Clippings:1883

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1883Clippings in 1883

Clippings in 1883 (478 entries)

Contents

$1000 paid for a release

Date Monday, September 24, 1883
Text

...[Fred] Lewis, the crack centre fielder, for whom St. Louis paid $1,000 to the Philadelphia Club for his simple release... The Sporting Life September 24, 1883

reaction to the formation of the UA

As foreshadowed last week, a movement toward the formation of a rival base ball association has taken shape at a meeting in Pittsburg last Wednesday, whereat was organized what is called “The Union Association of Base Ball Clubs.” Officers were elected, and a constitution adopted which is said to be similar to that of the American Association, “with a few changes.” What these changes were may be inferred from the adoption of a resolution that “while we recognize the validity of the League and American Association, we cannot recognize any agreement whereby any number of ball players may be reserved for any club for any time beyond the term of his contract with said club.” The meaning of this is that the new Association proposes to adopt the club-wrecking policy and go into the “cut-throat” business helter skelter. If this programme were backed up by men of means, responsibility, and respectability, the League and Association clubs might well feel alarmed at an outlook so injurious to their own prospects generally. But we search the list of officers and directors in vain for the name of one person of means or responsibility, or whose business and social standing is such as to inspire confidence either among ball-players or ball-patrons. The organization savors of the wildcat species all through. Nevertheless a wildcat may scratch around and do considerable mischief when people are off their guard. Believing firmly that a wide-open competition for players will force salaries up to a point where financial failure and insolvency are a certainty, and that in this way an injury will be inflected upon players and upon the game of base ball, American Sports favors the reserve system as wise and judicious, and condemns the policy of the new association as mischievous and censurable. Players will be foolish if they fall into any such trap as that set by the adventurers and speculators who made up the Pittsburg meeting. There is a vast difference between a big salary promised in May and a big salary not paid in July or August, and if players allow themselves to be tempted by a large offer by parties without capital or character they will have nobody bu themselves to blame for the consequences. The Sporting Life October 1, 1883, quoting the Chicago American Sports

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

'Oscar Wilde' BBCs

Date Saturday, January 20, 1883
Text

It is estimated that there were over one hundred Oscar Wilde Clubs in the United States last season.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

25 cent admission for the Phillies

Date Sunday, June 17, 1883
Text

[Cleveland vs. Philadelphia 6/11/1883] A notable increase in attendance was witnessed at the Philadelphia ground, on Monday, on which day the 25-cent rate first went into effect.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a Chicago Base Ball Academy

Date Wednesday, November 21, 1883
Text

[Spalding's] plan contemplates the engagement of ten or twelve auxiliary players separate and apart from the regular members of the Chicago team. These auxiliary players will be drawn from semi-professional and first-class amateur ranks, and opportunity will be afforded to young men of ball-playing qualifications and tendencies to demonstrate, under careful and competent supervision, their possibilities as exponents of the game.

The auxiliary team, which may perhaps be called “Chicago No. 2, “ or following the style of English cricket clubs, “Chicago Colts,” will be under the direct charge of Capt. Anson for daily practice and training, and he will exercise to the utmost his skill and tact in ascertaining the special and peculiar qualifications of the players who shall enroll themselves as students in the “Base Ball Academy” of the Chicago Club. A large number of applications have already been received by President Spalding for admission to the auxiliary team, and several players of exceptional promise are already under engagement. It should be understood that there is no distinct limitation fixed to this number of young men who will be afforded the opportunity of testing their capacity as ball-players. Any person with reasonable claims to consideration and trial in this regard will not be denied the privilege of showing what he can do in the various field positions or as a batsman and base runner. The strongest possible inducement is held out for active and athletic young men with some skill as ball-players to enter the competitive examination. If accepted the player is given an engagement as a member of the Chicago Club at a regular salary, and the higher his grade of efficiency the larger will be his compensation and the more certain his advancement to a place on the regular nine. Should the experiment result in developing a larger number of players than the Chicago Club has use for, there will be forty or fifty other professional clubs throughout the country next year which will be only too glad to engage players bearing Chicago's certificate of efficiency and success. Such players will be in brisk demand at lucrative salaries., quoting the Chicago American Sports

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a Providence reserve player released to go to Philadelphia

Date Saturday, June 2, 1883
Text

[Edgar] Smith [of the Providence reserve nine] was released on Friday, and was immediately sent for by the Philadelphia management. He will go to the Quaker City next week, after certain important matters pertaining to his majority and property are settled. He has in him the making of a valuable pitcher, and as he bats freely, will probably show up well in the league before long. Providence Morning Star June 2, 1883 [Smith has played two games for the Providence Club.]

Source Providence Morning Star
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a backdoor reduced admission in Philadelphia

Date Saturday, February 17, 1883
Text

Al. Reach of the Philadelphia Club visited The Clipper office Feb. 10. He says that the increase of the tariff of admission consequent upon the Philadelphias being admitted to the League will not hurt the attendance. Fifty cents will give each person entrance to the ground and a seat also in the grand-stand, while those that come late or prefer to take a seat elsewhere than in the grand-stand will be allowed a rebate equivalent to their car-fare to and from the ground.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a baseball recall

Date Sunday, April 29, 1883
Text

A. Reach, the maker of the American Association ball, has confessed to the unfitness of those already sent out to the clubs. Word comes from Philadelphia that he has called in all that were sent out, and will forward to Secretary Williams a new supply for delivery for Tuesday's games. If this be true, it will be important. Reach says his first supply of balls were covered too tight, and with a leather in which he was deceived. He claims that the new supply of balls have no such defects. We shall see when they are tried.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a better offer from a minor league club

Date Sunday, June 3, 1883
Text

Smith, change pitcher of the Providence Club, was released on Friday and bespoken by the Philadelphia management. … A despatch from Harry Wright, received yesterday afternoon, however, says that it is doubtful if the young man will come here, and he has better offers from Brooklyn and Trenton, and rather leans toward the former.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a block ball

Date Monday, August 6, 1883
Text

[Baltimore vs. Athletic 8/5/1883] [Rowe and Gardner on base.] Sweeney next lifted a fly to Knight and Rowe started for home. The ball was in Rowan's [catcher] hands in time, but Rowe knocked it out and it passed the catcher. Gardner thereupon also started for home. A boy picked the ball up and handed it to one of the Athletic players, who threw to Rowen, but, of course, this was illegal and both runs counted.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a bonus to players for winning the championship

Date Sunday, November 4, 1883
Text

The Boston players, as a reward for their winning the championship, each go an extra hundred dollars from the directors and $250 each from a benefit game. This, it is claimed, brought their salaries up to the average of the high wages of some of the gilt-edged teams. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a botched transfer from the New York to the Metropolitans

Date Tuesday, December 4, 1883
Text

Secretary Williams, of the American Association, has refused to approve the contract of O’Neill with the Metropolitan Club, on the ground that it is invalid. The rules are that the player shall not be eligible to contract with another club until ten days after the notice of his release has been mailed to the Secretary. In the case of O’Neill his contract with the Metropolitan Club was received one day before the notice of his release from the New York Club. St. Louis Post-Dispatch December 4, 1883, quoting the Philadelphia Record [N.B. O’Neill signed with St. Louis] [N.B. Williams was already hired to manage the St. Louis Club.]

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a broken catcher's mask 2

Date Sunday, June 3, 1883
Text

[Brown vs. Yale 6/2/1883] In the latter part of the sixth inning Hubbard’s mask was bent by a ball, and his forehead was badly cut, but he pluckily played on.

Source New York Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a broken catcher's mask 3

Date Thursday, October 18, 1883
Text

A sharp foul tip broke the wire and the broken wire cut a long gash in Phil Powers' face, yesterday. He patched it up with a little piece of court-plaster and kept on in the position.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a call to fire the manager

Date Sunday, June 3, 1883
Text

The failure of the Philadelphia club to make a stand against its colleagues in the League has been the source of much regret to the many warm friends of the club. In our judgment the club is composed of players as good as any in the country, and occasionally they prove it by an exhibition that revives hopes of their supporters, but then fall back again to such miserable playing as to invite disgust. All lovers of the game are interested in the club and would like to see it make a respectable showing, but until certain remedies are applied this can never be expected.

In conversation with one of the players the latter said: “There is no use talking, we cannot play under Ferguson. He is harsh, cruel and unjust. Fines are inflected for the most trivial offenses and the entire team is in a state of demoralization. We don't object to discipline, but there is such a thing as too much of it. We are treated more like slaves than players.” This in our judgment is the key-note to the whole trouble and if the club is to be saved at all it must be through heroic measures. There are only two courses open: Release the players who are “kicking” or release the manager. The remedy must be applied at once, too, or it will be too late.

It is also evident that the feeling held by the players toward Ferguson has extended to the audiences, and the scene on the ground last Wednesday afternoon was such as is seldom witnessed. Cries of “Lynch Ferguson,” “Somebody hit Ferguson on the head with a bat,” being uttered throughout the game. When players see this the manager's usefulness is at once gone, and he should resign to save his own self respect.

No one holds Manager Fergsuon in higher respect as a gentleman, and a ball player than the writer of this, but it is too evident that as a manger he is a colossal failure. He lacks magnetism, his idea of discipline is false, his domineering tendencies fatal.

Managers Reach and Pratt are suffering by this a much as the public, as the slim attendance at games last week shows. Mr. Reach is deserving of better fortune than this. He is honest and conscientious in his efforts to raise the standard of the game, and is one of the few professionals who have risen from the ranks to a business that is rapidly making his fortune.

To these gentlemen, then, we respectfully submit whether something should not be done at once. The club has many friends, and if it plays good ball, the attendance will be large.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a capacity crowd

Date Sunday, June 3, 1883
Text

[Cincinnati vs. Athletic 5/30/1883] From noon until nearly five the people poured in and when the time to play arrived at least 16,000 people were within the enclosure, one third of whom swarmed over the ground, as every available space was filled. It was with the utmost difficulty that sufficient room was made to play and then it was nearly five o'clock. The diamond was completely surrounded and this seriously interfered with the catchers, and, in fact, lost the Athletic the game, as in the fifth inning O'Brien had two chances to put out men on foul flies, but he couldn't get through the crowd in time and these batters afterwards made hits and two runs.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a capacity crowd in Providence

Date Thursday, May 31, 1883
Text

[Cleveland vs. Providence 5/30/1883] There were 7,500 people present at the afternoon game, every seat, all the standing room, and fence, and even the roof of the shed adjoining the fence being covered. The “bullpen” was filled, and the carriage way was four and five deep with vehicles from the right field way around to the carriage gateway.

Source Providence Morning Star
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a catcher not wearing a mask?

Date Tuesday, July 3, 1883
Text

Billy Holbert, the gentlemanly catcher of the Metropolitans, while attmpting to catch a foul ball from Deagles bat in the sixth inning yetserday, was hit in the eye and knocked down. He recovered a short time afterward and pluckily caught through the rest of the game. He will have to adron his phiz with a piece of raw beefstead for several days to come, however, to get the optic back to its normal condition.

Source Cincinnati Enqiurer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a charge of an illegal delivery

Date Sunday, May 27, 1883
Text

Coleman, Philadelphia's pitcher, in the game of May 11 got his hand above the shoulder a little more than half the time. Capt. Anson did not call for judgment on his illegal delivery, and he kept up his overhand throwing all through the game., quoting Chicago American Sports

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a cheap shot at Caylor

Date Sunday, December 23, 1883
Text

The lizard-like official of the Cincinnati Club should be careful when he enters the Grand Stand at the Cincinnati Ball Park, as he might sit down on a nail, when there would be an awful calamity. There would be nothing left but a little shriveled-up skin and a bad smell. Cincinnati Enquirer December 23, 1883 [see also CE 831225 for more, at length]

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a claim that Mills was the brains of the operation

Date Monday, December 31, 1883
Text

Even in the days of the lamented Hulbert, Mr. Mills was the power behind the thrown; his brain brought forth the ideas and Mr. Hulbert fathered them. It is, however, safe to say that three-fourths of all the League legislation ever enacted emanated in his busy mind, though until after Mr. Hulbert’s death he kept himself well in the background. He seldom makes mistakes, and never boasts vauntingly. St. Louis Post-Dispatch December 31, 1883, quoting the Cincinnati Commercial-Gazette

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a clue about the popularity of grandstand seats

Date Monday, August 27, 1883
Text

41,000 people witnessed the four Athletic-Cincinnati games and the receipts amounted to $11,400.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a collective hold-out

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

...Corcoran's name is not in the list [of players signed by Chicago], and the reason is that he wants more money than the club will pay. Just before the club disbanded this fall, Flint, Corcoran and Gore agreed to strike the club for big money. Flint asked for $3,500 for next season; Corcoran put his pitching at the neat sum of $4,500; Gore, the best one of the three named, was not so much of a hob and asked for 42,500 only.

Mr. Spalding never lost a single night's sleep over this tremendous strike. He engaged all the other men of the old team at a fair advance in salary and waited for the syndicate to tumble. Flint was the first to weaken. He came to Spalding with a yarn about being offered $2,000 to go to St. Louis, and as his wife's folks lived there he resolved to would accept. Spalding talked to him a few moments and the result was that he signed to play for about $2,500, and catch only half the games, as Kelly had been raised under a contract to play half the schedule. Gore held out for a long time, but as he was starting for his New Orleans tripe he came to Spalding and signed to play for $2,000.

Corcoran, however, had set his mind on $4,000 at least, and went East. He was offered $2,100 next year, but he refused to take it, and Spalding refused to consider the other absurd figure at all. If Corcoran does not sign with the Chicago team he will have to give up the business, as the reserve rule will be strictly enforced. However, the club will not fare badly as to pitchers. Goldsmith is at the top, with Crosby, late of the North Side Stars, second. Captain Anson thinks Crosby will puzzle the boys for a few games at least. The Sporting Life December 12, 1883 [See TSL 12/19/1883 for a letter from Corcoran denying any collective action.]

Larry Corcoran, who signed a contract with the Chicago Club, after having signed with the Chicago Unions, did so, it appears, because he dreaded the blacklist. He had just two more days grace to sign, as on Monday the 9 th he would have been penalized by the Chicago Club, he having had a month to declare himself. Mr. Spalding, president of the Chicago Club, was interviewed on the subject of the prodigal’s return and expressed his gratification thereat.

“What salary do you pay Corcoran?” he was asked.

Mr. Spalding replied: “Twenty-one hundred dollars; not a cent more.”

“How do you account for his action?”

“Good sense; that’s all. Larry had no fault to find with our treatment of him, and he knows that $2,100 in cash goes further than $200,000 in promises.”

“Do you think he falls into line willingly?”

