows.]

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player abandons baseball for a clerkship

Date Sunday, April 30, 1882
Text

John O’Rouke has notified the Worcesters that he will not play ball with them this year. He has a $1,200 postal clerkship, and would be a donkey to give it up to play ball.

Source Providence Sunday Star
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player expelled for attempted revolving; reinstated

Date Thursday, June 15, 1882
Text

While the Cincinnati Club was in the East, they were solicited by Henry T. Luff for an engagement. He had just been released by the Detroits. The Cincinnatis concluded to give him a trial at first base, but he refused to sign on conditions, and said it must be for the season or not at all. For the season it was, therefore. In the absence of an official blank a contract was drawn up in writing, wherein Luff agreed and bound himself to play for the cincinnati Club till October 1 at a stipulated sum per month. Also, to be governed by all the rules and regulations of the American Association. It further stipulated that he should sign an official contract to replace the written one when opportunity presented itself. He played with the Cincinnatis in the East, and on their return to Cincinnati continued to so play. Meanwhile he was several times requested to call on the Secretary and replace the verbal contract by a written one. This he promised to do, but failed to fulfill his contract. Yesterday the official contract, regularly filled out, was put inot Manager Snyder’s hands, with a request that he hunt up Luff and have him sign it at once. At noon he reported that Luff refused to sign the contract, and would give no reasons therefor. The Secretary meanwhile had accidentally discovered that Luff had for several days past been carrying on a correspondence by letter and telegraph with Manager James O’Rourke, of the Buffalo Club. Suspecting treachery, he hunted Luff up, coming across him at the Crawford House. He also and again solicited Luff to replace his original contract. The latter said no, he would play the base until the Club could replace him, and then he would accept his release. He was told that the Club did not want to give him his release. Still he would not sign. He further denied that he was intending treachery to the Cincinnati Club. Finally he said he would probably sign the contract this morning, but he was told that the Board would met at 5 o’clock, and something must be done by that time. Then he told the Secretary he would call before 5. This promise was also broken. When the Board met at 5 o’clock the case was laid before them. They sent for Mr. Luff to appear before them. He appeared, and, in the kindest manner possible, he was asked to consummate his written agreement and sign the contract. He again refused. When suddenly told that the Board knew he had been corresponding with the buffalo Club he acknowledge it and had the gall to say that nothing came of it, as he had put his figures too high for them. He steadfastly refused to sign the contract. When convinced that he had acted dishonorably with them and meant to do so whenever an opportunity should offer, the Club promptly and in his presence expelled him and entered their action upon their minutes. Secretary Williams was notified by wire immediately and also by mail with a full statement of the case and the contract inclosed. Mr. Luff was surprised into acknowledging his negotiations with the Buffalos, and at the same time expressed surprise and wonder how the Club found it out. The Club and profession are well rid of all such as he. A man who will prove treacherous and dishonorable to his employers against his written pledge is not a safe man to play base-ball, however well he can play. There is not another man in the Cincinnati team who would be guilty of such dishonest work. He has made a sad mistake, as he will realize in time. Cincinnati Commercial June 15, 1882 [Luff apologized the next day and was reinstated.

The directors of the Cincinnati Base Ball Club to-day expelled Luff, their first baseman, and engaged Powers to fill his place. The charge against Luff was that he had been in correspondence with manager O'Rourke, of the Buffalo Club, and had under consideration an offer to join that club. Luff admitted the charge, but expressed great surprise that it should have become known. Philadelphia Times June 15, 1882

Luff, who was dismissed yesterday for leaving the Cincinnati, was reinstated to-day. He begged hard, is a good player, and the punishment of dismissal was finally changed to that of a fine. Philadelphia Times June 16, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player expelled for throwing games

Date Sunday, May 21, 1882
Text

The Allegheny base ball club directors, at a meeting held on Thursday night, expelled Critchley, the regular pitcher, because there was strong reasons to believe that he was throwing games.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player resigns after being fined

Date Thursday, August 3, 1882
Text

Harry Luff, the first baseman of the Cincinnati nine, will leave it. While in Pittsburg recently he met an old school-mate, who made him a flattering offer to join a civil engineering corps, Luff being a graduate of the Philadelphia Polytechnic School. The matter was taken under advisement, and when he reached home he found a telegram asking him to report at once. He had by this time about decided to remain with the team, but on Tuesday came a turning point. In the game on that day he was fined $5 for trying to catch an assist by Wheeler with one hand. If he had caught it, every thing probably would have been all right—but he lost it. He thought this fine was wrong, as long as Snyder was not also mulcted for colliding with him and making a wild throw. The fact seemed to prey upon his mind, and after due deliberation he decided to accept the Pittsburg offer. He stated the case to the Directors, and wished for his release, informing them that he would go any way. He says that he has decided to quit base-ball, and to confine himself strictly to his calling. He graduated first in his class, and is reported to be a marvelous mathematician. Luff is a good fellow, a fine player, and Cincinnati loses a strong man. The Directors have not as yet taken any action in the mater, but should and will, undoubtedly, give him his release. Cincinnati Enquirer August 3, 1882

Luff was given his release yesterday, and will report at once at Pittsburg, where he joins a civil engineer corps. Luff is a decidedly peculiar fellow, a character rarely met with in the profession. A College graduate, highly connected and of good means, he has played ball simply out of love for it. He proposes now to retire forever from the diamond, and will devote himself to his calling. Cincinnati Enquirer August 4, 1882

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a proposal for an amateur reserve club

Date Sunday, December 3, 1882
Text

The managers of the Athletic club have under consideration an excellent idea which will undoubtedly be fully matured before the opening of the next season. It is to bring under their management a fine amateur club to be chosen from players in this city who desire to enter the ranks of professionals. This club will occupy the grounds of the Athletic club during the club's absence and will play with Inter-State and other clubs. When the club is home the amateurs will be taken on short trips and games will be arranged so as to keep the club playing nearly every day. The details of this movement are not yet all completed but will probably be so before very long.

By this means the Athletic club will bring into prominence many an excellent amateur that is destined to shine as a bright particular star in the ranks of professionalism in seasons to come, and at the same time will have the effect of enlarging the professional circle and doing away with the exorbitant salaries that are now demanded.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a proposal to allow runner to overrun every base

Date Sunday, November 12, 1882
Text

The Item also advises that the rule allowing the over-running of first base be extended to all the bases. During the last season many of the players were badly hurt by attempting to hold themselves on second and third bases after hard runs. There is no reason why they should not over-run both second and third, and we therefore urge the adoption of this rule.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a proposal to change the game to eleven innings; game too short

Date Sunday, November 12, 1882
Text

We suggest as new rules, that the game be changed from nine to eleven innings. As it is now played, it is entirely too quick, the games played last season by both the Philadelphia and Athletic clubs averaging only one hour and a half to each game. Eleven innings would lengthen the game to about two hours and fifteen minutes, which is certainly short enough. Give your patrons the worth of their money, and they will come again.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a proposal to eliminate the high and low strike zones

Date Saturday, October 21, 1882
Text

It is suggested that the rules in relation to pitching be amended so that the pitcher will stand six feet further back, and every ball going over the plate fairly, whether high or low, if not struck at, will be called against the batsman.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a proposal to eliminate the recording of errors

Date Sunday, December 17, 1882
Text

Readers very jealously regard the error column... It is the opinion of the writer that the error column...should be entirely wiped out. Give every man in his position credit for what he does—for what chances he accepts and never mind what he does not do. In comparing fielding records then, compare them by positions—pitchers with pitchers, catcher with catchers, first basement with first basement, and so on. The old system of comparisons is ridiculously unfair. The most mediocre first baseman can easily beat the record of the best catcher in the country. The error column is a constant source of jealousy among players, and causes more internal dissensions and decided “kicking” than any other feature of base ball. Cincinnati Commercial December 17, 1882

On the subject of playing for the team instead of for individual record... If there was not error column, there would be no shirking of field plays for the purpose of “making a record.” A player can do more harm in playing for a fielding record than he can in playing for a batting record, for in the first place he makes a record by avoiding all plays wherein there may be much risk, and in the latter he makes a record by securing base hits, which are always desirable. Cincinnati Commercial Gazette January 7, 1883

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a proposed trade of reinstatements

Date Sunday, October 15, 1882
Text

It has been suggested in some quarters that, if the league would reinstate Jones, who was expelled by the Bostons, the American association would do the same by wise, who was expelled by the Cincinnati club, and thus amicable relations between the two organizations would be restored.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a purported authorization for a high delivery

Date Wednesday, September 13, 1882
Text

[Louisville vs. Cincinnati 9/12/1882] Mullane’s delivery was, as usual, too high. In the third inning it was appealed from by Capt. Snyder, and Umpire Walsh produced the letter alleged to have been received from Secretary Williams, saying a pitcher could not be compelled to keep his arm down. This letter Mr. Williams denies having written, but the Eclipse carry it around with them, probably for the purposes of keeping Mullane pitching in that style.

Source Cincinnati Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a rare double steal

Date Sunday, June 25, 1882
Text

[Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati 6/24/1882] A species of base running not often seen was accomplished by the Cincinnatis yesterday–two men stealing bases at the same time. Fulmer was on second, and McPhee on first. Fulmer made a dash for third, and McPhee, seeing it, slid for second. Both landed safely on their respective bases at the same time, amid the admiring applause of the spectators.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a reconciliation meeting between the NL and AA

Date Sunday, December 3, 1882
Text

It is authoritatively announced that there is to be an informal conference early this week between representatives of the American and League looking to a reconciliation of all difficulties between the two associations. This conference will to a great extent influence the legislation of the meetings of the two associations to be held this month. The American will demand that the League recognize its contracts and that base ball playing be brought down to a pure matter of business. If the League refuses this there will be no intercourse between the clubs of the rival organizations next season.

This will be a serious blow to the League as the American has at its back the Northwester League in the West and the Inter-State in the East, leaving the League entirely out in the cold. The odds are too great in favor of the American, and it is evident that the League managers have at last come to their senses.

The demand made by the American is of a character that the League cannot refuse without stultifying itself. It has very freely black-listed players of its own clubs that have signed two contracts, and in order to keep up even an appearance of honesty it should stop at once patting on the back and encouraging players to break contracts with American clubs. It is an evil that they have fostered and which at last has come home to mock them.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a rumor of Reach reluctant to join the League

Date Thursday, September 28, 1882
Text

It has also transpired that the taking of the Philadelphia Club to League membership was done without the consent of Al Reach, and it is said that unless Reach can get hold of an unusually strong team for 1883—one calculated to give him a good show for the pennant—he will retain the position he now has as a League Alliance member. Should he decide to stay as he is, an opportunity would be afforded the Troy Club Directors to transfer their team to Philadelphia and become the representative League Club of that city.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a seating chart

Date Friday, June 30, 1882
Text

The plat of the seats in the grand stand at the ball grounds will be ready to-morrow at Hawley’s, and reserved seats, of which there will be about 600, can be secured for the afternoon game of the 4th of July at seventy-five cents, guarantor ticket holders to pay the extra twenty-five cents. For the morning game the usual prices will be charged.

Source Cincinnati Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a shipwrecked crew plays baseball

Date Saturday, April 15, 1882
Text

From the account published in The New York Herald of April 7 of the wreck and rescue of the crew of the bark Trinity, of New London, Ct., lost off Heard’s Island, in the South Indian Ocean; where the men suffered much hardship for many months on a cold, bleak and rocky island, we clip the following, which shows how they relieved the tedium of weary hours, and, at the same time, engaged in healthy exercise: “Finally, to cap the climax, a baseball club was organized, and on one sunny day the first of a series of the national game was inaugurated. There was some little difficulty at first because one of the Portuguese was appointed referee and was not posted on the rules of the League, but it was finally arranged by putting the colored man in the field, and appointing the cook to the responsible judicial post, which he filled to the satisfaction of all, notwithstanding the dinner was somewhat late in consequence. It was a queer sight when the wooden ball prepared by the carpenter after a vast amount of consultation flew from the bat, and was chased by a number of bearded and hairy-coated fielders. The game was a success and was followed by others. New York Clipper April 15, 1882 [See also Proceedings of the US Naval Institute March 1883.]

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a shot at Horace Phillips

Date Sunday, January 15, 1882
Text

Horace B. Phillips has resigned his interest in the Philadelphia Alliance Club. It is hard to say which ought to be congratulated, he or the club.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a shot at Hulbert

Date Sunday, January 15, 1882
Text

President Hulbert is a scoffer at vaccination. He will not allow any of this family to be vaccinated. Mr. H. is a fanatic in more things than the Jenner theory.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a stratagem for Detroit to keep Troy and play the AA

Date Sunday, February 26, 1882
Text

We learn on good authority that the Detroits intend to drop Troy if the American Association makes a fight about him. Their manager is shrewd enough to see that he can make money if he can arrange games with the Clubs in the Association, and does not intend to put any thing in the way of his nine to prevent him from so doing. It may be that Bancroft will secure [a] substitute infielder to start the season with, reserving Troy until the regular League campaign opens. Whatever the Detroits do, they will find that the American intend to adhere to their original purpose to make matters exceedingly warm for the deserters, Wise, Troy and Holbert.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a suggestion for an NL-AA post-season series

Date Monday, April 17, 1882
Text

It begins to look as though the Cincinnatis would readily win the American championship. If they do a series of games in October between them and the League champions would be a magnet to draw people together.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a suit against the Cincinnati stockholders

Date Friday, May 19, 1882
Text

Suit was filed yesterday before ‘Squire Powers, by Charlie Jones, against the Cincinnati Club, as represented by its stockholders, Justus Thorner, Aaron Stern, Geo. Herancourt, Louis Kramer, Victor H. Long, and O. P. Caylor, to recover $133 33 1/3, which amount he claims to be due him under a contract made November 4, 1881, to play with the Cincinnati Club during the season of 1882. The case will be heard on next Tuesday. Cincinnati Gazette May 19, 1882

In the case of Charles W. Jones, the well known base ball player, against the Cincinnati Base Ball Club, before ‘Squire Powers and a jury, for salary claimed under a contract, judgment was given yesterday for the defendants. The evidence was that Jones was to be employed by the club provided he was reinstated in the league, from which he had been expelled. He was advanced $200 to go to Chicago to the annual meeting of the league, but was not reinstated. Then he was to be employed, provided the American Association, to which the Cincinnati Club belongs, agreed, but the latter adopted a resolution not to employ any player who had been expelled from the National League. Jones had also failed to comply with the stipulation of the contract in putting himself in training before the season opened, and the jury gave a verdict as above stated. Cincinnati Gazette June 8, 1882

Source Cincinnati Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a switch pitcher 2

Date Wednesday, July 19, 1882
Text

[Eclipse vs. Baltimore 7/18/1882] During the game, when the Baltimore’s group of heavy left-handed hitters, Whiting, Householder and Pearce, were coming to the bat, Sullivan [sic: should be “Mullane” and is correct in the box score] the Louisville’s pitch, changed his delivery from right hand to left, and puzzled the batters considerably. This was a novelty in pitching, and excited much interest. He was not, however, able to keep the left-handed delivery up for any length of time, but it was very effective while it lasted.

Source Baltimore American
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a synopsis of the state of AA-NL relations

Date Sunday, October 29, 1882
Text

The American Association held a special meeting on October 23, in Columbus, O. Two new clubs were admitted, the successful applicants being the New York, under the management of James Mutrie, and the Columbus club, under the management of H. B. Phillips. The policy of the League in taking players signed with the American clubs was severely criticised. The Allegheny and other clubs will contest violations of contract in court. Permission was given to the clubs composing the association to employ any of the black-listed or expelled players, such such as have been expelled for crooked play. The question of expulsion of the Cincinnati club for violation of rules, in playing League clubs, was considered, and a motion to expel was lost by a vote of 2 to 2. the Allegheny and St. Louis clubs voted for expulsion, and the Louisville and Athletic against it. The Cincinnatis were reprimanded and fined. The annual meeting of the American Association will be held December 13, in New York City.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a tacit understanding not to enforce pitching delivery rules; overhand necessary for a down shoot

Date Monday, September 4, 1882
Text

Our Columbus correspondent, under instructions, interviewed Secretary Williams, of the American Association, as to whether he had, as reported, written to Louisville that the rules regarding the overhand throw had been printed in the American Association Book by mistake. Mr. Williams, in reply, says:

The facts are: On May 20 Pank wrote me asking if the clause of Rule 23, requiring pitcher’s hand to pass below his waist in delivering the ball, was not put in the printed rules by mistake; saying further, that the had it marked out of his copy that he used at the convention, and that it was intended to have it stricken out.

I answered that the rule was printed as adopted. I also said that I had suggested its abolition in the Convention entirely; that it was a dead letter in the League and would be in our Association, and would be better stricken out. There was a good deal of discussion upon it, and it was finally left as it is, but there was a tacit understanding that it could not and would not be enforced, as almost all our pitchers are guilty of violating it, and I am certain it could never have been adopted if had been understood that it was to be rigidly enforced, as it would deprive every club in our Association of a pitcher or two, except Cincinnati. McGinnis, of St. Louis; Mullane, of Louisville; Salisbury, of Allegheny; Sweeney, of the Athletics, and Landis are all guilty of illegal pitching, and almost every pitcher in the League is as well. Even McCormick and White get their hands too high when pitching a “down shoot.”

I claim that I was perfectly justifiable in writing the letter to Pank, but that the letter does not say that the rule is printed wrong, and was, therefore, null and void, but that the understanding was that it was not to be strictly enforced.

Pank telegraphed me to-day officially as Vice President of the Association, to notify all clubs that the restriction referred to is null. This, of course, I can not do. Have consulted President McKnight about the matter, and will be governed by his decision. There has been no complaint from any club but the Cincinnati, the reason for which will found in the list above, no doubt. They are all in the same boat.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a temporary engagement 2

Date Sunday, August 27, 1882
Text

Powers finds that he cannot be able to throw with accuracy for several weeks to come. Therefore, on his recommendation, the Cincinnatis have engaged for one month W. H. Burrell, a Canadian catcher of good repute. Mr. Burrell leaves London, Ont., for cincinnati this morning, and will joint the Cincinnatis at Louisville Tuesday. He will be used only in case of accident to Snyder and is had on hand only to be provided for an emergency. The Cincinnati Club do not propose to be put in a hole if it can help it. Cincinnati Commercial August 27, 1882 [He did not appear in a championship game.]

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a threat of legal action against a revolver

Date Thursday, January 19, 1882
Text

[Sam Wise has asked for his release so he can play in Boston] He will not be released. The Cincinnati Club Directors held a meeting last evening, and decided to compel the performance of all contracts with players at whatever cost. President Thorner was authorized to at once employ an attorney in each League city, as well as in New York, to enjoin Wise or any other “revolver” in every city where he may attempt to play ball next season, except with the Cincinnati team. A responsible person as bondsman, also, will be secured in each city, whom the Club will indemnify. If the League will take advantage of weak-kneed players, the American Association, and particularly the Cincinnati Club, will demand the protection of the courts under the contracts.

...

Two prominent gentlemen of this city yesterday offered to give their checks to the Cincinnati Club to help defray the expenses of enjoining Wise, or other dishonest players, from playing with League Clubs. Cincinnati Commercial January 19, 1882

The Cincinnatis have engaged the services of a Boston lawyer to fetch the base ball renegade, Wise, up with a jerk in the Courts. The suit will be instituted in Boston as soon as his Cincinnati contract begins to run, which will be next Saturday. An injunction will be secured before May 1. Cincinnati Commercial April 8, 1882

In the suit, tried in Boston, of the Cincinnati Base Ball Club, seeking an injunction restraining Samuel W. Wise from playing with the Boston Club, Judge Nelson dismissed the bill on account of lack of jurisdiction, Wise being a citizen of Ohio. Cincinnati Commercial May 13, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a triple play on a dropped third strike

Date Thursday, September 14, 1882
Text

[Eclipse vs. Cincinnati 9/13/1882] In the eighth the Kentuckians made a good effort. Hecker and Wolfe batted safely, and matters looked decidedly hard for a tie. Sullivan, however, struck out. Snyder, however, dropped the ball, and, throwing it to Carpenter, it was passed around by second to first, and before the astonished Louisvillians or the excited crowd could understand it, three men had been extinguished. The spectators were rather slow in getting on to the play, but when they did they applauded most heartily.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a triple play on an intentionally dropped third strike; umpire calls a strike out without an appeal

Date Wednesday, June 7, 1882
Text

[Baltimore vs. Cincinnati 6/6/1882] The bases were now full, and nobody out. Jacoby, the fourth batter, struck three times, Snyder [catcher] purposely dropped the third strike, picked up the ball, put his foot on the plate, forcing out Meyers at home, threw to Carpenter, forcing out Whiting at third and Carpenter threw to second, forcing out Householder at second. Pearce [umpire] had cried “Striker out,” before he saw that Snyder had dropped the ball, and at once corrected his decision. This created a stubborn kick upon the part of the visitors, which delayed the game quite a while.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a trophy ball in a professional game

Date Sunday, April 23, 1882
Text

When harry Wright handed the ball to Mutrie at the end of the game Harry told him to get it put in a glass case, as it was the last he would get from the Providence Club this season. The Philadelphia Item April 23, 1882

dissatisfaction with the NL uniforms

The new uniforms for the Boston club,made in accordance with the league legislation, arrived the past week, and to say that the players are extremely disgusted with them is a light expression of their feelings. Some of them look like clowns, and all are dissatisfied with the makeup of the uniforms. The shirts are very thick, and, in hot weather, will be very uncomfortable, while the pants are very thing and apparently made of poor material, consequently, if a player slides to his base, it must be at the risk of scraping his skin or tearing his pants. The rules for washing the uniforms are long and the source of no small amusement. President Soden of the league expresses his dissatisfaction at the way the uniforms look, and the opinion is pretty general that the legislation creating the system will be rescinded at the next meeting of the league. Boston Herald April 23, 1882

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a wire screen in front of the grandstand

Date Sunday, April 16, 1882
Text

The wire screen in front of the grand stand at Oakdale, is a great institution.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA and NL diverge of the foul bound rule

Date Saturday, December 23, 1882
Text

[reporting on the new AA rules] The convention retained the existing clause relative to foul-bound catches, and this is the essential point of difference between the American and League codes, the former recognizing the foul-bound catch, while the latter admits only of the complete fly-catch game. The experience of the American clubs during the past season, their delegates said in advocating the retention of the foul-bound catch, was that their assemblages favored small-score games, and that any reduction of the facilities for putting out batsmen would have a tendency to increase scores at the cost of fielding. The League argues in favor of prohibiting the catch that it helped the batsman by lessening his chances for outs.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA black list

Date Friday, December 15, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA convention] When the subject of the black list came up for action the names of Bennett, Williams and Galvin were placed on the list of players of the American Association black list for 1883, and among those expelled by the association were Denny, Radbourne and Whitney, together with J. Berg, of Boston. On motion, John Troy was reinstated to membership of the association.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA championship calculated by winning percentage

Date Friday, May 26, 1882
Text

Persons figuring on the American Championship should remember that with those clubs the result is determined by the per cent. of games won, not by the greatest number of games won. For instance, up to yesterday the result was: Athletics 78 per cent., St. Louis 58 per cent., Cincinnatis 50 per cent. Alleghenys 55 per cent., Baltimores 11 per cent. Their standing in the race was, therefore, Athletics first, St. Louis second, Alleghenys third, Cincinnatis fourth, Louisvilles fifth, Baltimores sixth. Cincinnati Commercial May 26, 1882

Sutton assaults the umpire

We have refrained from comment on the discreditable conduct of Ezra Sutton of the Boston Club in his personal attack on Dick Pearce, on the occasion of the Troy-Boston match two weeks ago, until we could interview Pearce on the subject. On May 19 we met Dick in Brooklyn, and heard from him the particulars of the case, which, in justice to him, and to do away with certain erroneous stories which have been afloat in regard to the affair, we give below. In the match in question Keefe of the Troys committed a balk by a movement of his arm which Pearce did not see, and, therefore, when judgment was asked he decided as no balk. As the decision was rendered, Sutton, who was standing on position coaching the base-runners, exclaimed: “That’s what you might expect from him,” plainly implying partiality in umpiring. Irritated by the remark, Dick turned to Morrill, the Boston captain, and said: “I’ll fine him ten dollars for that.” Shortly afterwards Sutton came up to Pearce and asked him if he had fined him, and Dick said: “Yes, I have.” Whereupon Sutton replied: “I’ll get square with you for that.” “All right,” retorted Dick. “I’ll give you all the chance you want after the game’s over.” When the contest ended Dick walked over to the stand to get his sleeve-cuffs, and while he was adjusting them Sutton, who was standing near him, said: “I’ve a mine to smash you in the mouth.” “Smash away,” replied Dick: and just then he turned to fasten his cuffs, and as he did so Sutton struck him on the side of his face. At once Dick, who is a smart little athlete, went for Ezra, and a fight seemed imminent, when Morrill and others interfered. Pearce proceeded to prepare papers of complaint to be sent to Secretary Young, as required by the rules, the result of which might have been Sutton’s prompt expulsion from the League. Some time afterwards, however, Pearce was told that Sutton wanted to see him; and when they met outside the hotel, Sutton most humbly apologized for the assault, claiming that it was done in the heat of the moment, and, appealing to Pearce’s good nature, urged that his expulsion would be taking bread from his family. This went home to Dick’s heart, and the ultimate result was his manly forgiveness of the assault, Dick withdrawing his complaint-papers. New York Clipper May 27, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA clubs purportedly applying to the NL

Date Saturday, September 23, 1882
Text

[reporting on the NL meeting of 9/22/1882] The secretary then read applications for membership from several of the American Association clubs. These were all rejected, however, on the ground that the policy of the League has always been to limit the number of clubs to eight, the present number, and the delegat5es present could see no reason for departing from this policy. Philadelphia Times September 23, 1882 [see also Cincinnati Enquirer of the same date, which notes the meeting was closed, and avers that the claim of AA clubs applying for membership is a lie]

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA clubs recruiting NL players

Date Sunday, August 20, 1882
Text

Just now the papers published in League cities are agonizing over the American Association, and holding it up to ball players as something awful and something that they should severely let alone, if they value self-respect and certain salaries. These articles have been called forth by the inroads made on League teams by the agents and managers of American clubs, and by the League rule prohibiting the engagement of players before October 1st. they are forced to stand idly by and see their best players taken away from them by the American clubs, whose swelling treasuries allow them to outbid the League in the secural [sic] of the best playing talent. There are many other reasons outside of salaries that are depleting the League, and among the number are excessive fines, unjust exactions, and a niggardly spirit that controls League management. In the matter of fines the League has gone entirely too far, and has driven several of its best players into the rival organization. Unjust exactions, such as the deduction of fifty cents a day from players while traveling, the purchase of suits, etc., will also stand responsible for driving players from the League. In the matter of the purchase of suits, the present President of the League has a monopoly, and by League legislation every player is forced to purchase from hi, and at prices fifty per cent. higher than could be obtained at other establishments.

In a single word, the spirit of the League clubs towards their players is to treat them like hired men, with no rights that the League need respect.

The American Association was organized to protect both players and managers, and their policy adopted is most liberal. Managers ask of players their best services, and treat them like gentlemen, and not like slaves. There are no fines in the American for trivial causes. There is no reduction in salaries when traveling. There is no monopoly to toady to, managers furnishing themselves the player's suits, and a player's salary represents just so much money, and is not reduced by fines, as in many cases that could be cited from the League, to just one-half the stipulated amount. This policy is attracting to the American the very best players in the country and the fate of the League can be easily told unless they come down from their high horse. Already there is a movement to right many of the wrongs of the League, and whatever justice players may receive in the future they will have the American to thank for.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA finances

Date Sunday, September 3, 1882
Text

A statement of the profits of the American Association clubs, taken from the books of each club, shows that St. Louis has cleared $25,000 so far this season; the Athletic, of this city, $20,000; Cincinnati, $15,000, Allegheny, $7,000; Louisville, $7,000, and Baltimore, $5,000. the Athletic have probably made the most money legitimately, as they have spent several thousand dollars in improvements. Much of the St. Louis' profit is made from the sale of beer, seventy waiters being employed to sling the frothy liquid at the Sunday games.

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA non-intercourse with NL clubs playing revolvers

Date Sunday, March 19, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting] Manager Simmons, of the Athle5tics, then brought up the case of Troy, and insisted that none of the Association clubs should play clubs employing either Troy, Holbert or Wise. After some discussion Mr. Simmons won a well-deserved victory, carrying his point triumphantly.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA secretary's salary

Date Sunday, December 17, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA convention] The Secretary's salary was then made $700...

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA umpires to be selected by the home club

Date Wednesday, March 15, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting of 3/13/1882] Here occurred the most radical change made over the League rules, for it was finally agreed to accept the recommendation of the Committee on Rules to allow the home club in every instance to choose and furnish the umpire, and pay all the expenses of his employment. This will simplify the bothersome question of umpires, and give the home club and the crowd of spectators full benefit of al the doubtful decisions. Cincinnati Commercial March 15, 1882

The decision to allow the home club to in all cases chose the umpire was a concession to the home spectators, for whom the game is played. It will certainly prove popular with spectators to see some one from their own city occupy that trying position, and not to see an imported professional insult them by hobnobbing with the visiting team at the hotel and deciding all questionable points against the home club on the field. Outrageously unfair umpiring against the home club has done more than any one evil to hurt base ball in Cincinnati, and the present club does not propose to see one man called an umpire disgust the crowd of spectators this summer. Cincinnati Commercial March 16, 1882

The rule allowing the home club to choose the umpire, has been modified by agreement of all the American Clubs. As amended, the rule requires that the home club furnish the visiting club with the names of three or more local umpires before every game played, and the visiting club must select one from the list. Cincinnati Commercial April 21, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA won't sign blacklisted players

Date Sunday, February 26, 1882
Text

During the past month quite a radical change has taken place in the feelings of the Association clubs in regard to the employment of black-listed players. Following on the heels of the treachery of Troy, Wise and Holbert, a strong feeling of revenge was generated, and the engagement of the black-listed players of the League was urged by several of the Association clubs. Sober second though has condemned this, and of all the Association clubs, the Allegheny stands alone in its advocacy. Cincinnati has condemned it by refusing to sign Jones. St. Louis, Louisville and the Athletic clubs have completed their nines, and not a black-listed player is to be found in any of them. It is not probable therefore that the Association, at its meeting in this city, next month, will advocate such a course. Time shows, too, that the League and Association are coming nearer together and it would not be a surprise that before the season ends, an alliance, offensive and defensive, between them was organized. The country is big enough and rich enough for both to exist.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Aaron Champion doesn't believe in curve balls

Date Sunday, November 26, 1882
Text

Mr. A. B. Champion, President of the famous Red Stockings, is firmly of the opinion that all talk about curve balls is humbug, and is willing to lose a small contingency to have the fact demonstrated to him that any pitcher can make a ball shoot any way that he wishes. Mr. White, where are you?

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

abuses of the reserve rule; dealing with the AA

Date Sunday, September 24, 1882
Text

[reporting on the special meeting of the NL] In the evening the delegates assembled in Mayor Thompson's room at the Continental to discuss informally certain matters connected with the League and the national game. Mr. Thompson spoke at considerable length upon the abuses contained in what is known as the “five-men rule,” under which a manager could hold any five players as long as he chose, and could then summarily discharge them without notice. The speaker held that this rule was unjust to the players, inasmuch as it prevented a player from improving his prospects, and frequently kept him from getting an engagement, as managers often took advantage of the rule to extend their season until after all the other clubs had been filled for the ensuing year. He also contended that the rule was imperative, as players are becoming independent, and had already disregarded it in many instances. “Why,” said Mr. Thompson, “I know it to be a fact that Bennett and Knight, of my club (Detroit), have signed with the Allegheny club for next year, although under the rule they were not allowed to do so until I had closed my season. In view of the rivalry between the American Association and the League, it becomes necessary for us to adopt some measure which will be just alike to the player and manager. You cannot afford to sneer at the American Association, and call it the abortion of the League. The American Association clubs have all made money this season, and the aggregate population of the cities in which they play far exceed that of the League cities. The Association has Philadelphia, Baltimore, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Louisville and Allegheny, including Pittsburg, while the League has been handicapped with Worcester and Troy—small places that could not afford a League club. In consequence, the other League club shave been compelled to contribute to their support in order to keep them from withdrawing in the middle of the season and breaking up the schedule. No, gentlemen, you cannot afford to sneer at the Association. They are taking our players because they can afford to pay high salaries.

… This independence on the part of the players shows plainly that there is a necessity for some measure that will protect us, and at the same time do no injustice to them.

Several other delegates spoke against the five-men rule, but some were in favor of treating the Association with contempt, and one gentleman remarked that there were new players coming up who could well fill the places of those whom the Association had taken away. Another delegate remarked that the players being taken by the American Association were those who were favorites with the public, whereas now players would have to make reputations. It was finally decided to refer the whole matter to the general meeting of the League in December. At a late hour the delegates adjourned to take the night trains to their respective homes.