“Yes he has not been bulldozed, bribed, coaxed or frightened. We have proceeded quietly and naturally. He will return and pitch just as good ball or better in 1884 than he ever did. He is no shirk. I know him well; he never does anything by halves.” The Sporting Life January 16, 1884

[from an interview of Henry Lucas] “I am, indeed, surprised at Corcoran’s defection. I thought he was made of more reliable material; that he had a mind of his own. Still it may be that I ought not to blame him, for I have been informed that Mills, Anson and Spalding threatened him with everything but death.” The Sporting Life January 23, 1884

the qualifications of a modern pitcher; fewer balls to a walk speed up the game; more base stealing than previously; catcher signals; pitchers poor batters

First, it is essential that the pitcher should have the curve—as the one out curve and accompanying slants and change of pace are termed. With these deceptive items must be coupled an ability to pitch swiftly or slowly at will, and with such delivery as to render it difficult for the batsman at the plate to gauge the pace of the ball until it is too late to bat it effectively. A skillful change of pace is the most valuable item in a pitcher's work, as Radbourne's success—due chiefly to it—proves. The so-called “drop” is either a ball started at the shoulder and slanting in its course, like Daly's, or a skillfully delivered slow ball, dropping naturally through lack of speed, such as McCormick and Radbourne use. The latter is the best, because easier for the catcher to handle. Then the ball should be so handled that time may not be wasted in the first motion to pitch and the act. Failure to do this, with the improved base running of the day, not only gives the runner a start, but handicaps the catcher in his throwing. McCormick, one of the first-class pitchers of the day, has this failing, and a fatal one it has often been. Command is another feature of the pitcher's work, and this is a technical term for placing the ball at will. League legislation lately has been made so as to shorten the game, by giving the pitcher less change to play with his batsman by means of well-placed ball,s which an anxious man will hit at and fail to drive effectually. Perfect command enables the pitcher to put balls over the plate and at the called-for heights at will. Failure to possess good command means bases given on balls—costly things in a game. Half of these qualifications were enough for the pitcher of eight years ago, but he is called up0on for much more now. He must watch the bases when men are on them and hold them close to their points, and often, when balls are batted to right short, necessitating fielding by the first baseman, he must cover first and make the put out. Added to all this, he must endure for nine and often more innings, and watch his catcher's signs or signal himself. Lately the catcher's signals have been used effectively for watching bases, the pitcher only throwing upon receiving a sign. Then his work must be quick and accurate, or no good results from it and often bad. With all this work it is no wonder that the base-running and batting pitchers are scare. The great pitcher is a valuable man, an expert of an almost art, and well worthy of his high salary. The Sporting Life December 12, 1883

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a complaint about the AA recruiting NL players before season's end; NL luring a contract breaker

Date Sunday, January 7, 1883
Text

[from an interview of Spalding] An agreement has always existed between clubs of the League that no players shall be approached or signed until the close of the season. [N.B. This is not true.] This left all the players unsigned, and all the league clubs at the mercy of those of the American Association. The latter took advantage of this, and sent their agents along to see our players. Williamson was the only man in the Chicago nine found willing to leave, and he signed with the Alleghenys. At the close of the season, and of his own free will, he signed a contract to continue in the service of the Chicago Club. In signing him we paid no attention to the claim of the Alleghenys, for in the first place they had not considered our claim.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a condemnation of the reserve

Date Sunday, December 2, 1883
Text

A base ball player's services are worth just what they will bring in an open market and the law of supply and demand should govern the price of these services. If every man could play base ball, or if all base ball players were equally expert, there would be no fancy price. Ewing, Mullane, Corcoran and others are exceptionally skillful and consequently the demand for their services is very great. If there was no reserve rule, several managers would be very glad to pay even bigger figures...for a contract with these parties, and would make money out of the transaction. The fact that these men, if they did not play ball, could not earn a fractional part of such of such wages, has nothing whatever to do with the subject. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a conspiracy theory about the ball

Date Sunday, July 15, 1883
Text

It is one of the remarkable feats of base ball that when the Chicagos play at home the balls used are noticeable for their hardness. They remain in this condition during the whole game, and time and again are just as good when the game is over as when it began. All the outside clubs have noticed this, and the players think Spalding manufactures an especial ball for home use. A hard ball can be sent much farther than a soft one, and the players say this is the reason the Chicagos make such long hits on the home grounds.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a criticism of Chadwick

Date Sunday, April 22, 1883
Text

[in response to a complaint by Chadwick about outsiders in the reporters' box at the Athletics grounds] Chadwick is mistaken, however, as every man in the gallery was a regular newspaper reporter. Chadwick makes the mistake of underestimating the enormous number of newspapers in this city. Isn't it rather cheeky, though, for this would-be base ball autocrat to come over here and dictate to the Athletic management how they should run things? Quite on a par, though, with his usual conduct.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a dead ball on a quick pitch

Date Thursday, April 19, 1883
Text

[Cleveland vs. Metropolitan 4/18/1883] In the third inning, when Reipslager went to the bat, Daily the one-armed pitcher, delivered the ball before the umpire was in position to judge it on the call, high or low ball, and when Reipslager hit a high foul, and the ball was caught, he very properly made the play dead, greatly to the astonishment of the crowd. In the sixth inning, when Roseman was at the bat, Darby did the same thing, and this time a base hit was made, and it of course counted for nothing. Players should learn the important fact that the ball is not in play for delivery to the bat, firstly as in the beginning of a game or after a suspension of play, before “play” is called; and secondly, before the umpire is in position to judge the ball and has called “high” or “low” ball. The decision rendered by Mr. Lane in calling the ball dead, and the play which followed it null and void was a sound one, and it is well that it occurred in a practice match, so that it can be made a precedent for the championship contest.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a fake team scam

Date Monday, July 9, 1883
Text

Jack Remsen, of the Ft. Wayne club, is engaged in a very small piece of business. He came down here last Saturday with what purported to be the Ft. Wayne Club, to play the Kentons, in Covington. The game came off, and to everybody’s surprise resulted in the crushing defeat of the visitors. The announcement was then made that believing they had an easy thing of it, the Ft. Waynes had brought their change battery only, but had telegraphed after the game for their regular pitcher and catcher to be here on time of the game yesterday. Luckily the rain prevented a continuance of the fraud.

In short, there were but two of the Fort Wayne team in the city Saturday, Remsen and Yot. The rest were a lot of non-descripts picked up by Remsen and brought here merely to get money, none of whom knew the first principles of ball playing. Yet the management of it all had the impudence to go further and publish the game, with the names of the regular Fort Wayne team in the report. The Fort Wayne team–mark you, gentle reader–were in Indianapolis all day Saturday up to 11 o’clock Saturday night, and the Fort Wayne Club got seventy-five dollars guarantee from the Indianapolis club for a game, which the rain prevented. If the game with the Kentons yesterday [Sunday] had come off, it would have been as great a deception on the public as that of Saturday.

The Kentons are between the horns of a very bad dilemma. They have either willfully deceived their patrons, or were most woefully imposed upon. If the Kentons can not distinguish between professional players and a lot of rag-tag and bob-tail, they are most verdant indeed. But if they “stood in” with Remsen in this deception upon their patrons, no condemnation of their action can be too strong. We should be most happy to publish any explanation that will let either the Kentons or Mr. Remsen out of this bad box.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a fight over paying a dividend

Date Sunday, March 25, 1883
Text

The Detroit Base Ball Club is out of debt, and has a cash balance in its treasury of $18,000, the earnings of the past two seasons. There are two classes of stockholders in the club. The small fry want a dividend, while the capitalists favor the accumulation of a surplus, to provide for an unsuccessful season. The last-mentioned faction propose that they only distribution of the proceeds shall be the giving to each stockholder of a season ticket. The small shareholders say they were overruled last year, and now threaten to apply for the appointment of a Receiver, unless there is a dividend declared forthwith. A fight is imminent.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a flag to signal game day

Date Tuesday, May 1, 1883
Text

The white flag with the red ball will wave from the Weddell house dome to-day, announcing the opening of the League season. If the flag remains there until 3 o'clock, patrons of the park may rest assured that a game will take place; if, however, the flag is hauled down before that hour no game will be played. No bunting, no game.

Source Cleveland Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a game between one-legged and one-armed men

Date Sunday, April 22, 1883
Text

A nine composed of one-armed men and known as the “Snorkys,” will on May 23, at Pastime Park, contend with a nine made up of one-legged men, under the club name of the “Hoppers.” Tickets are out and selling rapidly. The two nines have been practicing for some time past.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a gong to call the time

Date Tuesday, June 5, 1883
Text

Manager Wright has had a large gong bell placed on the grand stand. At 2:55a the gong sounds, and the men come out and take their seats. At 3:30 another stroke is given, when the game opens.

Source Providence Morning Star
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a high spite fence to prevent outside spectators

Date Sunday, May 27, 1883
Text

The Brooklyn base ball management put up the fence around their ball ground so high that it is impossible for any wagons to drive up in the street and hire out standing room to the ten-cent class to look over and see the game. The fact is the fence is so high that the boys have great difficulty in seeing the game from the tops of the trees in the streets surrounding the ground. The Sporting Life May 27, 1883

thirteen man roster

Before the game was called all of the Athletic players, thirteen in number, were photographed in groups by an enterprising photographer, and the men all looked their sweetest, as they faced the camera. The Philadelphia Item May 27, 1883

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a hint that the Metropolitans and the New Yorks have separate ownership

Date Saturday, January 13, 1883
Text

It was the intention of the financial backers of the Metropolitan Club to have procured a separate ground of their own; but the needed outlay was found to be so great that they finally decided to lease half of the Polo Grounds from the Metropolitan Exhibition Company, which they have done, and the two assiciated clubs will therefore play on adjoining fields, the Sixth-avenue ground being open to the public on match-days at twenty-five cents admission, while at the Fifth-avnue field the admission will be half a dollar.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a late example of a catcher not using a mask

Date Monday, September 24, 1883
Text

Roxburgh, of the Leadvilles, catches without a mask. How long he will continue it probably depends upon the number of fouls he is called on to catch. One of the audience remarked recently it reminded him of the engineer's opinion of the Indian who attempted to stop a train by standing on the track.: “I admire his pluck,” he said “but blank his judgment., quoting the Toledo Blade

Source The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a late proposal to allow all bases be overrun; to move the pitcher back

Date Wednesday, December 26, 1883
Text

Harry Wright has two pet ideas which are worthy of consideration: First, he would put the pitcher back two feet, and secondly he would have base runners to overrun second and third bases just as first is overrun now. The first would give the batters a chance to display their skill and make the game lively and the latter would prevent many of those painful accidents to players which yearly cripple clubs.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a league membership needs to be divisible by four

Date Sunday, July 29, 1883
Text

...the Association will be very cautious about increasing its membership beyond eight clubs. It was found, last year, that any number not divisible by four, made a schedule exceedingly awkward. Ten would be as bad as six, as was determined by the St. Louis meeting. The only increase allowable or possible, would be twelve, and it is safe to say that the Association do not hanker after an increase to this number.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a lot redeveloped for a ball park

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

...the old Cincinnati Club has at last secured grounds to play on next season, and yesterday a contract was closed for the lease of a piece of property that can, by the expenditure of a considerable sum of money, be transformed into a ball park. It is situation on Western avenue, just north of Findlay street, and is what is known as the Hulbert property. At present it is occupied by several dwelling-houses, a brick-yard, and part of it is under cultivation, being used for “truck patches” by gardeners. The present occupants, it is understood, have no stipulated lease on the grounds, and it is said that they will remove their effects to some other place in time to let the Cincinnati Club being the necessary improvements as early as January. The lot extends from Western avenue through to McLean avenue, and runs from Findlay street nearly as far north as York street. It is 750 feet long by 450 feet wide. The Sporting Life December 12, 1883 [This is the site the Reds would use through 1970.]

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a low-salary team won't win

Date Monday, September 24, 1883
Text

The salary list of the Eclipse club, only footed up to $15,000 this season, and the local papers had the nerve to expect such poorly paid players to win the championship.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a national amateur association

Date Sunday, January 7, 1883
Text

A meeting of amateur base ball players was held here [New York City] tonight [1/6/83]. A constitution and bylaws were adopted, by which membership is limited to those who belong to the National Athletic Association. The next national meeting of the association was fixed for the second Thursday in February, 1884. the executive committee was instructed to make arrangements for the games to be played the coming year. The rules of the league clubs are to be adhered to, except when the executive committee sees fit to change them. Honorary members will not be allowed to take part in any of the games. The executive committee chosen is composed of members of the Adelphia, American, Manhattan, New York and Williamsburg clubs. The executive committee meets on the second Thursday of February next.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a nickname

Date Sunday, June 17, 1883
Text

“Dasher” is the nick name Troy has received in New York.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player agency

Date Sunday, November 18, 1883
Text

J. R. Hawley is about to establish a sort of base-ball agency for players much after the style of theatrical agencies. During last season he was frequently in receipt of letters and telegrams from clubs in different parts of the country, asking him to secure them a catcher or a pitcher or a player to fill some other position. He was unable to comply with these requests, as he was at a loss to know where to get men. It is his idea to secure the addresses of the most prominent amateurs around Cincinnati, and have them on file in his store. This will obviate any trouble in filling orders for additional base-ball talent when the calls are made from a distance. It is to the interest of all amateurs in this vicinity, or professionals out of a job, to have their names and addresses placed on file with Mr. Hawley, a it may be the means of securing them an engagement. No charge will be made in the way of a commission, as is the custom with other professional agencies.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player fined for trying to fool an opposing player

Date Sunday, July 1, 1883
Text

[a letter from umpire W. E. Furlong to Nick Young] “In yesterday's game I fined Fred Goldsmith, of the Chicago Club, five dollars for calling out to one of the players of the Boston Club to take a fly ball, for the purpose of preventing the ball from being caught. I thought that Goldsmith was the man who called out, although after the game Sutton, of the Boston nine, told me that it was somebody else in the crowd, and not Goldsmith, who did it. Please let me know whether under the circumstances the fine should be remitted, and I will then inform Captain Anson.

Source The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a player-manager

Date Monday, September 10, 1883
Text

[the Columbus Club, planning for next season] There is a strong feeling in favor of a player as manager of the team, with a local business manager.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a presidential visit

Date Wednesday, April 4, 1883
Text

Manager Bancroft and all the members of the Cleveland Base Ball Nine, called on President Arthur this afternoon and were received in the Cabinet room. After a general handshaking the President complimented the nine upon their appearance, and remarked they look like good base ball players, and that good ball players were good citizens.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a professional club's junior team

Date Sunday, April 22, 1883
Text

The season in Louisville, was opened April 8, when the Eclipse Club of that city contended with their junior team in the presence of about one thousand people.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a prohibition of collusion between the NL and AA New York Clubs

Date Tuesday, March 13, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting] [A section of the constitution] was adopted, the breaking of which is punishable by expulsion. It forbids any of the nines from playing or presenting in its nine any player who shall have been released from any other professional club from the same city. This little enactment was decided upon to prevent the New York Club from drawing upon either its league or American nine to strengthen the other. In other words, the clubs in that metropolis, it having control of both nines, can not now, if it finds that its league representative is unable to win the championship, transfer players from that body to the American nine, provided it stands some show of securing the pennant, and thus add to its playing power.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a realistic assessment of the UA's prospects

Date Monday, September 17, 1883
Text

The new body might as well realize from the start that it will have a hard, unequal fight, and prepare itself accordingly. The American Association found the field ripe for it, and but little cultivation was required. With the new organization things will be different because it has in its ranks too many cities where strong clubs are already located, and it is just possible that the base ball business may be overdone. A new club in Chicago will have hard work to divide the support of the popular League club. In Baltimore base ball is well patronized, but it is an open question whether two professional clubs can live there. In New York and Philadelphia there are already four professional clubs, and to put in one more in each is giving it to the public in rather heavy doses. In St. Louis, the field is inviting, as but one club exists there now, and the management of that is extremely unpopular. In Washington there will be be no opposition, and there the outlook is bright. In Richmond there is already a club, the Virginia, which has the best ground and good financial backing, which declares is purpose of going into the new Eastern League. In Pittsburg there is possibly room for another club, as the Association club now located there is somewhat in public disfavor, and besides the population is large. Brooklyn, Hartford and Indianapolis are good ball towns, and there is no opposition.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a rumor of a players' union

Date Sunday, July 15, 1883
Text

It is intimated that a movement is on foot among professional ball palyers to organize a society to fight the reserve-men claims of the agreement entered into by the three base-ball association. The proceedings of the society will, it is understood, be carried on secretly—a sort of secret fraternity, as it were, in which, however, the proverbial goat will be conspicuous by its absence.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a rumor that Walter Camp will manage the New Yorks

Date Wednesday, November 14, 1883
Text

In an interview with Mr. John B. Day, President of the New York League Club, he stated that having failed to secure Harry Wright to manage the team next season, he was now in communication with one of the best athletic managers in the country, with the view of engaging him to manage the New York team next season. It was ascertained from another source that the gentleman is Walter C. Camp, director of athletics at Yale College.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a scurvy trick: an intentional wild throw of a dead ball

Date Sunday, May 13, 1883
Text

[Allegheny vs. Baltimore 5/11/1883] The Baltimore lost the game through what they consider a scurvy trick of Driscoll. Say, of the Baltimores, had scored, Clinton was on third, Kelley on second, and Reid, who was at the bat, made a foul. Driscoll got the ball and, while out of the pitcher's box, made a wild throw over third. The ruse worked charmingly. Clinton went home, Kelley took third, Battin returned the ball to Driscoll and Clinton and Kelley were both fielded out.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a small strike zone

Date Friday, June 15, 1883
Text

[Detroit vs. Providence 6/14/1883] The umpiring of Lane was terribly bad and was condemned by everyone. He began with bad decisions on balls and strikes, forcing Radbourn to lay the ball right on to the Detroit bats, so to speak.

Source Providence Morning Star
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a snipe at curve pitching

Date Tuesday, May 1, 1883
Text

[Toledo vs. Cleveland 4/30/1883] The Clevelands could not bat McLaughlin with any satisfaction, as they kept popping flys into the hands of their opponents. This was mainly due to the fact that McLaughlin has not yet got up to the science of curving as indulged in by the League pitchers, and the home team were not used to it, besides he was the first left-handed pitcher they have met this season.

Source Cleveland Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a suggested proto-World Series

Date Sunday, July 1, 1883
Text

A fine scheme for the end of the base ball season would be for the clubs winning the pennant in the Association and League to play a series of games in all the cities having clubs attached to each. It would give the people a chance to form an estimate of the relative strength of each association and be a mind for the promoters of the scheme.-- {Louisville Courier-Journal. Our Western friend is a little late in his idea. The scheme has already been taken up and the Athletic and Providence clubs will play early in October.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a transparently false claim to disability

Date Thursday, May 3, 1883
Text

[St. Louis vs. Cincinnati 5/2/1883] It was at this point that McGinnis discovered (!) that his arm was sore—so was his heart. He made a plea to be allowed to retire from the nine and let Hodnett, their new pitcher, come in. but the Cincinnatis would not have it so. Then he claimed he was “permanently disabled” under the rules, and could be replaced by an outside man. The Cincinnatis replied that White, in the early part of last season, was “permanently disabled” in the same way, but was not allowed to retire. The excuse of a lame arm—discovered in one inning—was too transparently absurd, so McGinnis was forced back to the points again.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a typical injury to a catcher

Date Wednesday, May 2, 1883
Text

[St. Louis vs. Cincinnati 5/1/1883] In attempting to stop a wild pitch, on which Reilly made third base, Deasley [St. Louis catcher] split the little finger of his right hand, which necessitated his retirement. Time was called, and it was nearly fifteen minutes before Dolan got dressed and took his place.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a war of words in Cincinnati; the reporter for the Enquirer

Date Monday, December 24, 1883
Text

The elegance of diction, the poetic and graceful courtesy which mark the controversies of the St. Louis press might well be copied by their Cincinnati brethren, who are getting up a very bitter personal and possibly sanguinary fight over the Union and American Association club prospects in Porkopolis. Thus the mild-mannered and usually complacent Harry Weldon of the Enquirer alludes to Caylor of the Commercial-Gazette as a “lizard-like individual,” and some other refreshing epithets... St.

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA considering expanding to twelve clubs

Date Wednesday, November 21, 1883
Text

The Indianapolis, Brooklyn and Washington clubs have made formal application for admission to the American Association. The last named club is the one now in the new Union League, and it looks as if this club is trying to carry water on both shoulders. Barnie and Houck, of Baltimore, are said to be working the wires here, being desirous of having an interest in a club in Washington. There is said to be a feeling among the American Association clubs in favor of admitting twelve clubs. Sporting Life is of opinion that the admission of twelve clubs would be a mistake, and the number will entail largely increased traveling expenses and give fewer games to each club at home, where all the money must be made under the guarantee system. Besides the general structure would be weakened. As the clubs now stand they are pretty evenly matched. With increased membership would come a larger proportion of weak clubs, with no drawing power. It is best to leave well enough alone, or, at any rate, not take in more than ten clubs. Brooklyn is entitled to membership; Indianapolis must be taken in to balance the sections; there the association should stop.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA officer salaries

Date Wednesday, December 19, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA annual meeting of 12/12/1883]The salary of the President, whose services heretofore were gratuitous, was fixed at $500 per annum, and the Secretary's was increased from $500 to $800.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA opposition to the reserve

Date Monday, March 12, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting] They all appear willing, except St. Louis, to adopt the agreement [with the NL]; but it is quite probable that that portion referring to the reserve policy will be killed. The delegates seem to look at the latter in the light of a strong concession to the league. They they do not like, and many of them do not propose to swallow any crow. Cincinnati Enquirer March 12, 1883

A year ago the new association started out as brave as a lion, determined to walk straight through to victory, league or no league. To-day it threw off its disguise, and is now nursing the hind teat most meekly. The league scoffed and laughed at it when first organized, and heaped the greatest of indignities upon its youthful head until the stripling bade fair to down the adult. Then casme the struggle. The league with clinched teeth said this American Association is becoming too strong. It is eating into our prestige; either our own organization or it must be in the lead. 'Twas a brief battle. The elder and more wily body cast the bait, and the yearling grabbed it, swallowing it entirely and without a grin. It was perhaps the finest exhibition of eating the crow that history has yet known. Men who have always been opposed to the league, who have fought against reserve policies, &c., and who had sworn eternal allegiance to any order that would oppose its forward march to success, this day fell upon their knees, childlike in their suppliance, and rechewed all that they had spat out before. Cincinnati Enquirer March 13, 1883

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA pitching rules and the foul balk

Date Tuesday, March 13, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting, rules revisions] The rule requiring pitchers to keep the arm below the hip was modified, and the twirler will hereafter be permitted to throw from the shoulder, but not about it. … The old foul balk was eradicated and a new style adopted. Now, if a pitcher gets his arm higher than his shoulder and the umpire calls a balk, the man at the bat and those on the bases are advanced a base.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA president given a salary

Date Friday, December 14, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting] The Secretary of the American Association will get $700 a year, the President $500.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Aaron Stern in the laundry business

Date Tuesday, July 3, 1883
Text

President Stern will leave in a few days for a visit to one of th Eastern watering-places. He will leave his laundry business in the charge of One Lung, the popular Celestial.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

admission fee in Cincinnati

Date Sunday, April 15, 1883
Text

At a meeting of the Directors, held Friday, the question of admission to the grounds was considered, and it was unanimously agreed to keep the prices as nearly to what they were last year as possible. This will be done, notwithstanding the fact that the club's expenses will be $12,000 more than last season. General admission will be 25 cents; Pavilion 40 cents and Grand Stand 50 cents. Nobody can growl at these prices, surely. The only difference from last year's prices is that the Pavilion is put at 40 cents instead of 35 cents. The increase of five cents was not made for purpose of gain, but for the convenience of the ticket-seller. Last year the greatest confusion occurred a t the ticket office during rushes because of the trouble in making change where a dime and a nickel were always necessary. This year the nickel will be dispensed with, and the process of a dime in change will not be so bothersome. The charge for the grand stand will remain the same, and the purchaser of a ticket for this section will have the advantage of a chair and of reserving a seat down town without extra charge. The base ball public should appreciate this effort of the club to please.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

advertising the club

Date Saturday, April 28, 1883
Text

The fourteen-sheet posters of the Cincinnati Club were put on the boards yesterday. The boys' portraits look familiar, particularly Whoop-la Williams?

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Allegheny Club finances 2

Date Monday, October 22, 1883
Text

[reporting the club's special meeting 10/16/1883] The first and only subject discussed was the financial condition of the club, and as it was one that called for thoughtful consideration, it was long before an adjournment was reached. Mr. Andrew Fulton, from the committee appointed to audit the accounts of Treasurer Brown, reported a shortage in the treasury of some $1,400. the pay-roll of the players for the season had been something over $14,00, the rent of the grounds $1,200 and traveling and incidental expenses had swallowed up the balance of some $29,000, which represented the season's receipts. $1,000 would fall due to players upon the following day and there was no money in the treasury to pay them. This, Mr. Fulton explained, was not the final report of the committee; it was merely a forerunner of what was to come when the treasurer's books had been examined, and could be relied upon as correct within $6,00 or $7.000. Two wealthy syndicates had representatives at the meeting, who made certain propositions to take the club. They were rejected, and fifty of the 300 shares of stock agreed to stand a 50 per cent. assessment, which will yield $625.The balance will be raised by President McKnight on his private paper. The rumor that there is talk of disbanding is untrue, as all of the players have been signed for next year. The Sporting Life October 22, 1883

The detailed report of the auditing committee on the books of the treasurer of the Allegheny Base Ball Club has been completed, and shows a worse state of affairs than was given out at the last meeting. It shows that there is $2,2027.71 due players up to Nov. 1st. during the season $425.65 was received on fines. At present there is $308.41 in the Treasury. The total receipts for the season were $32,809.49. During the year $1,435 was paid for the rent of Union Park and the Exposition grounds. The receipts from games amounted to $27,135.46. For paid games, expense accounts and traveling expenses of the club there was $19,395.70. The largest amount due any player is $1.246, which is due Swartwood. For advances to player for next season there was $960. The Sporting Life October 29, 1883

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Allegheny Club finances and officers

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

[from the report of the stockholders' meeting 12/4/1883]:

LIABILITIES [sic]

Receipts last season's games.................. $27,682.89

Stock..................................................... $ 4,425.00

Fines...................................................... $ 424.65

Gain 1882.............................................. $ 599.91

Season tickets........................................ $ 125.00

Lemonade and cigar privileges............. $ 100.00

Score card............................................. $ 30.00

Total...................................................... $33,385.45

EXPENDITURES

Association dues................................... $ 725.00

Rent....................................................... $ 1,485.00

Paid visiting clubs and traveling expenses $11,048.20

Expenses................................................ $ 4,835.49

Players................................................. $14,384.80

Money advanced players..................... $ 900.00

Total..................................................... $33,382.19

After the adjournment of the meeting, which had virtually placed the destinies of the club in the hands of the syndicate [i.e. directors], the directors held a meeting and elected E. C. Converse president, W. A. Nimick, vice president; H. R. Brown, treasurer, and H. D. McKnight secretary and manager.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Allegheny Club finances; a scheme to seize control of the club

Date Wednesday, October 17, 1883
Text

The committee of the Allegheny Base Ball club to examine the treasurer's books make the following statement: The committee found that the salary list for the past season amounted to $16,330.82. The total expenses of the club, including travelling, ground rent, etc., amounted to just a trifle over $30,000, while the receipts had been in the neighborhood of $2,000 less than that. The committee and board of directors further state that in order to pay off some outstanding bills, hire players for next season and fix up Union park they would require about $5,000. In order to get this money the stockholders will have to levy an extra assessment upon themselves or else dispose of their stock to one or the other of the syndicates which are so anxious to get hold of it. (St. Louis) Missouri Republican October 17, 1883

The meeting of stockholders of the Allegheny Club, which had been called at the request of the Auditing Committee appointed at the last meeting, was opened by a statement that the committee was not able to report. They said that roughly estimating there was a deficiency of $2,000, and that $1,000 would have to be raised to-morrow to pay salaries due players.

A proposition was made by President McKnight that he would raise $1,000 on a note, and collect the money by subscription from the stockholders. Fifty stockholders agreed to stand an assessment of 50 per cent. on their stock, which will raise $600. This will leave really about $5,000 to be raised to pay advance money and put Union Park Grounds in condition. The McKnight faction, which embraces himself and five of the directors, are working a fine scheme to gobble the charter of the club, was what a leading stockholder said about the meeting. They are laboring to freeze out the lamb-like stockholders. This will be done by mcKnight giving his note and making no effort to raise money to liquidate it; in fact, many stockholders who are disgusted with the present management and their failure will not give up any more money. The note will fall due. The charter will lapse in thirty days and go into McKnight's hands, who will make an effort next season to run the club on his own hook. Cincinnati Enquirer October 17, 1883

At the annual meeting of the stockholders of the Allegheny Base-Ball Club to-night [10/16] the fact was developed that the concern was $2,000 in debt, of which $1,000 is owing to the players. Unless it is paid to-morrow the default releases the players from their oblgiations, and renders the club liable to expulsion from the American Association. The total expenses of the club for the season were $31,000, and the receipts $29,000. About $16,000 were paid for salaires. Two wealthy syndicates had representatives at the meeting, who made certain propositions to take the club. They were rejected, and fifty of the two hundred shares of stock agreed to stand a 50 per cent. assessment, which will yield $625, and the balance of the debt will be raised early to-morrow morning, so that the players may be retained. Cincinnati Enquirer October 17, 1883

The report of the auditing committee of the Allegheny Base Ball club, which was made public to-day, shows a worse state of affairs than was given out at the last meeting. Instead of owing $1,000 to the players the indebtedness on this account is a little over $2,000. Other liabilities will swell the total indebtedness to nearly $3,000. On account of the opposition to the management it has been impossible to get the stockholders together this week, as was expected, but President McKnight is pouring out large quantities of conciliatory oil, and hopes to have a meeting in a few days. Several of the stockholders insist they will not pay another dollar into the treasury, and it is now generally believed the club will go to pieces. Once of the directors, George McLean, resigned to-day. The team selected for next year, if the organization survives, is to cost $16,300. Nine hundred dollars has already been advanced to Knowles, Miller, Alberts, Beck, Fox and Baker, who have been signed for next year. (St. Louis) Missouri Republican October 27, 1883

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Allegheny Club ownership

Date Tuesday, October 30, 1883
Text

The franchises of the Allegheny Base-Ball Club practically changed hands at a meeting of stockholders this evening [10/29]. The majority were visited ruing the past week, and asked to consider two propositions: to submit to an assessment on their stock sufficient to pay the indebtedness of the club and place it on a sound financial basis, or transfer their stock to a syndicate who would do this. At the meeting to-night the first proposition was rejected, and a majority expressed themselves as being in favor of the second. A few persons, who consider this move as a scheme of President McKnight to obtain control, refused to do any thing; but they will be whipped into the traces, and the transfer will be made in a few days. One syndicate is said to be composed of five persons, but only the names of two can be ascertained to-night. They are Henry Brown and E. G. Converse, gentlemen of abundant means. They say they will pay the indebtedness of the club at once, and invest $10,000 in order to prepare for next season. Cincinnati Enquirer October 30, 1883

The new management of the Allegheny Base-Ball Club, which, in addition to the persons mentioned last night, is composed of City Assessor Andrew Fulton, Wm. A. Nimick and W. E. Jones, announce that they will pay the salaries of players to-morrow, and will at once begin to make arrangements for next season. … It does not appear yet what interest President McKnight has in the new management. It si considered certain, however, that he will continue to vote a good block of the stock. Cincinnati Enquirer October 31, 1883

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

allowing the overhand delivery

Date Friday, November 23, 1883
Text

[reporting on the NL meeting] The question of the pitcher's delivery of the ball was settled in a manner that astonished every one. The rule for next season will permit the pitcher to deliver the ball in any manner that may please his fancy, and he can jerk, pitch or throw.

In speaking of the effect of this new departure, Mr. Spalding said to an Enquirer representative that he thought it would not materially affect the result of the game; that it has always been a difficult thing for an umpire to tell just exactly where a jerk left off and a throw began; that this pitching question caused any amount of difficulty heretofore, and promised to do so in the future, if something definite was not done by the league, and the only solution of the question seemed to lie in the direction pursued at today's meeting. George Wright says that this concession to the pitchers will eventually ruin the game, and he would not be surprised if, at the end of next season, the league retraced its steps and put restrictions upon the pitcher's delivery. Cincinnati Enquirer November 23, 1883

The “dead balk clause” of the by-laws, which was the penalty to be imposed by umpires in case a pitcher should break the rule by raising his hand too high when delivering the ball to the bat, ha been virtually a dead letter since its introduction. It is a question whether this penalty was ever inflicted by an umpire in a professional game. The league did well to take cognizance of this fact... Cincinnati Enquirer November 25, 1883

Harvard faculty concerned about professionalism

The Harvard Herald Crimson, discussing the question fo professional trainers in colleges, says: “While we are in hearty sympathy with the college authorities in their efforts to keep the taint of professionalism from our college athletics, we can not forbear calling attention to the ridiculous extremes to which their fear of this professionalism has carried them. As long as we have professionals trainers in sparring, fencing and general athletics, we can not see why we should not have professional trainers in base-ball playing. Playing with professionals is certainly not so injurious as playing with some of the team we practiced with last year, although we confess that the general recruiting of the professional ranks from among college players that has taken place during the past few seasons is a severe blow to college athletics. The faculty Committee of Conference meets in a short time, and we hope the subject of a professional trainer will be taken up. Cincinnati Enquirer November 25, 1883

President Porter, of Yale College, and Dr. McCosh, of Princeton, have expressed themselves strongly on the subject, but have not absolutely forbidden outdoor sports. The athletic youths, however, have one champion among the faculty in the person of President Eliot, of Harvard, who is said to be a great admirer of any thing that will develop the muscles and sinews of the students. Cincinnati Enquirer January 6, 1884, quoting the New York Tribune

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Altoona a site for exhibition games

Date Sunday, May 27, 1883
Text

A very strong club has been organized in Altoona to contest for the Western Inter-state championship, and judging from the material composing it, it stands a fair chance of success. A new enclosed ground has been secured, and a handsome grand stand erected. … Altoona has a population of 23,000, situated along the main line of the P.R.R. and is just the place for League and American Association Clubs to fill in a date between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an amateur reserve nine in Baltimore

Date Sunday, May 13, 1883
Text

Manager Barnie is now organizing an amateur team, that will occupy the grounds while the professionals are away from the city. His object is to bring out some promising young ball-players, of whom there are many in the city. This team will be called Baltimore, Jr.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an appeal for obstruction

Date Thursday, May 3, 1883
Text

[Boston vs. New York 5/2/1883] In the seventh innings he [the umpire] had to answer .