The general tone of the conference was to respect the Association and to view it as it is, an organization in every respect equal and much stronger financially, than the League. There was no mistaking the fact that the League clubs feel rather scared over the desertion of their players and were willing to make any concession that would steady their faltering ranks.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

admission rates in Cincinnati; no alcohol in the grandstand

Date Saturday, April 1, 1882
Text

A good deal has been asked about the price of admission to games this summer. The American Association refuses to set any fixed general price, but wisely leaves the question to home clubs, to regulate each to suit itself. In Cincinnati the club will put it within everybody’s power or means to see games. The grand stand will be set at fifty cents, and the covered pavilion down the south side at thirty-five cents. Over on the east side, where the uncovered benches are, will be a twenty-five cent division. A separate gate will admit to this part of the ground and division fences will cut it off entirely from the out part. Another gate will admit all who hold thirty-five or fifty cent tickets, and the latter will have to pass a second gate-keeper at the entrance to the grand stand. These divisions are made to accommodate all classes. No beer, liquors or cigars will be allowed in the grand stand, where an attendance of ladies will be especially invited. The desire is to make this division of the ground so attractive and inoffensive that ladies will find it a pleasure, as they did some years ago, in patronizing the game. The thirty-five cents admission to the Pavilion will allow a man to attend the game, pay street-car fare and get a glass of beer for fifty cents. The area for a twenty-five cents admission will be nearby accommodation to the best part of the field to see a game, the only difference from the other sections being a lack of roof or covering. It is likely that for the Fourth of July games a fifty-cent admission will be charged to all parts of the grounds. It is proposed to open the championship season May 2, with a band of music on the ground.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Al Reach forced to join the League

Date Saturday, October 7, 1882
Text

The reason that the Philadelphia Club entered the League was because Al. Reach was told that if he did not, a League club would be placed in Philadelphia which would throw out the League Alliance Club.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Allegheny Club expels players

Date Sunday, December 10, 1882
Text

The Allegheny Base Ball Club held their annual meeting today [12/9], at which the cases of the League players, Galvin, Williamson and Bennett were taken up. These three men had signed agreements to come here and then broke their promises. After discussing the cases in all their phases the trio were expelled. Berg, the young Boston player who last season received $50 from the club to pay his expenses, but who failed to show up, was also expelled. None of these parties will now be permitted to play in the American Association.

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Allegheny Club finances

Date Saturday, July 22, 1882
Text

The Allegheny Club held a special meeting July 14, when the treasurer’s report showed a flourishing financial condition, there being a balance in bank of about $2,700. A resolution was adopted recommending the directors to correspond with the leading players, and to spare no pains to make the Allegheny team of 1883 the strongest in the United States.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Allegheny Club sues Bennett

Date Sunday, October 8, 1882
Text

The Allegheny base ball club has brought suit in the United States District Court against Charles Bennett, catcher of the Detroit, for alleged breach of contract to play in Pittsburg next season, which agreement he afterward refused to sign. The club asks $1,000 damages and an injunction restraining him from playing with any other club next season. The Philadelphia Item October 8, 1882

The American Association clubs that have suffered from dishonest player who have broken thrier contracts, have engaged some of the best legal talent in the country to test the matter in the courts, and it looks as if it was going to be made very warm for some of the “revolvers.” A well-known lawyer in this city, in an interview with the editor of this department on the subject, said that there was no doubt but that a player could be enjoined from playing with any other club than the one that held his contract first, and that by accepting advance money they made themselves liable for a criminal action for accepting money under false pretenses. The American proposes to settle this matter now and here, and the coming season will be opened with some interesting litigation.

The matter has passed the point of mere honor now, and has settled down to that of legal rights. In this chaos of broken contracts, specious lies and outright falsehood, it is pleasing to note that the proportion of dishonest players is very small, and what there is of it the League must answer for, and we shall be greatly surprised if this organization is not the chief sufferer. The Philadelphia Item November 5, 1882

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an analysis of the AA

Date Tuesday, February 28, 1882
Text

...the new professional organization called the American Base Ball Association marks its opening into life with the announcement that it will allow beer selling and Sunday playing on its club grounds, In fact, it has been organized solely in the interests of the Cincinnati Club. It also differs in an important point from the League, by adopting as its rule of gate money sharing that each club shall take all the money received at the gate on its own grounds paying to visiting clubs, in lieu of the share hitherto granted, a fixed sum of $65 a match. Such a rule is tantamount to the exclusion of visits from Eastern teams to Western cities, as the traveling expenses alone would exceed the specified sum received. The new association ran against a snag when they undertook to engage players in their team who were under the ban of the League. No matter whether such players were unjustly punished by the League or not, if the new association desired to carry out amicable intentions in their intercourse with the League, they went to work to do it in a very roundabout way, to say the least. It is to the interests of the League that ll professional clubs outside of its own ranks should be under the control of some national association or other, as by such means are recruits for the League army to be secured in the future; but it is not likely that they are going to recognize an organization which begins its existence by recognizing players as eligible who cannot play in any League team. The new association is to meet in Philadelphia in March, and it is to be hoped that very different legislative action will be taken to that which marked the Cincinnati Convention, or it will be far more to the interests of outside clubs to join the League Alliance than to become members of an association which practically throws them out of the profitable intercourse they would otherwise have with League teams.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an appeal to the umpire; confusion over a fair/foul call

Date Saturday, June 17, 1882
Text

[Athletic vs. Cincinnati 6/16/1882] [McPhee on third, McCormick at second] Then Sommer hit a grounder down the left foul line, away out to the foul flag. It passed near the third base, and Blakiston [third baseman] hallooed “How is that?” Crandall [umpire], instead of maintaining silence, cried “fair ball.” McPhee heard the cry without understanding it, but thought as it was given at all it was “foul ball.” He therefore ran back to third, and McCormick, who was crossing third homeward bound, also turned tail and skinned back to second. Sommer, who was cantering toward second, fellin with the panic and returned to first. Before the umpire could explain that he had called “fair ball,” the ball was fielded in and all three runners were on bases, whereas two should have been home and Sommer at second. This was discouraging.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an assessment of A. G. Mills

Date Friday, December 15, 1882
Text

I presume you are fully posted regarding the proceedings at the League meeting. All through it was quiet, orderly and businesslike. Mr. Mills was the business man and will make a grand President. New York was inclined to dictate in certain particulars but he kept them–and Detroit–within bounds. [from a letter by Harry Wright writing from Providence to Frederick Long dated December 15, 1882]

Source From a letter by Harry Wright writing from Providence to Frederick Long
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an early example of typographical cursing

Date Wednesday, June 14, 1882
Text

Manager Simmons after the game yesterday was heard to remark: “!-!!-!!!-!!!!-***-(?).

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an illegal delivery

Date Friday, August 4, 1882
Text

[St. Louis vs. Cincinnati 8/3/1882] McGinnis’ delivery is outrageously unfair. The rules require that the pitcher’s hand shall not go above his waist while delivering the ball. White and McCormick both come within the requirements and still pitch a pretty good ball, as the clubs who bat against them can testify. But McGinnis does not try to keep his hand below his shoulder, and yesterday jocosely called the crowd’s attention to his ear as the height he reached. Carey [umpire] was shown the rules relating to a high delivery, and his duty regarding it. But he refused to enforce the rule, because “other pitchers do it.” On the same principle, one violation of law excuses another.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an illegal delivery 2

Date Tuesday, August 22, 1882
Text

[Cleveland vs. Philadelphia 8/21/1877] His [Rowe, of the Clevelands'] delivery, under strict umpiring, is clearly unfair. Before delivering the ball, except when there is a runner on the bases, he takes a regular hop, skip and jump, and in every instance yesterday he stepped outside the limits of the pitcher's box. The Philadelphia appeal and Umpire McLean warned him, but he did it repeatedly afterward.

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an illegal delivery called by the umpire

Date Saturday, April 15, 1882
Text

[Yale vs. Metropolitans 4/7/1882] The Yales entered upon the match...with an untried pitcher [Jones] in position, who had been practicing with a high and illegal delivery, and when he was obliged to lower his arm by the umpire, he failed to delivery with any special effect, and the result was his punishment at the hands of the professionals...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an implicit acknowledgment that the NL is stronger than the AA

Date Sunday, March 26, 1882
Text

...the general public will witness the games of both clubs [the Philadelphia and the Athletic] and will be able to gain some idea of the merits of the material of which they are composed. In regard to the Philadelphia Club, the public should be very lenient in its judgment at first, as the club will be called upon at the very outset to meet the very best professional clubs in the country, which, to say the least, will be a decided ordeal.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an intentionally dropped infield fly 2

Date Saturday, July 29, 1882
Text

[Troy vs. Metropolitan 7/22/1882] Mansell was on second and Reilly at first when Reipschlager hit up a high ball, which fell easily into the palms of Pfeffer’s [short stop] hands, who held the ball a moment, but let it rebound in the air and then fall on the ground, when Pfeffer at once picked it up near second base, and, touching Mansell–not entitled to hold the base–put his foot on second, forcing Reilly out. The crowd on the free stand, not understanding the point, began to hiss the umpire, and they jeered him all through the game...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an interracial game 2

Date Thursday, July 20, 1882
Text

The newly organized Orion Club, composed entirely of colored players, made its first public appearance at Recreation Park yesterday and were beaten by the Philadelphia nine by a score of 17 to 1. It has been some years since a regularly organized colored nine has appeared in this city and yesterday's match was a decided novelty in its way.

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an overplus from the Sam Wise case

Date Tuesday, October 24, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA special meeting of 10/23/82] ...the Cincinnati club gave an overplus of twenty-five dollars from the Wise case to Secretary Williams, as a bonus over and above his salary.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an ownership dispute over the Cincinnati Club; commentary on said suit

Date Thursday, September 28, 1882
Text

In the Superior Court, yesterday, suit was brought by Justus Thorner against George Herancourt, Louis Kramer, Aaron Stern, John R. McLean, Victor Long and O. P. Caylor for the dissolution of a partnership. The petition alleges that on September 1, 1881 the plaintiff entered into an agreement of copartnership with Victor H. Long, John E. Price and O. P. Caylor to form the Cincinnati Base Ball Club, each partner to have one-fourth interest, and to share profits and losses equally; that it was understood at the time that Louis Kramer was interested in Long’s one-fourth interest, and entitled to half thereof; that Herancourt was interested with plaintiff in his interest, and entitled to half thereof; and that J. R. McLean was interested with Caylor, and entitled to half his interest. The plaintiff further alleges that Price died, and that Aaron Stern succeeded to his one-fourth interest; that in the organization of the club plaintiff was elected President, Herancourt Treasurer, and Stern Vice President, and these three, with Louis Kramer and Victor Long, constituted the Board of Directors. It is further set forth by the plaintiff that this Association has earned large profits, to the extend of $15,000 over and above all expenses, which sum is in the hands of George Herancourt as Treasurer; that since last June the plaintiff has been excluded from all participation in the affairs of the partnership, and from all meetings of the Club. It is alleged that the defendants now threaten to divide among themselves the accumulated profits, excluding the plaintiff from any share thereof, and he, therefore, asks that the Court shall order a dissolution of the partnership; that Herancourt be restrained from parting with any portion of the funds held by him as Treasurer, and that a Receiver be appointed, and the funds of the partnership be distributed among those entitled thereto. Cincinnati Commercial September 28, 1882

Now that the financial success of the Cincinnati Base Ball Club is assured, every ambitious young man in the city should sue for a share of the dividends. So far the returns of the claimants are fair. It is presumed, however, that if the Club’s books had balanced on the other side, these same wronged creatures would not be suing for the privilege of paying their alleged shares of the deficits. Cincinnati Commercial September 29, 1882

[Caylor’s Answer to John R. McLean vs. O. P. Caylor, the Cincinnati Base Ball Club and Geo. L. Harencourt, Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas 66.631] And now comes the defendant, O. P. Caylor, and for answer to plaintiff’s petition denies that the plaintiff is the owner of one of the shares of said base ball club, but says that a long time prior to the bringing of this suit the plaintiff parted with any interest he had therein by making a gift thereof to this defendant, and transferring and delivering his said interest or share to this defendant.

This defendant admits that the plaintiff was one of the original subscribers to said base ball club, by paying a small sum of money, merely for the purpose of organization, which was some time prior to July 14, 1881; defendant admits that at this time plaintiff subscribed and paid in said money, he was in the employ of the plaintiff, in charges of what is known as the “Base Ball Column,” of the Cincinnati Daily Enquirer, and newspaper in the city of Cincinnati, of which the plaintiff was the proprietor, but the defendant denies that the plaintiff ever requested said club to recognize and treat this defendant as his agent and representative, as in the petition alleged, and the defendant says that the plaintiff never notified said club or said partnership that he had any interest or share in said club or business, never demanded that he be recognized in any manner as the owner of any share, or as interested in any manner, until the bringing of this suit. Defendant admits that said club or partnership treated him as the owner of said share, and alleges that he is such owner, and always has been since the same was transferred and delivered to him by the plaintiff, as aforesaid, on the day of June, 1881; defendant did leave the employ of the plaintiff on or about the 18th day of August, 1881, to resume the practice of the law, and afterwards also engaged with the Cincinnati Daily Commercial, a newspaper published in Cincinnati, to do occasional literary and other work for said paper.

Defendant denies that he ever represented the plaintiff in said partnership or club, and denies that the plaintiff ever notified said club of any revocation of said gift, or any revocation of any pretended authority over said share, and denies that he ever demanded of said club that it return him the right to represent any interest or share. It is true that said club failed to recognize the plaintiff as the owner of any share, because he never claimed such ownership, and never asked to be so recognized, and never asked to be present at any meetings, and was not in fact present at any meetings, and was not in fact the owner of any share of interest from the time he paid said small sum of money for an interest in said club, and made a gift thereof, and transferred and delivered the same to this defendant as a gift.

But now, so it is, that since the defendant has left the employ of the plaintiff and engaged with the Cincinnati Daily Commercial, and because said club has earned large profits, the plaintiff is seeking to revoke his said gift, and pretends that he is the owner of said share. Plaintiff has at no time given any service, time or attention to said partnership, and has not at any time been connected or identified with said partnership or any of its affairs, and never was associated with the other members of said partnership, as a partner or otherwise, and never had any contract or any kind of interest or partnership with them; but the defendant has given his entire time, services and skill thereto, and this defendant avers that he is the sole owner of said share and that the plaintiff has no interest therein whatever, and the defendant denies each and every other allegation in the petition inconsistent herewith.

Wherefore, this defendant prays that the Court will decree said share in said Base Ball Club and partnership to be the property of this defendant, that the plaintiff’s petition be dismissed, and for all other and proper relief in the premises.

M. F. Wilson and Long, Kramer & Kramer, attorneys for defendant.

Cincinnati Commercial October 8, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an umpire is mobbed

Date Saturday, July 15, 1882
Text

W. H. Hawed of Lowell, Mass., acted as umpire in the two games between the Detroit and Boston Clubs on the Fourth of July in Detroit, Mich. The contest in the afternoon was won by the Bostons by 14 to 1, and during its progress the spectators, exasperated because the home-club was being outplayed at every point, continually greeted the umpire with insulting remarks, jeers and hisses. After the game the crowd tried to mob him. Four policemen came to his rescue, but efforts to disperse the mob were unavailing, and the ill-starred umpire was finally saved by being thrust into a carriage and driven rapidly to his hotel. Hawes notified the Detroit Club the following morning that he was not hog, that he had had enough, and that another umpire would have to take his place in the game July 6. Comment is unnecessary.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an unfavorable impression of Hulbert; the baseball war

Date Sunday, December 24, 1882
Text

The base ball fraternity had a right to expect a more favorable and liberal policy from the League upon the accession to the Presidency of Mr. A. G. Mills. True, his election to the Presidency can not at one sweep wipe out of every league club the spirit of meanness and roguery which has of late years insidiously crept into some of them, but his hold on the reins will check that association in its course toward rule or ruin, and if he can influence a settlement of the differences between the two bodies, he will preserve the power of the older body and make it as popular as it was some years ago. Mr. Mills must see that it is policy to end this bitter warfare, and that there will then be more than room enough for both parties. The only way, however, to end this contention is for the associations to take hold of it as bodies, and compel each club in each body to live up to and respect mutual laws for the welfare of both associations.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

applications for entry into the AA

Date Tuesday, October 24, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA special meeting of 10/23/82] New applicants for membership were presented by Henry Gundersheimer for the Columbus Club, James Mutrie for the New York Club, William Barnie for the Baltimore club, J. A. Evans and A. C. Richter for the Camden (N.J.) Club, and William Petterson for the Aetna Club, of Chicago.

...

The subject of new admissions was then taken up; the resignation of the old Baltimore Base Ball Club was read and accepted.

The Association then acted upon an agreement drawn up by Mr. Kramer, to the effect that the Association for 1883 shall consist of clubs from Cincinnati, St. Louis, Louisville, Columbus, Pittsburg, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York. For this purpose the applications of the new Baltimore Club, the Columbus Club and the New York Club were accepted, and an agreement signed pledging the Association to admit these clubs at the annual meeting in December, and authorizing the Secretary meanwhile to receive and record all contracts sent to him by these three clubs, which shall then be of full force and effect.

The Camden Club and Chicago Aetnas showed good financial backing, but there were not admitted, for the sole reason that a schedule could not well be arranged for ten clubs. As it is, the eight clubs above named have advantages in location and prestige never before embraced in base ball associations.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

assists should be scored on errors

Date Wednesday, August 16, 1882
Text

[from Questions Answered] Should a fielder, who fields a ball to a base, and, but for an error of the baseman, would put a runner out, be credited with an assist? … Yes.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Athletic Club finances 5

Date Sunday, October 29, 1882
Text

The Athletics of Philadelphia have disbanded. They were very successful financially, the profits of the season reaching $22,000.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Athletics finances; control of the Oakdale Ground; liquor sales

Date Sunday, June 4, 1882
Text

Up til Friday last the Athletic had sold 84,000 tickets this season. Enough money has been taken in to pay the expenses this year, and $5,000 have been deposited in bank towards a nine for next year. After July 4 the management, Messrs. Simmons, Sharsig and Mason, gain control of the lease of the ground. Their first action should be to abolish the sale of beer on the ground. The stand there now is an eyesore and source of much complaint from the respectable element attending the games. The League Prohibits all liquor selling. The American Association should do likewise.

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Baltimore Club finances and ownership

Date Tuesday, September 26, 1882
Text

An exchange says: Notwithstanding the ill-luck of the Baltimore Club this season, it is said that Myers and partner, the only managers of the Club, will clear at least $10,000 between them. Whether the same club will be in existence next year is a matter of some doubt. Cincinnati Enquirer September 26, 1882

William Barnie, the manager of the Philadelphia Baseball Club, has procured a copartnership in the Baltimore Association Club for next season, and will personally manage that team. Mr. Barnie took hold of the reins of management of the Philadelphia Club when, under the control of Horace Phillips, that nine was playing losing games, and he has handled them so skillfully that not only has the Philadelphia Club defeated every team in the National League, but many thousands of dollars have been drawn into the treasury. Mr. Barnie has become very popular here, and his departure will be regretted. The new Association Club in Baltimore will be supported by business men who have never been identified with the defunct Baltimore nine. George Cassidy will be President; Wm. Gettinger, Treasurer; N. W. Stewart, Secretary; and Wm. Barnie, Manager. Cincinnati Enquirer October 1, 1882

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Baltimore in the AA

Date Tuesday, March 14, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting of 3/13/1882] Among others present were A. K. Fulton, one of the proprietors of the Baltimore American and formerly the manager of the Monumental City’s “Canary” nine, and A. J. Houck, also prominently identified with base ball matters in that city.

The resignation of the Atlantic Club, of Brooklyn, was accepted. That club will therefore play nothing but exhibition games during the coming season, acting as an independent organization and having no interest in the championship scores. The Baltimore Club put in an application for admission, was granted membership, and its delegates, H. C. Myers and C. Watts, were invited to seats in the convention.

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Barnie to manage the Philadelphias

Date Sunday, July 23, 1882
Text

William Barnie, who has successfully managed the Atlantic, of Brooklyn, for the past your years [N.B. This is false], has been engaged as manager of the Philadelphia Club. Mr. Barnie has had plenty of experience, and under his able management the Philadelphia Club will no doubt reap new laurels. Barnie is a good ball player and will prove serviceable, in case of necessity, as change catcher. He made his reputation years ago, and has caught for the best pitchers in the country. In 1876 he caught for Nolan, who was then the great curve pitcher with the Buckeye of Columbus. Philadelphia Times July 23, 1882 [Atlantic vs. Philadelphia 7/27/1877 Barnie catching for the Philas]

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

baseball manufacture 2

Date Sunday, November 5, 1882
Text

Harwood, the base-ball manufacturer, is dead, aged sixty-seven. He has been in the business a quarter of a century. Cincinnati Commercial November 5, 1882 [Harwood ran a baseball factory in Natick, Mass.]

Ross Barnes, who has been engaged during the past two years by a railroad company to hunt up stray freight cars, has entered into partnership with Louis H. Mahn, in the ball-manufacturing business. An extensive factory has been established for that purpose in South Natick, Mass., where Barnes will attend personally to business, while Mahn will take a brief vacation, in order to visit Berlin and Paris. Cincinnati Commercial November 5, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

bat cases

Date Saturday, May 6, 1882
Text

[Chicago vs. Metropolitan 4/27/1882] The Chicago team, headed by Captain Anson, entered the field with the air of coming conquerors, each man with his new leather bat-case in hand, reminding us of the English cricket professionals with their bat-bags...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Billie Barnie invests in the Baltimores

Date Sunday, October 1, 1882
Text

William Barnie, the present manager of the Philadlephia club, has taken a monetary interest in the Baltimore club, and will manage it next season. In Billy Barnie the Baltimores will get one of the best managers that ever handles a ball nine. Barnie has already signed several good players, and its dollars to cents that the club next season will be way up front.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

black-listed players and the AA

Date Saturday, March 18, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting of 3/13-3/14/1882] In the revision of the constitution, O. P. Caylor moved to substitute Section 9o f Article 6 by the following:

“any baseball-0player, manager or umpire who shall, after March 12, 1882, be expelled, suspended or black-listed by the National League or College Association of Baseball-players may appeal from the said disability to the directors of the American Association. The said board, at its next subsequent session, shall hear evidence from said expelled, suspended or black-listed player as to the justice or injustice done to said players, and if upon such investigation it shall appear to the entire satisfaction of the said board of directors that the said expulsion, suspension or black-listing of the said player shall have been unjust and unmerited, said player shall be declared eligible as an honorable player in the American Association, with full privileges of that body. If such injustice be not proven, then the disability imposed upon the play by said League or College Association shall be affirmed by the American Association. No player who shall be resting under any sentence of expulsion or suspension, or be on any so-called black list on March 15, 1882, shall be permitted to play with any American Association club until such disability be removed by the power that imposed it.”

D. L. Reid [of St. Louis Club] offered to amend by striking out the date and making the matter one of general consideration for players coming under the rule as it existed. A very warm discussion followed, in which Cincinnati, St. Louis and Pittsburg had it pro and con. Finally a vote was put and it resulted in a defeat of the amendv ment, Pittsburg and St. Louis making a very decided stand against accepting the League's black-list.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

block balls 2

Date Saturday, May 6, 1882
Text

[Chicago vs. Metropolitan 4/25/1882] In the seventh inning, a low, wide throw by Hankinson [third baseman] gave Dalrymple a life and a chance to reach third-base on a “block” ball... New York Clipper May 6, 1882

[Chicago vs. Metropolitan 5/1/1882] ...three runs were given the Chicagos by the effect of “block” balls, viz., balls which, being stopped by the crowd, have to be held by the pitcher while standing in his position before they are again in play. New York Clipper May 6, 1882

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

boarish behavior by Anson

Date Tuesday, May 9, 1882
Text

During the excitement that followed the close of Saturday's game Anson was hit by a flying cushion. Turning in anger upon a couple of gentlemen who were near by, he made a loaferish exhibition of himself by proposing a fight, thinking one of them had shied the cushion at him. He went so far even as to lift his hand to one of them, much inferior to him in stature, and would have struck him but a bystander warded off the blow. The gentleman he attached is a well-known physician of the eastern part of the city, who is not desirous of being brought into publicity in such a matter, or he would swear out a warrant for assault and battery against the Chicago brute. Anson on the field may be a good ball-player, but his conduct Saturday indicate that in private life he is a blustering bully., quoting the Cleveland Herald

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Bobby Mathews the last of the old pitchers

Date Saturday, August 5, 1882
Text

Little Bobby Mathews never pitched better than he is doing this year. Bobby is now the only one of the “old” pitchers who has not outlived his usefulness. More men have struck out off Bobby than off any other pitcher. Thirteen were disposed of by him on strikes July 29 in the Worcester game.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Boston Club finances 6

Date Thursday, December 21, 1882
Text

The annual meeting of the Boston Base Ball Association was held here tonight [12/20]. the treasurer's report shows that the net receipts for the season's play exceeded those for any two previous years combined. The gross receipts were $42,224, and total expenses, $38.473. The old officers were re-elected.

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Boston Club finances 7

Date Sunday, December 24, 1882
Text

At the annual meeting of the Boston Base Ball Association Tuesday, the treasurer's report showed that the net receipts for the season's play exceeded those of any two previous years combined. Fifty-one thousand persons witnessed the games on the home grounds. The total receipts were $42,224 and the expenses $38,473. The Philadelphia Item December 24, 1882

The annual meeting of the stockholders of this [Boston BBA] association was held Dec. 20 in Boston, Mass. The reports of the treasurer and directors were read and approved. From the treasurer’s report the following facts were obtained: Total gross receipts for 1881, 28,719.57; for 1882, $42,224.42; a gain for 1882 of $13,504.86. Total expenditures in 1881, $28,644.48; 1882, $38, 473.50; an icrease in 1882 of $9,829.01. Gross gate-receipts in 1881, 424,987.53; in 1882, $37,917.42, a gain in 1882 of $12,292.92. Net gate-receipts in 1881, $19,686.01; in 1882, $29,847.23, a gain in net gate-receipts for 1882 of $10,161.22. Paid visiting clubs in 1881, 45,301.52; in 1882, $8,060.22, and increase for 1882 of $2,768.70. The home-receipts were $30,000; receipts from League clubs abroad, $7,200; receipts from the Metropolitan Club of New Yor, $3,700; receipts from the Philadelphia Club, $1,300. The total attendance during the year was 139,615 persons, divided as follows: At home, $50,971; League games abroad, 48,066; in New York City, 29,584; and in Philadelphia, 10,904. The officers for the ensuing year were elected: Directors–A. H. Soden, A. J. Chase, W. H. Conant, J. B. Bilings, E. D. Mayo; president, A. H. Soden; treasurer, A. J. Chase, clerk, F. F. Roundy. New York Clipper December 30, 1882

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Boston clubroom

Date Sunday, April 2, 1882
Text

The Boston club has furnished a new clubroom in the rear of Howland's store, 765 Washington street, for the accommodation of the season ticket holders, stockholders, players and the press. Boston Herald April 2, 1882

A bonus for hitting a ball over the fence

Manager Lew Simmons, of the Athletics, offers a $20 gold piece to every man who knocks a ball over the fence at Oakdale Park. Cincinnati Commercial April 8, 1882

In the Athletic Atlantic game, last Saturday, Dock Mansell, of the Athletics, knocked a ball over left field fence, earning the first $20 gold piece from Manager Simmons. Lew was no hog, however, and at once issued a bulletin withdrawing the standing premium. Cincinnati Commercial April 21, 1882

Manager Simmons, of Philadelphia, denies that he ever put a premium of twenty dollars on every fair ball batted over the fence at Oakdale Park. Cincinnati Commercial Gazette April 28, 1882

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Brooklyn Club doesn't get the financing; Baltimore placed in its stead

Date Monday, March 13, 1882
Text

It is quite probable that Brooklyn will not remain a member of the Association. Mr. Barnie, the manager, has secured the old Union Grounds for his team to play upon, but was unable to obtain the necessary funds to fit them up for use. He has written to Secretary Williams to the effect that he supposed that as he had failed to pay his dues, which he should have liquidated some weeks ago, he will be dropped. He expressed himself as being exceedingly sorry that he was unable to realize his expectations in a financial way. It is believed, however, that he does not want to continue with the American, as he fears that such action will be taken by it as will preclude him from playing with the Metropolitans in New York, and he holds that his contests with that team would be his chief revenue. Cincinnati Enquirer March 13, 1882

In case Brooklyn is dropped, Mr. Meyers, who is present from Baltimore, will make application to take his place. He had signed to play in the short field for Pittsburg, but has received a promise from that city to release him, provided he is able to start a Club in Baltimore. He comes to the meeting with most excellent financial support. He has, he says, fine grunds situated in the heart of the city. The fever is stronger than ever before, and, with the money he has to back him, he has no doubt the success of a team there this season. He managed a nine there last year, and, although it was of an inferior order, it paid. Cincinnati Enquirer March 13, 1882

[reporting on the AA meeting] As has been previously stated in the Enquirer, considerable doubt has existed in regard to Manager Barnie remaining in the organization with the Atlantics. He had not sent in any contracts with players to the Secretary for filing, nor had he forwarded his guarantee, and it was generally believed that he would withdraw. He expressed a desire this morning to be heard before the meeting, and, on motion, his request was granted. He had, he said, failed to get up a stock organization, and had not sufficient backing to warrant his continuing in the Association. He had secured the Union Grounds, but was uncertain about being able to pay the $65 guarantee. He could play five days in the week, but not on Saturday. He was anxious to remain in the Association if that body could make concession enough to allow him to go ahead. He was 3willing to give 50 per cent. and accept 40 per cent. His nine was stronger than the one of last year. Mr. H. C. Meyers, who, as before stated, had signed as short-stop with the Alleghanies, but had been released as soon as it was ascertained that he could help the Association by organizing a Club in Baltimore, appeared. He made quite an interesting statement of the affairs in that city, saying that he had possession of the grounds, which are centrally located and in most excellent [condition]. He submitted a letter from E. R. Whiteside, of that city, who is a gentleman of considerable means, offering to back the team through the season. He had, he said, signed five of his nine, and contracts had been forwarded to a number more. On motion, the resignation of the Atlantics was accepted, and the Baltimore Club's petition for membership was accepted. Cincinnati Enquirer March 14, 1882

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Buck Ewing plays the AA off the NL for higher salary

Date Sunday, October 29, 1882
Text

...the Cincinnati Base Ball Club, through an agent, some time last August, signed a contract with... Ewing to play base ball in Cincinnati next season at $1,600 for six months. Afterward the amount was raised to $1,700. It now appears that this same Ewing used the faith of the Cincinnati Club to further his own ends, and by treating his signed contract with them as a “bidder,” succeeded in getting a larger and later offer from a New York Club, which, contrary to the rules of honesty and decency, he accepted and entered into a second contract with the New York parties. Cincinnati Commercial October 29, 1882 [a long and detailed account of the specifics follows]

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Buck Ewing signs for more money

Date Thursday, October 26, 1882
Text

Buck Ewing arrived in the city yesterday. Of course there was much anxiety to hear what he had to say about his refusal to come to this city after he had signed. In an interview with a reporter of the Enquirer he said that he affixed his name to a contract with the Metropolitans simply because he got more money, twice as much as he was offered here. “Had Cincinnati,” said he, “paid me what Troy owed me, I would have come here; but it is nonsense to think that I , who have no one but myself and my playing to secure a position, would refuse $3,200 for $1,800 a season.” When asked if he was to receive that amount, he said that that was the sum he signed for, and he was to obtain $1,000 in advance, the largest sum ever paid a base-ball tosser. He expected that Cincinnati enthusiasts were disappointed, but bread and butter was more important to him than petty praise.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

calling the shot

Date Saturday, January 28, 1882
Text

Hines of the Providence Club made a queer calculation Sept. 30, when playing against the Buffalos. Previous to the game he took a score-book out of the hands of one of the reporters and wrote “one home-run,” and then made a mark over the fifth-inning column to indicate at what stage of the contest he would score it. Sure enough, in the fifth inning he knocked the ball over the left-field fence, and came home on the hit.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Candy Cummings in an amateur game

Date Saturday, July 15, 1882
Text

The annual meeting between the nines of the New York and Providence Jewelers’ Associations took place July 6 in Hoboken. The home team, who were materially aided by Arthur Cummings’ pitching, won by a score of 4 to 2 in a game limited to seven innings.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catcher not wearing a mask?

Date Monday, May 1, 1882
Text

[Baltimore vs. Peabody 4/30/1882] Jones [catcher] played very well, and faced the deliveries of Nichols in the first three or four innings, and of Wise in the latter portion of the game, in a plucky manner. He was struck in the eye during the game by a foul tip, but continued catching.

Source Baltimore American
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catcher's mask

Date Thursday, April 13, 1882
Text

Irwin, the new catcher for the Providence team, plays with a mask. Cincinnati Enquirer April 13, 1882

[Buckeye vs. Cincinnati 4/13/1882] In the second inning yesterday afternoon, while Snyder was up behind the bat catching, White pitched a close ball to Deagle, who was at the bat. The latter unintentionally swung around and struck fiercely at the ball, making a foul. Snyder, thinking that it was a high one, threw off his mask, and as he did so the club struck him on the forehead, inflicting a deep but not serious wound just above the left eye. He was taken to the players' house, where the injury was washed and attended to. Cincinnati Enquirer April 14, 1882

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chadwick's status

Date Sunday, January 1, 1882
Text

Chadwick, the “old fossil,” who was kicked off the Clipper, is trying to champion the League. The League is dead and so is Chadwick.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

changes to the pitching rules

Date Friday, December 15, 1882
Text

You will notice there was [sic] some changes made in the rules. ... The ball may be delivered shoulder high. There will be some queer pitching!! It was voted not to move the pitcher back. It was well they did for it might have proved injurious to Richmond. I would have liked to have seen the number of “called” balls reduced to six. It would have been an improvement I think. [from a letter by Harry Wright writing from Providence to Frederick Long dated December 15, 1882]

Source From a letter by Harry Wright writing from Providence to Frederick Long
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

changes to the scoring rules

Date Sunday, December 17, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA convention] Two important changes were made in the scoring rules, one being the charging of an error to the pitcher for every runner given his base on called balls, and the other the taking out of the assistance column in the score the pitcher's assistance on strike, the latter now having to be recorded in the summary. No assistance, either, is to be credited to the pitcher on players being put out on foul balls.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

charges against the Cincinnati Club

Date Sunday, October 8, 1882
Text

The Cincinnati club having disregarded the rules of the Association in playing a League club, will certainly be expelled from the American Association at the meeting of the latter in December. The club was warned time and time again by President McKnight of the consequences of playing such games. It is probable that Columbus will take the Cincinnati's place in the Association. The Philadelphia Item October 8, 1882

[reporting on the AA special meeting of 10/23/82] The Board of Directors met in the morning to hear for playing League clubs. Mr. Kramer made a defense for his club and after a few hours’ friendly chat the were unanimously withdrawn and every personal feeling was buried, whereupon a love feast was in order. Cincinnati Commercial October 24, 1882

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Charles Eliot's critique of intercollegiate competition

Date 1882
Text

Intercollegiate contests in athletic sports demand further regulation by agreement between the colleges whose students take part in them. They are degrading both to the players and spectators if conducted with brutality, or in a tricky or jockeying spirit; and they become absurd if some of the competitors employ trainers, and play with professional players, while others do not. The opinion of the authorities of Harvard College upon this subject is perfectly distinct; they are in favor of forbidding college clubs and crews to employ trainers, to play or row with “professionals,” or to compete with clubs or crews who adopt either of these practices. They are opposed to all money-making at intercollegiate contests, and to the acceptance of money or gratuitous service from railroads or hotels, and therefore to all exhibitions or contests which are deliberately planned so as to attract a multitude and thereby increase the gate-money. In short, they believe that college sports should be conducted as the amusement of amateurs, and no as the business of professional players. The distinction between amateur and professional players is one easily made and easily maintained, as the experience of the numerous amateur athletic associations in this country and in Europe abundantly proves. The opposite view is that all games should be played to win, and that whatever promotes winning should be done,--that the best trainers should be employed, and the most expert professional clubs be hired to play with college clubs, and to meet these expenses that the largest amount of gate-money and the largest subsidies from railroads and hotels should be sought for in a business-like way. Between these opposing views there seems to be no tenable middle ground; whoever tries to occupy an intermediate position soon finds himself pushed to one extreme or the other. It should be observed that the evils and excesses which now need to be checked have grown up in connection with intercollegiate athletic contests—contests which attract undue public attention, but in which only a few persons from each college actually participate,--and that they have no tendency to weaken the force of the arguments in favor of promoting physical exercise and manly sports among college students. Annual Reports of the President and Treasurer of Harvard College for 1882-83 pp. 22-23 (published early 1884) [available at archive.org]

Source Annual Reports of the President and Treasurer of Harvard College
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Charlie Snyder switch hitting

Date Wednesday, August 23, 1882
Text

[Athletic vs. Cincinnati 8/22/1882] Snyder, who was unable to hit Sweeney right-handed, faced him left-handed. The result was a safe fly to right. Cincinnati Commercial August 23, 1882 [Snyder is listed in baseball-reference as batting right handed.]

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chicagos yell to distract the fielder

Date Sunday, June 11, 1882
Text

The Chicagos, as usual, resort to yelling when a player on the opposing nine endeavors to catch a fly ball. The trick gave them two runs in Saturday’s game.

Source Providence Sunday Star
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cincinnati Club complimentary tickets

Date Saturday, April 1, 1882
Text

It was resolved to issue no complimentaries except to the members of the press. To the latter the club will be more liberal than usual, thirty personal season passes being authorized.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cincinnati renews the guarantor notes; then scraps it

Date Saturday, November 18, 1882
Text

The club starts into the new year with $2,000 in the treasury and all the elements to give them a successful season. They, however, are determined to keep up the guarantee plan. The total fund this next season will be $4,000, in one hundred and sixty notes of $25 each. None but the best and most responsible parties will be accepted as subscribers. Over half of the number have been taken, and the chances are that the complement will be filled within a fortnight. As the newspapers say, “Now is the time to subscribe.” Cincinnati Commercial November 18, 1882

Base ball patrons of the Cincinnati Club will no doubt regret to hear that there will be no guarantors nor guarantor tickets next season. The Directors decided upon this course yesterday. A few notices in the newspapers that these tickets would be issued to a certain number upon application brought in such a flood of applicants that it was apparent not half who applied could be supplied. Several parties applied for three and four tickets in order to supply the wants of the family. A number recited in their application the fact that they were great patrons of the game, and always had been, and urged this fact as an argument that their petitions should be granted. It was, therefore, wisely concluded to give no chance for anybody to be offended because somebody else received a ticket and they did not. There seems to e a revolution in the feeling this winter to that of last winter about guarantor notes. Then it was all that an earnest solicitor could do to persuade enough persons to subscribe to complete the final fund. Now the men who snubbed the solicitor last year are among the most eager applicants for favors. The Directors feel grateful toward last year’s guarantors, and if other tickets of the same kind were to be issued gain those who stood by the club last season would be remembered first this year. Cincinnati Commercial November 25,1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

commentary on Sunday baseball

Date Friday, September 15, 1882
Text

The Cincinnati papers announce a game of base ball with the Irontons, on the Cincinnati grounds, next Sunday. This is premature. The Irontons didn’t make the engagement. The Irontons don’t play ball on Sunday. They are young men who maintain a decent respect for the law of God and the intelligent opinion of mankind. Cincinnati Gazette September 15, 1882, quoting the Ironton (Ohio)

Source Cincinnati Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

complaint about the umpire's calling of balls and strikes

Date Sunday, June 25, 1882
Text

We are being skinned out of every game in Cincinnati. The umpiring is villainous and the calling of balls and strikes monstrous., purportedly quoting a letter from Manager Pratt to the Allegheny Club directors

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

confusion about a block ball

Date Monday, August 7, 1882
Text

[a letter from Indianapolis signed Ball Player] I would like to have your decision on the following matter: In a game of ball played here last week there was a kick. There were men on all the bases. The pitcher delivered the ball, which was muffed by the catcher, and passed him. I asked umpire and he called passed ball. I ran my man in. catcher did not touch him,, but made an overthrow to the pitcher standing at home. This let another man in, tieing the game. It was then learned that the ball had touched a bystander after passing the catcher. Umpire ruled one run out, after telling the scorer to put it down, and made the man take third base. Are we not entitled to both runs?

You are. Then men were each entitled to a base even if the ball did touch a bystander, and the overthrow had nothing to do with it. The umpire was wrong.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

confusion over how many balls for a base on balls

Date Sunday, April 16, 1882
Text

[Cleveland vs. Cincinnati 4/15/1882] Snyder went to bat, and seven balls were called; as the seventh was called, Snyder threw down his bat and trotted down to first, Kemmler going to third and Stearns to second, though the umpire had done nothing but call seven balls. Here began Bradley’s kick. It was agreed before the game began that the rules of the American Association should govern the Clevelands’ games in Cincinnati. These rules differ only in respect to foul balls from the League rules, being substantially the League rules of last season. Bradley excitedly claimed that there were eight balls to a base in the American rules. The umpire, not having a book, did not know whether it was eight or seven. Snyder walked back, picked up his bat, called to Kemmler and Stearns to hold their bases, and said he would be willing to submit to Bradley that it was eight balls. Then Bradley declared that Kemmler and Stearne must return to the bases they first occupied. But the umpire declared they had been allowed by the Cleveland fielders to advance a base each without him (the umpire) telling anybody to take a base. As they had advanced without anybody trying to put them out and were then holding the bases, he didn’t see how he could compel them to relinquish what they had gained. All the Cleveland players but Bradley admitted the decision was right, but that eminent bully consumed a quarter of an hour with vile abuse and persistent cussedness. When forced back to the points he delivered another bad ball and Snyder again took his base.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

continuity of the Allegheny Club

Date Saturday, February 4, 1882
Text

The directors of the Allegheny Club, at a meeting held Jan. 24...decided to procure a new charter at once instead of working under that of the old Allegheny Club.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

control of the Polo Grounds

Date Saturday, February 11, 1882
Text

The Metropolitan Club of 1882 is evidently to be run in good style this coming season. The management gained valuable experience in 1881, from which they should this year profit; and now that they have entire control of the grounds, which they had not last season, they can carry out improvements, and present conveniences for the public comfort at their matches which were not in their power to do in 1881. The club has leased the Polo ground for three years, and, with the large amount of capital they have invested in the enterprise, it will not pay to adopt any other course but that which makes the ground a favorite resort for the best patrons of baseball.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

cost of litigation

Date Sunday, February 12, 1882
Text

The Boston Herald keeps insisting that neither Troy nor Wise will be enjoined on the ground that it will cost too much. There is where it makes a big mistake.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

credit for the AA given to Horace Phillips

Date Saturday, September 2, 1882
Text

While in St. Louis the past week, your correspondent had an interview with Horace B. Phillips, late of the Philadelphia club, and everything is favorable to a strong team at Indianapolis. Phillips has many warm friends in the West, and the Western journals all unite in giving him the credit (and justly, too,) of being the originator of the American Association, his earnest efforts last Fall, when connected with the Athletic club, being the means of securing the Louisville and St. Louis to take an interesting in reforming the new association, besides reviving the interest in Allegheny by playing the Athletic-Detroit game there on September 12, last year.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

credit of the curve to Cummings and Mathews

Date Sunday, November 5, 1882
Text

The credit of curving a ball has been unanimously given to Cummings and Mathews, of New York. They learned it in private, and were too fearful of its success or being 'cribbed” by other pitchers to bring it out in public for a long time., quoting the Chicago Herald

Source Louisville Courier Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

curve pitching blamed for bad umpiring

Date Sunday, August 13, 1882
Text

Ever since the introduction of curve pitching the position of umpire has been a difficult one to fill, and, as a general rule, the persons chosen to officiate in that capacity have given far more dissatisfaction than otherwise.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Dan Rowe's delivery; wind-up versus set position

Date Friday, August 25, 1882
Text

[Dan Rowe's] delivery, under strict umpiring, is clearly unfair. Before delivering the ball, except when there is a runner on the bases, he takes a regular hop, skip and jump, and in every instance yesterday he stepped outside the limits of the pitcher's box. The Philadelphias appealed, and Umpire McLean warned him, but he did it repeatedly afterward., quoting the Philadelphia Press

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

David Reid a reporter in St. Louis

Date Sunday, July 2, 1882
Text

Dave Reid, of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat, is the fairest and squarest base ball reporter in the West.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Deasley's complaints about the Boston Club; abuse of the blacklist; reserve

Date Saturday, December 9, 1882
Text

[a letter to the editor from Thomas Deasley dated 11/29/1882] I take the liberty of writing the particulars of what would appear to be my questionable transactions with the Boston Club. I have only played two seasons in the League, both with Boston. The season of 1881 I was engaged for seven months. They refused to pay me for the seventh month. I was retained, and compelled to sign for 1882 for less than I could get elsewhere, as they threatened to black-list me for charges they claimed they had against me. (It is very singular how they retain candidates for the black-list.) This season I played thirty-eight successive games, suffering with two broken fingers, because the Boston Club had no one to catch Whitney, and all the thanks I got was a refusal to give me what the St. Louis Club offered, my wife, who was anxious to remain in Boston, having called upon the management to see ab out it before I signed with St. Louis. After I had signed with St. Louis it was another story, and the Boston management tried every way to make me break my contract, and said they would keep my October salary this year for fines, which were then first heard of, as I have not been guilty of any misdemeanor not shared by other members of the club, whom they did not fine; and as I was determined to be even with them in money matters, I signed with them. It was not honorable, but I think just as fair in me as it was in them, for they owed me for October, 1881 and 1882, $342.86, and I was not able to carry the case into court, so I made up my mind that I would rather not play in the League again if the Boston Club had the power to retain me year after year and not keep their contract, besides compelling me to play for less than many of the League catchers, and supporting Whitney, whom I claim is more difficult to catch than any other pitcher. I have always worked hard for the interest of the Boston Club, and no one has yet accused me of dishonest or tricky play. I intend playing in St. Louis next year.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

delivery point raised to the shoulder

Date Sunday, December 10, 1882
Text

The Association should do something to definitely settle the question of the height of a pitcher’s arm–either to fix a penalty to keep it down or allow it, in express words, to go as high as the shoulder but no higher, under a fixed and well-defined penalty. As the League have it, there is no penalty to prohibit a pitcher from throwing over his head, and the higher you allow them to go the more they will encroach upon the privilege. Cincinnati Commercial December 10, 1882

[reporting on the NL meeting] The playing rules were amended to the effect that the pitcher's hand, in delivering the ball, must pass below the shoulder instead of the waist. The Philadelphia Item December 10, 1882

[reporting on the AA meeting] The class 3, rule 23 was changed by leaving out the words, “arm swinging nearly perpendicular by his side,” and the word “waist” was changed to “shoulder,” thereby admitting of any delivery of the ball to the bat below the line of the pitcher's shoulder. The Philadelphia Item December 17, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Detroit Club finances 3

Date Saturday, January 28, 1882
Text

The Detroit Club stockholders are discussing the dividend question. Some are in favor of dividing the profits of last season, and others think that the money should be reserved to meet any deficit that may occur during the coming season. New York Clipper January 28, 1882

There has been no instance in the history of the clubs of the League Association of such exceptional success, financially and otherwise, for an inaugural season's career, as that of the Detroit Club for 1881, the first year of its entry in the League. Especially was the financial management up to a high business rank, if we mayjudge by the results. Here are the chief figures of the treasurer's report at the recent annual meeting: Starting with a capital stock of $5.000, their receipts at the close of the season aggregated over thirty-five thousand dollars, as follows: From home games, $26,050; from visiting games, $8,299; from season-tickets, $1,405—total, $35,754. Their outlays were: For salaries, $13,214; paid to visiting clubs, $8,058; traveling expenses, $4,297; rent of grounds, $1,265—total, $26,861. Adding other expenses, a balance of $12,440 was left at the end of the season. This is a financial record the club-directors have a right to be proud of. … The dividend the club declared, is in the form of two season tickets for 1882. New York Clipper February 11, 1882

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Detroit Club finances 4

Date Sunday, February 12, 1882
Text

The Treasurer's statement of the finances of the Detroit Club of 1881 shows the following: Starting with a capital stock of $5,000, their receipts at the close of the season aggregated over $35,000, as follows: From home games, $26,050; from visiting games, $8,299; from season tickets, $1,405—total, $35,754. their outlays were: For salaries, $13,214; paid to visiting Clubs, $8.058; traveling expenses, $4,297; rent of grounds, $1,265—total, $26,861. Adding other expenses, a balance of $12,440 was left at the end of the season.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Detroit re-signs Troy

Date Sunday, April 30, 1882
Text

It was given out that the Detroit club had released Troy, but it now appears that the announcement was premature, for, after playing all the American association clubs that it could arrange games with, it has again engaged that player, and he left New York last Tuesday evening for Detroit.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Devlin a policeman

Date Saturday, September 30, 1882
Text

Jim Devlin is now a Philadelphia policeman, a position he was appointed to a few weeks ago. New York Clipper September 30, 1882

a call for cooperation between the NL and AA

An understanding between the two Associations would save many thousand dollars in the matter of salaries alone. As long as this cut-throat policy is continued players are able to dictate their own terms and managers have but to submit to their extortionate demands. We know now of players who have signed contracts whose terms are exorbitant, but who could have received more if they had asked it, rather than to be allowed to go with a club of the rival organization. The line should be drawn somewhere on matter of the salaries, abut it never can be done as long as the associations are fighting with each other. The Philadelphia Item October 1, 1882

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

dismissing the Cincinnati Club

Date Sunday, January 22, 1882
Text

The Cincinnati club has advertised for a short-stop. Why this neglect on the part of so many good players, not now engaged, to secure an engagement in Cincinnati? The average base-ball player knows that the Cincinnati club is to be short-lived and they do not desire to embark in an already sinking ship.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

disputing Horace Phillips' claim to originating the AA; Phillips' reply

Date Saturday, November 11, 1882
Text

[discussing a new poster design advertising upcoming games] By the way, we notice that Manager Phillips, of the Columbus Club, is already claiming the idea, as of growth from his original brain. Don’t do it, Horace. You no more originated that idea than you hatched out the principles of the American League. There are newspapers on file in this city which will prove, if necessary, that the plan of the American League originated in Cincinnati in the fall of 1880. If you will read up you will find that at that time Colonel L. A. Harris, of this city, went to New York to meet several other delegates, but adjourned without doing anything. The plan then remained dormant, till once more stirred up a year ago. Do sit down, H. P., and give the world a chance. First thing you know, Sir Isaac Newton, Professor Morse, Edison and the like will lose their supposed laurels. Cincinnati Commercial November 11, 1882

[Phillips responds] Messr. Pank, Sharsig, Von der Ahe and McKnight are well aware of the fact of what I did. I took the Athletic Club West last fall to Pittsburg, Louisville, St. Louis and Cincinnati, to see what could be done toward organizing an opposition to the League on a twenty-five cent basis. Mr. Harris may have gone to New York to organize an association, but he did not succeed in getting those interested that I did. The call at Pittsburg was originally made by me, but you know why I was left out at that time, but would not had my backer kept his word with me. In order to revive the game, I stopped over in Cincinnati and played to less that 250 people, in order that I might consult Mr. Mark Wallace and yourself in order to have Cincinnati represented.

If anybody wants to lay claim that they originated the American Association, let them do so. I have glory enough in knowing that there is such an association, and as successful as it has been. And now that I am connected with it I shall try to elevate its standing in any manner that is in my power. The name, “American,” I suggested to Mr. Christ Von der Ahe, and I believe was introduced at the meeting by him.

...

Mr. Phillps...is mastaken about Mr. Von der Ahe introducint the name “American.” The Association was christened at the Pittsburg meeting, and neither Mr. Phillips nor Von der Ahe was present. Cincinnati Commercial November 18, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

dissension within the AA; bootleg post-season games

Date Sunday, October 1, 1882
Text

There is brewing just now within the American Association ranks something that promises to give trouble of the liveliest description. The champion club, the Cincinnati, is in a rebellious attitude, and liable to get into a position that will make expulsion possible. There has been a manifest disposition in the Pork city to have the Association operated in the interest of the club there, and now the desire of a fresh young lawyer of that city to become the boss—the Hurlbut as it were—of the Americans, has manifested itself stronger than ever. The Cincinnati club have arranged to play with the Cleveland and Providence clubs. During the season, it will be remembered, there was trouble about players taken by the League from the Americans. The Cincinnati club alone carried that trouble, in the case of Wise, to the extent that made it necessary for the Association to enact such rules as forbid its clubs to play with the League teams which have recognized the right of theft of players. To get around this rule the Cincinnati people propose to discharge their players and then hire them over, outside of the Association rules.

President McKnight, of the American Association, said last night that the proceeding would be outrageous and unlawful, and should it be persisted in, he would be earnestly in favor of expelling the club. He has been in correspondence with the Cincinnati people and notified them of this view of the case. They put in the plea that they will have players on salary half a month with nothing to do if this is not accomplished. Now Cincinnati having cleared $12,000 to $15,000 this year can afford to have some idle weeks, but they could easily have filled up the time spoken of with any or all of the other Association clubs. So Mr. McKnight wrote them, but in response received an emphatic statement that they were going to proceed with their plan.

They alleged that the Athletics and St. Louis would do the same thing. President McKnight wrote to both these clubs, and yesterday received a letter from Simmons pronouncing the story a lie as far as his club was concerned, and expressing his determination to aid in expelling any club which would be so false. The Cincinnati people are certainly acting peculiarly, in view of the trouble they caused earlier in the year on the other side of this subject. It is reported that one Stearns, a backer for the club, and Caylor, the Secretary, are at the bottom of the whole thing, expecting to make some money out of the snap. The Philadelphia Item October 1, 1882, quoting the Pittsburg Despatch.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

dissension within the American Associations

Date Sunday, December 17, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA convention] There are indication of internal jealousies and unbusinesslike feeling. It was the element that the more conservative friends of the new Association feared might arrive. The truth is, if it must be told, that there are at least three men connected with three clubs in the Association who would sacrifice their clubs' interests, as well as the Association's interests, to gratify personal spites. Such men are dangerous instruments, with which harm irretrievable may be worked against the Association. We do not accredit any such feeling to Mr. Simmons, of the Athletic Club. Among all the gentlemen assembled in that body, Mr. Simmons has shown himself impartial and manly. He would not lend himself to a mean act to gratify a personal spite under any circumstances.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

don't make the first out stealing third

Date Friday, September 22, 1882
Text

Nor should any attempt be made to steal third when none are out, unless first base be occupied also.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early rumor of Dunlap unhappy in Cleveland

Date Tuesday, August 1, 1882
Text

A statement published a few days ago in the Detroit Free Press, to the effect that Dunlap and Glasscock were dissatisfied, and wold rather suffer expulsion from the League than play in Cleveland another season, is wholly without truth, and it is at the request of the players mentioned that the Herald takes occasion to say so. The item has been widely copied, and has been a source of much annoyance to them. The Free Press might be in better business than circulating false reports concerning players., quoting the Cleveland Herald

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early talk of a Northwestern League

Date Tuesday, August 15, 1882
Text

A North-western League is talked of. Among the cities in which the project is being agitated re Grand Rapids, Saginaw, Milwaukee, St. Paul, Minneapolis, Keokuk, Janesville and Fort Wayne.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early use of 'half inning'

Date Wednesday, August 2, 1882
Text

[St. Louis vs. Cincinnati 8/1/1882] The came the disastrous half inning by the St. Louis club.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early use of 'pitcher's box'

Date Sunday, May 28, 1882
Text

[St. Louis vs. Athletic 5/24/1882] The presence of Weaver in the pitcher's “box” and O'Brien behind the bat steadied the entire nine. The Philadelphia Item May 28, 1882

spreading the news of the game

In each of the eight league cities there are business men who, by a system of exchange, have arranged for the earliest possible intelligence. Upon the Worcester ball field yesterday there was a youth who, at the conclusion of each inning, ran to the telephone and informed the down-town agent of the result of the inning, who immediately telegraphed the news to Soper [in Detroit]. He...bulletined the same for the benefit of the public. And that wasn’t all. Over in one corner of the store a boy was kept busy answering telephone calls from all parts of the city, and as his answer was invariably “Ten to three in favor of Detroit,” it is a fair presumption that there was a similarity in the questions asked. Detroit Free Press June 2, 1881

marketing to the German language population of St. Louis

Dave Reid of the St. Louis Browns has undertaken a big task. He is furnishing the German press of the Mound City with baseball items, and is getting the Teutonic element posted on the national game. New York Clipper June 3, 1882

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early use of 'twirl' 2

Date Sunday, July 9, 1882
Text

[Boston vs. Philadelphia 7/8/1882] Matthews, who had been pitching up tot his time, was now sent into the field, and Whitney began to twirl the ball, and not another run was made by the home club after this.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early use of to 'spike'

Date Thursday, July 13, 1882
Text

John Troy, who was yesterday spiked in the third inning by Gore, was so severely injured in the right leg that he will probably not be able to play again this season.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

evolving opinion on blacklisted players

Date Sunday, March 12, 1882
Text

[regarding the upcoming AA meeting] Many questions will come up that will require diplomacy, good judgment, tact, rather than impulse or revengeful feeling in their solution. Prominent among these questions is the recognition and employment of black-listed players. There is no mistake in the feeling of the general public on this question. It condemns it, and the association might as well accept the inevitable. There has been a decided revolution in the feeling of our bas ball patrons on this subject during the past two months, sober second though having taken the place of a revengeful feeling for the outrages and indignities suffered by the new Association at the hands of the League, in recognizing and engaging players signed with Association clubs. In our judgment, honesty on the part of the Association will be met half way by generosity and a spirit to do justice on the part of the League. Even if this be not so, two wrongs cannot make a right. The Philadelphia Item March 12, 1882

[reporting on the AA meeting] Upon the question of black-listed players, the Association wisely followed the counsel of The Item, and left them where they rightly belong, to the power that disbarred them. In the matter of players who have proven treacherous to the Association, the law will be invoked for justice. Thus, with clean skirts, above even a suspicion of wrong doing, the Association enters upon what gives every promise of a most successful career, and , by this success, will for the League in an alliance to protect itself. The Philadelphia Item March 19, 1882

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

expanding the schedule

Date Sunday, November 5, 1882
Text

Harry Wright told our reporter that he favored a schedule of championship games for every day of the season not occupied by necessary traveling. He says when a team is not traveling it should be playing. This plan would give every team about sixty games at home during the year. Cincinnati Commercial November 5, 1882

[The expanded schedule] is, however, the direct opposite of the late President Hulbert’s views. He always held that there were too many games played, though he acknowledged there were not more than enough to pay expenses of traveling so much and so far. Cincinnati Commercial November 11, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

fallout of the Troy dispute

Date Saturday, June 17, 1882
Text

Within a short time things will probably be all serene between the League and American Association clubs. The League clubs have united in an application to the Athletic, of this city, to reinstate Troy, who has been the bone of contention. Immediately following this action the Detroits promise to release Troy and thus end the difficulty. A gentleman connected with the Philadelphia Club is authority for the statement that the Athletic Club has signed a paper to this effect, but one of the Athletic directors most positively denies this and says that they have refused to consider the proposition. Another inducement offered the Athletics is that they can have the privilege of playing all the League clubs in this city after September 30. the truth of the matter appears to be that the Troy imbroglio has cost the League clubs many hundreds of dollars and they are anxious to have the matter arranged so that they can play with the Association clubs in the east and West. The League clubs claim, however, that they are only anxious to settle the trouble to benefit the Philadelphia and Metropolitan Clubs. Both the latter clubs will have very few games while the League clubs are in the West, as all the semi-professional clubs are anxious to keep in good faith with the American Association.

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

finances in Providence

Date Sunday, March 19, 1882
Text

The season of 1882 promises to be the liveliest in Providence since that city entered the national league. Heretofore the base ball association has begun the season with a large indebtedness staring it in the face, as a gentle reminder of the previous season, and on top of that it has had to raise funds to start the club on its trip. This year but very few debts had to be met, and they were provided for at the annual meeting of the stockholders by spontaneous contributions, which aggregated more than $400. since then about $600 more has been contributed by admirers of the game. The new management is taking hold as though it meant business, and is preparing to run the club on thorough businesslike principles. Boston Herald March 19, 1882

Feguson gets Caskins blacklisted

The true inwardness of the suspension, by black-listing, of Caskins, is gradually but surely cropping out. A number of weeks ago the Sunday Star asserted that it would be a matter of exceeding difficulty to prove that Caskins was fairly and squarely black-balled in the open meeting of the league delegates assembled at Saratoga. Evidence is accumulating to sustain that assertion. A few days ago, a representative of this paper had a conversation with a veteran base ball man, who was acquainted with the facts relative to the suspension of Caskins. The entire blame was laid at the door of that great disorganizer, Ferguson. The gentleman said that the trouble arose at New-York city, one day last summer, when Caskins wanted to cross over the ferry and go out and see his wife, who was then indisposed. He applied to Ferguson for a leave of absence, agreeing to be back in time to play on the succeeding day. Ferguson would not grant the favor, whereupon Caskins telegraphed to the president of the Troy association, stating the facts of the case and requesting him to authorize the leave of absence. The president granted Caskin’s request, and the latter went to see his sick wife. The Star’s informant averred that Ferguson stated that he would get even with Caskins. When the latter’s name was brought up in the meeting at Saratoga, only a trifling accusation was made against him. His suspension was left in the judgment of the Troy directors, who met that same night, and, influenced by Ferguson, voted to black-list. The gentleman further averred that after Caskins was suspended, that Ferguson bragged of what he had done, and that he said he would shall all base ball players who ran against him just what they might expect in the future. Ferguson is in bad repute with Providence base ball patrons, who cannot forget his ungentlemanly conduct and speech last season, and he is also disliked in Detroit, where he also turned to the people in the grand stand, and made ungentlemanly remarks. Providence Sunday Star March 19, 1882

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

finances of the Athletic club

Date Sunday, October 22, 1882
Text

Financially, the success of the [Athletic] club has been remarkable, the profits of the season reaching $22,000.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

financial condition of the AA clubs

Date Sunday, September 3, 1882
Text

A glance at the books of the treasurers of the various clubs reveals the startling but truthful fact that the different clubs of the Association will close their season with profits ranging close upon the following figures:

St. Louis …..........$30,000

Athletics …..........$25,000

Cincinnati............ $15.000

Allegheny …........$7,000

Baltimore …....... $7,000

Louisville …....... $5,000

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

flooding on the Pittsburgh grounds

Date Monday, May 15, 1882
Text

Owing to the high water which has flooded the Exposition grounds, rendering playing there out of the question for several days at least, the Alleghenys will leave this evening for Cincinnati and there play on to-morrow and Wednesday two of the four championship games that were booked this week for here. The other two games will be played on the Exposition grounds on Thursday and Friday if by that time they should be in condition. If not, they also will be played in Cincinnati. The managers of the Exposition promise to improve the field at once. Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette May 15, 1882

[Louisville vs. Allegheny 5/29/1882] The pond on the grounds was swollen by the high river until it was within a few feet of first base, and an arm stretched out across right field. As a consequence of this it was necessary to keep three balls handy, a dry one ready for use when the one in play was knocked into the water, which was a frequent occurrence. Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette May 30, 1882

[St. Louis vs. Allegheny 6/2/1882] Fortunately for the St. Louis yesterday's was not a championship game. The rules provide that the grounds must be in condition for playing. Inasmuch as the right field was more than half covered with water they were not in condition and Cuthbert refused in consequence to play a championship game. If was therefore mutually agreed that it should be an exhibition game. Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette June 2, 1882

Source Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

free and reduced-price tickets

Date Sunday, February 26, 1882
Text

The new management of the Providence club proposes to cut off eery free ticket holder possible. In past seasons a great many 15-cent tickets have been used, and by persons perfectly able to pay the regular prices of admission. What little they have paid has gone to the visiting clubs, while the home club has received nothing. It is now proposed to do away with these tickets altogether. Another scheme in view is the issuing of special tickets for the use of Sunday newspaper reporters, which will be good for Saturday games only.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

George Wright retires from professional play

Date Saturday, April 8, 1882
Text

[from a letter from George Wright] The Beacon Club, an amateur organization composed mostly of college graduates who are engaged in business in the city, and of which I am a member and will play with, go to Worcester to play the opening game with the Worcester Club. I will play short, and my brother Sam will play third. I will become a regular member of the Longwood C. C. No more professional cricketer for me. This club will return to their old field at Longwood, and not play at Beacon Park. They expect to place a strong eleven in the field. They have their annual meeting at the Parker House to-morrow evening, after which they have a supper. New York Clipper April 8, 1882

We speak by the card when we state that George Wright will not be the regular short-stop of the Providence Club this season. He may play in one or two games during the Summer, but the demands of his business prevent him from making any engagement for the campaign. New York Clipper April 8, 1882

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

George Wright signs with Providence

Date Saturday, June 24, 1882
Text

George Wright has signed with the Providence Club for the remainder of the season, taking the position of short-stop made vacant by the release of Manning and Arthur Whitney.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Governor Pattison a former ballplayer

Date Sunday, November 26, 1882
Text

Governor-elect Pattison was a member of the Harry Clay Base Ball Club, of Philadelphia, during the years 1866, '67 and '68 and played first base with the club in a famous game which came off at Pottstown, on Thanksgiving day, November 29, 1866, with the Pottstown club. In those days the game of base ball was different from what it is now, big scores were made on hotly contested games, and this was a very sharp contest, resulting in forty-eight runs for the Harry Clay to forty-five for the Pottstown club. The latter were ahead until the last inning, when the Clays saved themselves by making nine runs. Mr. Pattison, though not yet sixteen years of age, was one of the principal players, figuring lively in the “sky scrapers,” “daisy cutters,” “hot ones,” “home runs,” etc. the return game was played one year later, on Thanksgiving day, 1867, on the Athletic grounds, Philadelphia, where Robert E. Pattison again played first base.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

guarantees required from League Alliance clubs

Date Sunday, March 12, 1882
Text

[reporting on the NL meeting] Messrs. Day and Reach were present at the meeting, looking after the interests of the Metropolitan and Philadelphia clubs. They rightly objected to paying League clubs if guarantee of $100 with a privilege of 50 per cent. of receipts before the opening and after the closing of the League season. They offered 45 per cent. of receipts without a guarantee. The League stuck to its terms, however, and it was intimated that if these clubs did any “kicking” the League would leave them to work out their own salvation, and play what clubs they pleased. The Philadelphia Item March 12, 1882

Mutrie says that all the appointed games with League clubs are off for the present unless the clubs should finally into the Metropolitan arrangement as regards terms. As the League clubs have to go to Philadelphia to fulfill their engagements in April with Al. Reach’s League Alliance Club, it is not likely that they are going to throw away hundreds of dollars by passing New York without stopping to play the Metropolitans, merely to carry out an agreement they had no legal right to make. New York Clipper March 25, 1882

Manager Soden has accepted Metropolitan Club terms for the Boston team to play in New York on April 24, 25 and 26, and Harry Wright for his Providence team the same month. They will all come into it before two weeks are over. They are not going to lose a hundred dollars a day for weeks, for mere obstinacy’s sake. New York Clipper April 1, 1882

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Harry Wright advocates eliminating the high-low strike zones

Date Friday, October 27, 1882
Text

[from an interview of Harry Wright] “One of the most difficult tasks [the umpire] has is to correctly call balls and strikes. If it is a little below or above the waist, a kick will follow from the batsman or pitcher. I believe that any ball which passes over the plate between the shoulder and knees should be termed fair. If such a scheme is adopted, it will compel the batter to hit.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Harry Wright out as Boston manager

Date Monday, January 30, 1882
Text

[from an interview of John Morrill] “Why was not Harry Wright retained in Boston as manager?”