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an attempt to ban colored players

Date Sunday, March 25, 1883
Text

At the recent meeting of the North-western Association the Peoria delegates offered a resolution barring out colored players. As one of the clubs has a colored catcher, and a very good one, the matter raised such a howl of opposition that the resolution was withdrawn, so that this new feature in base-ball may be regarded as adopted.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an attempt to block transfers between the New York clubs

Date Sunday, March 18, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting of 3/12/1883] The sections in regard to making the playing with league and league alliance an expellable offense were expunged, and in their place one was adopted, the breaking of which is punishable by expulsion. It forbids any of the nines from playing or presenting in its nine any player who shall have been released from any other professional club from the same city. This little enactment was decided upon to prevent the New York club from drawing upon either its league or American nine to strengthen the other. In other words, the clubs in that metropolis, it having control of both nines, can not now now, if it finds that its league representative is unable to win the championship, transfer players from that body to the American nine, provided it stands some show of securing the pennant, and thus add to its playing power.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an attempt to cash out the Providence Club; finances

Date Monday, October 8, 1883
Text

A marked sensation was produced in Providence on the 25th ult. by the publication of a call for a special meeting of the stockholders of the local League Base Ball Association. Coupled with this was the rumor, which flew thick and fast, that the meeting was called to ratify a vote, passed at a meeting of the Directors held Monday night to declare a dividend of 100 cents on the dollar, and by doing so, to absorb all the funds in the treasury, and kill off base ball in favor of horse-trotting. It was further rumored that, in the absence of many of the stockholders from the city and of the short notice given, the meeting would be packed for the purposes named. The result of the rumors was that special efforts were taken by a few who want to see base ball here this year to get out a full meeting and to obtain proxies from absentees. The meeting was held at 8 P.M. and was largely attended—more so than any meeting since the association was formed. Mr. H. B. Winship, the President, tendered his resignation, and in doing so positively denied that anything had been done looking towards the abolishing of the national game in favor of the trotting interests. His resignation was accepted, and then a vote was passed that a committee of two be appointed to revise the stock-book and decide who are entitled to receive dividends. This meant a delay of fully three weeks before the list can be reported and acted upon, and would serve to thwart any injurious action, if such was intended. The matter of the 100 per cent. dividend was called up. The Treasurer said there was $14,00 in the treasury, and after paying all bills there would be $9,000 left, and that to pay 100 per cent. dividend on $10,000 worth of stock would cripple the association beyond redemption. Following this were remarks somewhat caustic and sarcastic, in which two of the Directors and a few of the stockholders took part. The upshot of the affair was that every one of the Directors present resigned. The following new board was then elected: George H. Flint, Thomas C. Peckham, William T. Smith, J. Edward Allen, and Henry T. Root. The adjournment of the meeting of the stockholders was followed by a meeting of the new board, who chose George H. Flint as President of the association. After the business was over Mr. Winship reiterated his denial of the truth of the rumors referred to, and said he would do all in his power to help along the game next year. … The 100 per cent. dividend was not denied, but the old Directors asserted that what they did was based upon purely business principles.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an attempted player loan

Date Sunday, July 1, 1883
Text

Harry Wright offered to loan the services of Mulvey, short stop, and Robinson, catcher, to Philadelphia, waiving the twenty days' notice in favor of Philadelphia if the same could be waived in favor of Providence should the two men be wanted by Providence in case of an accident, but the other League cities would not consent to waive.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an attempted sharp play

Date Sunday, June 17, 1883
Text

[Cincinnati vs. Baltimore 6/15/1883] Fox, the [Baltimore] pitcher attempted some sharp practice in his position, which Umpire Kelly would not allow. A dispute followed, and Fox was fined $10, whereupon the umpire narrowly escaped a mobbing. The trick complained of was this: The Cincinnatis had two men on the bases, when Fox pitched wild, and, thinking Baker [catcher] had passed it, ran to the home-plate to cut off the runners. Baker had caught the ball, however, and gave it to Fox, who, retiring in the direction of the pitcher's box, purposely pitched a wild ball before resuming his position. The two runners immediately came home, when Fox called to Baker to throw him the ball to put out the two runners who had gotten in on the ball pitched outside of the pitcher's box. Umpire Kelly let the two runs count. The Sporting Life June 17, 1883

[Cincinnati vs. Baltimore 6/15/1883] The exciting feature was a quarrel in the seventh inning between Fox, pitcher of the home team, and Kelly, the umpire. White, of the Cincinnati club, was on the third base when Fox pitched a wild ball. It passed Phil. Baker, who was behind the bat, and White came home. Fox ran to the plate and yelled to Baker to throw the ball to him. The umpire said, “What do you want to do?' “To put that man out a third,” answered Fox, “because I was not in the box when I pitched the ball,” Fox continued to talk. “Shut up and go play ball,” broke in Kelly, in an authoritative voice. “If you try any game like that on me I'll fine you $10.” Fox became so provoked at this that he threw the ball on the ground and walked off the park into the club room, followed by some of the Cincinnati team and Baltimore boys. A hot discussion took place, in which Fox maintained that the run made by White should not be counted because he (Fox) was not in position as required by the laws of the association. Snyder, of the Cincinnati Club, became so pointed in his remarks that policeman Hardesty was compelled to caution him. In the meanwhile the spectators, who numbered at least four thousand persons, including many ladies, became much excited, and an attempt was made by some to jump from the grand stand. The umpire firmly maintained his position, and gave the Baltimores five minutes to return to their places, or else he would decide the game against them. The game went on again, the Baltimores doing nothing to better their score. Baltimore Sun June 16, 1883

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an early report on Fleet Walker

Date Friday, January 19, 1883
Text

Young M. F. Walker, the colored man who has been engaged to catcher for the Toledo Base Ball Club during the coming season, is said to be a wonder behind the bat. He has grit unsurpassed, stands up to the hottest pitching without trouble, and cannot be excelled at throwing rapidly and correctly to the bases. At base running he is said to be very expert. For six years he has been catching for college nines at Oberlin and Ann Arbor, and when with the latter team last year excited wonder wherever he played. There is already much talk, about him in Cleveland, and when he comes here with his club in April his work will be watched with much interest.

Source Cleveland Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an economic analysis of player salaries

Date Sunday, July 15, 1883
Text

“The salaries base ball players want nowadays,” said a prominent manager the other day, “are simply preposterous. It's an outrage, the prices we have to pay for talent.” This is all very well from the managers' standpoint. If the players had anything to say on the subject, he would be equally justified in remarking: “I know my salary is a big one, but So-and-So makes big money and can afford to pay it. He only engages me because he wants me. If he couldn't make money off of me he wouldn't engage me, and if I could make him pay me a hundred a week more I'd do it.” The relations of managers and player are admirably regulated under the laws of demand and supply. In an era of large returns large expenditures are the just rule. The man whose profits are handsome can afford to pay those who help him earn them handsomely, and he ought to do it. It is the fault of those whom he has to pay if he does not pay enough, and it is as unjust of him to blame his employee for setting a high price upon himself as it would be in the employee to blame him for taking in all the money he could at the gate. When the profits of the business decline, salaries will go down of their own accord. As long as there is enough amusement money afloat to keep the base ball field as full of attractions as it is, good players will be scare and dear. For the sake of all hands we trust they will be scare and dear for many years to come.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an editorial opposing the reserve rule; a hint about players organizing

Date Sunday, July 22, 1883
Text

[from a long editorial on the subject] When the American Association came into existence a demand arose for ball players which could not be met, and through this the salaries of the better grade of professionals rose to figures which exceeded even those reached by able men in the learned professionals. Then a few of the shrewder managers put their heads together, and evolved the eleven-men reserve rule, and somehow or other convinced the rest of the managerial tribe that the rule would be of advantage and benefit to all concerned, and it was accordingly adopted without a dissenting voice. Yet hardly has half the season passed, ere a universal demand arises for its repeal. The rule was supposed to have one point, in that it was to prevent clubs tampering with each others' players in the course of a playing season, but even this supposed good has proved fallacious, as it it suspected, and with good reason, that several club managers, whom we could name were we so disposed, have secured verbal and written promises from some of the finest players in the country to play with the clubs of those managers in case the reserve rule should be repealed. That the rule will be repealed is certain, because it is contrary to reason, justice, and policy. When the Cincinnati, Cleveland, Chicago, Athletic and Providence clubs had secured their nines for the season each supposed it had about the strongest team that could be selected and each was ready and eager for some plan by which they could hold these players at the end of the season, well knowing that if a successful year ensued salaries would rise still higher, and hence these leading clubs united and exerted their powerful influence to have the rule passed, which they fondly imagined would secure to them the possession of their treasures. But they forgot that there are certain rules of nature and of business with which this rule came in direct conflict, and of which we shall speak presently. Suppose, now, that the Athletic and Cleveland clubs win the championship of their respective association, will it do for either of them to go into another season without strengthening such weak points as they may discover? Assuredly not. Then where will they get the material necessary to strengthen the flaws? Not from the amateur and semi-professional element, as experience has shown this season that such experiments are costly and unsatisfactory. Plenty of jewels are lying around, but it generally takes a great deal of experimenting to discover these hidden treasures, and in the meantime important games are being lost and all chance of success thrown away. … But suppose the champion clubs conclude that they can stand another season with such men as they already have, what will the other clubs do. For instance, will the Chicago Club, with its wealth and influence, consent to play second fiddle and go into another campaign without an effort to remedy defects? And if it stands by the reserve rule where will it get the players to strengthen itself? … “But,” some managers argue, “these high salaries will break up the game by bankrupting the weaker clubs in the smaller cities.” Well, suppose they do, base ball will be all the better for it. If small cities can't support clubs in competition with the larger cities, then let them drop out and into their proper position as second and third-class clubs, like the towns they represent. … Bankrupt! Pshaw! Those clubs which are worth living can stand it, and those which can't must subside into their proper rank. It is simply a question of survival of the fittest. … Let the eleven men reserve rule be repealed, or else let the players organize and resist its operations. The Sporting Life does not counsel any measure that may injure the national game, of which it is one of the most earnest and enthusiastic exponents and supporters. Harmony between managers and players is essential to success. But we do insist that the laborer is worthy of his hire, and that the ball players is a man and a citizen, and not a slave, and as such is entitled to all the rights and privileges of a free man.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an interpretation of the reserve, only applies to clubs

Date Sunday, November 11, 1883
Text

To those unacquainted with the text of the rules it would look as though Tony Mullane and Jack Gleason, to use a common expression, had gotten themselves into a bad box by signing contracts with the new St. Louis Club. Such is not the case, however, as neither one of the men has broken any of the rules of the American Association, and therefore they can not e black-listed or suspended. The tripartite agreement entered into by the three associations makes no restrictions whatever against the players, but is simply a binding agreement between the clubs in the different associations to protect each other's interests. Its restrictions are simply confined to the club, and provide that neither of the clubs shall negotiate with or sign a player included in the reserve list of another team. Not a single word is said in regard to a reserved player who should be approached, and it is difficult to see how any one can be punished for the violation of a rule that was never in existence.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an interracial game 3

Date Saturday, May 12, 1883
Text

The game between the Shamrocks [the Cincinnati reserve nine] and the black Socks o fSt. Louis, the champion colored club of the United States, has caused considerable comment, and will undoubtedly attract a large crowd to the grounds this afternoon. Cincinnati Enquirer May 12, 1883 [The Shamrocks won 4.0, CE 5/13/83]

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an opinion about the durability of the reserve

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

The Cleveland Herald says: “There seems to be but a misty understanding of the chief point in the reserve rule—the period covered in its holding of a player to the club that reserves him—on the part of both the public and players. The rule is clear on this point: Once reserved and failing to join his club, the player is not released from his obligation. It continued in force from year to year, until the club is either expelled or dies of the player is released from his ties under the rule. A lapse from play for ten years has no effect.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an umpire hung in effigy

Date Sunday, July 15, 1883
Text

Umpire Burnham found an effigy of himself hanging by a rope in the club house when he went to umpire Saturday's game in Chicago. It bore the legend: “Burnham—Cleveland, 3; Chicago, 2.” He cut it down and the Chicago papers say he was outrageously unfair in his decisions in the game and virtually gave it to the opposing side.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

analyzing an increase in offense; pitching delivery

Date Sunday, June 24, 1883
Text

By a comparison of the scores in the National League championship games played up to and including June 12, 1883 with the scores of games played during the corresponding period of 1882 it is found that a marked increase in total number of runs made has taken place. … The rate in increase is a fraction over 10 per cent, and it is due to a variety of causes. The increased latitude given to the pitcher in the style of delivering the ball has been of no disadvantage whatsoever to batsmen, for the reason that precisely the same latitude as to throwing was exercise last year, though against the rule, so that the change in the rule made no change in the delivery. The but main reason for the increase in run-getting is an increase in batting, and with harder hitting has come a larger proportion of fielding errors, the two causes combining to yield more runs. Just why the pitchers have been hit harder this year than last is difficult to account for, unless it be on the hypothesis that batsmen are as a rule becoming more accustomed to the swift-curve throwing of the pitchers, and are able to hit it more freely than ever before. With the stronger batting has of necessity come more difficult fielding, especially as regards to balls hit to the infield and the result is a smaller percentage of chances accepted than during the past two or three years. The averages as computed up to June 1 of this year showed an almost uniform falling off in infield play; there were not 10 per cent, of the player who had held up their fielding averages of last year. This is not saying that the general standard of fielding skill has been lwoered; the fielding is as good as it ever was, and better, too, but the hitting is harder and the balls for that reason far more difficult to handle without error.

The main cause, after all, is the increase in batting—not necessarily the increase in the proportion of safe hits, but the increase in the proportion of hard hits. This is an improvement in the right direction. The game will stand an increase in run-getting. For the active season of 1882 the average of total runs per game for the National League clubs was 10.79, or two runs less than for the season of 1883 so far as played. Heavy batting, albeit productive of fielding errors, is a prime factor in a good game of ball. The day has passed when people enjoy seventeen-inning games of 1 to 0, and poor batting is now justly regarded as poor ball-playing.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

another proposed league

Date Monday, September 10, 1883
Text

A new base ball association, known as the American League of professional base ball clubs, has been organized, and will hold a meeting at Pittsburg, Pa., on the 12th inst., for the purpose of arranging for a solid foundation. The new League, which has the support of the majority of the base ball players in the present League and American Association, will abolish what is known as the “eleven men reserve rule.” Thus far the clubs entered are the New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Pittsburg, Chicago and Indianapolis. In addition, it is expected that the St. Louis and Cincinnati clubs will be represented at the meeting alluded to. Mr. James Jackson, of New York, is the projector of the new association. [This is followed by a disavowal of Jackson by The Sporting Life, which had up to recently employed him as its New York agent.]

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

antedating 'high sky'

Date Monday, April 16, 1883
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Athletic 4/15/1883] Birchall, Purcell, Ferguson and Bakiston dropped fly balls, and they all united in blaming it on a “high sky.” This is, the atmosphere was so clear that the ball appeared to be much higher than it really was, making it impossible to fairly judge it.

Source Philadelphia Inquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

arm angle and new curves

Date Saturday, March 3, 1883
Text

Bradley is taking advantage of the new rule by practicing with his arm up, and has mastered several new curves.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Athletics trounced by League clubs, disband early

Date Friday, October 12, 1883
Text

The managers of the Athletic Club yesterday decided to cancel all games arranged for the club after this week, and disband for the season. The poor showing made by the Athletic players against League teams was the cause of the move. … The attendance at the Athletics' games with League clubs has grown steadily less, and yesterday only about 800 were there to see the Buffalo Club adminsiter its third drubbing to the champions.

Source Philadelphia Record
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

awareness of breaking a record

Date Monday, September 10, 1883
Text

Brown, the right fielder of the Columbus Club, beat the best single game batting record at Baltimore on Tuesday, making two single and two double hits and two home runs. In the six hits he made fourteen bases.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ballpark layout

Date Tuesday, May 15, 1883
Text

[Baltimore vs. Athletic 5/14/1883] During the [rain] intermission the crowd sought shelter under the grand stand and seats. Those fortunate enough to have umbrellas hoisted them, and the rain trickled down the necks and backs of the enthusiastic unfortunates who vociferously demanded that the game should “go on.” “Put down your umbrellas” yelled the left field crowd over to their neighbors in the right field. “Go on with the game or give us our money back,” retorted the latter. Then a crowd of boys jumped the fence and came on the playing grounds, and the crowd yelled and laughed good-naturedly at the futile attempts of the officers to catch them.

Source Philadelphia Inquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ballplayers in a brawl

Date Monday, June 25, 1883
Text

In yesterday's Enquirer appeared an account of a fracas which took place in Harff & Cramer's restaurant, in which young Jake Aug was roughly handled by a crowd of ball-players, members of the Allegheny Club, excepting Harry McCormick, of the Cincinnatis. It has since been ascertained that the slugging and brutal kicking was done by Hayes, Creamer and Swartwood, of the Alleghensy, and that Mansell and McCormick, while present, did not participate in the disgraceful affair except in their efforts to pull the ruffians off of their prostrate victim. This is all good enough, but the whole party is likely to hear from their individual mangers in reference to an explanation of their presence in a drinking place a t three o'clock in the morning. A meeting of the Directory of the Cincinnati Club will be held to day to consider McCormick's case, and, as “Mack” has had numerous mishaps to contend with lately, he should be treated leniently.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Baltimore the best baseball city

Date Sunday, September 16, 1883
Text

Taking every thing into consideration, Baltimore is the best base-ball city in the country. For two seasons the representative club has pulled up at the tail end of the race, but notwithstanding this fact the games on the local grounds continue to draw large crowds.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Baltimore the best baseball city 2

Date Sunday, September 16, 1883
Text

Taking every thing into consideration, Baltimore is the best base-ball city in the country. For two seasons the representative club has pulled up at the tail end of the race, but notwithstanding this fact the games on the local grounds continue to draw large crowds.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

banning quasi-farm team players

Date Wednesday, June 13, 1883
Text

Secretary Williams, in a letter to Mr. Pendleton, of the Kenton Base Ball Club, has settled an important point on the use of players in one team who are under contract with another club. The letter says:

“I have decided that no player not under contract is eligible to play in any club, either Association or Alliance, so long as there are enough men under contract to fill the nine of said club. Also, that no club can borrow players under contract with other Association or Alliance Clubs. Both or these decision are indorsed by the President of this Association.”

Under this decision Deagle [the Cincinnati's third pitcher] will no longer pitch for the Shamrocks nor can Sullivan of the St. Louis Club or John Ewing, play with the Grand Avenues.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

bar concession at the Athletics ground

Date Monday, December 17, 1883
Text

President Appleton of the Mets has secured the bar privileges to the Athletic grounds for $1,500. St.

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

baseball in the water

Date Sunday, July 15, 1883
Text

A game of base ball fearfully and wonderfully played was the special attraction at Bay Ridge, near Baltimore, on Wednesday [7/11]. The Newington and Our boys base ball clubs, both of the amateur league, of Baltimore, met in the water off Bay Ridge, and engaged in a game, and after some of the most unnatural playing ever seen the Newingtons bore off the palm of victory. When the game was called in the beginning of the ninth inning, the Newingtons had two runs to their credit and Our boys none. The two runs scored by the Newingtons were made on lost balls—fortunate accidents, for without them there would have been no result at all. The game was called for a reason not often given—the supply of balls became exhausted. Three were lost, that is to say, went to the bottom. The loss of the third ball terminated the game with the Newingtons ahead. The water game began at 4 o'clock and lasted until 6. The players were placed in a line para llel with the shore, but even with this arrangement there was a great variation in their apparent height. The first base and the right fielder stood knee-deep in the water, the batter and battery were up to their waists, while only the head and shoulders could be seen of the left fielder. The rope which marks the bathing limit served as the fence. The bases were life-preservers anchored in the water. The frantic and generally unsuccessful efforts to reach the first base in time made the whole affair look very much like a game between two nines composed exclusively of cripples. In the sixth inning Horner struck a fly to Toffling, the pitcher for the Newingtons, who turns a somersault in his anxiety to take it. In the fourth, fifth and sixth innings William Adreon took the place of Williams, the right fielder of the Newingtons. The uniforms were useful, but decidedly not ornamental, being bathing suits—gray for the Newingtons and blue for the Our Boys. The idea of aquatic base ball, as an interesting variation of the usual way, originated with Messrs. Mann & Benolt. The Philadelphia Sunday Item July 15, 1883

Very few base hits were made. The batter if he succeeded in getting in any sort of a crack would seldom knock the ball further than a few feet, when it would disappear in the briny deep; then he would paddle away for dear life for his base; if possible he would throw himself on the ball in front of him and take it along with him, until the catcher, swimming up to him would upset his plans by grabbing his foot. The ball would be let go and the fugitive would make some further headway toward his base, when the catcher would splutter around waiting for the ball to come to the surface. He would then scramble for it and just as the man thought he had his base he would find the ball a second ahead of him. The scrambling for the ball and awaiting its coming to the surface proved the most amusing and most exciting part of the game. There was always some doubt as to just where it would rise and how deep it had gone. The fielders had the easiest time of all and for the most part amused themselves swimming along the outskirts of the field as unconcernedly as if no game was going on nearer than Oriole Park. The positions were undoubted sinecures. The second baseman made himself useful by swimming to first base, where with the first baseman he succeeded in getting most of the hands out. One or two very good double plays were made. It was a bad day for balls, no less than three being lost, in one case the Newingtons making a run. The loss of the third ball, just as one hand of the Our Boys was out in the beginning of the ninth inning brought the game to a close, when the contestants dragged themselves to the shore, after swallowing enough salt water to preserve them for years and with appetites warranted to dispatch the most leathery steak ever cut from an antiquated ox. All, however, acknowledged that it was capital fun. There is already some talk of these same clubs giving a similar exhibition at Cape May. The Sporting Life July 15, 1883

the Athletics gathering relics of the old club

[a letter to the editor] I send you, by bearer, one of the caps won [sic] by the original Athletic nine. This cap was given to me by Mr. Elias Hicks Hayhurst, who treasured it very highly, and only gave it to me as a mark of warm personal friendship, and after frequent asking. It has been in my possession twelve years, and I would not part with it now but for the fact that, hearing that the Athletic managers are gathering relics of the old club, I feel that it is my duty to put it in their hands. I therefore desire to present the cap to them, through The Item—the first and foremost support of Our National Game. J.K.M. The Philadelphia Sunday Item July 15, 1883

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

batter no longer out for not running

Date Wednesday, December 19, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA annual meeting of 12/12/1883] Paragraph 5 of rule 51, which reads that a base-runner was out if, after three strikes, seven balls or a fair hit, he fails to run to first base, was stricken out, and the catcher and fielders will have chances next season to make double and triple plays on forced runs.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Bobby Mathews' rapid pace

Date Sunday, June 3, 1883
Text

Bobby matthews, who is now pitchign such a great game with the Athletics, of Philadelphia, occupied the box for one of the Queen City's Jonah nines, several years ago. It is doubtful whether the little veteran can hold up his present rapid pace through the whole of the season.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

borrowing a substitute from the other team

Date Sunday, May 20, 1883
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Chicago 5/14/1883] The “Phillies” went into the game without Ferguson, who has a nail torn from his finger, and Benedict, a young man whom the Chicago have been having in reserve, played the bag [second base] acceptably in his stead, besides doing heavy batting, clearing the bases in the fifth inning.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Boston Club attendance

Date Monday, October 15, 1883
Text

The number of people—by turnstile count—who visited the Boston grounds this season were 138,204, which gives an average attendance of 2,816. the same official figures for the attendance at the Bostons out-of-town games was 73,632, giving an average attendance of 1,530. The grand total amounts to 213,856 people. It has been the most successful season, financially, known in the history of the Boston Club.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Boston Club finances 8

Date Wednesday, December 26, 1883
Text

The Boston Base Ball Association had its annual meeting at Boston, Dec. 19. No financial report was submitted, but the affairs were reported as being in a satisfactory condition.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

box seats

Date Sunday, April 29, 1883
Text

There are 1,800 chairs in the grand stand of the Chicago Club. The ball field is entirely inclosed from spectators and eighteen private boxes have been erected on the roof of the grand stand. There are seven exits from the grounds.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

breaking a force by refusing to run

Date Sunday, July 29, 1883
Text

[New York vs. Detroit 6/27/1883] [runner on first, Ward at bat] [Ward] hit a hard grounder right into short-stop's hands, which he saw as soon as he hit it would result in a double play if he ran. He accordingly stood stock still purposely. The short-stop threw to the second baseman, who touched second and threw to first. Meanwhile the base runner from first went on to second. The umpire declared Ward out for not running, and the base-runner safe at second, on the ground that as Ward's out was recorded before the ball reached the second baseman, the runner at first was not forced, and would have had to be touched to be put out. The next man batted the runner home, with the winning run.

The umpire was right. One rule says the batter becomes a base runner if he has struck three times at the ball and the ball be not held by the catcher on the third strike, or if he make a fair hit. But a second rule says the batter is out if, after three strikes or a fair hit, he fail to run to first base. This is the rule of which Ward took advantage. The moment he failed to run after hitting the ball he was out, and that was before the ball reached the second baseman's hands. Now that the play has been made other players will be trying it, now doubt, but where Ward succeeded others may make a botch of it. Those who question the correctness of the umpire's ruling in the premises should recall how many times the batter is told by his captain not to run if he strikes out, so as to not force men on bases ahead of him.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Brooklyn gets the early lead on signing Camden players

Date Sunday, July 29, 1883
Text

The moment it was rumored that the disbandment of the Merritts was in contemplation, Mr. Byrne went to headquarters at once, and interviewing Senator Merritt, of Camden, ascertained the true state of affairs. Mr. Byrne was cordially received by the Senator, who fully coincided with the Brooklyn's Present in his view, and the result was that he was admitted to a private meeting of the Directors of the club, and was there introduced to them. Already the reputation of the Brooklyn Club for good management in properly caring for the interests of their players, had become known among the Camden players, and the more intelligent of them were desirous of joining the club. But no sooner was the fact of the disbandment known outside, than sharp competition sprang up from the managers of the Philadelphia, Baltimore, Athletic, Louisville, Harrisburg and Trenton clubs. Fortunately, Mr. Byrne had secured the inside track in the race for the Camden players, and after he had done the preliminary work, he sent on his able manager, Mr. Taylor, to complete the negotiations, and the result was that the Brooklyn Club has secured the services of the cream of the Camden team, greatly to the discomfiture of the rival managers, who had to pay exorbitant salaries for the few men they did get...

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Buffalo Club finances 4

Date Wednesday, November 7, 1883
Text

The Buffalo team cost $15,700 last season. The team lost $199.00 on the season, counting everything. Its receipts were $14,379.39 on the home grounds and $12,165 on foreign ones. Buffalo is evidently a poor ball town.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Buffalo Club finances; should be dropped from the League

Date Sunday, November 4, 1883
Text

A good deal has been said about the Buffalo club, and it has generally been regarded as in extremes, financially. Its managers, however, claim that the club made money the past season, their last four games at Boston, when their share netted them $2,500, giving them a balance on the right side of the ledger. … There seems to be a wonderful vitality about this organization. Every year predictions are freely made that it will drop out of the league, and give room for a team in a paying city. But every year a few enthusiastic and wealthy gentlemen put their hands in their pockets, pay up all deficiencies, provide the necessary advance money and put the same team, with hardly a change in its arrangement, into the arena for another “go” at the championship, which they can never hope to capture. As a matter of fact Buffalo ought to be dropped out of the League as Troy and Worcester were last year. It has a better team than that of either of the last named cities, but the Buffalo audiences are so small that a visiting club's share of the gate receipts is rarely large enough to pay its hotel bills, to say nothing of salaries and traveling expenses. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

bumming the entrance fee

Date Sunday, April 8, 1883
Text

Another specimen of Yong America is the boy who arrives at the scene of the game early and informs every comer that he is short one cent and in this way generally manages to secure the requisite amount and makes his appearance on the ground by the time the game has been called, with the air of an old veteran.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

buying a release; a hold out

Date Wednesday, December 19, 1883
Text

Al McKinnon, the great first baseman of the Philadelphia Club, signed to-day [12/18] with the New York League Club. McKinnon played with the Philadelphia Club in 1882, and at the end of the season was reserved by that club. He asked for his release, but it was refused him. He then refused to play with the club at all, and they refusing to release him from reserve he did not play last year at all. The New York Club got their eye on him last fall, but as he was still refused his release he could not play then. The New Yorks then bought his release.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

calling for judgment

Date Monday, July 2, 1883
Text

Walsh may have been honest in his decisions in the game in which the Metropolitans were downed—we believe he was—but he shows no firmness whatever. He seems to be guided by what the players think of the matter, and it was no uncommon thing to hear Keefe's “How's that?” precede his decisions.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

calling strikes and balls

Date Friday, March 23, 1883
Text

Umpires this season are especially cautioned as to care in calling strikes on a batsman. He must be absolutely certain, with no shadow of a doubt that the ball passed over the home plate. After being assured of that fact he must next decide as to whether it was high or low as called for, although in this such care is not strictly necessary as in deciding on its coming over the plate, for it may be a little lower or a little higher than called for, and yet a good ball to strike at. In calling balls there must be no hesitancy in calling every ball that is not over the plate, and if there is any doubt, it must be decided in favor of the batsman.

Source Cleveland Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

carrying fourteen on the roster

Date Friday, May 4, 1883
Text

The Cincinnati Club will now hold and carry fourteen men of good salary, with a salary list of over $18,000.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catcher directs the infield; signals

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

The true catcher should almost direct the infield work, coach the pitcher, and especially watch the bases and by signs instruct his pitcher when to throw and his basemen when to dodge the man on the base, so as to receive his swift, sharp throw, to catch the player away from his base. In these days it has become almost a fashion for old catchers to give the pitcher signs to pitch. Such is not the catcher's office. A pitcher, to be effective, should deliver his ball as he chooses himself, sizing up his batsman and signing to his catcher what he pitchers.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catcher's gloves and mask

Date Thursday, April 26, 1883
Text

[Cincinnati vs. picked nine 4/25/1883] The regular team had Deagle in right field and Sommer behind the bat when the game began, but Joe got a whack on the wrist with a pitched ball and in the fifth inning changed places with Hickory Carpenter. Hick put on the gloves and mask as though he had spent all his early life behind the bat, but in one inning he had the mask broken beyond repair and had so many foul tips carom from his tender body, that he concluded he was not catcher and he returned to third base, a sadder, but a wiser man.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catchers' salaries

Date Saturday, October 13, 1883
Text

A Buck Ewing has been soundly abused for getting all he could for his services as the highest salaried catcher in the country it is but fair to say that Bennett deserves that distinction—he getting $3,300--$100 better than Buck. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chadwick plays in an editorial match

Date Monday, October 15, 1883
Text

The veteran Chadwick entered upon his sixtieth year on Oct. 5 and by celebrating the last week of his fifty-ninth year he took part in an editorial match on the diamond field, pitching through the entire game and running the bases. He also on the same day began his thirtieth year as a journalist, having first written for a newspaper in 1853.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

charge of faking lameness to get a release

Date Sunday, April 15, 1883
Text

One of the chief players of the Columbus Club was Smith, the first baseman, who played last year with the Troys. Our correspondent at Columbus makes the startling announcement in a dispatch below that Smith claims to be lame and wants his release. The initiated will look upon this as a trick until the truth of the lameness is established. This man has been guilty of playing a similar game once before for which he was suspended. It behooves the Columbus Club to not let themselves be trapped. Their course is clear—namely, not to release Smith, but to suspend him until his disability be removed. If he tells the truth such a course will be no hardship to him, for he could not play elsewhere if his arm be too sore to play at Columbus. The Columbus Club may possibly lean toward a release in order to get back their $200 advance money. But they should bear in mind that if his money be paid back it will not come out of Smith's pocket, but out of the pocket of some club, which has made him a larger offer. The members of the tripartite agreement can not afford to allow any of their clubs and a tricky player to bend the intents of their ratified protection rules. If the Columbus Club ignores Smith's request for a release, he will, no doubt, recover the use of his arm before May 1.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

charges against Horace Phillips

Date Monday, May 28, 1883
Text

The local [Columbus] papers have been scoring Manager Phillips and certain members of the local team for several days, and the lack of success on the Western trip has been laid at Phillips' door. It has been charged that he will not strengtnen the team where it is needed—at short, first, second and center—for the reason that he receives a bonus from Richmond, Kuehne, Straub and Mann. It is also charged that the directors would send a man with the club on the Eastern trip because it did not want Phillips to handle the money.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Charles Eliot on the evils of competitive sports

Date 1883
Text

An ill effect of some of the inter-collegiate contests is their tendency to restrict the number of men in College who practice the competitive sports. The keenness of the competition creates a high standard of excellence, and persons who know that they cannot reach that standard cease to play. The athletic sports ought to cultivate moral as well as physical courage, fair-dealing and the sense of honor. If any form of unfaithfulness, unfairness, or meanness is tolerated in them, they become sources of wide-spreading moral corruption. If students do not find their sense of honor cultivated and refined by their College life, they may be sure that their education is failing at its most vital point. Annual Reports of the President and Treasurer of Harvard College for 1883-84 p. 32 (published early 1885) [available at archive.org]

Source Annual Reports of the President and Treasurer of Harvard College
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

chartering a special train to bring in an umpire

Date Sunday, July 8, 1883
Text

The first defeat last Thursday set the management nearly crazy and all sorts of things were said by the few weak-minded individuals, who lost money on the game, some charged that Kelly, the umpire, was crooked, because he gave a close decision against St. Louis, and I am sorry to say that the president of the club, Mr. Von der Ahe, himself joined in the cry, and is reported to have said that he would have another umpire or break up the American Association, which remark, if true, is deserving of the severest censure. Whether he said it or not, the fact remains that he insisted upon having another umpire. A telegram was immediately forwarded to Secretary Williams, requesting that Kelly be called elsewhere and another umpire ordered here, reasons for the request being embodied in the message. In due time Secretary Williams telegraphed that Kelly had been ordered to Louisville, and Daniels would come on from that point to umpire to-day's game here. Then all was serene for a few hours. Kelly took the P.M. train on the Ohio and Mississippi Road, and the local position became visibly strengthened. All went merrily until about 9 o'clock, when consternation spread through the camp. A telegram from Daniels stated that he had missed the train. There was agitation in managerial circles, while everybody outside laughed. Kelly was gone, Daniels could not get here, and the only thing to be done was to play an exhibition game instead of a championship contest, and divide the gate receipts with the Athletics. But the visitors would not play an exhibition game. What could be done in the emergency? Hire a special train for the umpire—there was no other alternative, if there was to be any playing on Saturday. “That game must be played,” was the authoritative final decision of the autocrat of Sportsmen's Park. It was cheaper to hire a special for the umpire than let the game pass. So about midnight a telegram was sent to Daniels at Louisville, and the latter routed the O. & M. boys out that morning, chartered an engine and coach, and made the run to St. Louis in six hours, reaching there at noon, in time for the game. The beauty of the joke was, that, spite of all this fuss and expense, the home club lost the game after all, and the umpire wasn't to blame either.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chicago Club proposes a reserve team