“There was a difference of opinion between the Directors and stockholders of the Club. Some thought he had been in Boston too long, while others possessed the opposite opinion. A warm time wa had at the annual meeting, but Harry's friends were beaten and he was not signed. His going to Providence will help renew the old rivalry between the two Clubs, and the interest in the games between the two will be greater than ever.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

high delivery

Date Friday, August 25, 1882
Text

The Boston Herald says there is a growing demand for some definite or stringent rule in regard to pitching, or rather throwing. At present pitchers are allowed to deliver the ball as they please, in spite of the remonstrances of their opponents. The rule requiring the ball to be delivered below the hip is a dead letter, and should be replaced by some legislation that can be enforced. This is very true, indeed, and the American Association, at its next annual meeting, should amend its playing rules so there can be no mistake about it, and enforce the rule next season.

Source Cincinnati Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

high pitch delivery

Date Tuesday, April 25, 1882
Text

[Detroit vs. Cincinnati 4/24/1882] Derby is considered one of the finest pitchers in the country, and he showed it yesterday. He was at his best, and took advantage of every point. In one respect he took advantage of a point that, under the circumstances, is not fair. The two clubs, belonging to different organizations, and governed by two sets of rules and constitutions, the umpire in these games has no control of the visiting pitchers. Derby took advantage of this fact to abandon all form of pitching, and throw a square overhand neck high ball, his hand passing above his shoulder every time. Those who saw the game will bear witness to this. The crowd contended itself by shouting “Keep down that arm” but it was of no use. Derby knew that there was no power to enforce the rule, and he threw till the last man was out.

This is not base ball, but in these exhibition games it can not be helped. The League Clubs are instructed by their Directors to beat the American Clubs as badly as possible, and every means is resorted to for that purpose. An effort was made in Pittsburg, during the Buffalos’ visit there, to enforce the rule. The umpire warned Daily to keep down his arm and called three “foul baulks” on him. This under the rules forfeited the game. The Buffalos simply laughed at the umpire and said they would not recognize his “foul baulks,” and asked “What are you going to do about it?” If the game had been declared forfeit nothing would have been gained except fo cut short the playing. So the Pittsburg Club, rather than prevent the spectators from seeing a whole game gave over and allowed the bold faced imposition to go on. Since then the League pitchers have been openly violating this rule, which is contrary to the demands of both Associations. A forfeit under the rules and a withholding of gate money might have a healthy effect. It is not base ball playing. If Mr. Derby pitches to-morrow we would advise admirers of the sport in Cincinnati not to go out to see the game unless he be first pledged to pitch according to the regulations of his own and the American Association rules.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips an AA umpire?

Date Friday, July 28, 1882
Text

T. J. Carey has retired from the list of professional umpires of the American Association, and Horace B. Phillips has replaced him. Cincinnati Commercial July 28, 1882 [He is reported the following day as being an applicant. Carey is reported in subsequent games as umpire.]

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips is a hustler

Date Friday, September 8, 1882
Text

Horace B. Phillips was in this city yesterday talking up Indianapolis as a city to put an American Association nine in the field for next season. He is getting the pledge of the American clubs to vote for the admission of Indianapolis if the club can show sufficient and satisfactory financial backing. Phillips is a hustler, and in the language of Captain Cuttle, “He kin, if any man kin, he kin.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips leaves the Philadelphias, Billie Barnie now managing

Date Sunday, July 23, 1882
Text

H. B. Phillips has left the Philadelphia club. He takes with him a high recommendation as manager from Mr. Reach. The Philadelphia Item July 23, 1882

H. B. Phillips expects to manager an American Association team in Milwaukee next season. The Philadelphia Item July 23, 1882

William Barnie, the new manager of the Philadelphia cl;ub has already made himself very popular. He is a hard-working, conscientious gentleman, and in him Mr. Reach has a very valuable aide-de-camp. The Philadelphia Item July 30, 1882

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips signing players for St. Louis

Date Saturday, August 12, 1882
Text

Horace B. Phillips, ex-manager of the Philadelphia, has a roving commission from the St. Louis Club to engage players for next season. He has engaged Latham, of the Philadelphia, for $1,400 and has made offers to Weidman, Trott, Derby, Bennett and Knight, of the Detroit, but all the latter have refused to bite.

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips tries to foist a scheduling off on the AA

Date Sunday, December 31, 1882
Text

Manager Phillips, of the Columbus Club, has made another bad break–such as he seems to delight in. He was appointed a member of the American Association schedule meeting, at the recent New York meeting, his fellow committeemen being Messrs. Mutrie, of New York, and Barnie, of Baltimore. Before the meeting and before he went in New York Mr. Phillips drew up a schedule which he was with great difficulty restrained from firing off at the convention. Having been appointed on the committee, however, Mr. Phillips hastened back to Ohio, and by arrangements eminently satisfactory to himself and most probably remunerative also, he secured the publication of this pseudo schedule. Its was even announced as the schedule which would without doubt be adopted in March. In this case Mr. Phillips has been entirely too premature. The instrument is indorsed only by his own brain, and his course does not even give satisfaction to the Columbus Club. This breach of trust as a member of the committee not only is inexcusable, but makes both himself useless as a member of the committee, and his schedule worthless. The clubs and papers are already wrangling over the affair, and calling Mr. Phillips names for his meddlesomeness. Never has a schedule been peddled out to newspapers by a committeeman before, and Phillips alone has the honor of betraying the trust the Convention placed in him when he was appointed. There is not danger, nor ever was, of that schedule being adopted, for it is absurd in the extreme on its face. There very expensive clubs are sent to the poorest cities on holidays, while the inexpensive clubs are allotted to reap the rich harvests. Besides, the cost of travel on that schedule is about twenty per cent greater to every club than it can and should be made. Mr. Phillips should efface himself into the mountains, else he’ll make as much trouble as he has done before.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Hugh Daly insulted a reporter

Date Sunday, February 19, 1882
Text

Hugh Daly is the change pitcher of the Buffalo team. This is the fellow who so grossly insulted the base ball reporter of the Herald last Summer on the grand stand at the polo grounds. He found it necessary to apologize to the young journalist before the season was over. Brooklyn Daily Eagle February 19, 1882

the end of the Jefferson street grounds

The old ball ground at Twenty-fifth and Jefferson streets, Philadelphia, is now almost covered with buildings, the only vacant section being disposed of at auction Feb. 14, and realizing upwards of fifty thousand dollars to the city, who owned the property. The ground was formally inaugurated May 25, 1864, by the playing of a game between selected nines of the most prominent clubs of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, for the benefit of the Sanitary Fair then being held in Philadelphia. The Athletics and Olympics jointly occupied the ground for fourteen successive seasons, sub-letting to to the Philadelphias in 1873-4-5. The closing contest on the ground took place Oct. 29, 1877, between the Athletics and an amateur club canned the United. New York Clipper February 25, 1882

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Hulbert's dog leads to a home run

Date Saturday, January 28, 1882
Text

Hulbert has an office in the left-field corner of the Chicago ground, and he also possessed a huge dog, which is allowed to play about outside the office and unchained. In one of the Chicago-Worcester games, the left-fielder while running after a batted ball, was brought to a sudden standstill by the appearance of the dog with his mouth open, and emitting the fiercest growls. The left-fielder viewed the animal , and not caring to lose an important part of his uniform pants, he concluded it was not bets to try for the sphere, and the dog guarded the ball until the batsman made a home run.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

idiosyncratic calling of balls and strikes

Date Sunday, April 30, 1882
Text

[Athletic vs. Merritt 4/25/1882] We have no doubt that Mr. Johnson intended to be honest and as impartial as possible, but some of his decisions were decidedly funny, and his manner of calling balls and strikes was decidedly original and unique. He would say, “Wa-al, I guess that's a ball,” and when asked by the astonished batter, “Are you sure?” would reply, “Wa-al, I guess I am!

Source The Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

in praise of high scores and a lively ball

Date Friday, July 21, 1882
Text

It used to be one of the charms of the game when the ball was poked all over the field and the bases were kept full of runners, and when a “whitewash” for nine innings was almost unknown and almost impossible among first-class clubs. Now it is a daily occurrence. It would add fresh interest to the sport if the gentlemen who now frame its rules were to place more rubber in the ball and make it “lively., quoting the Philadelphia Chronicle

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

increased attendance

Date Sunday, August 20, 1882
Text

As an indication of the increased interest in the national game in this vicinity over 18841, it may be stated that the audiences per game this season, have, on an average, been about three times as large as last year.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

inflated attendance figures

Date Wednesday, June 14, 1882
Text

[Athletic vs. Cincinnati 6/13/1882] Over two thousand six hundred people paid to enter the grounds, and there were nearly two hundred ladies present. Ad to these the guarantors holding guarantors’ tickets, and the crowd footed up pretty nearly three thousand. This is actual count and no fancy figures set down on paper to look nice. Had it been a St. Louis crowd, the papers over there would have called it ten thousand, for they always multiply the real figure by three.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

interest in the game is in batting; proposal to move the pitcher further back; lively ball

Date Sunday, November 12, 1882
Text

We contend that the great attraction, the one which draws at least nine out of every ten persons, is the batting. Therefore, to develop the batting is a prime consideration. The game as it now stands is entirely that of the “battery”–the pitcher and catcher—and run-getting is reduced to the very lowest consideration. The Item advocates that a livelier ball be used next season and the pitcher's position removed back at least five feet. The live ball and the increased distance of pitchers will all aid the batsmen and make the fielding much livelier than it is at the present time.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

interracial games

Date Saturday, July 29, 1882
Text

The Orion Club of Philadlephia, Pa., whose nine claim to be the colored champions of that city, tested its strength against two prominent professional organizations last week, and met with two decisive defeats. Fully two thousand people, one-third of the colored, witness the game July 19 in Philadelphia, the Philadelphias then winning by 17 to 1. The Orions failed to make a safe hit off Neagle in the entire contest, and their only run was made by Williams, who reached first base on called balls, stole second, and came home on successive outs in the first inning. The Orions visited this city July 20, when their game with the Metropolitans at the Polo Grounds was witnessed by about two thousand people. The Metropolitans won easily by 19 to 6. Williams, who led off with a three-bagger, scored three of the six runs credited to the Orions.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

James Whyte Davis retires

Date Saturday, May 13, 1882
Text

James Whyte Davis of the old Knickerbocker Club of this city has retired from active business pursuits, and on My 5 started on an extended Western tour. He contemplates going to San Francisco, visiting while en route all the principal places. New York Clipper May 13, 1882

J. Whyte Davis, the well-known veteran of the Knickerbocker Club of this city, sailed for Europe July 1 on the steamship Circassia. New York Clipper July 8, 1882

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jimmy Williams drawing a salary as AA secretary

Date Thursday, March 16, 1882
Text

Secretary Williams was voted a handsome salary by the American Association at Philadelphia. “Jimmy” is also Secretary of the Columbus Trotting Association, clerk in the State Auditor’s office, and a right jolly good fellow besides.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jimmy Williams' day job

Date Saturday, January 28, 1882
Text

Secretary Williams of the American Association, is a valuable clerk in the State Auditor’s office at Columbus.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jones to recover money from Boston

Date Thursday, November 9, 1882
Text

Jones received word yesterday from Cleveland that $180 of the Boston Club’s money, garnished at Akron in 1881, was paid into Court and awaits his order, on the judgement against that Club. The mills of the gods grind slowly, &c.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

juvenile sliding

Date Sunday, March 12, 1882
Text

A little boy came home one day last summer with the seat of his pantaloons in streamers, and when his mother appointed an Investigating Committee of one, with power to send for persons and papers, he quashed proceedings by exclaiming: “Why, mother, hain't I got to slide in on bases?

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ladies day in Philadlephia

Date Sunday, June 11, 1882
Text

On and after July 1, every Thursday will be known as “Ladies' Day” at Oakdale Park, when ladies accompanied by gentlemen will be admitted free to the grounds and grand stand. This is a move in the right direction.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ladies' day

Date Saturday, June 3, 1882
Text

The Board of Directors of the Cincinnati Club at their meeting yesterday passed a resolution to introduce s at the Cincinnati grounds during the rest of the season. These days will be every Tuesday, when the Cincinnati club plays a game. In case of postponement or on weeks when no Tuesday game is played, the Thursday following will be . The idea is to have one day of each week so denominated. Upon all these days ladies will be admitted to the grounds and to the grand stand free, provided they are accompanied by male escort. Gentlemen can bring as many ladies as they please, and will be asked to pay admission for themselves alone. Upon these days smoking will be positively prohibited at any place in the grand stand, and every effort will be made to make it pleasant and agreeable to lady patrons. The Club desires to revive the old-time interest which ladies used to take in the splendid sport. The first one of these days will be next Tuesday, upon the occasion of the first game of the Cincinnatis after their return from the East. And each succeeding Tuesday, except July 4, will also be free to ladies attending. It should be borne in mind, however, that in all cases the ladies must be accompanied by a gentleman escort.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

League umpire corps; umpire uniforms

Date Sunday, December 10, 1882
Text

The most important legislation was that regarding umpires. It was decided to appoint four men at a salary of $1,000 a season. The umpires to be under the sole direction of the secretary of the League, and to report at games according to the order of the secretary, so that the clubs will not know who will umpire the game until the umpire reports for duty....

A bad feature of the League legislation, however, is the decree that all umpires shall be uniformed. It is not likely that any competent umpire will consent to be arrayed in costume, as his position is conspicuous enough without any extraneous adornment.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Lew Simmons leaving the theater

Date Sunday, March 12, 1882
Text

Manager Simmons, of the Athletic Club, will severe his connection with the Arch Street Opera company, at the conclusion of their Baltimore engagement, in order to give all his attention to the Athletic club.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

liquor concession revenue

Date Tuesday, March 14, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting] The playing rules were then taken up. Those of the League were read section by section, and nearly all were adopted down to the section regarding umpires. The article which makes it a penalty to sell liquor on the grounds was quickly slashed out. Mr. Von der Ahe said that the bar represented $4,000 or $5,000 to their Club, and Mr. Thorner followed suit. No delegate objected to the expunging of this article, and as it was held to be naught but a private business matter the liquor law was eliminated.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Lon Knight buys a saloon

Date Sunday, December 10, 1882
Text

Lon Knight, of next year's Athletics, has bought a half-interest in a saloon under Wright & Ditson's base-ball emporium, Boston, and takes to the “white apron” like a duck to water.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

making infield fly double plays harder

Date Thursday, December 14, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA convention] In class 4 the words “momentarily held” were defined as making a catch of the ball if it be grasped by the fielder but for an instant. Under this ruling, therefore, a fielder desiring to make a double play must let the ball drop to the ground and catch it on the rebound close to the ground in order to effect it.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

manager and captain the same person

Date Sunday, April 30, 1882
Text

A paragraph is circulating through the papers that Burdock is captain of the Boston team, and Morrill is manager. This is incorrect, as Morrill is both manager and field-captain.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

McLean files his lawsuit against Caylor

Date Saturday, July 15, 1882
Text

On July 4, 1881, John R. McLean purchased one of the four shares composing the capital stock of the Cincinnati Base Ball Club, and subsequently authorized O. P. Caylor, then in his employ, to act as his agent and to represent him in all matters pertaining to the business of the club, and instructed the club so to recognize Caylor. Yesterday McLean filed a petition in the common Pleas Court in which he alleges that Caylor, no longer in his employ, still claims to be the owner of the share; that the club refuses to recognize him (McLean) or admit him to their meetings, and refuses him access to base ball information to which he is entitled; that the club has earned money in excess of expenses, which it is about to divide among the members, and that it will pay the share in question to Caylor unless restrained, in which event he will be without remedy because Caylor has no property from which a judgment can be realized. Upon the prayer of the petition Judge Avery granted a temporary restraining order, enjoining the club and Geo. H. Herancourt, its treasurer, from paying over to Caylor any dividends or moneys appertaining to the share in the name of Caylor, or recognizing him in any way as the owner thereof, the order to take effect upon McLean giving bond in the sum of $1,000, and to continue in force until the final disposition of the cause.

Source Cincinnati Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Metropolitan Club finances

Date Sunday, October 29, 1882
Text

The new League club in New York for 1883 will be the wealthiest professional organization that has ever entered the arena since professional play was inaugurated. They hold funds—cash in the bank—to the amount of $60,000, and this is their available capital for carrying on their work under title of the Metropolitan Exhibition Company of New York.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Metropolitan Exhibition Company stockholders

Date Saturday, July 15, 1882
Text

One of the obstacles to [the Metropolitan Club’s] greater success in 1881 was that the management did not have entire control of the grounds the club played on. To remove this difficulty the existing “Metropolitan Exhibition Company” was organized under the auspices of gentlemen of means who were desirous, not only of fully reviving the professional play in the metropolis on the basis of honest service; but also of encouraging all gentlemanly sports of an athletic nature...

Source Metropolitan
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Morrill's multi-year contract; reserve status

Date Monday, January 30, 1882
Text

[from an interview of John Morrill] “Let me see, you had the longest contract with Boston that any player has ever signed, I believe?”

“I do not know. I signed in 1875 with Boston for five years. I was then playing second base with the Lowell (Mass.) Club, so that with 1882 I have been there six years. I suppose I could do better in another city, but as they insist in reserving me I must stay with them.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Mutrie withdraws from the Metropolitans

Date Sunday, September 24, 1882
Text

James Mutrie, the organizer and manager of the Metropolitans, withdraws from that club at the close of the season. Mutrie is now getting together a club to represent New York in the American Association next season. He is backed by Messrs. Lippincott and Day, the present backers of the Metropolitans, who have a lease on the Polo grounds, where the “Mets” now play. Among the players that are claimed for the new club are Radbourne, Start, Gore and several of the Metropolitan nine. It is likely that the “Mets” will be under the management of Ferguson, with their grounds in Brooklyn.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

NL claimed to be fining players for errors

Date Sunday, August 6, 1882
Text

It being so difficult for some of the League clubs to pay salaries, even after cutting them nearly on-half by fines, it has been decided to fine every player for errors made in games. This ought to help the bankrupt treasuries, for, as a rule, the players will be owing the clubs at the end of the season. If this arbitrary robbery continues, League clubs will not be able to hold their players, even with cable chains, next year.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

NL-AA conflict and expelled players

Date Sunday, May 7, 1882
Text

The Buffalo game arranged for next Monday (to-morrow week_ may have be to declared off on account of the Troy complication. Troy is now playing with the Detroits, and the Buffalos have played against the club. If Troy is expelled by the Athletics, the under the Constitution of the American Association the Cincinnati Club can not play the Buffalos or any other club that plays against the Detroits with Troy in the nine. As yet the Cincinnati Club have received no official notice of Troy’s expulsion, and until they do there can be no objection to the Cincinnatis playing the Buffalos in this city. Cincinnati Commercial May 7, 1882

The Cincinnati Club yesterday received official notice from Secretary Williams that the Philadelphia Athletics had expelled John Troy for breach of contract. The club at once telegraphed to Manager O’Rourke, of the Buffalo Club that if his team played against the Detroits with Troy in the Detroit team they would be prevented by the American Constitution from playing in Cincinnati next Monday. Cincinnati Commercial May 12, 1882

The expulsion of Troy by the Athletics will, probably, cut off the Detroit Club from any games in New York this season. If the Metropolitan or Atlantics should play against the Detroit Club they could not play against the American or American Alliance Clubs. They have games arranged with Cincinnati, Pittsburg, Philadelphia, St. Louis and other American clubs, and it is not likely they will allow the Detroit folly to deprive them of these games. Cincinnati Commercial May 12, 1882

Manager Jim O’Rourke wrote to Browning, of the Louisvilles, and tried to get him to desert his club and come to Buffalo. Browning took the letter directly to the President of the Louisville Club and turned it over to him, although the wily Jim had cautioned him to keep mum. O’Rourke offered as an inducement “advance money.” He probably didn’t know that Browning’s mother could buy him and the whole Buffalo Club without hurting her bank account. It is about time that such men as Soden, of Boston; O’Rourke, of Buffalo’ and Banesoff, of Detroit, were shown up as the kind of men they are. The Association Club players get their money regularly, and that’s more than League players can say. Cincinnati Commercial May 12, 1882

Secretary Williams, of the American Association, has by suggestion, written to the Metropolitans, of New York, and Atlantics, of Brooklyn, notifying them of the expulsion of John Troy, by the Athletics, for breach of contract and also that he has been employed by the Detroit Club. Mr. Williams (officially) warns these clubs, that if they play with the Detroits all games arranged between them and Association clubs must, under the Association Constitution, be declared off. The Metropolitans have dates arranged with the Cincinnatis, the Pittsburgs, and nearly every Association Club. It is probable that Detroit will thus be debarred from playing in New York. If the Metropolitans do not play against the Detroits they can play any other League club, and still play their American club games. Cincinnati Commercial May 13, 1882

dueling official scores

The following paragraph appeared in a recent issue of the Dispatch: “Some talk was occasioned yesterday among lovers of the game by the difference between the Dispatch Allegheny score and that printed in some of the other city papers. The score printed in this paper was the official record of the game which will be sued in making up the playing averages. All bets on home runs, errors and other features of the game will be governed by the score printed in the Dispatch.”

The object of our contemporary is to cast discredit upon the scores published in this paper, as it is the only one, besides the Dispatch that obtains the full scores specially by telegraph of games in which the Allegheny club is a contestant. H. D. McKnight, President of the Alleghenys, is authority for t he statement that the scores published in this paper are official, and to emphasize his statement the following was received last night in reply to a question from F. H. Wright, official scorer of the Cincinnati club: “Your scores are official.” Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette May 9, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no reporters stand on the Baltimore grounds

Date Wednesday, May 10, 1882
Text

The arrangements for the accommodation of reporters [at Newington Park] are very slight. The stand formerly on the grounds for their use has disappeared, and the reporters have at present no facilities for writing. This should be remedied at once.

Source Baltimore American
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

O'Rourke lawsuit against the Bostons

Date Saturday, December 2, 1882
Text

Case No. 334 on the Superior court list at Boston, Friday, Nov. 24, was the long-pending case of John O’Rourke vs. the Boston Baseball Association. O’Rourke sued for $185, the amount of salary claimed to be due for services rendered during November, 1880, and the jury found for him in the sum of $205.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

open betting on the Polo Grounds; criticism of the ground

Date Sunday, May 7, 1882
Text

[Athletic vs. Metropolitan 5/1/1882] The ground of the Metropolitan club is far inferior to those of the Athletic and Philadelphia clubs of this city. Another bad feature that Manager Mutrie should look after is the open betting on the grand stand and on the ground, vividly recalling the days of the Union and Capitoline grounds in Brooklyn. There is nothing, as has been demonstrated time and again, that will kill off base ball quicker than pool-selling and open betting. In this respect the management of the home clubs have clean skirts and as a result we see at every game a liberal attendance of ladies.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

open mocking of Chadwick

Date Sunday, May 7, 1882
Text

Henry Chadwick, better known as “Old Fossil” Chadwick, is the reputed base ball editor of the Clipper, and like many others who linger on this terrestrial globe, has outlived his usefulness, and is not able to keep up with the progress of the times. The result is that the Clipper has become a laughing stock as a base ball paper, and is no longer relied upon as an authority. Chadwick has surrounded himself with mean and petty jealousies, and vents his spite on all occasions in a very childish manner, and often, in utter disregard of all truths and facts.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

opposition to Horace Phillips

Date Sunday, October 22, 1882
Text

An evening paper quotes from a private letter from Joe Simmons to the effect that President Pank, of the Louisville Club, will oppose the admission of the Columbus Base-ball Club to the American Association in case Horace B. Phillips appear as manager. Mr. Phillips has been selected by the Board of Directors, and is now in the East engaging players. There is an element here which failed to defeat the organization of the company and the raising of the stock, and they now propose to carry the fight to the meeting of the association, which will convene in this city [Columbus] on Monday. It is not believed here that the Association will allow Simmons and Pank to bring their personal grievances before the body.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Oscar Wilde attends a game

Date Saturday, April 29, 1882
Text

Oscar Wilde witnessed the game between the Clevelands and Alleghenys on Thursday at Pittsburg. He admired the game very much, but the uniforms were not quite to his aesthetic taste.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Outfield fence advertising

Date Saturday, April 1, 1882
Text

Bids were received [by the Cincinnati Club] from Manly, the clothier, and the Golden Eagle Clothing Store, to take the whole fence for advertising purposes. As the amounts were so near alike it was decided to deputize one of the Directors to call upon the two firms and further arrange the matter.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

overhand delivery 2

Date Friday, May 12, 1882
Text

[St. Louis vs. Allegheny 5/11/1882] The delivery of Schappart raised a howl at the very commencement. He started in at throwing just such an over-hand ball as Dailey, of the Buffalos, does. His delivery of some of them was as high as his head. Of course this was against the rules. The umpire called several foul balks on him, which forced him to lower his arm so that when the playing ceased he was doing pretty well.

Source Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

overtures from the League

Date Sunday, June 18, 1882
Text

For a week or two past the League clubs have been trying to patch up the difficulties between the League and Association, occasioned by the Detroits insisting on playing Troy, who had broken his contract with the Athletics. The Association took a determined stand in the matter, and all dates with League and League Alliance clubs were declared off. Finding that this course was working disastrously to the League and League Alliance clubs, depriving them of thousands of dollars, the League has suddenly developed a vein of stricken conscience and wants to shake hands over the chasm. Nearly all of the League clubs have united in a request to the Athletic club to recall Troy's expulsion, and in that event the Detroits will release him; and as a further peace offering all the League clubs ill consent to play with the Athletics after September 30. this is entirely too kind. The Athletics are asked to condone an offense that the League has time and time again declared unpardonable, and for this action the League will repay them by playing with them after the season is over. The Athletics very properly refuse to accede to this. They have all the games they can play from now until the close of the season, and games in which the lions share of the receipts go into their own cash boxes and not into the treasuries of starving League clubs. What the American Association demands is that the Detroits unconditionally drop Troy, who has forfeited all recognition as a ball player. It is this or nothing, gentlemen.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

PEDs

Date Wednesday, September 6, 1882
Text

[an advertisement] THE BOSTONS WILL WIN. At last the mystery is cleared up! Everybody in two worlds knows that the Chicago Base Ball Club has carried the championship pennant for three years. It has puzzled the brilliant Bostons to account for the change. They were and are unwilling to admit that their loss of the bauble was due to superior playing by the Chicagos, and they were right in refusing to subscribe to that solution of the puzzle. Before the Bostons left Detroit they were given a hint of the cause of Chicago’s greatness on the diamond field. It is not batting; it is not base running; it is not fielding; it is not partial umpiring. In fact, none of the supposed causes have ever been at work in the case. Anson, during a recent visit to Detroit, dropped a hint to an old base ball friend named Joe Hull, and Joe, who believes in the Bostons, communicated the secret to Morrill, the natty captain of the latter nine. It is not likely that he will be able to avail himself of the disclose so as to make it serviceable this season, for the Chicagos have had too long a start in the race; but there is no doubt that with wise use of the Secret, which is now no longer a secret, Boston will next year once more carry home the banner of victory. Wouldst know why the Chicagos are the champion club of the league? No man belonging to it ever goes upon the field without having first consulted a bottle of Sanford’s Ginger.

Source Cincinnati Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

parti-colored uniforms adopted only by Cincinnati

Date Tuesday, March 14, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting of 3/13/1882] An effort was made to introduce the parti-colored uniform of the League, but as several of the clubs had already contracted for uniforms, the plan was not adopted as a whole. The Cincinnati Club, however, has given orders for these uniforms, and will use them during the coming season.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Permanent outfield foul lines

Date Monday, March 6, 1882
Text

Preparations for the season at the Polo Ground have already been begun. In order to get the new diamond in perfect condition for the summer it is deemed advisable to open the season on the old diamond, which was laid out in 1880, when the first professional game of baseball was played in this city. The new diamond is to be sodded carefully with fine rich sward, and the path around the bases is to be carefully cut and kept in perfect order. Zinc lines will be sunk into the ground from first and third bases, respectively to the foul ball posts, forming the foul line in the outfield.

Source New York Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Phillips managing the St. Louis club

Date Saturday, September 2, 1882
Text

Phillips has been engaging the team to represent St. Louis for 1883, and from private information gained he has made most excellent selections. He also leaves this week for Memphis, New Orleans, Galveston and other Southern cities, to arrange exhibition games south between the St. Louis and Athletic clubs. The St. Louis will take their team for 1883, and it is expected that we will do the same. After he returns from the South Phillips will at once proceed to Indianapolis to form an Association club there.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitcher to get an assist on foul outs

Date Thursday, March 16, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting] The concession to the pitcher of an assist off every foul ball chance offered to the catcher for a put out is something which should have been given to the pitcher long ago. It is certainly as much credit to the pitcher to put a man out on a foul as on a strike out.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitchers' signals to the catcher

Date Saturday, October 7, 1882
Text

[Providence vs. Metropolitan 9/27/1882] ...the play strikingly illustrated the necessity for each pitcher having his own catcher. Ward has his own special code of signals, by which he imparts to his catcher the kind of ball he is going to send in, and these he has made Nava familiar with. Radbourn also has his private code–as every strategic pitcher should have–and with these Gilligan is familiar. In this match Radbourn was put in to pitch, and owing to Nava’s five passed balls, four runs were scored on three base-hits...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitching rotation 2

Date Sunday, February 5, 1882
Text

[discussing the Cleveland Club] The plan of alternating the pitchers is more favorably regarded now than ever before, and, in all probability, Bradley will be given as much to do as McCormick.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitching rotation 3

Date Saturday, April 29, 1882
Text

A feature of this season’s campaign is the carrying out of the rule of alternating the club “batteries,” a rule which has thus far resulted very satisfactorily indeed, first to one club and then to another. It game the Mets a victory over the Providence team, after a signal defeat, and on Saturday, April 22, it gave the Troys a signal victory on the occasion of the second game with the Mets. The change made by the Troys was from Keefe and Holbert to Welch and Ewing; while that made by the Mets was from Lynch and Clapp to Doyle and Reipschalger.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

placement of the umpire; mask

Date Sunday, October 8, 1882
Text

[Chicago vs. Metropolitan 10/2/1882] John Kelly occupied the umpire’s position for the first time here in weeks, and he gave the spectators a sample of first-class umpiring. John wore a mask while standing up close behind the bat, and it is the only way in which the ball can be carefully watched. Without one umpires cannot help shrinking back from the line of sight to avoid the ball, and hence comes their errors in calling strikes.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

plans for the Athletics' grounds

Date Saturday, February 18, 1882
Text

The ground at Oakdale Park will be sodded and leveled, and, with the addition of a new fence and a new grand stand, it will be one of the best in the country. The contract for the grant stand has been awarded. It is to be two hundred feet long, seating fifteen hundred people, and will be divided into three sections. The section for season ticket holders will have cane-seated chairs, and another section will be reserved for ladies and gentlemen accompanying them. The reporters’ stand will be placed on top of the pavilion, and will seat twenty reporters. The Reading Railroad Company will build a station at the entrance to the ground, and will run special trains on the days of match games. The Athletics’ have a nicely fitted up club-room at 135 North Eighth street, where ball-players visiting Philadelphia will receive a cordial welcome. Cincinnati Commercial February 18, 1882

Those who visited the Oakdale Park Grounds, in 1881, would scarcely recognize the place now, so greatly has Manager Simmons and his aids changed the appearance of things there.