Date Monday, October 22, 1883
Text

The Chicago Base Ball Club has decided to engage for next season an auxiliary team of ten or twelve young players from semi-professional and amateur ranks, put them on salary and keep them in training under the direct supervision of Capt. Anson, with the view of developing base ball talent to supply places in emergencies and increasing the supply of available men in the country. The effect of the rule by which each club can reserve eleven men is to make good unengaged players scarce.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cincinnati adopts three batteries

Date Friday, May 4, 1883
Text

In order to be prepared in case of an accident ot any of their catcher, and to have three complete batteries that can be changed at a moment's notice, they have signed another catcher.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cincinnati reserve players

Date Monday, April 30, 1883
Text

...the Shamrocks, the American Alliance team of the Queen City, which is composed of the reserve men of the Cincinnati Club and a number of the best amateur players in the city.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

club movement between leagues, cities

Date Friday, December 14, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting] A provision [to the constitution] was made which allows a club to transfer its membership from one association to another without affecting the validity of their contracts with players. They can not, however, move from one city to another.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

clubs now can switch leagues

Date Wednesday, December 19, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA annual meeting of 12/12/1883] A provision was made which allows a club to transfer its membership from one association to another without affecting the validity of their contracts with players. They can not, however, move from one city to another.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Columbus Club finances

Date Wednesday, August 8, 1883
Text

The stockholders of the Columbus Base-ball Club held a meeting to-night [8/7]. Reports showed $2,000 now in the treasury, and that they would have $4,000 or $5,000 surplus at the end of the season, enough to pay for the original stock of $5,000. the success has been more than was expected, financially as well as otherwise. It was decided to continue the club next year, and steps were taken to look after the management, reserve, rule for players, and such other ma6tters as would put them in better condition for next season.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Columbus Club finances 2

Date Monday, October 22, 1883
Text

[reporting on the stockholders meeting of 10/16/1883] Treasurer Gundersheimer reported the receipts as having been $19,365,78, expenses $18,268.98, balance $1,096.80. Included in the expenditures are $900 which has been advanced to the players. The final salary list will be discharged to-day, the amount being $712. There will be about $600 more advance money to be paid, which will leave the club short in the neighborhood of $300. Counting the advance money as so much capital, the club is about $1200 ahead for the season. The report showed that Mr. Phillips had two weeks' salary, amounting to $40, coming to him, and that he owed the club $100 for score card privileges. As there are a few bills out yet, a complete financial statement could not be made. An auditing committee was appointed to look over the treasurer's books and report at the next meeting. The Sporting Life October 22, 1883

The auditing committee reported the books in such a condition that they could not make anything out of them in the limited time allowed, and asked for more time, which was allowed. There is a general opinion that the integrity of Mr. Gundersheimer is not questioned, but his accounts are not in a lucid condition. Phillips, ex-manager, was there, having returned from St. Louis for the purpose of submitting an explanation of accounts, but failed to materialize. The Sporting Life October 29, 1883

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Columbus Club finances 3

Date Wednesday, November 14, 1883
Text

[reporting on the stockholders meeting] The report of the auditing committee was next presented. The financial condition of the club was reported as follows: Receipts for stock, $4,900, with the addition of $100 collected on the last assessment of 20 per cent., making a total of $5,000; season ticket, $0 [?]; net receipts on games, $14,xxx.xx [illegible], making a total of $19,734.53. Disbursements, $19,503.36, leaving a balance of $140.97 to be accounted for. A shortage of $4 was reported on the game of May 5. the committee also found that the club was entitled to $135 from the Metropolitans, and recommended that this be looked after, as well as all indebtedness for the use of the ground.

The committee concludes by saying that it is unable to find what is due the club from Mr. Phillips or what he owes the club, no account having been kept by the treasurer. The report of the committee was received and adopted.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

commentary on scoring

Date Saturday, March 10, 1883
Text

For some years past there has been a decided waste of figuring indulged in in recording the scores of baseball matches. Experience has shown that all that is essential in the recording of a match-game for publication is simply the amount of figures necessary for data in making p the season’s averages of a player. Now, what comprises a players’s averages to be used in judging his skill alike at the bat and in his special fielding position? Simply his average of first-base hits applied to his batting and his average of putting out players–or assisting to put them out in fielding–arrived at by comparing the chances offered him with those accepted. The figures required for this data are merely those used in recording times at bat, base-hits made–not total, but single–and the number of chances offered for putting players out in the game and the number of such chances accepted. The score of runs indicates nothing of material import, as runs are more frequently scored by the batting of succeeding players, or by fielding-errors, than by skill in base-running, runs scored by the latter being exceptional plays. Add to the figures used in recording the above data those showing the runs made in each inning, the number of times the batting side made first base by fielding-errors, the total runs earned on each side, and the total fielding-errors by each nine, and the record is complete, so far as is needed for publication or for ordinary averages data. For a special record there should be the figures showing the sacrifice-hits made–hits made which, though putting the batsman out, afford the base-runner a chance to score a run or to secure an extra base–as also bases stolen. The pitcher’s score, too, should be a special record, showing what assistance–not fielding, but pitching–had been rendered in the form of outs on strikes. The catcher, also, should have a special score showing the record of bases scored on passed balls or on poor throws to bases. By confining the score-sheet figures for publication to the record of chances offered and chances accepted ,while every error in the game, as well as every good play which bears upon the record of chances for putting out opponents offered and accepted is duly recorded, no errors are directly charged to each fielder in the printed score-sheet, as is the case under the existing rule. Certainly, the present method of scoring the game and preparing scores for publication is faulty in the extreme, and it is calculated to drive players into playing for their records rather than for their side, especially as regard their batting.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

complaint about an exhibition game

Date Friday, May 4, 1883
Text

[Athletic vs. Allegheny 5/3/1883] If there ever was a base ball fraud perpetrated, one thousand people witnessed part of it to-day, and then generally went home disgusted. Daniels [umpire] was sick, so the Allegheny and Athletic Clubs couldn't play a championship contest, but postponed it until to-morrow, and gave an exhibition game.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

complaints about the reserve clause in the Tripartite Agreement; a suggestion dissolve it

Date Sunday, June 24, 1883
Text

The reserve clause inserted in the articles of agreement at the meeting of the American, League and Northwestern League last Spring to patch up peace between these associations, promises to be the rock upon which these articles oaf agreement will split. The American clubs are already chaffing under this restriction, and are casting about for some means to throw off the shackles. Under this reserve clause it will be impossible for the American clubs to strengthen their teams for next season, and in playing strength they will have to continue playing second fiddle to the League...

The St. Louis papers have taken up the discussion, and the meeting of the American Association to act upon the cases of Baker and Overbeck, now playing with American clubs, and who have been black-listed by the Northwestern League, is looked upon as the entering wedge that will split the reserve policy. The American Association will undoubtedly sustain Baker and Overbeck, and then the trouble will being. The American is strong enough to walk alone now, and it is time it asserted its independence. The doing away of the reserve clause will also greatly benefit the Philadelphia club, as it will enable the managers to secure a nine by open competition that will be a credit to the city. The Philadelphia Sunday Item June 24, 1883

Put all the players in the market and let their services be bid for. If a man is a good player he is worth just as much as his services demand, and there is no other way to look at it. Break the rule, and the Philadelphia club will be able to secure a nine that will worthily represent the city. Break the rule, and the Athletic club will give the city such a nine as has never before been here. Keep the rule in force, and both our clubs will have to remain as they are now. The demand for the suspension of this rule is so strong that we cannot see how it is going to be enforced. If the League insists on it we advise that the League be entirely ignored by the American, and players promised every protection by the American will soon come swarming over to the clubs that are able and willing to give big salaries for the best of players. The Philadelphia Sunday Item July 8, 1883

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

concern over the UA

Date Monday, September 24, 1883
Text

One of the chief officers of the National League, writing of the new association to an officer of the Cleveland Club, says: “While I do not regard the new body as possessing any of the elements of success, yet, in view, of the credulity and weakness of certain players in signing contracts, it may be well to keep the new organization in mind.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

concern over the UA 2

Date Thursday, November 22, 1883
Text

[reporting on the NL meeting] The subject of rival associations making inroads into league players, by inducing them to leave the old combination for higher salaries in the younger associations, was a theme for long and sharp debate. The league representatives are evidently alarm at the aggressiveness of the other combinations, and will do every thing it can to counteract what is terms a growing evil in the base-ball arena, the St. Louis Club being cited as an instance.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

concerns about the viability of the AA Washington Club

Date Wednesday, December 19, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA annual meeting of 12/12/1883]The Brooklyn, Indianapolis and Toledo Clubs were admitted without the slightest quibble, by a unanimous vote. The kick came on the Washington Club instead of Richmond, as was anticipated. The poor showing made by the representatives from the Capital City in regard to the prospects for a good team, raised some doubt in the minds of the delegates whether this application had enough financial backing to enter the list. After some discussion Mr. Hollingshead, the secretary of the club, was called in, and by his assurance on his honor that the schedule of games would be carried through faithfully, as far as the Washington club was concerned, it was also admitted.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

confirming the reserve rule; dismissing the Union Association

Date Monday, September 3, 1883
Text

[reporting the special meeting of the AA 9/1/83] The meeting was for consultation and action upon important matters. The tripartite agreement, which includes the reserve rule, was unanimously endorsed. … the meeting was harmonious, all the clubs reporting strong financial success and a determination to continue next season. … The project of a new base ball association that will not recognize the reserve rule, and will put opposition clubs in several American cities, was received with derision. It is headed by Pratt, the late manager of the Allegheny Club, and is all on paper. The Association thinks that players will prefer to remain with clubs which have, and will continue to pay, good salaries to going into an experimental organization, such as the one proposed for the new association, even if it should get so far as to organize. [signed] Lew Simmons.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

connection between the Chicago and Baltimore Unions

Date Sunday, December 9, 1883
Text

Fusselbach strenuously object to being assigned to Baltimore. He was assigned by Mr. Henderson to play with the Chicago Union club, and not in Baltimore, and considers that if any attempt is made to compel him to play in the Monumental city that his contract is invalidated. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

contracts cannot exclude the reserve

Date Monday, October 15, 1883
Text

Mr. A. G. Mills, Chairman of the Arbitration Committee, has notified every club in the League, American Association and Northwestern League that any contract made with a player stipulating that he is not to be reserved another year will be nugatory, so far as such special provision goes. The Arbitration Committee do not intent to permit of such an evasion of the reservation rule.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Corcoran signs with the Chicago Unions

Date Sunday, December 16, 1883
Text

Corcoran, the great pitcher of the Chicago League team, has signed with the new Union Association club of that city. In a card to a sporting paper he explains that he did finally agree to play with the Chicago League club next season for $2,500, but they did not accept his offer. After he had signed with the Union Association club, the League club sent on a contract for him to attach his name to. It was then too late and he returned it unsigned. Gross has also contracted to catch for the new club. The League club will probably take steps to have Corcoran expelled. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

criticizing an umpire's technique

Date Sunday, May 20, 1883
Text

Odlin is incompetent and that is all there is about it. He is a raw and verdant youth, lacking in dignity, self-control, quickness of perception and good judgment. When he decided a base-runner out he would run into the infield, shaking his head and brandishing his arms like an old woman driving hens out of a garden patch, and in every way made himself the butt of ridicule and censure.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

crowd estimates

Date Wednesday, June 13, 1883
Text

To show how wild guesses of base ball crowds sometimes are we refer to the reports of the Cincinnati Athletic Decoration Day game. Some of the papers estimated the crowd in attendance at 16,000, yet the receipts showed just 9,761 people. Cincinnati Commercial Gazette June 13, 1883

a foul tip double play

[Chicago vs. Providence 6/12/1883] Gilligan and Start delighted the 1,470 spectators in the third inning by make [sic] a rattling double play. Flint had hit safely, and, just as he attempted to steal to second, Pfeffer went out on a foul tip, and before Flint could return to the base Gilligan had given Start the ball, and the runner was declared out. Providence Morning Star June 13, 1883

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

David Reid leaves the Republican

Date Sunday, October 28, 1883
Text

The base ball season over, Mr. David L. Reid takes his leave of the Republican to accept the position of dramatic and sporting editor of an afternoon paper. It is no small compliment to Mr. Reid to say that during his connection with the Republican this paper was generally recognized as authority on base ball matters and was considered the best daily paper in the West for base ball news and, in fact, sporting matters generally. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

David Reid leaves the St. Louis Club

Date Saturday, February 17, 1883
Text

David L. Reid, who has been thoroughly identified with professional baseball in St. Louis, Mo., since 1875, has severed his connection with the St. Louis Club. Very much of the remarkable financial success attained by the St. Louis Browns last season was due to his executive tact and ability. He has been a strong and open opponent of many of the lines of policy adopted by the new management, and his resignation as secretary was a legitimate consequence thereof. He asserts that the team engaged for 1883 is not nearly as strong as St. Louis could and should have placed in the field. The impression prevails in the Mound City that a serious mistake has been made in the releasing of Walker and Fusselbach, and engagement of T. J. Sullivan, Loftus and Nicol, and in changing the color of the St. Louis Club from brown to scarlet.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

David Reid with the Post-Dispatch

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

The press is represented [at the AA meeting] by Mr. Dave L.. Reid, the dramatic and sporting editor of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, one of the most experienced and best posted newspaper man on affairs of the national game in the United States.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Day forms a club in Newark

Date Sunday, June 10, 1883
Text

The Metropolitan Exhibition Company of New York has organized a new base ball club to represent Newark. The following players have been engaged... The club will play its first game with the Metropolitans in Newark.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Deacon White credited with inventing the fair-foul

Date Monday, October 29, 1883
Text

Jim White, now with the Buffalos, is the inventor of the fair foul—or of making a ball foul when it crosses the line before reaching first or third bases.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

defensiveness about the NL being better than the AA

Date Saturday, August 11, 1883
Text

“This talk about the league clubs being so much superior to association clubs is all bosh,” siad an admirer of the game the other day. “I tell you the Cincinnatis, Athletics and St. Louis teams are made up of just as good players as there are in most of the much-lauded clubs of the older organization.” Cincinnati Enquirer August 11, 1883

Dave Eggler and Grace Pierce, two players who were not considered good enough to be retained by the association clubs, have been eagerly gobbled up by League managers. This looks like the older organization is not so much superior to the young one in point of playing ability. Cincinnati Enquirer August 12, 1883

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

defining and calling block balls

Date 1883
Text

In the case of a “block ball” it is to be understood that no “block” can be called on any ball delivered to the bat which passes the catcher, and is stopped by the crowd behind the bat. A block can only be called on a batted ball so stopped by the crowd, or on a ball thrown by a fielder to a base player which is similarly stopped.

Rule 60 says that whenever a “block” occurs—that is, when a ball is stopped by an outsider—the Umpire shall call “block ball,” and on such block ball base-runners may run bases without being put out until the ball has been held by the pitcher while standing within the lines of his position. Spalding's Base Ball Guide for 1883 p.

Source Spaldings Base Ball Guide
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

delay of game retrieving a foul ball

Date Saturday, August 4, 1883
Text

[St. Louis vs. Cincinnati 8/3/1883] The game, while very exciting, was slow and tedious in some respects. Any number of foul bounds were knocked over the fence, and in eery instance five or ten minutes would elapse before the sphere was brought into play again.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

deliberately throwing at the batter

Date Sunday, June 10, 1883
Text

A Wilmington paper says:--There have been universal complaints ever since the season opened of the cowardly habit of Shappert, the Harrisburg pitcher, in maliciously crippling men at the bat. When the Quickstep left for Harrisburg several of the members their defeat was certain if Shappert pitched, inasmuch as nearly all players are afraid to stand in front of the fellow's balls. The expectation has been fulfilled. The whole course of the Harrisburg nine has been marked with an apparent determination to win by foul means if necessary every game played in their city. The crowd at Pennsylvania's capital applaud their brutal habits and egg them on to acts of violence. The manager of the Columbus Club, defeated by the Harrisburg team last week, attributed the defeat to Shappert's action, the Ohio men being afraid to stand up to the plate.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

deserting players enticed to return to the fold

Date Wednesday, December 19, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA annual meeting of 12/13/1883] Another blow was aimed at the new Union Association by the insertion of the substance of what is known as the Day resolution. It is a conditional measure, giving the deserters under the reserve rule a chance to come back to the fold of the clubs that reserved them. The measure provides that if the deserters make application to return to their old clubs before they participate in a game with the Union Association they will be accepted; if not before that time they will be expelled.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

desparate for a catcher

Date Friday, July 6, 1883
Text

Mr. Wm. S. Gittiner, Secretary and Treasurer of the Baltimore Club, returned home yesterday from a trip round the country looking for a first-class catcher. He says that he offered Allen Hubbard, of the Yale College nine, a salary of $600 a month, with a cash advance of $1,000. Hubbard said it was the largest offer he had received, but that he could not accept it, as his family objected to his becoming a professional ball-player. Mr. Gittinger says he will give any manager in the country a bonus of$1,000 for a first-class catcher, and will pay the catcher himself an increase on present salary., quoting the Baltimore Sun

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Diddlebock the scorer for the Phillies

Date Sunday, March 25, 1883
Text

H. H. Diddlebock has been appointed official scorer for the Philadelphia club. The appointment was not sought for by Mr. Diddlebock, but the managers could not have secured a better or more competent gentleman. There will be no trouble about the averages this season.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

difficulty with umpire rules

Date Friday, May 11, 1883
Text

Secretary Williams has asked the unanimous consent of all the Association clubs to declare null and void that part of Rule 58 of the American Association Code which prohibits an umpire from officiating in any game wherein any club takes part which hails from the same city where the umpire claims his home. Mr. Williams says that if any umpire gets sick, as Daniels did recently, he can with difficulty fill the vacancy under the rule above referred to. The consent of all the clubs will doubtless be given.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

dispute within the AA over the reserve clause

Date Sunday, March 18, 1883
Text

The Cincinnati Enquirer is particularly severe on the American Association for adopting the Conference Committee report, especially that clause referring to the “reserving of players,” and claims that it is a complete back down on the part of the American Association, and that the only clubs benefited are those in New York And Philadelphia.