In place of the meager accommodations of last season, there is now a room grand-stand of a seating capacity for over 2,000 people. This structure is divided in three parts–the main stand, which directly faces the home plate, and east and west wings, running at angles from the main-stand. The main-stand will be seated with chairs, and will be devoted to holders of season tickets and ladies. On the top of the main-stand is the reporter’s pavilion, a fine structure, which will hold twenty persons, and will be used only by reporters. To the left of this is a private box, erected by Stephen Flanagan, Esq., for the use of himself and family. On the right and left of the field open seats have been erected capable of seating 2,000 persons. The ground has been enlarged 100 feet, the home plate being back of where the old grand-stand used to be. The infield has been plowed, re-sodded and rolled, and is now as level as a parlor floor. The outfield has been filled in and graded, and in its entirely is one of the handsomest grounds in the country. Of course there will be considerable interest taken in the contests between the Athletic team and the college and other teams which they are already engaged to play with; but the main interest will center in the grand matches for the local championship, Philadelphia vs. Athletic. A new fence is being erected, which, with the other improvements, will be completed this week. The managers of the Athletic Club have been liberal in their expenditures, and the patrons of the National game will find that everything possible has been done to secure their comfort and convenience. ... The Reading Railroad Company will erect a station at Oakdale Park, and will run special trains to the ground on days of games. New York Clipper April 1, 1882

New York Clipper April 1, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

plans for the Phillies grounds; folding iron seats; admission prices; private boxes

Date Sunday, February 5, 1882
Text

The stand will be divided into three portions. The centre portion (reserved) will be furnished with six hundred iron folding-chairs with perforated board seats. In the rear, will be seven private boxes seating eight persons each. A large stairway back of the stand will lead to a wide platform to which entrance can be had to the entire stand. The price of seats in reserved coupon section will be twenty-five cents extra. The right arm will seat seven hundred and sixty, and the left arm nine hundred and eighty persons. These seats will cost but fifteen cents extra. This gives a seating capacity in the stand for twenty-three hundred and ninety-six persons. On the roof, directly over the reserved seats, will be placed a reporters' box, to which none but reporters and visiting club officials will be admitted. Along the Columbia avenue side of the grounds will be first-class open seats—having foot rests—for fourteen hundred and fifty persons. Another section, seating the same number, will be placed on the Twenty-fourth street side. The brick building formerly used as a saloon will be repaired and used for club and dressing rooms, with a private office attached for business purposes. In this a telephone will be connected with Reach's Eighth street store, and the result of each inning will be send down as soon as played. A new fence, nine feet high, will be placed around the grounds, to make the change complete. The price of season tickets has been placed at twenty-five dollars, which includes admission to grounds and a numbered reserved chair in the Grand Stand, to all exhibitions held on the grounds between April 1, 1882, and March 31, 1883. most of these tickets have been subscribed for, but a few may be ordered on application to Treasurer Reach. They will be delivered about April 1st, and the season is expected to open about April 10th. The Philadelphia Item February 5, 1882

The changes effected involve the erection of a substantial fence, and also of a grand-stand and four rows of free seats. The main stand has patent perforated numbered folding-chairs. In the rear of these chairs are several handsome private boxes, capable of holding four to eight persons. The wings will be seated with regular chairs, the entire stand accommodating fully 1,500 persons. Along the left and right field fences, seats with foot-rests will be provided sufficient for 2,000 people. The ground has been plowed up, sodded and rolled, and is in splendid condition for ball-playing. Tracks for footracing, bicycling, etc., have been prepared, and the ground is so arranged that almost every known field sport can be indulged in upon it. At the sides of the grand-stand, dressing-rooms for the players and offices for the managers have been erected. On top of the grand-stand a handsome reporters’ stand has been placed. New York Clipper April 1, 1882

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

players on an 'outbreak'

Date Sunday, September 3, 1882
Text

It is reported that, at the next meeting of the League, the Worcester management will report an “outbreak” in which Goldsmith and Williamson of the Chicagos participated last Wednesday night. It appears that on the night in question the two players mentioned went to a house of ill-fame in the outskirts of Worcester, where Goldsmith got drunk and knocked down two or three fellows, not of his party, who came to the house in a hack. Williamson was not drunk, but did not turn up for duty until the next afternoon. Several of the Chicagoes had a similar “racket” last year, but it was hushed up. In the affair of last Wednesday night Hayes of the Worcester team was also mixed up, though he did not drink.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

players turning down fancy offers from AA clubs

Date Sunday, September 24, 1882
Text

Several of the players who were considering flattering offers from the American association clubs have wisely come to the conclusion that “all is not gold that glitters,” and consequently there is a coldness in the negotiations pending. According to good authority, some of the clubs of that association are offering such large salaries (on paper) that, with other expenses, will surely swamp the club financially, with the price of admission at 25 cents. The veterans of the league see this, and are therefore becoming shy of the tempting offers.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

playing Devlin

Date Saturday, May 20, 1882
Text

The Princeton College club recently played the Trenton Club, for which Devlin is pitcher, and batted him for twenty-two runs. Their playing the Trentons was very injudicious, for they can not now play either a League or an American Association Club, nor yet an American Alliance or League Alliance Club. The Yales and Harvards subsequently played against Princeton, and an effort is being made to show that they, too, are outlawed by the act. This will fail, however, as the ostracism goes only two steps–first, against the club employing an expelled player, and secondly, against any club playing with any such club employing an expelled player.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

playing for a base on balls

Date Friday, September 22, 1882
Text

...the batter who plays for his club will never strike at the fifth or sixth ball when he had no strikes called, nor yet at the sixth with one strike called. His chances in either case for a base on balls is far better than it is in any other way.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

premature signing a cause for expulsion

Date Sunday, December 10, 1882
Text

[reporting on the NL meeting] The League...adopted a rule rendering liable to expulsion any player under contract with a League club who shall, without the consent of such club, agree to enter the service of another club at the expiration of the contract.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Princeton under the NL ban?

Date Saturday, May 20, 1882
Text

A letter has been written to Secretary Young, of the League, asking information in regard to the status of college teams that may play the Princeton nine. The Princeton nine having played the Trentons, who have Devlin and Crowley in their team, have debarred themselves from further play with League professional teams. It is stated that the Metropolitans cannot play with Yale or Harvard after they have played Princeton, and it is this point that the Secretary is called upon to decide., quoting the New York World

Source Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

professional umpire staff

Date Sunday, July 2, 1882
Text

This morning the Directors of the American Association will hold a special meeting at the Gibson House to devise some solution to the at present very disagreeable Umpire difficulty. It appears to be getting worse, or else the teams are playing more than ever the baby act. Undoubtedly there is an excuse for the cry occasionally, but it is certainly in bad taste for visiting teams to be howling all the time about the deals they receive from Umpires. The idea that appears to satisfy all the Clubs is to have three competent men chosen as official Umpires; they to be paid a good salary, and they alone to umpire American contests. This is undoubtedly the best plan for the present. There will be some trouble in selecting the three men, as every nine will want its city represented. There should be an additional proviso that no local Umpire should officiate for a local nine. This will avoid all tendencies to raise any claim of being robbed. Cincinnati Enquirer July 2, 1882

The new rule of the American Association in relation to umpires goes into effect to-day and Secretary Williams has officially appointed the following gentlemen: Joseph Simmons, Rochester, N.Y.; Michael Walsh, Louisville; Thomas Carey, Baltimore; George H. Bradley, better known as “Fog-horn Bradley,” Cleveland; John Kelly, New York, and Robert Ross, of Pittsburg. These gentlemen are considered as among the best umpires in the country, and as the clubs have nothing to do with their selection base ball matches hereafter will be more impartially conducted. Secretary Williams furnishes the umpire for each series of games. The umpire travels with the visiting club, which pays his expenses, but his salary is paid by the association as a body. Philadelphia Times July 6, 1882

A special meeting of the American Base Ball Association was held in Cincinnati on the 2d. The session was protracted until late in the evening. President McKnight, of Pittsburg; Van Rank, of Louisville, Williams, of Columbus; Kramer, of Cincinnati; Simmons, of Philadelphia; and Von der Ahe, of St. Louis, were present. The question of a system of umpiring was discussed at great length and resulted in a decision to employ three official umpires, who are to be selected and employed at a fixed salary by the Association and to travel with the clubs. The names of those appointed as umpire will be announced as soon as their acceptances are received. It is believed that this arranged will be well received. The Philadelphia Item July 9, 1882

[from a letter from Jimmy Williams to the newly appointed umpires] Your compensation...is $75 per month and all necessary hotel and traveling expenses. The salary will be paid by me on or before the fifth day of each month. The expenses will be paid by the Club with which you are traveling. You are required to travel on same trains, stop at same hotels and otherwise conform to the wishes of the visiting clubs. Cincinnati Enquirer July 9, 1882

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

proposal to abolish the foul bound out

Date Sunday, November 12, 1882
Text

The rule putting a man out on a foul ball is ridiculous and should be abolished, as well as the rule that puts a runner out for not running back to his base on a foul ball. The rule putting a player out on a foul bound should also be done away with, and the game made that of a fly game entirely. These are the principal objections made to the rules now in force.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

proposals for changes to the scoring rules

Date Sunday, November 12, 1882
Text

In the matter of scoring, some changes are also demanded. As the rules now stand every scorer is left to his own judgment, and it is very seldom that two of them ever agree. The catcher should be given an error for every passed ball, in addition to being charged with passed balls. Batsmen reaching base on called balls should be credited with base hits, which go against the pitcher and make him more careful in his delivery. In addition to having a base hit charged against him in a case like this, he should also be charged with an error. We would also suggest that the pitcher be charged with an error on a wild pitch. In any light we view a passed ball or a wild pitch, they are errors, and errors often of the most damaging nature, and there is no reason why they should not be scored as such. As the rules now stand they are too lenient to the pitcher and catcher.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

proposed unbalanced schedule, regional championships

Date Friday, December 15, 1882
Text

The number of games has been increased from 84 to 98. I suggested to Mr. Mills the number of games should be increased and in this way–The West & East to play the usual series of 12 games with each other–total 48 games; but the East to East and West to West to play a series of 16 games–total 48, grand total 96 games. The series of sixteen games in each section to decide the local championship, and the grand total to settle the championship of the U.S. He was the only one I talked to in regard to this change suggested before it was brought up. He said the idea was good, but he thought having two local championship contests would cheapen the grand championship contest, and that I had better not propose it. I said I would like to have it discussed, so when the rule in regard to the number of games to be played was read, Mr. Mills stated what I had proposed, and it was met with favor right away, and resulted in the number of games being made 14, and would have been 16 could we have played them. [from a letter by Harry Wright writing from Providence to Frederick Long dated December 15, 1882]

Source From a letter by Harry Wright writing from Providence to Frederick Long
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

proposed uniforms for umpires

Date Sunday, December 17, 1882
Text

The umpire should also be uniformed and never permitted to go upon the field in the presence of a large crowd and make a spectacle of himself with a sort of ward summer dress, such as some of last season's collection wore. Cincinnati Commercial Tribune December 17, 1882

As to the uniforming of an umpire, no one ever though of putting on them a regular base ball uniform. But they should be furnished with a genteel suit of some agreed upon style and be required to wear it on all occasions while umpiring; should not be permitted to take off their coats and roll up their sleeves like a prize fighter, as was done in several instances last year. If we are to be “gentlemen” to umpire games this year let the people not be made to think they are a class who are not accustomed to wear a coat in company. Cincinnati Commercial Gazette January 7, 1883

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Providence threatens to leave the League; Pittsburg ready to sign its players

Date Sunday, January 15, 1882
Text

It may not be known, but it is a fact, nevertheless, that at the time the Providence Club were threatening to withdraw from the League, if Gross was not restored to the white list, the Pittsburg Club, had Al. Pratt quartered in Providence, watching results. If the threat had been fulfilled, and the Providence Club withdrawn, Pratt would have signed Ward, Hines, Farrell, Start and York within an hour after the news arrived.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Purcell cuts the ball

Date Tuesday, July 4, 1882
Text

The Buffalo Club last night fined Purcell $100 for cutting a ball while on the field. This is about the most idiotic piece of management we have heard of in many a day, and accounts in a measure for the wondrous success of that team of late. Too much brains has always been the trouble at buffalo, and this last display is decidedly rich. There is not a player in the country who would not do the same thing, provided he saw that it would help the pitcher of his nine. That such a highly unjust fine should be imposed on one who always plays for the best interest of his nine is indeed perfect folly. It tends so well to urge the boys to do the best they can. It is not a new nine they want in Buffalo, but a new Board of Directors. They had now better begin to fine the men for batting at a ball when a base-runner starts for first, the purpose being to unnerve the catcher. That is a dirty trick, while cutting a ball is nothing. It is quickly discovered, hurts nobody, and merely means a new ball. The Buffalo Club is out to be rich at the end of the season. Cincinnati Enquirer July 4, 1882 [N.B. The purpose in cutting the ball was to force its being replaced.]

Athletics salaries, finances

The salary list of the Athletic nine this season is less than $8,000. The managers propose to double this next season in order to secure a first-class nine. Philadelphia Times July 9, 1882

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

quality control problems with balls

Date Sunday, December 17, 1882
Text

Last season there was considerable trouble with the use of the ball. Mahn & Col, who had the contract, sent out to the clubs balls put up separately in paper boxes and sealed. These boxes were broken open and the ball taken out by the umpire just as the game began. But the balls were found to vary greatly in weight and texture. Some immediately got soft and mushy, while the cover would become baggy, so much so that you could pinch up the leather as you would pinch up the skin on a dog's neck. Then, too, some of the balls were extremely light and around many the cover was as rotten as paper. The Association this year wisely allows the Secretary to do the boxing and scaling. The manufacturer will be required to send the balls by the quantity to Secretary Williams who will carefully examine each one as to weight, size, texture and quality. Those that he finds perfect in all the requirements he will box and seal with his seal. The rest he will reject and return to the maker. In this way none but perfect balls will go out to the clubs, for every club must get its balls from Secretary Williams, and none will be official unless it comes to the umpire's hands duly boxed and sealed by the Secretary.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

quality control problems with the Mahn ball

Date Wednesday, June 21, 1882
Text

On account of the large number of balls that have been used, there having been two used almost every day for some time, the Cincinnati people have become dissatisfied, and an attempt will be made to have the association adopt the league ball, as for championship games. The one used now becomes soft very soon, bursts easily, and batted out of shape so that it cannot be handled well by the fielders or pitcher. Cincinnati Gazette June 21, 1882

The Cincinnatis are greatly dissatisfied with the present ball. They say that it gets soft and irregular in shape early in the contest, and rips very easily. Scarcely a day goes by but what a new ball is needed before the contest is half through with. Manager Snyder would like very much to have the Spalding ball adopted in place of the Mahn. Cincinnati Enquirer June 21, 1882

a revolver case within the AA/Alliance

A letter was received here yesterday morning to the effect that Secretary Williams had received notice from the Albert Merritt Club of Camden, New Jersey–an Association Alliance club by the way–that they had expelled Phillip Powers for breach of contract. They claim in their letter to Williams, that they had negotiated with Power previous to the Cincinnati Club’s correspondence with him, and that he had agreed to play with them–aye, further, that he had accepted advance money, for which they hold his receipt. Secretary Williams, after examining the case thoroughly on the statement alone of the Merritt Club, refused to issue official notice of the expulsion, on the ground that the Merritt Club had transcended its power, and had no right, under the American Constitution, to expel Powers. That document says that any club may have the right to expel one of its players for breach of contract, but as Powers was never under contract with them they have no power over him. If he acted in bad faith them then the most they could do would be to have him black listed at the annual meeting next winter. In this substance Secretary Williams wrote to President McKnight, including the Merritt Club’s complaint.

But that is only one side of the story. The Cincinnati Club yesterday called Mr. Powers before them, and acquainted him with the Merritts’ complain. As they expected from him, he explained everything to their satisfaction, namely: Over a week ago–yes, two weeks ago–the Merritts telegraphed to him that they would give him $150 a month to catch for them, and asked for an answer. Powers replied that he would come if he could get his release, and he thought he could. Immediately came a reply that they had telegraphed $25 to him to pay expenses East and that he should come at once. He asked the Tecumsehs for his release and a meeting was called to consider it. Most of the directors were Aldermen of London, and the day preceding the night when the meeting was called the Chancellor of the city was discovered to be a default and he killed himself. The Aldermen held a special meeting that evening and the club meeting was postponed. Meanwhile the telegraph officials sent him word to call and get the money or it would be sent back, as the order held good for only two days. Powers accordingly called, receipted for and received the $25, holding it till he saw what would be the result of the Tecumseh Club’s deliberation. Mark, it, he never asked for this money, b ut it was sent without his request or consent. When the Tecumseh Club Board of Directors did meet they concluded they must have $200 for his release. Powers then telegraphed to the Merritts that they must pay $200 to the Tecumsehs or he could not come. To this they made no answer. Then came a telegram from the Cincinnatis offering $125 a month. He replied immediately, saying he would come if the cincinnati club would buy his release for $200. The Cincinnati Club then replied: “We will pay no bonus, but will give you $135 per month.” The reply came immediately, “Will not break my contract for $200 a month.” Does that seem to be the sentiment of a dishonest man? The Cincinnati Club, then by advice of Manager Snyder, gave over, and telegraphed the $200 to the Tecumseh Club, who game him his release, and he came here at once for $125 a month. If he had wanted to be dishonest, or had been a tricky man, he could have let the Cincinnatis buy him off and then have gone to Camden, where he would have gotten $25 a month more. Mr. Powers has all of the Camden Club telegrams to him and he has written to London for copies of his messages to them. With these he can substantiate his story. Secretary Williams acted wisely when he refused to consummate the folly of the foolish Merritt Club.

The Cincinnati Club go still further, and insist that President McKnight has no authority delegated him in the Constitution to sit in judgment in this case, for all disputes between clubs or clubs and players, as well as all the business of the Association, must under the Constitution, be adjudicated by the Board of Directors. But with Powers’ statement and proofs of his conduct in the premises, the case will probably drop without any further action. Cincinnati Commercial June 22, 1882

Source Cincinnati Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

quick pitching

Date Saturday, July 29, 1882
Text

Lynch–The strategic pitcher of the Metropolitan team has this season presented quite a model for young pitchers to copy in his wonderfully quick returns of straight balls to the catcher when he finds a batsman out of proper form for batting. He can outwit a batsman in this way more successfully than any pitcher that has appeared on the Polo Ground diamond.

Source Metropolitan
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reconstructing the inning to determine earned runs

Date Thursday, September 14, 1882
Text

[Louisville vs. Cincinnati 9/13/1882] After two were out in the seventh, McPhee made a two-base hit to left and on a wild pitch came home. Macculler’s daisy cutter to right earned the run, the latter got around to third on two passed balls, but White, who had five balls called and should have tried to get a base on balls, struck at the sixth ball and made an easy out to Mullane.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rejecting official scoring rules

Date Saturday, April 15, 1882
Text

[from answers to correspondents] Why doesn’t The Clipper in its baseball scores observe Rule 70 Sec 6, second paragraph of the Playing Rules, which says that the pitcher should be credited with an assist when a man on the opposite side strikes out? ... The Clipper has its own scoring rules, and abides by them. To give the pitcher credit for fielding assistance in case of outs on strikes is to render it impossible to obtain data for judging his skill as a fielder in his position. Assistance on strikes belongs entirely to the pitching, and is shown by the figures of “struck out” given in The clipper scores. The League rules govern League clubs, and nothing else, as far as scoring is concerned.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

return to traditional uniforms

Date Sunday, December 10, 1882
Text

[reporting on the NL meeting] ...a return to the old distinguished colors in the uniforms of the older clubs was agreed upon.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

returning to the base on a run on a foul ball

Date Saturday, December 23, 1882
Text

[reporting on the new AA rules] In Section 11 of Rule 51 the rule now reads as follows: “If, when the ball from a foul hit has struck the ground once before being caught or the batsman has made a foul strike, the base-runner shall return to the base he left when the ball was so struck, without his being put out, provided he do so on the run.”

This does away with the rule in vogue in the American arena of the past season, which admitted of playing running bases on foul-bound hits, being put out in returning simply by the ball being held by the pitcher, whether in his position or otherwise, a rule which was the death to base-running. In reference to the running back on foul balls, it was decided that it was optional with the runner to run back or walk back, but that if he ran back he was exempt from being put out, while if he did not he was liable to be put out by being touched while off a base, as in the case of running any base. The umpire, however, cannot decide him out for not running back, except he be touched while off a base. This is the League as well as the American definition now. The object of the rule is to prevent delay. If the ball be hit a long distance foul, the base-runner occasions no delay by walking back; but if it be a short hit he will have to run to escape being put out by being touched.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rival New York organizations applying to the AA

Date Sunday, October 1, 1882
Text

Two rival professional teams are endeavoring to be admitted as the representatives of New York in the American Association. Each claims to have strong backing. James Mutrie is the manager of one, and James Jackson is said to be at the head of the other team.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rowdyism at the Cincinnati ground

Date Tuesday, April 18, 1882
Text

[a letter to the editor 4/17] Unless some one in authority introduces better discipline at the base ball games than was observed to-day, that noble game will be shunned by decent people in Cincinnati. The brawling profanity which accompanied the loud betting of a party of half drunken men, who had conspicuous seats in the grand stand, is not the kind of entertainment people pay for or want when they go to see a game of base ball.

Source Cincinnati Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rumored skullduggery in Day/Mutrie getting two franchises; railroad access to the Polo grounds

Date Sunday, December 17, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA convention] There was some wild talk in New York last Tuesday night of refusing admission to the New York Club because it was suspected that the same backers were running both New York clubs. That suspicion is undoubtedly correct. But if the Association had made the big mistake of refusing admission to the New York Club on this account the damage done to the other clubs would have been almost irretrievable. The Association can not afford to drop New York out of its circuit. The Club will draw second to no club but the champions. There is plenty of room in New York for the two clubs and the American club has the advantage, because it can charge cheap admission if it sees fit. Cincinnati Commercial December 17, 1882

It is a well known fact that the [Metropolitan] company argued long and earnestly to convince themselves into which camp [NL or AA] they should go. The bent was for the League camp, as that was a little the more aristocratic. But the gentlemen composing the company were sharp enough to see that if they were absorbed by the League there would be an opening for an American Association Club; also that such a club, playing to popular prices, and under the popular rules of the new corporation, would be likely to attract the popular favor. In this dilemma the fend Italian hand of Jimmie Mutrie makes its appearance. He resigns(?) the management of the Metroplitans. Several of the head men of the Exhibition Company also resign(?) and organize an opposition(?) club to be known as the New York Club, and to be a member of the American Association. This club applied and was admitted to the membership they sought.

At the recent New York meeting it was hinted that such a pooling of New York interests had been made, and there was no out and out denial from either club. On the contrary, they asked, What if it be so? That was a poser that no one felt called upon to wrestle with, and the situation was tacitly settled. It was wisely admitted on all hands that in New York City there is plenty of room for two professional clubs, just as there is plenty of room and patronage for twenty-five theaters. It is not the question of two clubs, but rather of the two teams being first class. Both teams engaged are good ones. Thought it is here predicted that the League team, which is a very expensive one, will be apt to disappoint the public. Like all high priced articles it will be expected to show up proportionally superior to its cheaper kind. This it will not do. There are several teams, particularly the Chicago, Cleveland, and Providence teams, which promise to knock the concept out of the $20,000 nine. About the time this happens the Exhibition Company will find that their American Association team, with Mutrie's level head behind it, and popular prices to back it, will be the favorite.

Now comes a rumor that, though unexpected, seems to smack of the truth. It is that the present Polo grounds, which are very large, are to be divided into two grounds, and occupied respectively by the two teams. Those who recollect Mutrie's reticence at the Columbus meeting as to the location of grounds for the new club, and recall his guarded words thereon, will not be surprised to hear that this rumor is correct. Mr. Mutrie said the new ground had been chosen, but his club didn't desire to disclose their location for good reasons. They would, however, be as large as the League Club's grounds, and as well fitted up. When asked whether they were nearer to or further from the down town district, he replied that they were a little nearer, being more convenient to the elevated railroad.

The rumor is that the west half will be occupied by the American Club and the east half by the League club. The latter contains the present diamond and seats of the Metropolitan Club, while the former division contains the club-house. The west half is much nearer the Sixth Avenue Elevated Railroad station, and visitors to the grounds of either club would have to pass the American grounds to reach the League grounds, unless the Third avenue road erects a station opposite the Polo grounds, which they refused to do last year. Cincinnati Commercial Gazette January 7, 1883

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rumors of a truce between the NL and AA

Date Sunday, September 24, 1882
Text

Morrill, manager of the Boston club, is of the opinion that the League and American Association will work harmoniously together next year. As a stepping stone toward that point a meeting is said to have been arranged between President Soden, and the League, and President McKnight, of the American Association.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rumors of the Phillies in the NL

Date Sunday, September 17, 1882
Text

The Philadelphia nine will be a strong one next season, and there is every reason to believe that it will be admitted to the League. Manager Reach has just returned from a Western trip, and it is rumored that he brings with him contracts with several fine players. The Philadelphia Item September 17, 1882

As premised in these columns, several weeks ago, the League has held a special meeting, and this city was honored by its presence. The delegates arrived on Thursday evening, and when the meeting was called to order, on Friday morning, every club was represented. The only business of importance was the reception of the resignations of the Troy and Worcester clubs. For their places in the League several applications were presented including the Philadelphia and Metropolitan clubs. The applications were laid over until the regular annual meeting of the League, when the Philadelphia and Metropolitan will undoubtedly be elected to fill the gap occasioned by the withdrawal of Troy and Worcester. The Philadelphia Item September 24, 1882 [The Troy and Worcester resignations were not in fact officially received until the regular December meeting.]

It is now a settle fact that the Philadelphia club will be in the League next season. The patrons of the game should be proud of this as it makes Philadelphia, with League and American Association clubs, the most important base ball city in the country. The Philadelphia Item September 24, 1882

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

runners required to return to their base on the run

Date Thursday, August 10, 1882
Text

Louisville exchange: “The rule putting a man out because of his failure to run back immediately after a foul ball is struck is altogether out of place, and is calculated to confuse the game. Yesterday three men were put out on the technicalities of this rule.” Possible. The rule was made to stop players from loafing back to first or second every time a foul is hit. If the Eclipse have men who are caught in it, they ought to catch on to a fine also. A ball-field is not the place for lazy people. Cincinnati Enquirer August 10, 1882

[from Questions Answered] When a foul ball is batted and not caught, does the simple fact of the base-runner not returning to his base on a run, whether or not the ball be thrown to his base, necessitate his being called out by the Umpire? If so, why is it ever necessary to throw the ball to a base for the purpose of putting out a man running on a foul ball not caught? … Some Umpires so interpret the rule. The ball should reach the pitcher's hands first; then, if the chance is offered, the ball could be sent to a base to catch a runner going back. Cincinnati Enquirer August 16, 1882

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Sam Wise expelled by the Cincinnati Club

Date Saturday, August 5, 1882
Text

The Cincinnati Club yesterday concluded to expel Samuel Wise, and the Secretary was authorized to notify Secretary Williams of the Club’s action. Mr. Williams was notified by last night’s mail of Wise’s expulsion, and he, in turn, will immediately notify all American Association and League Clubs. The Club’s attorney has been requested to dismiss the injunction suit against Wise on account of its dilatory nature. Wise is now the only barrier that stands between the two Associations. If the clubs of the League wish friendly relations with the American Association Clubs they must induce the Boston Club to let Wise go. Cincinnati Commercial August 5, 1882

The Cincinnati Club has at last taken proper action in the case of Wise, the renegade who deserted the local nine last spring. They have decided to dismiss the injunction suit began at Boston against him, and hve notified their lawyer in the Hub of that conclusion. They then expelled Wise, and due notification was last evening forwarded to Secretary Williams. The other Clubs will receive official notice in a few days. This will bar all American nines from playing with League teams, even if the Troy difficulty was amicably settled. It is just the treatment that Wise deserves, and next year, if the American Association and League have an amicable understanding, he will find himself in the cold. Cincinnati Enquirer August 5, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Sam Wise expelled from the Cincinnati Club

Date Sunday, August 13, 1882
Text

In the expulsion of Wise by the Cincinnati club, all of the barriers between the League, League Alliance and Association clubs, have been raised again, and the contemplated series of games between the Athletic and Philadelphia clubs will have to be declared off. In our judgment, the expulsion of Wise at this stage of the season, exhibits the worst judgment on the part of the Cincinnati club, which, by the way, has managed the Wise business very badly throughout. Having failed in their legal process it would have been much better for the club to have waited until the annual meeting of the Association, to pronounce sentence upon the deserter. While by no means defending the League, whose practices and deceitful artifices we have from time to time exposed and denounced, there is, however, two sides to this Wise business, and but for the fiery, uncouth, and bitter attacks made upon Wise by the Cincinnati papers, before the season was opened, we are almost certain that the whole matter would have been amicably settled, and Wise would to-day be playing in Cincinnati.

For our own people, the new aspect of the Wise case is very unfortunate, as the game between the Athletic and Philadelphia clubs in September would have been the events of the season, besides contributing thousands of dollars to the treasuries of both clubs. While neither club will be bankrupted by the new order of things, thousands of the patrons of the game will be disappointed. Cincinnati has pronou8nced the decree, however, and the Athletic will honorably stand by it. The Philadelphia Item August 13, 1882

The Cincinnati club has at last taken proper action in the case of Wise, the renegade, who deserted the local nine last Spring. They have decided to dismiss the injunction suit begun at Boston against, him, and have notified their lawyer in the Hub of that conclusion. They then expelled Wise, and due notification was last evening forwarded to Secretary Williams. The other clubs will receive official notice in a few days. This will bar all American nines from playing with the League teams, even if the Troy difficulty was amicably settled. It is just the treatment that Wise deserves, and next year, if the American Association and League have an amicable understanding, he will find himself in the cold. The Philadelphia Item August 13, quoting the Cincinnati Enquirer [The expulsion occurred 8/4/82.]

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Sam Wise to be a test case

Date Tuesday, March 14, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting of 3/13/1882] The following resolution was offered: “That the Cincinnati Club be requested not to expel Samuel Wise, but that an injunction be obtained from the United States District Court of Boston to prevent him from playing with the Boston Club, should he attempt to do so, as he has not fulfilled his contract with the Cincinnati Club.” This was proposed as a test case, the expenses to be paid by the association. This resolution was agreed to. Philadelphia Inquirer March 14, 1882

[reporting on the AA meeting of 3/13/1882] ...the cases of Wise, Troy and Holbert were taken up and discussed. … It was decided to instruct the Cincinnati Club not to expel Wise, but to retain him upon the players' roll until an injunction could be issued to prevent him from playing with the Boston nine, and thus make a test case of the matter. The result of this case will apply to those of both Troy and Holbert. Philadelphia Sunday Item March 19, 1882

Source Philadelphia Inquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring a dropped third strike 3

Date Saturday, April 29, 1882
Text

[from answers to correspondents] If a batter strike three times at the ball and fails to hit it, but on the third strike the ball passes the catcher, or the catcher throws wild to first, or gets someone else out at second or third, is the striker scored as struck out? ... The batsman who is put out in any way on three strikes, either by the catcher or throw to first, is recorded as struck out. In the latter case the catcher is credited with an assist, and the first-baseman with an out.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Scoring an error on an intentional walk; early use of 'twirler'

Date Sunday, December 31, 1882
Text

The decision of the recent league meeting to score an error against the pitcher when a batsman is given a “base on balls,” while it may prevent carelessness on the part of the pitcher and help to some degree the batting feature of the contest, also affords an opportunity for injustice being done to the sphere twirler. It often occurs, especially where a notably weak batter follows a strong one, that a “base on balls” is the best piece of strategy of the game, and yet a pitcher must be credited with an error if he performs it. Then again the poor judgment of an umpire finds a victim not in that official, but in the pitcher. Verily, the lot of the latter is a hard one.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring an error on base on balls, no assistance on a strike out

Date Thursday, December 14, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA convention] Two important changes were made in the scoring rules, one being the charging of an error to the pitcher for every runner given his base on called balls, and the other the taking out of the assistance column in the score the pitcher's assistance on strikes, the latter now having to be recorded in the summary. No assistance, either, is to be credited to the pitcher on players being put out on foul balls. Cincinnati Enquirer December 14, 1882

deliberating peace with the NL

[reporting on the AA convention] ...there was an animated discussion over the motion to appoint a Committee of Conference to meet with the League Committee, the delegates of the Cincinnati, St. Louis, Columbus and Athletic Clubs being dead against it, while those of Pittsburg, Baltimore, New York and Louisville favored the appointment of the committee. By this course the Association avenged the violation of the contracts by League clubs, but at a heavy pecuniary cost to both organizations. Cincinnati Enquirer December 14, 1882

On motion of Mr. Pank, of Louisville, the matter of the appointment of the conference committee was brought up again in the form of a reconsideration of yesterday's vote on the subject. In presenting the motion President McKnight remarked that after due reflection on this matter of conference he had come to the conclusion that it involved a question of very serious import, affecting the future welfare of the organization; and he did not think the convention yesterday had duly considered the importance of it. “One bearing,” he stated, “which would result from a neglect of combined action with the league in the matter of observing the contracts and black-lists of each others association, would be to open the door to the evil or revolving and to introduce a phase of crooked work in the association which could not but be damaging to all the clubs of both associations. For his part, although his club has suffered as bad as any from violated contracts he was willing to let that pass, rather than to bring about a worse complication of troubles by refusing to second the movement made by the league in favor of some compromise.

Mr. Simmons, of the Athletics, seconded these remarks by withdrawing his vote of opposition to the appointment of the committee, and finally when the matter came to a vote only two clubs were found opposed to the compromise measure, and those were Cincinnati and St. Louis, and afterward when the matter was finally explained the Cincinnati delegate had his vote changed so that Mr. Von der Ahe was left out in the cold on the question, the vote for the appointment of the Committee on Question being seven to one in its favor. The President then appointed Messrs. Pank, Simmons and Barnie as a Conference Committee, and the Secretary was requested to notify the President of the League of the action taken by the convention, and that the American Co0mmittee was ready to confer with the League Committee on the subject of a compromise of the existing difficulties between the two organizations. Cincinnati Enquirer December 15, 1882

Louis Kramer, President of the Cincinnati Club, was asked this afternoon by a correspondent of the Commercial what was the feeling among the delegates in regard to the allege peace overtures from the National League.

“There have been no official overtures of peace from the League,” Mr. Kramer replied. “ A few men who have been hanging about the corridors of the hotel since we came here, and who represent themselves to be members of the League, have been urging us to appoint a conference committee to consult with one from the league. That is all we have heard of the matter except what has appeared in the newspapers. The general feeling among the delegates present is that the American Association should not encourage any overtures from the League, unless that body agrees to make some fair and equitable concessions beforehand. Our members feel that the League should at least restore some of the men whom they have stolen from us. We don’t think it is just the correct thing for the League, after persuaded several of our good players to break their contracts with us, to come up smilingly and say, ‘Now that we have gained everything we wanted, let’s appoint conference committees and smooth it all over..’

All our delegates expressed a desire on the part of their clubs, to make no move in the matter till the proper concessions are made by the League. We do not wish all the players returned whom they stole from us. All we desire is the return of one man to each club that was injured, namely the St. Louis, Cincinnati and Pittsburg Clubs. Our delegates say they intend to be treated with some respect and some dignity, and that they will, therefore, do nothing about it until some official communication is received from the League. We do not court an alliance with the League, but we would not discourage any just offer of concession and amicable agreement with that organization. Cincinnati Commercial December 14, 1882

The President of the Association announced that official information had been received from the National League that a conference committee had been appointed by that body. The motion to appoint a conference committee of three from the Association was reconsidered and adopted. J. H. Pank, of Louisville, Lewis Simmons, of Philadelphia, and W. Barnie, of Baltimore, were appointed as the committee. Cincinnati Commercial December 15, 1882

He [A. G. Mills] was not inclined to take, or rather that the League should take the initiative in conferring with the American Asso’, but if it was the voice of the meeting he would not object. Messrs. Mills, Soden, & Day were appointed the committee.

You will notice by the reports of the American Asso’ meeting in New York the last two days that they rather turned their back on the League. They faced about and appointed a committee yesterday, but I don’t consider it a suitable committee to meet the League. Their President should have been on the committee in place of Barney.

They voted not to play games the coming season with League clubs. They could not very well have done otherwise. I don’t mind the non-intercourse if there can be some agreement in regard to recognizing contracts, suspensions and expulsions. I think both League and Amer’ know the importance of being able to fully control the unruly element in their teams. [from a letter by Harry Wright writing from Providence to Frederick Long dated December 15, 1882]

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring bases on balls

Date Saturday, May 20, 1882
Text

The scoring rules in vogue out of town, in which a batsman is not charged with a “time at bat” when he takes his base on called balls, is in direct violation of two sections of the League playing-rules of the game. Rule 41 states that a time at bat begins the moment the batsman becomes a base-runner; and rule 52, section 2, states that the batsman becomes a base-runner “instantly after seven balls have been called.” To ignore such time at bat, though he take his base on called balls, or on three strikes not caught, and afterwards scores a run because he does not hit the ball, is nonsense.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring walk-off hits 2

Date Saturday, April 22, 1882
Text

Secretary Young “officially” says that when a game is a tie in the last half of the ninth inning, with a man on third base, the batter who gets a safe hit, bringing home the man on third, thus scoring the winning run, is, by a strict interpretation of rules, entitled to but a base-hit, even though it be a two or three baser; and the same rule applies if he makes a home-run. Mr. Young thinks, however, that in justice the batter would receive credit for whatever credit his hit would otherwise be entitled to, but under existing rules the batter is only entitled to what he was accomplished at the moment the base-runner closes the game by crossing the home-plate.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

season ticket prices 3

Date Saturday, April 8, 1882
Text

An application for season tickets to the Cincinnati Base Ball Park induced the Directors, yesterday, to resolve to issue a limited number of these tickets to those applying immediately. They will be made out in the name of the purchaser and will not be transferable. The price will be $12,50 for those admitting to the pavilion and $15 for those admitting to the grand stand. As there are forty schedule games and nine already arranged with outside club, they will be cheap at those prices. They can be had by applying at Room 18 Wiggins Block, at any time before next Saturday.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

season tickets in Detroit

Date Saturday, April 1, 1882
Text

At a meeting of the directors March 24 it was voted to charge $20 for season tickets, and issue a complimentary ticket to each stockholder.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

service of process in the Wise case

Date Wednesday, May 17, 1882
Text

Yesterday afternoon President Soden of the Boston club and Samuel W. Wise, one of the players, were served with notices to appear before the supreme judicial court the first Money in June to answer to a bill of complaint made by Justus Thorner and others representing the Cincinnati Base Ball Club.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

slow curves 2

Date Sunday, June 11, 1882
Text

[Baltimore vs. Cincinnati 6/10/1882] The home team found some trouble in hitting Landis, being fooled very often by his .

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

slow drop curve(?) balls

Date Sunday, May 28, 1882
Text

[St. Louis vs. Athletic 5/27/1882] The slow drop balls of Fusselbach puzzled the home club, they only scoring two runs off of him...

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Spalding elected president of the Chicago Club

Date Saturday, May 6, 1882
Text

In 1876 A. G. Spalding became a member of the Chicago Club as its secretary and manager, and the success of the club in winning the pennant over the previously successful Boston team attested the ability of Mr. Spalding’s work as manager that season. The next year he entered into business in Chicago, and practically ceased to be a professional player. Fortune favored him in establishing the largest sporting-goods house in the Western States, and, though he still continued to be club secretary, the management of the team fell into other hands. The recent death of the president of the club obliged the members to elect a success, and on April 26, at a meeting of the stockholders, Mr. Spalding was unanimously elected president, and a better man for the position could not have been selected. Though his extensive business in Chicago and manufactory at Hastings, Mich., command his attention, he still finds time to attend to his club duties, and now, as its president, he will devote more of his efforts for its welfare and success than ever before, considerable as his services have been. The election of the new president was followed by the choice of the following well-known and influential citizens of Chicago as the club’s new board of directors, viz., Messrs. John B. Lyon, Chas. T. Trego–members of the Chicago Board of Trade–John R. Walsh–President of the Chicago National Bank–and a. G. Mills, with President Spalding as a member ex officio. The new secretary is John H. Brown. The club is to be congratulated upon the high character of the gentlemen who have been chosen to govern it this season.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

spectators paying a player's fine

Date Sunday, August 27, 1882
Text

In a recent base ball game at Worcester Bushong, catcher of the Worcester Club was fined by Pearce, the umpire, for objecting to a decision. The spectators immediately raised a purse and paid it for him.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

spectators want more offense; moving the pitcher back

Date Saturday, December 2, 1882
Text

[from a letter to the editor] I was glad to seem some time ago that the veteran manager, Harry Wright, would have brought forward at the coming League meeting certain changes in the rules, with the object of increasing the batting and thus adding interest to the game. I was glad to see that at last somebody seemed to appreciate the fact, that all patrons of base ball are not experts and able to thoroughly appreciate the very find displays of fielding we frequently have in games between our best professional teams to the exclusion of batting and its attendant base-running. The managers and directors of our base ball clubs should understand that they are conducting an amusement for the entertainment of the public at large, and not for the few. What would be thought of Manager Miles if he insisted in giving a continuous round of tragedies at this theaters just because many of the best posted in dramatic art claimed that such plays called for the highest exhibition of histrionic genius? The public demands all kinds of entertainments, from the highest to the lowest, from the tragedy to the comic opera, and so it is only, perhaps, in a less degree with base ball. More life must be infused into the game, more spirit and more activity, and this can not be accomplished in any other way than by increasing the batting. It gives greater opportunities for brilliant play in the out field, and for nerve and skill in the in-field, enlarges the opportunity for five base-running, and promotes a general activity.

The question, then, is how are we to obtain this great desideratum? Harry Wright advocates increasing the distance from the home base to the pitcher’s box, thus intending to decrease the pitcher’s efficiency by lessening the speed of the ball, and also giving the batsman more time to judge of the curve, thus increasing his chances in hitting the ball successfully.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

St. Louis opposes peace with the NL

Date Saturday, December 23, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA convention] ...the president called attention to the fact that he and others of the convention had thought over the matter of the appointment of a committee of conference, which by a tie vote had failed the day before, and he had come to the conclusion that their action had been somewhat hasty. This opinion was endorsed by Mr. Pank of Louisville, who made a motion to reconsider the vote of the previous day on the subject. This motion was seconded by Mr. Simmons of the Athletics, who stated that he had slept on the matter, and he was now in favor of a committee of the kind. On the question being put to a vote it was decided to appoint a committee by a vote of 6 to 2, St. Louis and Cincinnati alone voting against it. Afterwards Mr. Kramer changed his vote to aye, but Mr. Von Der Ahe adhered to his opposition, so the vote remained at 7 to 1 in favor of a committee, and Mr. McKnight appointed Messrs. Pank, Simons and Barnie as the committee.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

St. Louis threatens to leave the AA

Date Saturday, December 30, 1882
Text

The St. Louis club threatens to withdraw from the American Association, unless at the proposed conference of the two leading professional associations their claims on certain of the League players are respected, or the League ignored entirely. This threat is the result of the refusal of Whitney of the Bostons and Radbourn and Denny of the Providences to fulfill the contract they made with St. Louis. If the League will not release these players, then the St. Louis Club will have nothing to do with that organization.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

stolen balls

Date Saturday, June 10, 1882
Text

[Chicago vs. Metropolitan 6/1/1882] An amusing feature was the hitting of foul balls over the grand-stand, most of which were stolen, no less than seven new balls being used in the two games the Chicagos played in the last week here.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

substitutes not in uniform 2

Date Thursday, August 24, 1882
Text

[Athletic vs. Cincinnati 8/23/1882] When the Cincinnatis were ready to go n the field it was discovered that Harry Wheeler had not reported. It was too late to send out a messenger to hunt him up, and McCormick had to dress and go to right field.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Sunday free games

Date Tuesday, September 12, 1882
Text

The Shamrock management have just closed a contract with the celebrated Ironton Club for a game with the Shamrocks on the Cincinnati grounds next Sunday. The Irontons have defeated every club in the State. They are brought here at a big expense and the management hope those who patronize the free games given on Sunday will be liberal at the contribution box. It will be a game worthy seeing. Cincinnati Commercial September 12, 1882 [This is one of an ongoing series of free games, with a contribution box, presumably to get around Sabbath laws.]

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

support for the foul bound out

Date Sunday, December 17, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA convention] The Association did well not to abolish the foul bound. It is one of the fine features of the game, and has more generally proven sources of great enthusiasm than any other point of play.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

tension between the League and Alliance clubs

Date Wednesday, March 8, 1882
Text

[reporting on the NL special meeting] All negotiations between the four Eastern League Clubs and the two [Alliance] clubs for games in the latter cities in April, were then suspended, pending a settlement of the terms to be given the League Clubs. The Metropolitans and Philadelphias prepared a schedule of games for April, assigning to each Club certain dates, and offering 45 per cent. of the gate receipts, without the usual guarantee of $100 made obligatory during the League championship season from May to October. The League clubs demanded the guarantee with the privilege of 50 per cent. of the gate receipts and eight agreed to accept nothing less. They then said that if Managers Day and Reach refused to give the guarantee they would be left severely alone, and at the special meeting of the League such action would be taken as would give League clubs the privilege of playing with out than League Alliance Clubs in New York and Philadelphia. The special legislation enacted for the benefit of Day and Reach seemed to operate badly before the season opened.

The subject came up to-day, but did not provoke much discussion. No vote was taken, and no question was raised, it being informally decided that the League amendment touching the same should be lived up to. Cincinnati Enquirer March 8, 1882

The management of the Metropolitan Base-ball Club are still firm in their resolve not to yield to the demands of the League in reference to guarantees during April. Therefore it is not likely that any League Clubs will visit this city during the coming month. This movement, it is said, will be of greater injury, financially, to the League Clubs than to the Metropolitans, as the latter will by no means lie idle. The Colleges nines will draw fully as well as the League Clubs, if not better, and Manager Mutrie has not been slow in taking advantage of this fact. … The Providence Club have been granted the refusal of the 12th, 13th and 14th, but if the dates are not closed within the next few days they will be given to the Baltimore and Athletics Clubs, who are now negotiating for them. Cincinnati Enquirer March 23, 1882, quoting the New York Herald

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The 'Buffalo Giants'

Date Sunday, June 18, 1882
Text

[Buffalo vs. Philadelphia 6/17/1882] The Buffalo Giants beat the Philadelphia at Recreation Park yesterday by a score of 9 to 5.

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA and blacklisted and expelled players

Date Tuesday, March 14, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting] It was soon evident from the sentiments of those present that the black sheep of the League had but little show in the meeting. Devlin and Bill Crowley (the latter black-listed by the Bostons) had been in the hotel corridors this evening with the delegates in regard to their cases, and it is quite sure they had one or two men in their favor. The article was thoroughly viewed by the delegates. One, Mr. Thorner, believed that the Association could not afford to resolve itself into a court of appeals and listen to all the old and well-worn testimony. The men had been punished by the League, and it was for it to remove the disabilities imposed. Although he knew as well as any body else that some of the men were not deserving of the punishment they had received, still the Association had been placed before the public in such a position that it could not afford to take any steps that meant so much paramount injury to its future as would the recognition of the castaways of the old institution. Mr. Von der Ahe believed that if any cases were to be examined, the old as well as the new ought to be taken up. If not, they ought to pass a motion to the effect that if the League did no6t hear anew the stories of its disfranchised players, the American would investigate them. He moved to have the date cut out, not leaving it obligatory with the Association as to what cases they should review.

Mr. Simmons supported Mr. Thorner's expressions, stating that he knew very well most of the men who had been barred by the League, some of whom were very clever. They had been dropped by that organization before theirs was a reality, and he did not favor going behind the returns.

The amendment to strike out the date was lost, St. Louis and Pittsburg along voting for it. The original motion was adopted.

The Cincinnati delegate was asked if his opposition to the hiring of these black-listed men was not, in the main, guided by the fact that he had booked games with League Clubs in April that would net him $2,000. This brought the representative of the Paris of America to his feet, and he denied most emphatically the soft impeachment. He had, he said, hired an expelled player on the condition that he was reinstated, and he would not be so quick to let go of him if he did not see the ruin such a policy was sure to bring upon them. For games with League Clubs, he would second a motion that would prevent the American teams contesting with the former. He did not care a scrap for the April games. Eh felt that such initiatory battles would put his men in better shape for the real camapign. The passage of this constitutional amendment settles the cases of Jones, Baker and the other men who have been put under ban by the League. They will never be acceptable to the Americans until the originator of their trouble restores them to their rights. In quite a number of instances this will never be as long as Hulbert lives, as he has often said so. Jones will now be released as a player by the Cincinnatis, and a new fielder will be secured in his stead.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA and blacklisted players

Date Saturday, March 11, 1882
Text

The members of the Association have naturally felt indignant at the course pursued by the Detroit and Boston League Clubs in enticing players to break their written contracts with the Athletic and Cincinnati Clubs, and by way of resenting this action some of the most hot-tempered of them proposed to make the black-listed players of the League eligible for service in Association clubs. This course would not only not trouble the League in the least, but would simply have the effect of cutting off all the profitable games the Association teams would otherwise be likely to have with the League clubs. The only right way to do is to bring the law to bear on the players who broke their contracts,by having them prohibited from playing in League cities of States where the clubs whose players were taken away from them are located. To open the door to all the black-listed players of the League would simply be to offer a premium to insubordination and other evils the American Association clubs desire to get rid of as much as the League clubs do. We are opposed to any cringing whatever on their part to the League, but we also desire to see the American Association placed on record as opposed alike to the engagement of kicker in their ranks as to crooked knaves.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA and the NL reserved men

Date Sunday, January 1, 1882
Text

[McKnight describing correspondence between him and Hulbert] The main feature of our correspondence, however, was this: In one of my letters explaining that we did not propose to engage any of their black-listed players, I had said we had no idea of engaging any players who had been expelled or black-listed for good reasons, which, I explained to him in a following letter, meant that if any players held by League Clubs under the five men reserve rule, but not yet signed, should sign with any of our Clubs, and be therefor expelled by the League, we would certainly not observe the expulsion. In that connection Mr. Hulbert writes, November 17th:

“Now, just so sure as your Association picks up one of the men we have disqualified, just so sure no League team will visit your grounds. This declaration is not a threat. Our laws are thoroughly well known throughout the world of base-ball.” Cincinnati Enquirer January 1, 1882

Early squabbling between the NL and AA; a plan for a baseball war

The Cincinnati Enquirer publishes an interview with Hurlburt, in which that worthy says: “The League does not recognize the existence of any association of Base Ball clubs excepting itself and the Alliance. If the Athletic club should expel Troy, I don't see what the League would have to do with it.” Here we have a showing of the League's hand. The Philadelphia Item January 1, 1882

In order to make sure of the position of the League in the Troy case, Manager Simmons, of the Athletic club, wrote to W. G. Thompson, President of the Detroit, concerning the engagement of John Troy, who has broken his engagement with the Athletics, and received the following reply:

Detroit, Mich., Dec. 22, 1881.

Mr. Lew Simmons—Sir: I am in receipt of your favor of the 18th inst., and would say that Mr. Troy has very correctly informed you that he had signed to play ball with the Detroit Base Ball Club, and I will add he will so play the forthcoming season. I do not know anything about your association, or about your claim that Mr. Troy had previously signed with you: if he has wronged you in any respect, of course, as you say, you can expel him, and have the courts open to you for redress. I request that in any proceedings you will take against him you will make this club a party to the proceeding. Very truly yours, W. G. Thompson.

This reply bears the impress of Hurlburt all over it, and was evidently dictated by this burly personage, who , in his mind, imagin3ed he owns the entire right of base ball playing in this country, and establishes beyond a doubt the League's policy, as foreshadowed in The Item, viz:

First—To ignore the American Association clubs, as such.

Second—Weaken its clubs by stealing players.

Third—To play such clubs only when there are no other clubs to play.

Fourth—To hold such clubs strictly accountable to rules that the League will not enforce on its own clubs.

In this connection it is our intention this week to show the weakness of the League's position on these points. As to the first, ignorance as to the existence of the American Association. In the eyes of the law the Association is in all intents and purpose a legal organization, amenable to and under the protection of the law. Players making contracts with any of its clubs can be enjoined from playing with other clubs, by the simple legal process of an injunction. It is an old legal maxim that no one can plead ignorance of the law as a defense.

Secondly, the weakening of association clubs by the stealing of its best players. This will prove a two edged sword in which the League is bound to get as much punishment as it gives. For trivial offenses, in fact to put it in a player light, as the League well understands it, to lessen the number of ball players and thereby increase salaries of favorites, a large number of excellent players have been prescribed and placed upon the black-list. All of these men are superior players, and if th4e League persists in its action, they will be engaged by the Association clubs and become greater attractions tha any of the players now in League clubs. When it comes to a test as to who will get the best by the stealing, the Association as a big advantage.

Thirdly, the playing of such clubs of the Association, only when there are no other clubs to play. The Association can squelch this at once by refusing to allow any of its clubs to play with the League unless all the clubs of the Association are placed on the same footing. Let it be a case of play all or none. The League clubs will have to make their expenses out of outside games, and it will have to bend or break in this connection.

Fourthly, violation of rules enforced on other clubs. If the League is weak in any respect, it is in the violation of its own rules. Instance after instance could be named, but it will suit our purpose sufficiently at this time to call attention to the fact that the Chicago Club is playing base ball in New Orleans every Sunday, and under the name of the Chicago Club—vide New Orleans papers. Puritanical, Pharisaical Hurlburt to the contrary, notwithstanding. The League may break the rules but the outside clubs must not. Let the American Association live up to its own rules and let the League take care of its own.

These are a few suggestions we offer to the Association, and by a firm stand on principle and for its rights, there can hardly be a question of its success. All honest lovers of the game will endorse it, leaving the League to the gamblers and the few men who follow its fortune as a means of a precarious livelihood. The Philadelphia Item January 1, 1882 [See also PCI 01/08/1882 for a long letter from Denny McKnight discussing the history of NL-AA relations.]

Hurlburt has answered in an indirect and very unsatisfactory manner, the open letter of President McKnight, of the American Association, in an interview with a reporter of the Chicago Times. Huirlburt complains because his letters to Mr. McKnight were published, and says that Troy's engagement by the Detroit club is legal because the Athletic club did not notify the League's Secretary of his engagement. This is entirely too thin, and Hurlburt would have made a better defense by not saying anything. The Philadelphia Item January 15, 1882

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA goes to war

Date Tuesday, October 24, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA special meeting] It was stated that inasmuch as the League refused to have any regard for the expulsion decrees of the American, and continued to hire men banished from its clubs, that no good reason was apparently why it was not just as well for the latter to adopt the same policy. If the disobeying of the rules of the Association was not criminal in the eyes of the League, certainly such alleged offenses by the latter could not be so considered by the former. What was sauce for the goose was sauce for the gander. … The original resolution was amended so as not to include the great black sheep, George Hall, Jim Devlin, Al Nichols and Bill Craver, the Louisville crooks. This was agreeable to all, and the motion was adopted. This action brings into good repute once more Chas. Jones, expelled by the Bostons for refusing to play in 1879, when the club owed him about $600; Alex. McKinnon, by the Troys in the same year, because he signed a contract with that team, and then decided not to play with them; Phil Baker, by the Providence nine in 1881, because after he had agreed to go to theat city he withdrew from the profession and went into business, and Joseph Gerhardt, by the Detroits last year, for the same offense. Also the following men, who were black-listed for various offenses, none of any great degree of criminality: Crowley and Fox, of the Bostons; Dorgan and Houck, of the Detroits; Gross, of the Providence nine; Caskins, of the Troys; Pike and Dickerson, of the Worcesters; and Nolan, of the Clevelands. All of these but Pike and Nolan had been reinstated by the League at their late Philadelphia meeting.

Source Cincinati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA institutes a black list

Date Sunday, March 19, 1882
Text

The offenses which are deemed sufficiently grave to warrant a player becoming black-listed are drunkenness, insubordination, ungentlemanly conduct, unfair playing, etc.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA talking points

Date Saturday, January 7, 1882
Text

Secretary Williams of the American Association has recently been interviewed, and is of the opinion that the opposition of the League will rather benefit the former's clubs than otherwise. He also thinks that the results of a law price of admission and the adoption of a more liberal policy promise to make the American Association a formidable rival of the League. The moral ground assumed by the League as the ostensible cause of its action against the American Association is untenable. The Chicago Club entertained no such scruples against Sunday games two years ago, when it sent its team to California, and the Chicago-Buffalo-Cleveland combination have played almost every Sunday since Oct. 30 last. He thinks that the American Association also differs from the League in the fact that it is intended to be self-supporting, each club reaping the benefit of its own patronage, while the League is said to be “the retreat for indigent clubs, where rich relative support the poor ones.” President McKnight of the American Association has published a lengthy communication, from which we make the following extracts: “I can hardly comprehend the assurance of a few men representing ball clubs in a few cities of this country saying that no other clubs shall be allowed to exist except as hangers-on to them. Has it ever occurred to the egotists of the League that our six cities contain a population of 2,370,000, while their eight only foot up 1,516,000, and that the people of our cities are enthusiastic over prospects of having baseball again, while their people are somewhat sick of it? On Nov. 27 Hulbert could not see how one association of ball clubs could hurt another, wherein I agreed with him exactly, provided both were anxious to promote and elevate the game in honorable ways; but he has since concluded evidently that he has discovered modes of hurting another association, first, by trying to legislate us out of playing in New York and Philadelphia, and then by stealing our players. Perhaps United States law will teach him that it is superior to laws of the National League, and that contracts must be kept. I suppose the League expected to aggravate us so by this Troy outrage that we would commence hiring their black-listed and expelled players for revenge, and thus get the press and public down on us. We will do nothing of the kind. We can get plenty of good players, and we propose to be governed by honorable rules if others are not.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA to sign most expelled NL players

Date Tuesday, October 24, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA special meeting of 10/23/82] On motion of Mr. Caylor the Association declared that ever expelled or black listed player of the League except Craver, Devlin, Hall and Nichols, of the Louisvilles of 1877, be hereafter eligible to play with American Association clubs, and any and all contracts with such players may be at any time made and put on record and be of full force and effect.

This reinstates Jones, Gerhardt, Baker and McKinnon, expelled players, and Houck, Gross, Crowley, Fox, Pike, Nolan, Dorgan Caskins and Dickerson. Jones is already under contract to play with the Cincinnati Club, and will play in the field for them. Gerhardt will probably play with the Louisvilles. Crowley is already under contract with the Athletic Club.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA's first expulsion

Date Thursday, April 27, 1882
Text

Last evening the Directors of the Allegheny Base Ball Club passed a resolution by a unanimous vote expelling John Sweeney for drunkenness and insubordination. This is the first action of the kind that has been taken in the new Association. The expulsion covers all the Association clubs. The only way to do in such cases is to set the foot down vigorously, and this action of the home club will likely give general satisfaction to admirers of the game., quoting the Pittsburg Dispatch

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the American Alliance

Date Sunday, March 19, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting] The first subject discussed was the advisability of instituting an alliance to the Association, to which outside clubs could connect themselves with and secure protection to the players. After some discussion the proposition was adopted. The Merritt Club of Camden, the Atlantic City Club of Atlantic City, and the Atlantic Club of Brooklyn, then made application for membership to the Alliance and were accepted. By the rules of the Association, each of these clubs must pay a membership fee of $10, and are entitled to a delegate at all meetings of the Association. The delegates are allowed to discuss all questions coming before the Association, but have no vote. The Alliance clubs, to have their players protected, must send all engagements as soon as made to the secretary of the Association.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Athletics outbid Boston for Mathews and Rowen

Date Sunday, October 1, 1882
Text

Mathews will not remain in Boston next season, as he has an offer from the Athletic club in Philadelphia which he will accept, as the sum offered hi is far in advance of that which the Boston club will pay. Although it is not positively stated to be a fact, yet it is probable Rowen will go with Mathews.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Athletics' trophy case

Date Sunday, July 23, 1882
Text

A handsome case of balls, won by the Athletic club while Col. Fitzgerald was President of the club, has been presented to the present managers of the Athletic club, by Hicks Hayhurst, Esq., to whom it was given by Col. Fitzgerald.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Chicago Club the economic bulwark of the League

Date Saturday, March 4, 1882
Text

It is well known in base ball circles that for two years Chicago has been the supporting pillow of the League. The Chicago crowds have furnished the financial pap which kept alive the puling infant clubs from other cities. The share of visiting clubs from the Chicago gate receipts has kept many of them above financial ruin. No one who is well informed believes for an instant that Worcester, Troy or Providence could last two months without the “big money” they yearly take away from Chicago. It has even been alleged with a decided assurance of knowledge that the Chicago Club has gone down into its prosperous treasury more than once and furnished financial aid of a substantial kind to several of the tottering members of the League.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Cincinnati Club issues guarantee notes

Date Saturday, March 25, 1882
Text

The guarantee notes have been in big demand, and all will be taken the coming week. They are the best means any person has of patronizing the game this year in Cincinnati. The notes are modeled after the Exposition guarantee notes, and are for $25 each (there being 160 in all, for $4,000 worth). They are payable on the 1st day of October, if at all, and have these conditions printed upon their face: “Upon the following conditions: That if the expenses of the said club for 1882 shall exceed in amount its receipts, together with the cash on hand when the playing season opens, it is hereby agreed and understood that said excess shall be provided for by an assessment upon this note in the proportion which this note bears to the total amount of the Guarantee Fund, which the subscriber hereby promises to pay on the day of maturity of this promissory note. If no deficits shall exist, the note at maturity to be returned to the subscriber, duly canceled. In consideration for the above, the Cincinnati Base Ball Club agrees to issue to said guarantor herein, or to any one he may name, a season ticket (not transferrable) entitling the said person to all the privileges of the Cincinnati Base Ball grounds during the season of 1882.”

The tickets to be given to subscribers of these notes are already printed (160 of them), and upon their face read as follows: “Guarantor’s ticket, No. –. For the season of 1882. Commencing May 1. Issued to –. Not transferable, and good only when signed by Justus Thorner, President, and countersigned by the Secretary.” There are fifty numbers printed around the margin, and for every game one of the numbers will be punched out by the gate-keeper. None but perfectly responsible parties will be received as guarantors. The chances are largely that there will not be a dollar deficit at the end of the season, and that the subscribers will get season tickets for nothing. The Club have every dollar of indebtedness paid at the present date and do not owe a single debt. They will have about $7,000 less expense than any club ever had in Cincinnati. One share of stock recently sold for 300 per cent. of its par value, and an offer of 350 per cent. was made last week and the offer refused. Indeed, no stock can be had. After next week and probably after Wednesday, the subscription to the guarantee will be stopped, as not one over 160 will be issued and over half are already taken. They can be had at Hawley’s, at Room 18 Wiggins Block, of Mr. Aaron Stern, Justus Thorner, or George L. Herancourt. Cincinnati Commercial March 25, 1882

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Cincinnati Club yesterday, the Secretary was requested to return to guarantors their notes, with the thanks of the club. The guarantors will now meet and shake hands with each other. Cincinnati Commercial August 20, 1882

The Cincinnati Club will to-day return their guarantors’ notes, with the following circular letter to each subscriber Cincinnati, August 22, 1882

Dear Sir–The Cincinnati Base Ball Club direct me to return to you the inclosed Guarantor Note with their thanks for backing them when the season was a doubtful one. The finances of the club are now such that the note can be surrendered without any risk to the club. We hope you will keep your guarantors’ ticket, and be present at every game played in Cincinnati from this date till October 1 st. Very truly yours, - - -, Secretary. Cincinnati Commercial August 25, 1882

Mr. H. C. Stewart, of Vienna Bakery fame, who was the first guarantee subscriber to the Cincinnati Club, has written the Secretary, offering to head a list of guarantors with a five dollar donation from each, the sum total to be divided equally among the men of the team who have done so well. Several other guarantors have agreed to “stand in” with Mr. Stewart’s plan. All who wish to do the same will please notify the Secretary at once. Those who join this list will be taken as the first guarantors next season. When that time comes there will be ten applications for each of the one hundred and twenty notes. Cincinnati Commercial August 25, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Cincinnati Club ownership lawsuit

Date Sunday, December 3, 1882
Text

Justus Thorner vs. Geo. Harencourt and others. In this case, heard by Judge Harmon, yesterday [in Superior Court], the plaintiff alleges he is in partnership with Geo. Harencourt, Aaron Stern, Louis Kramer, Victor H. Long, John R. McLean and O. P. Caylor, in what is known as the Cincinnati Base Ball Club, that the association has made money, and the Treasurer has accumulate profits, now in his hands, amounting to $15,000; that his interest is one-eighth and that defendants have excluded him from the partnership and denied his right to participate in the management of the affairs of the association. He asks for a dissolution of the partnership, the appointment of a receiver to take custody of the assets; that an account be taken to ascertain the sums due to members of the partnership, and that the sums so found due be equitably distributed.