Mr. Wright, the versatile young man of the Enquirer, has a very clear head, and it is not often that we are compelled to differ from him in his conclusions. In this case, however, we feel satisfied that his reasonings are false. In the first place he claims that the reservation rule prevents the American from ever securing any of the League's present players. Granted. At the same time, it prevents the League from stealing any of the American men. Honors are thus even. Gain, experience has taught us that whenever an attempt has been made to corral a League player his salary has shot up to a figure that makes it suicidal for a club to attempt to pay it. It was this bedding evil that called out the passage of the reservation clause. Again, each year new players are being developed and taking the places of old ones, and one organization can secure them as readily as the other, as there is no restriction on them, and when once engaged they cannot be spirited away by the rival organization.

We can, therefore, see no reason why the American should be charged with backing down or falling a victim to the League, as the Inquirer [sic] would have us to believe. On the contrary, we think it is the most sensible and business-like thing the American has ever done, and will prove to be such before the season is over.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

do players still throw games?

Date Monday, August 27, 1883
Text

[reporting on a rumor of Athletic players throwing games] We do not believe any player nowadays would sell a game under any circumstance. The cases of Hall, Devlin and Craver has been a lesson to all of them.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

documentation of 'Bid' McPhee's nickname

Date Sunday, April 29, 1883
Text

[Anthracite vs. Cincinnati 4/28/1883] they playing of the whole team was fine excepting that of McPhee. “Bid” seemed to be “off,” and played listlessly—a thing rather uncommon for him.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early brotherhood rumor

Date Tuesday, July 10, 1883
Text

A Pittsburg paper has a startling rumor in its capacious grasp that the base ball players are about to start a protective association in opposition to the eleven men reserve rule. The rumor has not penetrated beyond the smoky confines of that city and has probably no foundation. The Arbitration Committee has provided to meet any such scheme and the fellows who ever attempt to start the “old thing” will wish they had not.

The better quality of professionals have no need of a protective association. So far as the Cincinnati Club players are concerned, none will be the losers on account of the reserve rule. Not one man of the present team who remains will be asked to play for less than he gets this year, and some will be paid more. We should like to see a list of the protective fellows when they get organized. Also a diagram of what they intend to do. All who think they can get through the winter without advance money should by all means subscribe. It will amuse them until spring comes, when they will either sign with the club that has reserved them or go to work at something else–cashier in a bank or a brick-yard. Let us organize, by all means.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early brotherhood rumor 2

Date Sunday, July 22, 1883
Text

It is intimated that a movement is on foot among professional ball players to organize a society to fight the reserve-men clause in the agreement entered into by the three base ball associations. The proceedings of the society, will, it is understood, be carried on secretly—a sort of secret fraternity, as it were, in which, however, the proverbial goat will be conspicuous by its absence.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early cite of sliding pads

Date Saturday, August 4, 1883
Text

“Fresh” Latham now wears a pad in the broadest part of his pants to prevent any unpleasant results from making slides to bases. He had on these trousers yesterday, but didn't have much of a chance to show their use by a practical illustration.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early proposal for inter-league play; a championship of the country

Date Sunday, July 29, 1883
Text

The Arbitration Committee of the three professional base ball associations of the United States will meet probably about the last of October or first of November. … One of the most important things to come from this meeting will be a plan for an interchange of championship games next year between the League and American Association clubs. It is a fact that President McKnight favors the idea, and that Harry Wright and others of the League believe in it. The plan was originally proposed last fall when the project of arbitration was talked of. It is simple and could easily be worked to advantage. The idea is about like this: … ...let each League club play a series of ten games instead of fourteen with each other League club, ditto, each American club. That would leave a series of four games to b3e played with each club of the rival organization. Each club, League or American, would therefore have to play seventy games for the championship of its own organization and twenty-eight games for the championship of the country or both organization—ninety-eight in all, just what the number is this year in both Associations.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early rumor of AA expansion

Date Monday, October 22, 1883
Text

We are credibly informed that the clubs of the American Association have, after a general inter-change of views, decided to support at the ensuing annual meeting a proposition to add four clubs to the membership of the Association, and that the new cities admitted will be Chicago, Indianapolis, Brooklyn and Washington. It is difficult to believe that the Association will take the step in question, as a championship schedule for twelve clubs would have to be reduced to eight games at most, so that the club series would be divided into four games at home and four games on the grounds of every other club, instead of seven games as during the past season. The effect of this would be financially disastrous just as soon as the play had developed the fact that at least eight of the twelve clubs were weak and had ceased to draw good patronage either on their own or other grounds. Our informant is positive in the assertion that the twelve club plan has already been agreed upon, but we can hardly believe it will be carried into effect.--American Sports.

Our Chicago contemporary has probably been misinformed, as the Athletic managers as well as the Metropolitan and Cincinnati clubs declare positive that they know nothing abut such an arrangement, and have never been spoken to about it.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early use of 'crank' in a baseball context

Date Sunday, May 20, 1883
Text

[a new AA umpire is appointed] Wm. McLean, of this city, was again slighted, but we suppose Mr. Williams was compelled to do this by his “boss” Mr. Caylor, of Cincinnati. Williams seems to become more subservient every day to the Cincinnati crank who now rules the entire Association.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early use of 'general manager'

Date Sunday, April 15, 1883
Text

[writing about Alonzo Knight] This gentlemanly and popular player will be the general manager of the [Athletic] club this year. The Sporting Life April 15, 1883 [note that Harry Stovey was listed in the same article as the field captain]

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early word of the Chicago reserve team

Date Saturday, October 20, 1883
Text

The American Sportsman announce to-morrow that the Chicago club was decided to engage for next season an auxiliary team of ten or twelve young players from semi-professional and amateur teams, put them on salary and keep them in training under the direct supervision of Capt. Anson, with a view of developing a base ball team for supplying emergencies, and with a goal of increasing the supply of available men in the country. The operation of the rule by which each club can reserve eleven men is [illegible] make good unengaged players scarce. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early word of the Eastern League; Philadelphia Club official scorer

Date Sunday, September 9, 1883
Text

There is a movement on foot to form a new Eastern Base Ball Association to take the place of the Interstate. The clubs of the Interstate Association are expected to be included in the new associaiton, aslo clubs from Richmond, Va., Washington, Baltimore, Alobany, Troy, New Haven, Hartford, Boston, new York and Philadelphia. The club in Philadelphia it is proposed to locate in the southern section of the city, and to call it the Keystone. It is hoped that the new association can be placed on an equal footing with the Legaue and American, and, while not being attached, to either, to have the new associations contracts recognized and to interchange games with both. H. H. Diddelbock, official scorer of the Philadelphia Club, is most prominent in the new enterprise. Philadelphia Record September 9, 1883

H. H. Diddlebock says clubs from eleven cities are anxious to joint the new Eastern association to be known as the Union League of Professional Base Ball Players. Two clubs each from Richmond and Baltimore have applied for admission, and hse is in communication with managers of clubs in Washington, D.C.; Brooklyn, N.Y.; Hartford and New Haven, Conn.; Springfield, Mass.; Albany and Troy, N.Y., and Reading, Pa. The Philadelphia club will be called the keystone. Representatives from these clubs will meet at Earle's Hotel, New York city, on September 25, to effect an organization. Philadelphia Record September 16, 1883

Source Philadelphia Record
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early word of the UA

Date Friday, August 31, 1883
Text

A movement is on foot to organize an independent base ball association, and for that purpose representatives from Chicago, St. Louis, Indianapolis, Pittsburg, New York, Philadelphia, Brooklyn and Hartford will meet on October 12, in this city [Pittsburgh]. It is the intention of the new organization to ignore the “eleven-men rule” now in vogue in the League and the American Association, and to make a number of alterations in the playing rules. Philadelphia Record August 31, 1883

Your correspondent saw Mr. J. A. Williams, Secretary of the association, yesterday [8/31], and in answer to the question as to what the American Association thought of the new independent association which is to be formed in this city [Pittsburgh] next month, he repled that he thought they would have a hard time of it. “And,” continued the speaker, “it is very questionable if the proposed organization can make the thing a go. In the first place they will have to contend with the two other association, both of which are now on a sound financial basis, and, of course, they will have to accomplish what hwe have already done. As to their stealing our players,” continued Secretary Williams, “that is foolish, for, with two exceptions, the American Clubs can pay larger salaries than the clubs in the new association dare offer. By their arrangements they are leaving Baltimore and Cincinnati out, and yet they are two of the best ball towns in the country. To sum up my opinion,” continued the Secretary, “I think the new association will be very short-lived, and it will die of starvation.” Cincinnati Enquirer September 3, 1883

Jimmy Williams, the Secretary of the American Association, laughs at the idea of Al Pratt's new association being a success. If Pratt has the backing he is credited with, there is liable to be a different tone to his mirth by the time of the next meeting of the directors. Cincinnati Enquirer September 3, 1883

Al Pratt, late manager of the Allegenys, has been conducting correspondence relative to the formation of the new Base-ball Association, the delegates to which will meet in Pittsburg on the 12th of next month. He says representaives will be present from Chicago, St. Louis, Indianapolis, Pittsburg, New York, Philadelphia, hartford and Brooklyn, and he is very enthusiastic over the financial outlook for the new organization. They will make several changes to the playing rules, and will adopt the cut-throat policy in regard to engaging players. No attention will be paid whatever to the eleven men reserve rule, and if they can tempt players from the League or American Association by higher salaries they will do it. Cincinnati Enquirer September 3, 1883

Source Philadelphia Record
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early word of the Union Association

Date Monday, September 3, 1883
Text

A dispatch from Pittburg, on Friday, says that a movement is on foot to organize an independent base ball association, and for that purpose representatives from Chicago, St. Louis, Indianapolis, Pittsburg, New York, Philadelphia, Brooklyn and Hartford will meet on October 12, in this city. It is the intention of the new organization to ignore the “eleven men” rule, now in vogue in the League and the American Association, and to make a number of alterations in the playing rules. More of this new movement is not known. It is evidently a secret one, and the above announcement was undoubtedly premature. The scene is one similar to that of the new Eastern Association. It is quite likely that ere long the League and American Association will discover that they do not monopolize the national game and own players as much as they thought.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Eggler hurt by the abolition of the fair-foul

Date Saturday, February 10, 1883
Text

The doing away with the fair-foul hit in 1877...materially weakened Eggler’s batting, and he has never since held the same high position in handling the ash.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

electing the new AA secretary

Date Wednesday, December 19, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA annual meeting of 12/12/1883] The most important office, and the only one for which there was any sort of a fight, was the secretaryship of the Association, made vacant by the resignation of James Williams. Mr. Dan O'Leary [Indianapolis Club] nominated Frank Wright, of Cincinnati. The name of W. C. Wikoff, of Columbus, O., was presented by Mr. Von der Ahe, and Mr. Barnie closed the nominations with the name of Thos. Moore, of Baltimore. The first ballot resulted in Wright four, Wikoff four, Moore four; the second ballot, Wright five, Wikoff five, Moore three; the third ballot, Wright four, Wikoff five, Moore three. At this stage a motion was made and carried to drop the name of the lowest candidate, and Mr. Moore fell out of the race. The fourth and final ballot resulted: Wright five, Wikoff seven. Mr. Wikoff was declared duly elected. The Sporting Life December 19, 1883

The new Secretary, Wheeler Wikoff, is not a newspaper man, as reported, but has a berth in the pension department at Columbus. The Sporting Life December 19, 1883

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

enforcement attempts on delivery rule

Date Wednesday, December 26, 1883
Text

Throwing pitchers will have a hard time of it in the American Association next year. The convention was unanimous in the belief that the League had made a mistake in giving the pitcher unlimited power in his delivery, and went to the opposite extreme. Last year the Association abolished the foul-balk and substituted the balk instead. They then made it a balk every time a pitcher delivered the ball with his hand passing above his shoulder, and added to the penalty a base to the batsman, so as to make it effective should nobody be on the bases but the umpires refused to execute or enforce the rule. The convention has now adopted a new rule as follows: “The umpire shall in all cases enforce the strict letter of each playing rule herein when requested by the captain of either contesting club, particularly those restricting the manner of the delivery of the ball to the batsman by the pitcher.

Source The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

expanding Oriole Park

Date Wednesday, December 5, 1883
Text

The work of modification of Oriole Park is about to commence. Messrs. Houck and Barnie have purchased the house and lot at the northwest corner of the grounds, which will give additional room. The diamond will be moved northeast, the home plate resting in the vicinity of what was the ladies' entrance to the grand stand. The grand stand will be let down to the ground and a tower erected in the centre, which will contain boxes, besides comfortably accommodations for the press.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

expanding the Baltimore grounds

Date Sunday, May 13, 1883
Text

As the home-club has left on its first trip, Managers Barnie and Houck are increasing the seating capacity of Oriole Park by extending the grand-stand and making other additions. The accommodations have been found entirely inadequate to the great rush, and on several occasions the sale of admissions has had to be stopped. The crowds have averaged from five to seven thousand, and this if many more than was ever drawn to a ball ground in this place—even in the days of the Lord Baltimores.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

expanding the reserve; the UA put under the ban by the AA

Date Thursday, December 13, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA convention] ...there was a very warm discussion over the question whether the Association would be allowed to play with the Union League clubs, but it was finally ended by the adoption of an amendment to the constitution [extending league discipline to reserved players]. St. Louis Post-Dispatch December 13, 1883

In regard to the Day resolution which is now written into the constitution, it will give reserved men who have signed elsewhere a chance to return to the clubs reserving them before play opens. After playing with the nines with whom they are under present engagement they will be permanently expelled. St. Louis Post-Dispatch December 15, 1884

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

favoring runs scored over batting average

Date Saturday, July 14, 1883
Text

The following letter will interest members of the Cincinnati team:

To the Base Ball Editor of the Commercial Gazette.

Being an admirer of base ball, and to further the interests of the National sport in our city, I propose to present to such member of the Cincinnati team having the best official batting average for the season of 1883 a handsome ebony bat, mounted with solid silver trimmings. The bat will be on exhibition at 80 West Fourth street for ten days. Hoping you will approve of my action, respectfully yours, S. Rosenberg.