On behalf of the defendant it was contended that the plaintiff was not a partner in the association, and that when an interest was offered he refused it.

The plaintiff testified that he was a member of the Club, but never contributed any money, but contributed his services, and in return was to have a pecuniary interest in the profits.

John R. McLean testified that Caylor, one of the defendants, who was at that time the base ball reporter for the Enquirer, told him that Thorner was a partner.

M. L. Hawkins testified to the same effect.

For the defense Louis Kramer, O. P. Caylor and A. Stern were called, and testified to the fact that Thorner had always stated to them that he had no pecuniary interest in the club, but was merely a nominal partner.

George Herancourt testifed that Thorner signed the articles of partnership for him simply as his agent, because he (Herancourt) did not want to be known in the matter; that he had furnished all the money, and that after Thorner had signed the articles for him upon Thorner complaining to him that he was doing all the work and getting nothing for it, he thereupon made an agreement with Thorner to pay him twenty per cent. of his profits in case Thorner did all the work.

Case submitted. Wilby & Ward for plaintiff; M. P. Wilson contra.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Cincinnati Club reorganizes

Date Sunday, March 19, 1882
Text

A meeting of the Cincinnati Club was held last evening at the Grand Hotel. The Directors were all present. When President Thorner entered he was greatly surprised to learn that the gathering had been called, unknown to him, for the purpose or reorganizing the Club. He was slightly at a loss to account for this. He was given to understand that certain circumstances had arisen which necessitated a change. Some of the Directors had had a meeting, at which it was decided to increase his (Mr. Thorner's) powers in the Board. So it was agreed to rearrange matters. Under the new state of affairs, an election was had which resulted in the selection of the following officers:

President—Justus Thorner.

Vice-President—Aaron Stern.

Treasurer—George Herancourt.

Then came the good word for President Thorner. One of the Directors announced that the Board was greatly pleased with his work so far. They fully indorsed all his engagements of players and other transactions, and especially did they support the stand taken by him in the American meeting at Philadelphia. Hereafter he was every thing. He had the entire say, and in his ability to successfully manage the Club did they have full confidence. He was authorized to engage a Secretary and manager, and do whatever he thought was for the interest of the Club.

Invested with such powers, he will make a number of improvements in the grounds. The privileges of the bar, &cs., will be put up for the highest bidder, and every effort exerted to have this the most prosperous season of base-ball ever known in this city.

The honors bestowed upon President Thorner are nothing more than that gentleman is deserving of. He has worked most zealously during the past winter to secure such a team as would do credit to Cincinnati, devoting much valuable time in that way. He has shown that he has the welfare of the National pastime greatly at heart. His many friends will heartily rejoice at this testimonial to his untiring energy and disinterestedness.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Cincinnati groundskeeper

Date Tuesday, October 17, 1882
Text

The ground-keeper of the Cincinnati Grounds, J. D. McMichael, will have a benefit Saturday. The Shamrocks will meet a picked nine consisting of “Buck” Ewuing, Harry Wheeler, Joe Sommer, McPhee and others. Mac has been a faithful servant, and should have a rousing benefit.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Detroit groundskeeper the substitute player

Date Saturday, April 1, 1882
Text

To guard against accidents, the [Detroit] management has engaged a practical ball-player (John J. Piggott) as janitor of the grounds, and he will be kept in active practice, and when needed will don a uniform and do duty in the nine.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Holbert affair

Date Sunday, March 12, 1882
Text

[from an interview of McKnight] I have just got back from New York where I had a conference with Manager Ferguson of the Troy Club. Mr. Ferguson told me that Holbert had signed with their Club before he had opened negotiations with the Allegheny Club. Ferguson also stated that Holbert had lately fallen into the habit of playing tricks of that kind where he had an impression that he could scoop in a little money. I came to the conclusion that it would cost too much money, time and trouble to go on to Troy and have Holbert jugged, and received an assurance from Mr. Ferguson that he would see that the $50 advanced by us to Holbert should be returned at the opening of the season. I have concluded not to do any thing further in the matter, until the next meeting of the Association, when I will move to have him expelled.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the League forced to reinstate blacklisted players

Date Friday, December 8, 1882
Text

[reporting on the NL meeting] Ten players on the black list for common drunkenness and insubordination were reinstated, namely, S. P. Houck, Lipman Pike, L. P. Dickerson, M. J. Dorgan, James J. Fox, Edward Nolan, Wm. Crowley, E. M. Gross, L. J. Brown and E. J. Caskins. The disabilities of John E. Clapp were also removed. Cincinnati Commercial December 8, 1882

[reporting on the NL convention] The ten players blacklisted in September, 1881, for confirmed drunkenness and insubordination were reinstated, namely: S. P. Houck, Lipman Pike, L. P. Dickerson, M. J. Dorgan, James J. Fox, Edward Nolan, Wm. Crowley, Emil M. Gross, L. J. Braun and E. J. Caskins. The disabilities of John E. Clapp were removed. Cincinnati Enquirer December 8, 1882

the league...showed that its black list was a farce in that all on it were reinstated without a single exception. Verily, the American hath done much good so far. Cincinnati Enquirer December 10, 1882

[reporting on the NL meeting] The inroads made upon League players by the American clubs was recognized, and a wholesale reinstatement of black-listed players was made, in order that some of the League clubs might complete their teams.

The ten players whose names were on the black list—Houck, Pike, Dorgan, Nolan, Gross, Fox, Dickerson, Crowley, Brown and Caskins—were re-instated to full membership. The Philadelphia Item December 10, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The League hopes the AA will fail

Date Sunday, April 16, 1882
Text

[Cleveland vs. Cincinnati 4/15/1882] Before leaving home the Cleveland Club were instructed to try and win every game they played on the trip, and in every case to beat each club as badly as possible. This is, not doubt, good League policy, for the reason that if the American clubs could be crippled in the calculation of their patrons in these initiatory games it would cast no gloom among the League managers, who earnestly hope for bankruptcy to befall the new association. The Cleveland made more fuss, did more kicking, and howled louder than if the game had been the deciding one in the League championship. Probably half an hour was consumed by three “kicks,” led every time by that boss of kickers, George Washbuckle Bradley.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the League ignores the American

Date Sunday, December 10, 1882
Text

The annual meeting of the League, contrary to expectations, was very tame and devoid of interest. In its legislation the American Association was entirely ignored, and the young organization was given to understand that the League did not propose to recognize it. There was considerable outside talk among the delegates relative to a conference between the two organizations, but the idea did not meet with sufficient favor to have it advocated in open session.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the League's advertising poster

Date Sunday, April 23, 1882
Text

The posters for advertising the league games of 1882 are gorgeous affairs. They are about two and one-half feet in width and about six feet in length. The design is gotten up to represent a catcher with a mask on, standing behind the bat. In front of him is the batsman, who stands with his bat aloft, ready to send the ball to “kingdom come,” if possible. The picture is very realistic, and reflects credit upon its designer. Above is a space wherein are printed the names of the clubs which it is advertising. At the bottom are the dates when they play. About the margins are printed the names of the eight league cities. They are printed in eight colors, and will serve as an attractive advertising medium., quoting an unidentified exchange

Source Providence Sunday Star
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the NL makes a peace overture

Date Saturday, December 16, 1882
Text

[reporting on the NL convention of 12/6/1882] The convention also took important action in the matter of promoting friendly relations with the American Association, inasmuch as they appointed Messrs. Mills, Soden and Day a committee of conference to act in conjunction with a similar committee of the American Association, with a view to agreeing upon some combined action in the matter of recognizing as binding the respective contracts with players of the two associations. They have thrown a veil over the occurrence of the past in this connection, and have agreed to recognize all contracts now made as fixtures, each Association to retain the players of the clubs of each now held. All the players on the black-list, including Pike and Nolan, were forgiven and reinstated. In the cases of Jones, Baker and Gerhardt, while they refused to reinstate them in the League, they decided that they would consider their playing in other clubs as no bar to any League clubs playing matches with the clubs they were attached to.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the NL refuses to give reasons for blacklisting players

Date Sunday, January 15, 1882
Text

Some time since Secretary, Williams, of the American Association, wrote Mr. N. E. Young, Secretary of the National League, asking for a complete list of the men who were disqualified from playing in the League, together with the cause of disqualification.

Mr. Young answered, giving the names of such players, but stating no offenses. Mr. Williams immediately wrote again, informing him that the American Constitution prevented Clubs of the Association from employing men expelled for certain offenses therein names.–To the last inquiry he has just received a reply, of which the following is the substance:

“I must peremptorily decline to furnish any such data. The League harbors no ill will towards the men it has officially declared unworthy, and, in evidence thereof, declines directly or indirectly to aid any class of them.

“It may well be that the men are all within the score of the ‘certain offenses’ of your constitution: if so, it would do you no good to know it. If perchance some of the men are not within the scope of your ‘certain offenses,’ we should feel we had wronged the men who were, by ‘giving them away.’”

It is clear that the League are not satisfied with their unjust punishment of such men as Jones by refusing to allow him to play in any other club of their Association, but refuse to give such information as would allow him to obtain an engagement in some other club, by the implication contained in Mr. Young’s letter thata ll the men expelled by the League are expelled for offenses that would preclude our clubs from engaging them. This we know is not the fact in the Jones case, and there may be others.

It is also very clear that the American Association need expect no assistance from the League in its efforts to keep bad men out of the profession. Still the American Association will stand by their promise to lend no encouragement to dishonest players.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the New York Club's application to the NL

Date Friday, September 22, 1882
Text

[a letter dated September 22, 1882, signed by John B. Day] The {Metropolitan B. B. C.} [the preceding struck out] New York Ball Club of N.Y. City hereby applies for League membership.

[a note dated November 12, 1882, signed by John B. Day and Charles T. Dillingham] The New York Ball Club hereby applies for League membership. Both letters in a lot auctioned by Christies in October, 2016

Source A letter
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Northwestern League

Date Saturday, December 16, 1882
Text

[reporting on the NL convention of 12/6/1882] In response to communications from , desiring to effect an arrangement with the League for the mutual recognition of players’ contracts, it was resolved that a committee of three be appointed by this meeting to confer upon this and other subjects of mutual interest with such association, or with any other association of baseball clubs.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Phillies' management

Date Sunday, January 15, 1882
Text

H. B. Phillips has resigned his position as manager of the Philadelphia Base Ball Club and accepted the management of the foot ball, lacrosse, polo, lawn tennis, bicycle and running exhibitions, which the Philadelphia Base Ball Club Association will give on their grounds, Ridge avenue and Twenty-fourth street, next Summer. A. J. Reach will superintend the base ball games. Season tickets will admit a holder to all exhibitions on the grounds. The ground and new buildings will be ready for occupancy on April 1st.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the admission of the Baltimore Club to the AA

Date Saturday, March 18, 1882
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting of 3/13-3/14/1882] The Association then went into executive session to pass on the election of candidates from Baltimore, Washington and Atlantic City, and to decide whether the delegates from the Atlantic Club of Brooklyn should remain in the Association, having been, as it is claimed, improperly admitted at the last meeting, by reason of the club not having its full complement of members at the time of the election of their representative. On opening the doors to the public, the resignation of the Atlantic Club of Brooklyn from the Association was announced as having been accepted. The application of the Baltimore Club for membership was received, and its representatives, Messrs. H. C. Myers and C. C. Waitt, admitted to seats.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the argument for parti-colored uniforms

Date Sunday, January 15, 1882
Text

It is very probable that the American Association, at their March meeting in Philadelphia, will adopt the parti-color position uniform adopted by the League. It is generally recognized to be a good idea, and one which is sure to become popular. Frequently three or four fielders run together to make a play. One handles the ball, but scorers differ as to which one it was, so thoroughly are the players jumbled together. All being uniformed alike, it is hard sometimes to say whether the second baseman, short-stop, left-fielder, middle-fielder or third baseman caught a short fly. Under the new plan every position in every club will be uniformed alike from the knees up. The distinguishing difference between players of different clubs will be in the color of their stockings alone. Thus the Chicagos will wear white stockings, the Bostons red, the Providence gray, &.

The pants in every Club will be white. In this respect the seventy-two uniforms will be alike. The shirts, belts and caps will be made to suit positions. Thus there will be four solid colors. All the catchers will wear blue shirts, belts and capts, all the left fielders will wear red shirts, belts and capts, all the third basement will wear grat and white striped shirts, caps and bilts, and the second basement black and yellow strikes, and so on, each position differing. The stripes run up and down in the shirt, and around in the cap and belt. A. G. Spalding & Co. will manufacture the uniforms. The material had to be manufactured to order, and it was secured only by a good deal of trouble. It comes from a Quaker factory somewhere up in Iowa. The gentlemen have ordered enough so as to provide the American Clubs also, if the latter fall in with the plan, and will make the uniforms at the same price charged to the League Clubs. The American Association act upon a desire to please the public, and not in an envious or spiteful manner, and therefore recognize the good policy of this idea, which sprang up in the League. The plan is Al. Spakding’s, having been fermenting in his fertile brain for several years.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the ball gets stuck in the catcher's glove

Date Tuesday, August 1, 1882
Text

[Allegheny vs. Baltimore 7/31/1882] Kemmler, the catch, in attempting to throw the ball to third to catch Brown napping, got it hung in his glove and slung it off toward the wicker fence. Pearce, who was on the bases, and who tried to follow Brown around, got caught on the home plate.

Source Baltimore American
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the baseball editor of the Cincinnati Enquirer; reporter

Date Sunday, July 30, 1882
Text

Our readers may remember that some weeks ago we showed up the nefarious umpiring in Cincinnati that deprived the Athletics of several games. Mr. Frank Wright, the genial young base ball editor, came to the rescue of the Cincinnati club, but, after a rather sharp fight of words, quietly retired from the field. We were apprehensive that his silence meant mischief, and our fears were confirmed on opening the Enquirer of Friday...

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the baseball editor of the Item

Date Sunday, November 26, 1882
Text

[presenting The Item prize to the Hartville Club, amateur champions of Philadelphia] At 8 o'clock, after a well rendered overture, J.P. Campbell, the base ball editor of The Item, in behalf of the Messrs. Fitzgerald, presented to the Hartville club the prize...

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the black list and war to the knife

Date Saturday, October 7, 1882
Text

President McKnight of the American Association has been interviewed recently. He says that if the League should resort to dishonorable means to prevent his Association from honorably engaging League players there would be a bitter war. He adds: “The League is now endeavoring to engage in underhand work towards us, and next season it will be war to the knife. We will ask for no quarter. The American clubs have made money this season, notwithstanding the opposition of the League. Unless we are fairly dealt with, we will engage any player who desires to enter the Association and should prove acceptable as a player, whether he is blacklisted by the League or not. We can and will pay as high salaries as the League, and our rules are not so tyrannical as theirs, which is the reason why so many League players desire to engage with us. The League is at liberty to engage our players if it can, and we expect the same privilege respecting theirs. At the recent League meeting there was adopted a rule to be announced privately to all the players who are desired to sign where they at present belong, to the effect that League players who refuse to sign with the clubs in which they are present and accept contracts with the American Association will be blacklisted in the League. In this way they hope to drive some of the players who have already joined the American clubs to break their contracts. They further took measures for the purpose of using old, trumped-up and trivial charges against players, threatening to blacklist them on these charges unless they would give up their American engagements.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the composition of the Atlantic Club; Manager Barnie

Date Saturday, April 15, 1882
Text

The Atlantic nine is composed of old and tried players, but they labored under the disadvantage of having played together in but two games prior to yesterday... ...the Atlantic will probably be strengthened by the addition of one or two Philadelphia players, whose services Manager Barnie is endeavoring to secure. Philadelphia Times April 15, 1882 [see also PT 5/20/1882 for a game with Barnie catching.]

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the condition of the Beacon Club; amateur clubs

Date Sunday, April 9, 1882
Text

The Beacon Base Ball Club, the only amateur club in the state of any note except the Harvards, is composed of young men who are engaged in business in this city or who follow professional pursuits, no less than four young lawyers being in their ranks.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the condition of the Olympic Club

Date Sunday, April 2, 1882
Text

The Olympic Club, of this city, held their forty-ninth annual meeting on Monday evening, March 20... The club has leased a ground situated at Bellevue Station, on the Norristown branch of the Reading Railroad, where they now have a large force at work putting the ground in shape for the opening of the season. The club has thirty-five members on its roll, and is in a flourishing condition.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the condition of the Olympic Club 2

Date Sunday, September 10, 1882
Text

This time-honored organization, and pioneer among base ball clubs of our city, composed of many prominent citizens and lovers of the game, are again in active duty, after many changes of players and location of grounds. Through the exertions and persistent efforts of a few of th most active members they have secured a most desirable location for Tuesdays and Fridays. The grounds are situation at Eighteenth and Cumberland streets, adjoining the Lamb Tavern, and in every way adapted for the use of the same, also being easy of access by the horse cars. [An account of an intramural game follows.]

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the crowd tries to help the home club; block balls

Date Sunday, April 30, 1882
Text

[Chicago vs. Metropolitan 4/29/1882] Singularly enough the rather partisan efforts of the crowd to help the batsmen of the home team actually had the very reverse effect, as, when the Metropolitans batted balls to the crowd they made way to let them pass, and afforded the fielders a chance to recover them; but when the Chicago players were at the bat the crowd would stop the ball, and this led to the “block” rule being worked to advantage of the Chicagos, who ran base with impunity until the ball was in play, which it could not be until handled by the pitcher while in the lines of his position. This helped the Chicagos to save three runs they would not otherwise have done. It was a just punishment to the home crowd for their partisanship.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the decline of regular amateur clubs

Date Saturday, July 29, 1882
Text

Amateur ball playing of late years, in the metropolis has taken up a new phase of its existence, which differs from its club life of twenty odd years ago; and that is the substitution of commercial nines in the place of the regular club nines of old. This has been brought about chiefly by the difficulty of obtaining regular club grounds to play on; the free public ball fields, such as the Parade ground at Prospect Park affords, presenting excellent facilities for playing games between extemporized nines, while regular club grounds are not at command, that is grounds used exclusively by one club. Within the past two or three years these commercial nine matches have come to be the great feature of amateur ball playing in the metropolis; and by amateur play we do not mean that so called amateur class who are but one remove from the regular professional class, but genuine amateurs, such as the Knickerbockers, the Gothams, the Eagle, et al were of old.

Source Metropolitan
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the disposition of Hulberts' stock shares

Date Sunday, April 30, 1882
Text

The Chicago association has voted to pay the wife of deceased President Hulbert par value for $2,000 worth of stock owned by her husband, on which 40 per cent. had been paid.

Source Providence Sunday Star
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the foul bound abolished

Date Friday, December 8, 1882
Text

[reporting on the NL convention] Rule 51, section 3, was amended so that foul hits must be caught on the fly and no on the bound. Cincinnati Enquirer December 8, 1882

The doing away of the foul bound is a measure long contemplated, and is undoubtedly a good idea, in that it helps the batter considerably. Cincinnati Enquirer December 10, 1882

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the growth of the sporting goods industry

Date Saturday, April 8, 1882
Text

It is over fifteen years ago since Andrew Peck first brought an advertisement to The Clipper office, and then it was one about baseball materials. At that time the sporting-goods business, as far as American manufactures were concerned, was in its infancy. What a change has occurred since then. Now there are over a million dollars invested in American manufactured sporting-goods, some of which are exported to Europe. A striking illustration of the rapid advance made in this special line of business is exhibited by Messrs. Peck & Snyder of this city, who on Saturday, April 1, took possession of their splendid sporting-goods emporium in the Vanderbuilt building on Nassau street, their new store occupying a frontage of seventy-five feet on Nassau street, with a similar depth. ... Looking around at the handsome cases containing finished materials and the best paraphernalia for all the sports and pastimes in vogue, such as archers’ bows and arrows, baseball and cricket players’ bats and balls, lacrosse bats, footballs, lawn-tennis players’ nets and bats, fowling pieces and rifles, trout, bass and salmon rods and fisherman’s tackle; in fact every class of outfit for the votaries of field sports, together with chessmen, draughts, backgammon boards, cards, etc., for indoor recreation, added to which are the endless variety of games for parlor amusement, and an exhibition of sporting goods as at command unsurpassed by any store of the kind. Hundreds of thousand of dollars are invested in this one firm’s business, and already their manufacturing departments employ over a thousands of persons.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the guarantee fund renewed

Date Friday, September 22, 1882
Text

The Cincinnati Club will have a $4,000 guarantee fund again next year. Inasmuch as there have been many personal applicaitons for guarantors tickets, the Club have resolved to receive them now. Therefore all who desire to be guarantors next year and possess guarantors tickets may send in their applications at once to the secretary at Room 18, Wiggins Block. Send by mail. Only the limited number will be received and the first supply will be first served. The notes, tickets and conditions will be the same as this year.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the holiday gate receipts

Date Monday, July 10, 1882
Text

The Athletics received over $1,700 for their share of the two games played in this city on the 4th inst.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the inferior strength of the AA to the NL

Date Sunday, September 10, 1882
Text

There is some very good material in the Association, but taking the League Clubs as a standard the fact remains that there is not a really first-class club in the organization. The Cincinnati is the best of the lot, but there isn't a club in the League that couldn't knock the Cincinnati boys out of time without any trouble whatever. … There is a good reason for this. The League had the pick of all the players of the country at the start and the Association had to get along the best way it could. But there is a change coming. Things will be different another year. The Association is an established fact. There is no longer any doubt about it. It has made more money than the League, and success tells. The best men are looking for positions in the Association clubs, and next season these clubs will be able to hold their own with any in the country. Philadelphia Times September 10, 1882

a high delivery

[Louisville vs. Cincinnati 9/11/1882] Mullane had his arm up to his head and threw with the utmost indifference as to height. His delivery is simply a disgrace, and should never be allowed by any umpire. And yet Hecker, who will occupy the points for the Louisvilles to-day, is equally unfair in his delivery. Cincinnati Commercial September 12, 1882

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the influence of Hulbert on the NL

Date Tuesday, February 28, 1882
Text

[The NL's] management has been largely illustrative of the boss system of legislation in the running of the association. President Hulbert, of the Chicago Club, having had almost supreme control of the league. Despite the drawbacks of arbitrary enactments, and the centralizing tendencies of its working, it has done this much good, and that is, that it has made dishonest play in the league too costly to be longer indulged in, and now it has proceeded against the drunken class of players with a strong hand, and in its own peculiar way is weeding out from the professional field the rank plants which have hitherto impeded the growth of a healthy crops.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the interim use of the Ridge avenue grounds

Date Saturday, January 21, 1882
Text

The Philadelphia Club, notwithstanding all reports to the contrary, has secured the ground at Twenty-fourth street and Ridge avenue, Philadelphia, Al Reach, treasurer of the club, having recently signed a lease for a term of years. Every vestige of what is known as the “Horse Market” will be removed, and new and suitable fences, buildings, open seats and a large covered pavilion will be erected early in March. The ground will be placed in first-class condition for baseball, football, lacrosse and lawn-tennis, also bicycle and pedestrian performances.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the lessee of the Oakdale grounds

Date Sunday, June 4, 1882
Text

Mr. Maley, who is still the lessee of Oakdale Park, announces the same to rent from this date to July 1 st. the Park is one of the best in the city, now that it has been so greatly improved. To organizations desiring grounds for base ball, and other Athletic sports, apply at... The Philadelphia Item June 4, 1882

Oakdale Park passes into the hands of the Athletic club on July 1, Messrs. Mason, Simmons and Sharsig having leased it for a term of years. A number of improvements will be made at once, including new open seats on each side of the field which will hold 3,000 persons. The beer stand on the ground is to be removed, and the sale of beer and liquor on the ground positively prohibited. The Philadelphia Item June 11, 1882

small turnout of ladies

[Baltimore vs. Cincinnati 6/6/1882] [ladies’ day] The Cincinnatis celebrated their return home form the East yesterday by soundly beating the Baltimores in the presence of a few over sixteen hundred delighted spectators. The day was a beautiful one, and, being the first of the newly-inaugurated Ladies’ Day, the response by the fair sex was good. About forty ladies were present, and the grand stand looked gay. Cincinnati Commercial June 7, 1882

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the manufacture of baseballs

Date Saturday, December 23, 1882
Text

“Base balls are like human beings—you never know what's in them until you cut them open,” said Al. Reach, the old time second baser, as he placed on of his professional league balls before a circular saw, and after some little trouble halved it. “There! What do you think of that? A great deal of science and hard work is required in the manufacture of balls. For instance, the ball known as 'Reach's professional,' adopted last week by the American and Inter-State associations, is patented. In the center is a round piece of the best Para gum. Then there is the best stocking yarn. This is stretched first by machinery to its utmost tension. Then it is wound by hand so tight that it resembles one solid piece of material. The winding is done by single strands at a time. This makes it more compact. A round of white yarn is now put in, and the whole covered with a rubber plastic cement. When this becomes hard it preserves the spherical shape of the ball, and it prevents the inside of the ball from shifting when the ball is struck. You have seen some balls knocked egg shaped the first blow they are struck. Well, with this cement covering that is impossible. Then comes more yarn, and finally the cover. The covering for all good balls is made from horse hide. Long experience has shown this to be the best. Cow or goat skin will become wrinkled and wear loose. Why, there is as much change in the making of base balls in the last ten years as there is in the game itself. The sewing on of the covers is done by hand, and the thread used is catgut.”

No one man makes a ball complete. One person becomes proficient in the first winding, then some one else takes it; another man will fit the cover, but there are very few of the workmen who become proficient in the art of sewing the cover. A dozen men in the course of a day will turn out 25 dozen first-class balls, and as a rule they made good wages. Some manufacturers put carpet list in the balls, but it can easily be detected when the batting begins, because the ball soon loses its shape. Of course, for the cheap balls, such as the boys begin with, not so much care is exercised in the manufacture. They are made in cups, which revolve by fast moving machinery. The insides are made up of scraps of leather and rubber, and then carpet listing is wound around the ball. It takes a man about ten minutes to turn one of these out complete. The professional ball weighs from 5 to 5½ ounces, and is 9¼ inches in circumference. All the other balls used by the professionals and high class amateurs are of the same proportions. It is calculated that about 5,000,000 base balls are made each year, and these are not extravagant figures when it is considered that upon every vacant lot in the large cities and upon every village green in the country there are crowds of men and boys banging away at a ball whenever the weather permits. And yet people say the national game is dying out. Cincinnati Daily Gazette December 23, 1882

Buffalo Club finances

The treasurer of the Buffalos has prepared a statement of the earnings and expenses of that team for 1882, and as it is of interest, in that it shows the nature of the income and disbursement of a nine, we give it in full as follows:

Receipts

Cash on hand November 22, 1881........................... $ 2,678.21

Stock subscriptions.................................................. $ 135.00

Home games (League)............................................. $17,636.66

Foreign games (League)........................................... $ 7,989.20

Exhibition games...................................................... $ 4,756.01

Exhibition game (Metropolitans vs. Buffalo)........... $ 100.00

Ground privileges..................................................... $ 524.05

Uniforms................................................................... $ 242.50

Interest...................................................................... $ 105.00

Total.............................................................. $34,166.63

Disbursements

Salaries..................................................................... $14,771.62

Visiting clubs............................................................ $ 5,107.05

Traveling expenses (including umpires)................... $ 4,985.16

Expenses................................................................... $ 940.15

National League dues............................................... $ 100.00

Ground rent.............................................................. $ 1,000.00

Uniforms.................................................................. $ 39 4.23

Employees at games................................................ $ 228.50

Cash on hand........................................................... $ 6,640.52

Total............................................................. $34,166.63

Cincinnati Enquirer December 24, 1882

Source Cincinnati Daily Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new Baltimore Club 2

Date Sunday, October 1, 1882
Text

There has been a regular association formed, the officers of which have been elected as follows: President, George Cassidy; Vice President, Charles J. McAleese, Secretary, N. W. Stewart; Treasurer, Wm. S. Gittinger; Managers, Wm. Barnie and Alphonse T. Houck. Mr. Barnie will have active management of the club on the field. Mr. Barnie is manager of the Philadelphia club, and is well known for his success in the management of base ball clubs. He has already secured several players, among whom is Householder, the first baseman of the present Baltimore Club. Newington Park grounds have been leased to Messrs. Barnie & Houck for next season, and all details arranged. The improvements at the grounds for next season will consist of an entirely new fence, sixteen feet high, enclosing them. A grand stand, capable of accommodating 1,200 people, will be erected and all new shedding and seating accommodation will be erected. The directors of the new club are the same gentlemen mentioned as officers, with the addition of the two managers.

Source Baltimore American
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new Baltimore Club 3

Date Saturday, November 4, 1882
Text

The Baltimore Club was not represented at the recent meeting of the American Association, and it was generally understood that it had resigned. A team under the management of Wm. H. Barnie was, however, elected to fill the vacancy. It is said to be backed by wealthy residents of Baltimore, and will play upon Newington Park, in that city.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new Columbus Club; liability of stockholders

Date Saturday, November 11, 1882
Text

The Columbus Baseball company is the name of the new club entered for the American Association championship, and hailing from Columbus, O. To show the interest taken in baseball in that city, we would state that the sum of $5,000 was subscribed in the brief time of three days, and as much more could have been raised if desired. The club was incorporated Oct. 14, with a captial stock of $5,000, in shares of fifty dollars each, and under the laws of Ohio each stockholder is liable for twice the amount of stock he owns.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new Oriole club

Date Saturday, December 2, 1882
Text

Barnie’s new Baltimore club has been christened the Oriole of Baltimore, and its colors will be black and yellow. The president is Geo. Cassidy, and the secretary W. S. Gittinger. Barnie and Houck are the managers.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the obligation to try to steal a base; batter swinging to protect the runner

Date Friday, September 22, 1882
Text

Any player who gets to first and is contented to stand there till some other batter advances him is a man that has no business at professional ball playing. It is his duty to make a dash for second just as soon ashe can get a start after first base is made; for if he stands on first till the next man hits the ball it is almost sure to be a force out or a double play, unless the batter hits safely. Then the man at bat should always assist the base runner by strking at and purposely missing the ball pitched as the base-runner starts. This piece of strategy is sure to more or less confuse the catcher. And to try to hit the ball as the runner is off to second is a bigger mistake than to stand inactive, for if a foul be hit, the chances are that the runner will be caught and put out before he can get back. A clear headed player of any running ability will never linger long at first, and a clear headed batter who is playing for his club and not for a record, will never miss striking at the ball as the base runner starts.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the refreshment and bar concession; advertising concession

Date Sunday, December 24, 1882
Text

The refreshment privileges of the grounds for 1883, including these privileges during Sunday games, will be awarded to the highest and best bidder at once; also the advertising privileges of the grounds. Cincinnati Commercial Gazette December 24, 1882

Mark Wallace has rented the refreshment and bar privileges of the Cincinnati Base Ball Grounds for 1883. Those who know Mr. Wallace know how well he caters to the public. A better man than he could not be put in charge. Cincinnati Commercial Gazette January 7, 1883

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the relationship between the Mets and the New Yorks

Date Sunday, December 17, 1882
Text

[reporting on the American Association convention] In the executive session there was quite a discussion held in reference to the position of the Metropolitan club, arising from the statement made in the convention that the Metropolitan club—applying for membership in the American Association—and the New York club, jest elected to the membership of the League, were practically but one organization with two club teams, one being assigned to compete for the American championship and the other for that of the League. Messrs. Appleton and Mutrie, the Metropolitan Club delegates, stated that no matter who the gentlemen were who backed the club financially, they were prepared to sustain the laws of the American Association and to work in support of its interest, even if the non-intercourse act of the past season went into force again, and after some further explanations of the status of the Metropolitan Club, the question of election went to a vote, and the club was unanimously elected to membership.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the reserve rule and the AA

Date Sunday, September 3, 1882
Text

Dunlap would like to play in this city next season, but the Cleveland Club intend to hold him under the five-men rule if possible. The same is the case with a number of other prominent League players who have offers from American Association clubs, and the League will have trouble in again enforcing this obnoxious rule.

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the rising pitching delivery; difficulty enforcing the delivery rule

Date Sunday, December 17, 1882
Text

The allowance of a shoulder delivery to pitchers is but an acknowledgment that the old rule of a waist height can not be enforced. The trouble heretofore in enforcing the rule was not for want of a penalty, but in the severity of it. The penalty was the forfeiture of the game, and a sudden termination of the playing. Of course this would not do, for no crowd of spectators who had paid their entrance money would submit to having a game cut short by an umpire calling a “foul baulk” for an offense in pitching. The penalty should have been made a reasonable one, then it could and would have been enforced and shoulder pitching would never have been successful. If the penalty would have been to give the batter his base, and base runners also a base, the result would have been a speedy cure of high armed pitching. As the rule now stands it is no better than before, because the penalty is not changed. The rule now says, “below the shoulder” instead of “below the waist.” Every sensible person knows that half the high-handed pitchers go above the shoulder, and some as high as the ears. The same old trouble and source of fussing will exist next year again unless a practical penalty be substituted and we shall, in a few years, be compelled to still further amend by substituting “below the crown of the head,” instead of “below the shoulder.” the upward tendency of the pitcher's arm should be checked.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the ruling in the Thorner case

Date Sunday, December 31, 1882
Text

Justus Thorner vs. Geo. Harencourt et al. Judge Harmon decided this case yesterday. He said, Plaintiff claims that he was a partner with defendants Geol. Herancourt, Aaron Stern, Louis Kramer, Victor H. Long and John R. McLean, in which was known as the Cincinnati Base Ball Club; that he was the owner of a one-eight interest; that Louis Kramer and Victor H. Long each had a one-eighth interest, and that Aaron Stern and John R. McLean each owned a one-fourth interest, O. P. Caylor also claiming to be the owner of the one-fourth interest of John R. McLean; that in the prosecution of the business of the partnership, large profits were earned over and above all expenses, and are now on hand, amounting to about $15,000; that defendants have excluded him from his right in participating in the management of the affairs of the partnership, and are about to divide the accumulated profits among them to his exclusion. He prays an account of such profits, that a receiver be appointed, and that, after ascertaining the sums due the members of the partnership, such sums may be distributed to them accordingly.

The defendants, other than McLean and Long, who have filed no answer, deny that plaintiff is or has been a partner with them, as alleged. It appears from the testimony that on June 28, 1881, a written contract of partnership was entered into, signed by Victor H. Long, Justus Thorner, John E. Price and O. P. Caylor, and articles drawn, providing that each one of these four persons should be an equal partner, and each entitled therefore to a one-fourth interest. It is conceded upon both side, that the sum of money to be put in by Justus Thorner, $100, was to be at the time payment was made, and in fact was furnished by the defendant Herancourt, and that the plaintiff never furnished any of the capital. The same was the case with Mr. Caylor and Mr. McLean, the latter furnishing the money, although Mr. Caylor signed the articles, and it further appears that Mr. Kramer was the real party in interest, although Mr. Long signed the paper.

It appears, too, that Mr. Herancourt was present at the time Mr. Thorner signed the articles, and that it was understood between them, and understood generally, that the real partner was Mr. Herancourt, although the nominal partner was Mr. Thorner. Although, of course, as to third parties, the apparent partner would be held to be the partner, it would be questionable whether, in a court of equity, in a contest between the parties, the real state of facts might not be looked at without regard to the apparent state of facts. But, whether that be so or not, this written article can cut no further figure in the case, because John E. Price died shortly afterwards, and the firm was dissolved. The parties appear, however, to have gone one, rather considering the concern as a joint stock company, or as a mining corporation, such as they have in the Pacific States, where the death of a partner does not dissolve the concern, but whoever buys the deceased partner’s interest steps in and takes his place. So Mr. Stern, who had purchased the interest of Mr. Price, appeared in September, 1881, as the partner in his place, and the concern went on.

Mr. Thorner contends that the one-fourth interest was, by agreement between him and Herancourt, to be their joint property–that is, this is the contention of his counsel–and that his right as such joint owner having been recognized by the Club by suffering him to appear at the meetings, he now has a right to an account. The exact state of the case, however, as detailed in his testimony and that of Mr. Herancourt, is as follows: Mr. Thorner says: “The agreement between me and Mr. Herancourt was that I should go and get up a club, and after the thing was in running order I could retire if I desired to do so, and he would give me half of his entire profits.” He says further that while he and Mr. Thorner were walking down Vine street one day, he remembered distinctly Mr. Herancourt saying: “I will give you twenty per cent. of my profits, if I make any.”

It is agreed, therefore, between Mr. Thorner and Mr. Herancourt that Mr. Thorner is entitled to something for his trouble in getting up the club, but he certainly is entitled to that something on an agreement between him and Herancourt. The testimony does not show that there was ever any agreement between Thorner and the toher parties as to his having a right to a share in the profits of the club, or any agreement between Herancourt and the plaintiff that Thorner should have any right to look to the profits of the club. They were Herancourt’s profits which Herancourt was to share as both say. Herancourt was the real partner. He was so recognized, and, in the very midst of the career of the club, sent a written statement to the club that he was the sole owner, and Mr. Thorner entitled to no interest in the affairs of the club, and, upon the strength of that, at the request of Mr. Herancourt, Mr. Thorner was ignored.

It appears by a decisive preponderance of the testimony that Mr. Thorner continually averred that he claimed no interest in the club; he claimed, so far as the club was concerned, to be acting in the general interests of the game of base-ball, his only expectation for compensation laying in his agreement with Mr. Herancourt.

The only issue appearing in the evidence is an issue, not between the plaintiff and all these defendants, but between the plaintiff and Herancourt. That issue is not made upon the pleadings, and the well known rules of pleading require the issue made to be one which relates to all the parties. It is conceded by both parties that the agreement was between Herancourt and the plaintiff; that Herancourt should share his profits with the plaintiff, and the only dispute between them is as to whether the plaintiff shall have fifty per cent. or only twenty per cent.

The Court can not, on an action for account against all these defendants, proceed to try an issue between two of them only. There is no averment here that Mr. Herancourt is not responsible or that he is insolvent, or in any danger of being insolvent, and, as the plaintiff’s rights depend upon the contract rights of Mr. Herancourt, instead of suing the partnership upon an account, he must sue Mr. Herancourt upon his contract. Whatever profits Mr. Herancourt got, and which he was to share with the plaintiff, he must share with him. Whether half and half, or to the proportion of eighty and twenty per cent, must be determined in an action between them on an issue made for the purpose. The petition must be dismissed. Cincinnati Commercial December 31, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the status of the Atlantic Club

Date Saturday, January 28, 1882
Text

We lately had an interview with Manager Wm. Barnie of the Brooklyn Atlantics, and the information derived from him in regard to the movements of the Atlantic Club management for the coming season is of sufficient interest to professional baseball readers to make special mention of the interview. We asked him what he intended doing in the matter of placing a new Atlantic nine in the field for 1882. Barnie's response to sundry queries on the subject showed very plainly that he was in a rather doubtful position as to where he would be found in April next, whether as a member of the American Association—the convention of which he attended as a delegate—or as a member of the League Alliance. Secretary Williams has written to know from him what his intentions are, but as yet he cannot satisfactorily reply. One of his objections to entering the American Association is the rule which gives to each club the whole of the receipts from matches played on their own grounds, substituting the payment of a fixed sum—sixty odd dollars a game—in lieu of the customary division of receipts. On the other hand Manager Barnie is debarred from any benefit accruing from his becoming a League alliance Club member by the fact that the Metropolitan League Alliance Club has entire control of the district of country which extends four miles from the corporate limits of the City of New York, which law deprives him of League Alliance membership in the City of Brooklyn. As regards joining either Association, it will be seen that Barnie is on the horns of a dilemma. He will await events until March, by which time things will have developed themselves more satisfactorily than exists at present. Barnie has, however, prepared himself to enter upon the coming campaign of 1882, and as a preliminary has engaged a very fair team, which will be materially strengthened as occasion may require.

He has choice of three grounds, one of which—located on Long Island—will enable him to join the League Alliance without interfering with the Metropolitan Club's district. The management of the latter club was last season taught by some costly experience that there was no club which attracted such a paying attendance to their matches with the Metropolitan team, as did the Atlantic nine; and as this season the promise is not very good for any rival local club being organized to give the Metropolitans paying games, it should be their policy to afford Manager Barnie every assistance. Were this done, it would unquestionably be pecuniarily advantageous to both teams. Under any circumstances, Barnie says, he will have an Atlantic nine in the local field for 1882. New York Clipper January 28, 1882

Manager Barnie recently addressed a communication to President McKnight, announcing the withdrawal of the Atlantics from the American Association. In assigning a reason for this action, Barnie said that he could not raise money enough in Brooklyn to warrant him in remaining in that city any longer. It appears now that he was rather too hasty in his action, as he writes that within the past few days matters have loomed up wonderfully, and the chances are that he will remain in the City of Churches. He is said to be negotiation for a ground adjacent to the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and easy of access from all parts of that city. New York Clipper February 18, 1882

The Brooklyn Atlantics left the American Association for two reasons; one was, that if it remained in it it could not play games with the Metropolitan or Philadelphia clubs; and secondly, because of the clause giving to the home club all receipts at the gate, which rule is death to clubs intending to go West to play and also to clubs coming East for the purpose, as the $65 they are allowed will not pay traveling expenses. Brooklyn Daily Eagle February 21, 1882

Manager Barnie has concluded to engage the Union Ball Grounds for the use of his Atlantic nine the coming season, and he has arranged with Mr. Cammeyer to occupy the old field every week day this season except Saturday, on which day the grounds are to be solely at the command of commercial nines as last year. Brooklyn Daily Eagle March 1, 1882

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the umpire assaults a reporter; reporter for the Herald; fireworks

Date Sunday, August 6, 1882
Text

“Joe” Dunnigan, one of the League official umpires, who resides in this city, last night, during the fireworks at the Polo Ground, poured forth a volley of foul and abusive language in front of the old grand stand over a statement which appeared in the Herald of Saturday, that he had made two glaring errors while umpiring the Boston-Metropolitan game. He was under the influence of liquor at the time and the Herald reporter, whom he addressed, refused to notice him and walked away with the manager and several directors of the Metropolitan Club. He followed and continued his low abuse. At the close of the fireworks he assaulted the reporter, tearing his clothing and was cowardly enough to attempt to kick him in the face when the reporter slipped down. Such men are a disgrace to baseball playing. New York Herald August 6, 1882

In Saturday’s N. Y. Herald Mr. Rankin, the baseball reporter of that paper, criticised the decisions of Dunnigan, the umpire in the Boston and Metropolitan match of the previous day. Instead of quietly discussing the merits of the question with Rankin, Dunnigan–as appears from Rankin’s report of the affair–on Saturday night met The Herald reporter at the Polo Grounds, and, after verbal abuse, at the close of the fireworks, assaulted him, tearing his clothing. One result of this disgraceful attack is that Dunnigan has been ruled off the grounds in the capacity of umpire, and steps are likely to be taken to have him expelled from the League.

Source New York Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the umpire is mobbed

Date Sunday, September 17, 1882
Text

Last Sunday Umpire Smith was attacked by a mob, after the Cincinnati-St. Louis game, and the Globe-Democrat describes the scene as follows: “Had the umpire been a pick-pocket, who had just retired from business with a competency obtained from the rough element of those present, he could not have been more roundly abused. Each inning after the sixth, at critical intervals, the hoodlums yelled and hooted at him. The most disgusting phase of their conduct was at the close of the game. Smith left the grounds, with the Cincinnati players, and was followed to the herdic by a gang of rowdies, who yelled, howled and shouted to slug the - - -. Smith reached the herdic in safety, and the players followed him in. as the vehicle passed through the gate it was met by another mob of young roughs. The latter were armed with chunks of macadam, and, as the herdic passed into Grand avenue, they fired a volley of stones at it. The missiles were undoubtedly directed at Smith, as nearly all hit that end of the coach. One of the stones broke a pane of glass. Another hit Smith on the side of the head, and hurt him severely. Incensed at the cowardly assault, Capt. Snyder ordered the driver to come to a halt, and, as he obeyed instructions promptly, Snyder, Carpenter, Macullar and two or three others jumped to the ground and made at the gang. The latter turned tail as they saw the Cincinnati boys get out of the herdic and scattered like a pack of scared hounds. Then the players returned to the coach, but had no sooner reembarked that the cowardly mob surrounded them again. At this juncture the mounted police went to the rescue, and the hoodlums were scattered right and left, while the visitors were driven away at a lively rate.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the umpire talks back to the crowd

Date Sunday, July 23, 1882
Text

[Boston vs. Philadelphia 7/22/1882] Mr. McLean umpired the game and had some close decisions. One of these proved to be directly against the home club, and the crowd jeered until the professor of the manly art lost his temper. Mr. McLean then walked boldly over to the crowd and informed them that he did not intend to stand any nonsense and was able to stand his own ground. After this McLean got along charmingly.

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the umpire won't force down the pitcher's delivery

Date Friday, September 1, 1882
Text

[Cincinnati vs. Louisville 8/31/1882] There has been a great deal of kicking on both sides about Simmons’ umpiring, and today Snyder wanted to rule him out because he would not force Mullane to lower his delivery. This made the crowd badly down on the crack catcher, and they hooted him in a manner that should disgrace any decent city.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

thirteen strikeouts in one game

Date Saturday, August 5, 1882
Text

Bob Matthews has not lost the cunning of his right arm. Last week he struck out thirteen men in one game against the Worcesters.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

three balls used in one game; a semi-intentional walk

Date Wednesday, September 6, 1882
Text

[Cincinnati vs. St. Louis 9/5/1882] The game was played with no less than three balls. When the Browns were at the bat in the eighth inning they knocked the cover off the ball and the home team called for a new one. Snyder, too experienced to be caught napping, pulled out his rules and showed that no new ball could be substituted for an old one, except at the close of an even inning, so the inning was ended, and when the eighth [sic] a new ball was put in play. ... In the ninth inning, with the score still 7 to 2, against the Browns, W. Gleason and McCaffrey hit safely, Comiskey followed suit, and the bags were all occupied when Walker took up his bat. Twice Oscar landed the ball over the right-field fence, and twice it sailed past each of the front line. The second stroke landed the sphere somewhere near the Fair grounds, and it was not recovered. Another new ball was produced.... [a run subsequently scored on an error] If Walker could land the ball on the far side of the fence the score would have been seven to six with no man out, and, the crowd knowing all this, watched the movements of the player with eagerness. White, [pitcher], whoever, would not let him hit the ball, and he was given first.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ticket scalpers

Date Sunday, May 28, 1882
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Athletic 5/22/1882] These clubs met for the second time on Monday afternoon, at Recreation Park, and so great was the excitement that every available space on the ground was occupied, and hundreds were turned away for want of room. On the outside drove a lucrative business and were soon cleaned out of all their tickets.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Troy and Worcester expelled from the NL

Date Saturday, September 30, 1882
Text

The League held a special meeting Sept. 22 in Philadelphia, Pa. ... The most important business of the meeting was the resignations of the Troy and Worcester Clubs, and the applications of the Metropolitan and Philadelphia Clubs to fill the vacancies. The principal reason given for the withdrawal of the two clubs was their want of success, both financially and in the contest for the championship. No objection was offered to the withdrawal of the two clubs, and when their delegates offered their resignations they were promptly accepted, to go into effect at the end of the present season. The applications for admission of the Metropolitan and Philadelphia Clubs were filed, and will be acted upon at the regular meeting of the League in December next. New York Clipper September 30, 1882

It is now denied that the Troy and Worcester Clubs voluntarily resigned their membership in the League. Director Simester of the Worcesters says that a resolution was adopted declaring it the sense of the meeting that these clubs be not represented in the association next season. The vote stood 6 to 2, Troy and Worcester of course voting in the negative. The resolution was offered by Thompson of the Detroit Club, who had been the prime moving in the scheme to change the membership of the League, and who recently made a personal canvass of the six clubs voting in the affirmative, to work up and secure concerted action at the meeting. The reason given for kicking out Worcester and Troy was that the patronage in either of these cities is not large enough to give the visiting clubs a share of gate-money sufficient to pay their expenses, and that, as New York and Philadelphia were anxious to be admitted, it was simply a question of business whether two non-paying cities should be continued in the copartnership when two paying cities could be secured to take their places. The representatives of Troy and Worcester made a vigorous resistance to the carrying out of the plan of the other clubs, but were powerless against the majority. As the matter stands they can remain in the League during the present week, and then they are practically out of the association, although their membership does not cease until the annual meeting of the League, in December. The League transacted no other business than to adopt the resolution offered by Mr. Thompson, and to vote to allow the clubs to engage players for next season. A director of the Troy Club also denies that they have resigned, and says that a resolution was adopted expelling the club after Dec. 2, against the protest of its representatives. The directors of the Troy Club have been at great expense this year in laying out new grounds, and according to the constitution of the League no club can be expelled unless it has violated the League rules. At the meeting the representatives of all the other clubs admitted that they had violated no rule. The directors declare that if the League insists upon the expulsion a suit for heavy damages will be begun by the Troy Club. The Troy players express indignation at the way Troy has been used, and say that they will remain there next season in preference to going to any other city. New York Clipper September 30, 1882

A director of the Troy base ball club denies the truth of the Philadelphia dispatch that the club resigned at the League meeting at Philadelphia on Friday. He says a resolution was adopted expelling the club after December 21, against the protest of its representatives. The directors of the Troy club say they have been at great expense this year in laying out new grounds, and that according to the constitution of the League, no club can be expelled unless it has violated the League rules. At the meeting the representatives of all the other clubs admitted that the Troy had violated no rule. The directors declare that if the League insists upon the expulsion a suit for heavy damages will be begun by the Troy club. In the meantime the remaining games of the season will be played by the Troy, and as many of Troy's players as possible will be retained for next year. The Philadelphia Item October 1, 1882

The representative of the Worcester club at the recent league meeting wishes it distinctly and emphatically understood that the Worcesters did not resign from the league. They were simply “bounced.” Boston Herald October 1, 1882

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Troy expelled by the Athletics; intercourse with the Mets cut off

Date Friday, May 12, 1882
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The Board of Directors of the local club received official notification from Secretary Williams of the expulsion of John Troy by the Athletics. This settles the matter of the American and League teams playing with each other from this time out. The Cincinnati Club immediately telegraphed to O'Rourke, Manager of the Buffalos, that if they contested with the Detroits with Troy in their team, the game booked with the Bisons would be declared off. A the latter nine will be compelled to remain in Detroit until Monday, the contest is off any way. The Athletics did perfectly right in bouncing the little crooked player, and the only mistake they made was in putting it off so long. Cincinnati Enquirer May 12, 1882

[reporting on a Board meeting of the Cincinnati Club] It was concluded to write to Secretary Williams and advise him to correspond with the Metropolitans and Atlantics in regard to playing the Detroits. He was requested to explain to those Clubs that if they did contend with the Detroits, all of their American dates would be declared off. It does not seem possible that they will sacrifice upwards of twenty games for the purpose of playing two or three with Detroit. The two Clubs can play the other League Clubs, and still the American nines can meet them. Cincinnati Enquirer May 13, 1882

President McKnight has notified the St. Louis nine that they can not play the Metropolitans on Thursday if the latter kept their engagement with the Chicagos yesterday. He holds that as long as the last-named team has met the Detroits, who have an expelled player in their nine, that no American Association team can do battle with them. The Constitution of the Association covering such matters is as follows:

“No game of ball shall be played between an Association Club and any other Club that has forfeited its membership in this Association. No game of ball shall be played between an Association Club and any other Club employing or presenting in its nine a player expelled, or under suspension, from the Association. Nor shall any Association Club play any Club that has, at any time during the same playing season, played a game of ball with any other club employing or presenting in its nine any player expelled or suspended from the Association; Provided, That in case the Club employing such expelled or suspended Association player shall discharge such player from its service, Association Clubs may thereafter play against such Club, and against other Clubs that may have played such Club while employing such player.”

There seems to be a diversity of opinion as to the real meaning of the section. Some hold that it does not prevent the Cincinnatis from playing the Metropolitans if they have had games with the Chicagos, who have met the Detroits. The rule only works when the Detroits and Metropolitans have a contest, then the latter nine is barred from any games with the American nines.

There is undoubtedly a chance for argument in the matter, but President McKnight appears to have announced his decision only after considerable investigation into the debated point. It might have been a little more judicious to allow the American nines to meet the Metropolitans until they ended the subject by entering into games with the Detroits. It certainly would have added to the treasury of all teams who might have dates with the New York club before the occurrence of that event. But as it would be a matter of but little time before the Detroits would go to New York, all discussion on the point should e done away with. The Metropolitans and the Philadelphias seem to prefer the League to the American Clubs, and they should not be interfered with. It is a long lane that has no turn in it. Cincinnati Enquirer May 30, 1882

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Troy players jump ship

Date Sunday, October 15, 1882
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The Troy players, who were going to be so loyal to that city, have weakened, and when Director Hotchkin got some of them together the other night, it was found that six had already signed with other clubs. It is said that Holbert, Welch and Gillespie will play in Cleveland. Only one of them was willing to sign in Troy, and he only if the others would. On account of this fiasco the opinion is generally expressed in Troy that this is their last year in the League.

Source Providence Sunday Star
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Troy signed with Providence

Date Sunday, September 10, 1882
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Official notice has been received that Troy has signed with the Providence club.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Troy's status

Date Wednesday, March 15, 1882
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[reporting on the AA meeting] Just before the adjournment Simmons, Philadelphia, arose and asked if any of the Association Clubs proposed to play the Detroits, if Troy, who deserted their team, remained with that nine. Manager Bancroft, of Detroit, who was present, made a statement to the effect that the President of their Club, who had signed Troy, did not know the circumstances of the case. He acknowledged that he had made a mistake, and proposed to let Troy go. He, however, wanted to keep his word wit that player, and he would release him if the Athletics would hire him. This Simmons said he could not do, still Bancroft says he will not play.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

turn-up reserved seats

Date Sunday, December 31, 1882
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[reporting on the Cincinnati Club annual meeting] There will be about three hundred turn-up seat chairs put into the grand stand and numbered, which will be on sale down town during the forenoon of games for those persons withing to reserve seats. ...an extra twenty-five cents will be charged for reserved seats. Cincinnati Commercial December 31, 1882

boys to be admitted for ten cents midway through the game

[reporting on the Cincinnati Club annual meeting] A ten-cent “pen” is to be erected against right field fence for the use of boys, who will be admitted after the fourth or fifth inning. Cincinnati Commercial December 31, 1882

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

two Lew Browns?

Date Saturday, August 12, 1882
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Lew Brown is not and has not been playing with the Baltimore Club this season, a Cincinnati contemporary’s continued statements to the contrary notwithstanding. The Baltimore player of that name hails from California, and was engaged by the Providence Club as their right-fielder at the commencement of the season, and was shortly afterwards released.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire Dick Higham expelled

Date Saturday, July 1, 1882
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A special meeting of the Board of Directors of the League was held June 24 in Detroit, Mich. They went into secret session to try Richard Higham, the well-known professional umpire, on charges of “crookedness” preferred by President Thompson of the Detroit Club, who alleged that Highahm had given “pointers” to gamblers on the results of the League games, and backed up his accusation with a letter purporting to be signed by Higham, offering to tell a well-known Detroit gambler how to bet on the games he was going to umpire on the Detroit’s last Eastern trip. The letter signed “Dick” is said to be addressed to James Todd, and proposed to arrange for cipher-dispatches, whereby Todd will know whether to bet on Detroit or their opponents. The letter was found either in the street or at the hotel Higham was stopping at in Detroit, and was handed to Thompson. Higham was heard in his own defense, and vigorously protested his innocence, denying that he wrote the letter; but it was alleged that four experts had compared it with other letters of his and pronounced the writing identical. Freeman Brown, manager of the Worcesters, testified that Higham was seen in the society of a gambler when in Worcester, Mass.; and Manager Bancroft was also called as a witness. The Board of Directors decided by an unanimous vote to expel Higham from the League and the list of umpires, and the result of their deliberations, which are supposed to be secret, was sent to N. E. Young, the League secretary, for official record and promulgation. It is but justice to add that Higham has many friends who refuse to believe him guilty. New York Clipper July 1, 1882

The directors of the League held a special meeting on the 24th, when the Detroit club presented charges against Richard Higham, one of the League's umpires. Letters and dispatches from Highham were presented, showing that he was in collusion with gamblers, telling them what clubs to bet on when he umpired. The charges were declared sustained, and Higham was expelled. In our opinion the League did a very sensible thing, for Dick has been under a cloud for some time, and should never have been chosen as an umpire.

The letter upon which Umpire Higham was expelled read as follows:

Detroit, May 27, 1882.

Friend Todd—I just got word we leave for the East on the 3 P.M. train, so I will not have time to see you. If you don't hear from me play the Providence Tuesday, and if I want you to play the Detroits Wednesday I will telegraph in this way: “Buy all the lumber you can.” If you do not hear from me do not play the Detroits, but buy Providence sure—that is, the first game. I think this will do for the Eastern series. I will write you from Boston. You can write me at any time in care of Detroit B. B. Club. When you send me any money you can send me check in care of the Detroit B. B. Club, and it will be all right. You will see by that book I gave you the other day what city I will be in. Yours truly, Dick. The Philadelphia Item July 2, 1882

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire behind home

Date Sunday, August 20, 1882
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The easiest position in a base ball match is that of the umpire. All he has to do is to catch all the passed balls and half the foul balls on his ribs and stomach and cry “ball” and “strike” in regular alternation, and enjoy a general and enthusiastic cussing from both nines and all the spectators when the game is over. Anybody can be an umpire if he has only the “gall., quoting the Burlington Hawkeye

Source The Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire close behind the catcher

Date Saturday, November 25, 1882
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... it [is] no small task to stand up close behind the catcher in a match-game and carefully watch the hieght and the direction of the swiftly-pitched ball sent in. No little courage or pluck is needed...to face the risks of injury involved in standing close up behind the bat to umpire a game in which swift curve-pitching is the feature of the attacking force on both sides. Then, soo, there are the coolness and nerve required in order to judge the character of the individual ball promptly and decidedly...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire indicator

Date Saturday, June 17, 1882
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Spalding’s Automatic Umpire’s Indicator is the name of a little apparatus just brought out by A.G. Spalding & Bros. of Chicago. It is convenient in size, works automatically, and is a great assistant to umpires in keeping an accurate record of balls and strikes. Dick Higham, John Kelly and other prominent League umpires pronounce it just the thing, we are informed.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire wages too low; a call for a salaried umpire corps; crowd control

Date Sunday, August 13, 1882
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it can...be hardly expected that a good umpire can be secured for $5 a game. Many of those who have been called upon to officiate in that position this season are broken-down players, with anything but a savory reputation, and whose integrity is regarded with considerable doubt, and competent, gentlemanly umpires suffer from association with such men. Ten dollars or $15 is not too much to pay an umpire. The sum now paid by the league is ridiculously small, and can call into service, with such rare exceptions as McLean, Doscher and men of that class, only men of small caliber. Now that there is an unusually large interest in base ball in the country, and probably will be next season, and the game has been brought to an honest, scientific basis, the next step to be taken to to make a complete change in the present league umpire system. It would be a good plan for the league to engage a number of umpires at a stated salary for the season. Boston Herald August 13, 1882

[from a letter to the editor by “Umpire”] Surely the fee paid an umpire will not correct [the problem], no matter how large that fee may be. There are competent men who will not bear the fault-findings, the jeers, insults and chaffings of a crowd for any amount of money7, but who will umpire, with pleasure, too, if this everlasting jibing of an audience can be stopped. Now, if the league managers wish to correct the “umpire evil,” they can nearly do it; not wholly, for the best men will sometimes err in judgment. How? Make rules that will assure competent men that their decisions will be respected. Make rules that will expel any spectator from the grounds who insults an umpire. Who thinks of insulting a performer in the theatre or in the circus? Why not insist that players and umpires shall not be ins8ulted on the ball field? It can be done, for 99 out of every 100 who patronize the ball field will aid the league officers in such efforts. Let the applause be hearty, but let the disapproval of wrong decisions and plays be free from insult, and the interest of the game will be promoted. Boston Herald August 17, 1882

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire's mask

Date Saturday, July 22, 1882
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Tom Carey, one of the American Association’s umpires, wears a mask while filling that position. New York Clipper July 22, 1882

[Tom] Carey [AA umpire] wears a mask to hide the blush of shame that must suffuse his face when he swindles a club out of a game. The Philadelphia Item July 23, 1882

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Von der Ahe a shrewd businessman

Date Sunday, December 31, 1882
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Some of the St. Louis papers have been trying to make a fool out of President Von der Ahe, of the Brown Stockings, which he is far from being. On the contrary, that gentleman is a shrewd business man.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

weak praise for the next season's Philllies

Date Sunday, October 22, 1882
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Mr. Al. Reach in announcing the [1883 Philadlephia] nine said that he had hoped to have secured some of the prominent players of the profession for his club, but he had been unsuccessful. He had, however, secured the very best playing talent available, and felt satisfied that the club would do honor to the city.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Wes Fisler working for Wanamaker's

Date Sunday, March 19, 1882
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Wes Fisler, the first baseman, as well as the best dressed man in the profession, is a clerk in Wanamaker's big store in Philadelphia.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

what is an error?

Date Sunday, November 12, 1882
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A fielder should be given an error for every misjudged fly, and the infield for every failure to stop and field a ball within any reasonable distance of them. The hit should never be too hot for a fielders, for it is for this work that he is paid to do. There should be no such thing as excusable errors, for no error, no matter under what circumstances made, can be excusable with professional players.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Wise to be a test case

Date Tuesday, March 14, 1882
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[reporting on the AA meeting] The cases of the traitors, Wise, Troy and Holbert were then brought up, and the line of action to be followed quickly adopted... The Association will take up one of the cases in order to test the matter, and will apply for an injunction to prevent the deserters from participating in the games of the Club with which he has signed. At first it was proposed to enjoin all three, but as only the contracts with Wise were at hand it was decided to make things warm for him first and let the other two cases hang fire until his was settled. The Cincinnati Club was requested to not expel Wise, but be required to get an injunction against him, the expenses of the suit to be borne by the entire Association.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Worcester Club finances 2

Date Saturday, July 22, 1882
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The stockholders’ meeting of the Worcester Club July 14 was largely attended. Enough money was raised to place a balance of $1,500 in the treasury. Freeman Brown was retained as clerk and treasurer of the corporation. New directors were elected, who were instructed to investigate whether outside influences had been brought to bear upon the players or officers of the club to cause its disbandment, and to report to the League if the charges to that effect were sustained. As matters now stand, there is possibility of the Worcester disbanding before the close of the season.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Worcester Club finances 3

Date Saturday, October 7, 1882
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The stockholders of the Worcester Club held a meeting Sept. 28, when it was announced that there was a balance of $650 in the treasury, but that $800 more would be necessary to pay the salaries in full. An effort was made to raise this amount, but it was not successful. The money in the treasury was divided pro-rata among the players–one, to whom $275 was due, got $20, and so on. New York Clipper October 7, 1882

Worcester people talk now of gracefully resigning from the league, thus gaining something of the good will of the other clubs, in case the city should wish a membership in the league at some future time. Troy is also about ready to throw up the sponge. Providence Sunday Star October 22, 1882

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Worcester votes not to disband

Date Sunday, July 16, 1882
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At a meeting of the Worcester base ball club on Friday night all the Directors resigned, but the meeting refused to accept the resignations of Pratt and Simester. Edwart P. Goulding, George E. Batchelor and Wm. S. Jourdan were elected to fill the vacancies, and Freeman Brown was retained as clerk and treasurer. The sum of $400 was subscribed in a few minutes, which makes a balance of nearly $1,500 on hand. No one favored the idea of disbanding. The Directors were instructed to investigate reports of outside interference with the club, and to report to the League if the reports are sustained. The Philadelphia Item July 16, 1882 [See Worcester Spy 7/15/82 for a long account of this meeting.]

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

yelling at the other team

Date Sunday, August 27, 1882
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[Athletic vs. Cincinnati 8/26/1882] [two Athletics on base, no outs] The Athletics now resorted to the yelling plan. All joined in the chorus, hoping to demoralize the Cincinnatis. It had no more effect on the Cincinnati players than water has on a duck’s back.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

`the cost of litigation

Date Sunday, January 22, 1882
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The talk on the part of the Cincinnati papers abut the Cincinnati and Philadelphia clubs getting out an injunction against Wise and Troy, to prevent them from playing with the Boston and Detroit clubs, next season, is all bosh. It would cost at least $1000 in each league city to carry out this threat, and, as there are eight league cities, it is preposterous to suppose that any club would pay out $8000 in enjoining any player.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

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