{While we appreciate Mr. Rosenberg’s intentions, we do not approve of offering a prize for official batting averages, because it tends to induce a player to look more to his average than to his club’s interests. We respectfully suggest to Mr. R. that he make the prize a reward to the player who shall make the most runs in championship games.–Ed. Com. Gaz.}

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

fielders backing up the sign of a well coached team

Date Sunday, June 3, 1883
Text

The [Detroit] club is well managed and well directed upon the field. In Quest it secured a competent playing captain and coach, and this is apparent in the backing-up of fielders and running of bases.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

fighting pool selling

Date Sunday, June 3, 1883
Text

During the past winter the [Michigan] State Supreme Court rendered a decision holding that pool selling was not gambling, and since the base ball season commenced nearly a score of pool rooms have been established in Detroit, their patrons being principally men and boys who are interested in the game. Manager Chapman has studiously refused to give any information as to the disposition of his players in advance of the game, in order to prevent, as far as possible, the sale of pools on the game. Recently the police raided the pool rooms, and the President of the Detroit Club authorized the statement that he and his colleagues will do all in their power to drive the pool sellers out of town.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

fining batters for hitting when the runner had a steal

Date Monday, August 6, 1883
Text

Two of the Cincinnati men were fined last Tuesday for hitting the ball just as the base-runner had a good steal on second. Captain Snyder intends to keep this up and impose a fine for thoughtless playing every time. The fines will not be remitted either.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

firing an umpire

Date Sunday, June 3, 1883
Text

The first removal among the National League staff of umpires occurred on Wednesday, when Mr. Odlin received a telegram from Secretary Young announcing that three clubs had joined in the complaint of incompetency preferred by Detroit, and his removal was therefore compulsory under the rule. While it is doubtless true that Mr. Odlin made some unfortunate mistakes in Detroit, it is difficult to perceive the necessity for the haste and harshness shown toward him by the Detroit Club, especially as he stood ready to resign provided his services did not prove acceptable in Chicago or Cleveland. He served with fair acceptability in the first two games of the Boston-Chicago series, and created the impression that he was rapidly acquiring the experience necessary to make him an excellent umpire., quoting Chicago American Sports

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

first baseman expected to be a strong hitter

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

The position [first base] is regarded as one of ease. Played perfectly it is not so, although the work is not uniformly heavy, and for this reason the first baseman is required to bat and run bases well.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

first word of the St. Louis UA club

Date Thursday, October 25, 1883
Text

St.Louis is to have another base-ball park and professional team next season. Messrs. Henry V. Lucas and Ellis Wainwright are to be the proprietors of the new park. They will fence in the open space on Jefferson avenue and Dayton street and will expend $8,000 on grand stands, fencing, etc. The grounds will be 400 x 600 feet in dimensions. They have not yet decided whether they will enter their new club in the League or American association. It is doubtful if they will be admitted to the latter, as there is already an association club here and the association cannot have two clubs from the same city. Then there is an objection to entering the League, as they prohibit playing on Sunday and fix the price of admission at 50 cents a head, whereas the American association only charge 25 cents. Messrs. Lucas and Wainwright are going right ahead, however, and looking about for good players. They intend getting together a strong nine. (St. Louis) Missouri Republican October 25, 1883

The new Union League club which has been started in St. Louis is the fruitful theme of discourse on every side, and all kinds of surmises are made as to the policy, its players and what it will do in the future. Mr. Lucas, the president, has forwarded application to Warren White, the secretary of the new body, making formal application for membership, which is equivalent to admission. It was stated on good authority yesterday that Messrs. Groves, Purcell, Manning and McClellan of the Philadelphia club had signed contracts with the new club. As they are all “reserve men,” this is a virtual violation, or rather disregard of the rule, and it is stated that more ruptures will follow. Rumors were extensively circulated that Mullane and Deasley had consented to join the new club, but this was not authoritative, and it is not likely that they will take so quick action. It was also stated that Daly, the Cleveland's one-armed pitcher, would be a member of the organization, he also being a reserve man of the Cleveland club. Much of this must be taken with salt, as rumors are wide-spread, and many of uncertain origin. The statement regarding the four Philadelphia players is, however, regarded as authoritative. It is said they are also after Sutton and Brouthers. (St. Louis) Missouri Republican October 26,1883

A chat was had with Mr. Henry Lucas yesterday in which he laid forth some of the plans of operations for the first campaign... In regard to his nine he said there were many exaggerated statements afloat and, that but very little which had been sent abroad was authoritative. Mr. Lucas was especially put out about the manner in which his name had been used regarding contracted players. “I am a business man, he said, “and would do no such foolish thing as to meddle with a player under contract elsewhere or with other parties. In regard to the reserve rule, that is an entirely different matter and it will not stand in my way.” (St. Louis) Missouri Republican October 28, 1883

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Fisler managing the Merritts

Date Tuesday, May 1, 1883
Text

West Fisler, of Philadelphia, formerly well known in base ball circles, has engaged with the Albert Merritts of Camden, as manager. Having a good situation with John Wanamaker, Mr. Fisler refused to play for less than $2,500. it is quite likely a larger sum has been promised by the Camden club. Harrisburg Patriot May 1, 1883

W. F. [sic] Fisler, the manager of the Merritt base ball club, yesterday denied in Reading the report that the club would disband. He says there is no truth in the newspaper stories. Harrisburg Patriot June 2, 1883

The aggregate of the monthly salary of the [disbanded] Merritt Club was but $1,315 divided up as follows: Gardner and Emslie, $150 each; Sweeny, Corcoran, Fennelly, Householder and Greenwood, $125 each; Warner and Kimber, $100 each, and Keinzel, $90. Wes Fisler got $100 per month. The differences in the salaries was not due to the worth of the men, but rather to the time of signing them. Those engaged early demanded les than those signed late in the season. Trenton Evening Times July 23, 1883

Source Harrisburg Patriot
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Fred Dunlap jumps to the UA

Date Wednesday, November 28, 1883
Text

A great sensation will be caused in base ball circles by the fact here announced the first time—that Fred. Dunlap, late of the Cleveland Club, who is, take hi all round, in batting, fielding and base running, the best second baseman in the country, has jumped the reserve rule and signed with the new St. Louis Club. Fred. went from Philadelphia to New York, November 19th, and there met Mr. Lucas. After some negotiation Dunlap appended his signature to a contract, binding him to play in St. Louis next season for $3,400, one thousand of which was paid him in advance before he returned to Philadelphia. Dunlap's desertion will be a heavy loss to the Cleveland Club. Fred. says he has fulfilled all his obligations toward Cleveland to the end of his contract, which left him free to dispose of his services as he saw fit, reserve or no reserve.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

free admission for retrieving a foul ball

Date Sunday, April 8, 1883
Text

Of the component part [of the crowd] young America is in the majority. This genus ranges in age from ten to sixteen,a nd finds his way to the ground in many different ways, from being possessed of the requisite cash to an entrance on a return of a foul ball over the fence. There are several players who have gained the title of the “boys' friend,” by their repeated hitting of a ball over the fence, and the poor boys swear by them, and never forget to give them vigorous applause whenever they make a good play. The boy who gets in on a foul ball return is contended with any location in the field, generally preferring a seat on the grass in the outfield.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

George Bradley signs with the Cincinnati Unions

Date Thursday, December 20, 1883
Text

Bradley played with the Athletics last season, and did more than any one player toward bringing the championship of the American Association to this city. He was placed on the reserve list of the Athletic Club for next season, and offered a contract at a reduced salary. He refused to sign it, and has been holding off for some time in hopes that they would pay him what he was worth. It was only by the hardest kind of work that he was secured by Mr. Thorner. The Athletic management seeing he was in demand made a great effort last night to have him sign a contract at several hundred dollars in advance of their original offer. Mr. Thomas Pratt also wanted him for his Philadelphia Union team, bu gracefully withdrew in favor of Mr. Thorner, who is already a great favorite with the delegates, and the fight narrowed down to Simmons & Co. Bradley called on the firm yesterday morning, but they could not come to his price, and at noon he met Mr. Thorner and affixed his signature to a contract, $500 in advance of what he was offered to stay with the Athletics.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

George Wright introduced the rubber mouth guard

Date Sunday, November 11, 1883
Text

Some years ago George Wright introduced in base-ball a rubber mouth-piece for the protection of the teeth of players behind the bat. The wire mask, which was introduced later on, rendered the use of the mouth-piece unnecessary, but now it promises to come into use again on the foot-ball field as a protection for “rushers” in the rough-and-tumble scrimmages of the game., quoting the Cleveland Herald

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

George Wright retires 2

Date Saturday, February 3, 1883
Text

George Wright visited The Clipper office Jan. 30. He has definitely decided to abandon professional playing, and will in the future devote himself to his steadily increasing business in Boston, Mass.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

George Wright rumored to be organizing an Eastern League club

Date Sunday, October 7, 1883
Text

George Wright is said to be the prime mover in the organization of a club in Boston for the new Eastern Base-ball Association.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

giving first base on a hit by pitch

Date Friday, December 14, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting] One of the most important changes in the playing rule, and one that puts a damper on the song-and-dance pitchers, whose effectiveness mostly depends on their hitting abilities, was adopted. It is a clause giving a batsman a base when he is squarely hit with a pitched ball. The umpire in a measure will decide on the merit of the case.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Goldsmith complains of high fines

Date Monday, October 15, 1883
Text

President Spalding, of the Chicago Ball Club, spent most of last Wednesday in signing the players of the Chicago team for the season of 1884. He got through the lest very comfortably until he came to Goldsmith, who absolutely refused to put his name to a contract, saying the he was not satisfied with his treatment by Captain Anson, and would not play with Chicago next year. He acknowledged that he had not pitched up to his usual standard this year, and said it was because his heart was not in the work. Most of his salary, he said, had been used up in fines for the last three years, and he found it impossible to get along with Anson.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

gongs at the Chicago ground

Date Wednesday, April 11, 1883
Text

[from the field rules of the Chicago Club] Upon the first sounding of the gong the gates will be opened for the audience, and players will cease to practice and repair to the club-house.

Upon the second sounding of the gong, twenty-five minutes before the commencement of the game, the visiting nines will enter the grounds in a body and take full possession of the field for their preliminary practice.

Upon the third sounding of the gong, ten minutes before the commencement of the game, the Chicago nine will come upon the field, and the visiting nine will immediately give up the field to the home nine and discontinue their practice.

Upon the fourth sounding of the gong, two minutes before the commencement of the game, all preliminary practice shall cease. The captains shall toss for innings and arrange any special ground rules that may be required.

Upon the fifth sounding of the gong the fielding nine, the batter and the umpire will immediately take their positions and commence the game. Cincinnati Enquirer April 11, 1883, quoting American Sports

The St. Louis Club patronizes the Chicago's plan of having every thing done at the tap of the bell. Cincinnati Enquirer April 19, 1883

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Harry Wright organizes a reserve nine

Date Sunday, May 6, 1883
Text

Harry Wright has, as is well know, organized a second nine to be known as the Providence Reserves, which is to play on the Providence grounds in the absence of the League team, and from which Harry hopes to develop good professional talent. Some of the other League clubs are kicking against this system, arguing that it will decrease the receipts of the visiting League clubs.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Harry Wright resigns from Providence; rumors about where he will go next

Date Monday, October 1, 1883
Text

Professional base ball circles in New York are exercised over the announcement that Harry Wright has resigned from the Providence Club, his resignation to date from the close of the season in October. The increasing question regarding this fact as regards patrons of the game in New York is: Where is Harry Wright going to locate in 1884? Manager Mutrie, it is said, over a month ago stated that Harry Wright was coming to New York. Harry's advent would mean his taking the management of the League team of New York. Such a consummation is devoutly wished by New Yorkers, as it would give them a good show for the pennant in 1884.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Henderson managing both Baltimore and Chicago Unions

Date Wednesday, December 26, 1883
Text

Mr. Henderson is...resting. [He] is just busy enough to be in negotiation with a modest but talented individual who requires as remuneration the round world and all that therein is, while the Chicago-Baltimore manager thinks he should play ball with him and yet allow him to have a small piece of the earth as his share. When the dickering culminates we shall have the name.

The Chicago Unions report for duty in Baltimore April 1 st, and take up field practice preliminary to the opening of the schedule season, thus gaining a month on the climate of Illinois and also the advantage of practice with the Baltimore Unions. With one of these two clubs Mr. Henderson is confident of capturing the pennant, and hopes to bring them in first and second.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

home and away uniforms

Date Sunday, January 28, 1883
Text

The Athletic players will have two uniforms next season. The suit which they will play at home in will be made up of white shirts and pants; blue stockings and belts; blue and white caps, and the word “Athletic” in blue across the bosom of the shirt. The other suit, which will be worn principally on Western tours, will be of a dark gray color, with red stockings and belts.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips accused of double dealing

Date Sunday, June 10, 1883
Text

Is it true that Manager Phillips received $50 from President Von Der Ahe, of St. Louis, for securing George Strief for that team? The story goes that Horace told the Columbus Directors that Strief would not play here for less than $1,500, when the truth was he agreed to come for $1,000. in the meantime he was commissioned by Mr. Von Der Ahe to secure Strief, for which he was to be allowed $25 on each hundred less than a $1,200 salary, Strief signing for $1,000. When the St. Louis Club was in Columbus, Strief said he would have come here for $900. The Sporting Life June 10, 1883, quoting the Columbus Times.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips arraigned for skipping out on a hotel bill

Date Sunday, June 10, 1883
Text

Horace B. Phillips, manager of the Columbus Base Ball Club, was Tuesday arraigned before Magistrate Lennon on the charge of obtaining board under false pretenses. Evidence was offered to the effect that in the Summer of 1882, while the defendant was acting as manager of the Philadelphia Base Ball Club, he incurred a bill amounting to ninety-one dollars at the Great Western Hotel, Market Street above Thirteenth. He represented to the proprietor that Mr. Reach, would settle for everything. Finally Phillips disappeared from the city. The defendant paid the money and the suit was withdrawn. The Sporting Life June 10, 1883

` the Mets organize a minor league club

The Metropolitan Exhibition Company, of New York city, has organized a new Base Ball club to represent Newark. … The club will probably be admitted into the Inter-state Association, in which event the schedule will have to be changed. The Sporting Life June 10, 1883

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips charged with extravagance in management

Date Sunday, July 1, 1883
Text

A good deal of excitement was caused in base ball circles to-day by the publication of a petition, signed by some forty or more of the stockholders of the Columbus Club, requesting the Directors to call a meeting of the stockholders, and to make an exhibit of the financial and other affairs of the club. It is understood to be a drive a Phillips, the Manager, who is charged with extravagance in management.

The Directors claim there is no ground for complaint, and that they will probably accede to the request. They profess to have confidence in Phillips, who does not seem disturbed over the matter.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips is not rehired

Date Monday, October 22, 1883
Text

[reporting on the stockholders meeting of 10/16/1883] The question of engaging a manger was gone into. Numerous petitions had been presented to retain Mr. Phillips. The board of directors reported that it had received three separate offers from Manager Phillips, all of which had been rejected. At the last meeting of the board a petition had been presented pretty numerously signed, asking that Mr. Phillips be engaged at $1,500, with $200 advanced money, and $60 per month for six months. Some of the directors were inclined to consider this proposition in a favorable manner, but they had finally concluded it best to submit the question to the stockholders. A vote was then taken, and the ballot stood 46 to 11 against Phillips. It was also decided not to engage a manager until spring. Manager Phillips showed considerable feeling over his treatment, and stated to your correspondent that when he came here last year he accepted an uncertainty of $500 over a certain sum, on condition that if he would get the club through the season without losing money he should have the option of remaining at an increased salary for another year. The result is that he has lost $82.17 on the score card enterprise, and worked for $78 per month or for $1,202. A position has been offered him which he thinks he may accept, the only different being a matter of $200 in the salary.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips seeking engagement as a theatrical manager

Date Wednesday, December 5, 1883
Text

Horace Phillips is loitering in St. Louis trying to “make a date” with some traveling theatrical company in the capacity of business manager.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips the projector of the AA

Date Friday, December 21, 1883
Text

It may not be generally known that while connected with the Athletic Club he [Phillips] was the projector and organizer of the now powerful American Association. St., quoting the New York Clipper

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips' character

Date Sunday, February 25, 1883
Text

[from a Columbus correspondent] ...the entire management of the players and business [of the new Columbus Club] will be in the hands of Horace B. Phillips. He comes well indorsed by the officers of clubs he managed in Hornellsville, Syracuse, Troy, Baltimore and Philadelphia (both Athletics and Philadelphias). Phillips' weak point has been his nervous unsettled temperament and a desire to be too independent, but t since he came here he has shown a decided change of disposition. Letters from various people connected with the League and American Association acknowledge his ability as a manger, and state that if he pays strict attention to business he has no superior, being sharp, quick at taking advantage of a weak spot of an adversary, and moreover intelligent.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips' financial management questioned

Date Sunday, July 8, 1883
Text

A good deal of excitement was raised in base ball circles, last week, by the publication of a petition, signed by some forty or more of the stockholders of the Columbus Club, requesting the directors to call a meeting of the stockholders, and make an exhibit of the financial and other affairs of the club. It was understood to be a drive at Phillips, the manager, who is charged with extravagance in management. The directors claim there is no ground for complaint, and that they will probably accede to the request. They profess to have confidence in Phillips, who does not seem disturbed over the matter. The Sporting Life July 8, 1883

There was a meeting of the stockholders of the Columbus Club this evening [7/9], called by the Directors, at the request of some of the stockholders, for the purpose of investigating the affairs of the club. It was understood that an effort would be made to oust Phillips from the management, on account of extravagance and untrustworthiness. There was a large attendance, nearly all the stockholders being present. The Directors made a complete showing of the receipts and disbursements of the club in detail.

Charges were made against Phillips of gross extravagance in the management of the club, and reflections were made upon his character from hear-say evidences. The stockholders, after hearing all the charges, adopted a resolution expressing their confidence in Phillips by almost a unanimous vote. It is believed that the club will do better since the agitation that has been going on has ceased. Cincinnati Commercial Gazette July 10, 1883

There was a meeting of the stockholders of the Columbus Club last Monday evening, called by the directors at the request of some of the stockholders, for the purpose of investigating the affairs of the club. It was understood that an effort would be made to oust Phillips from the management, on account of extravagance and untrustworthiness. There was a large attendance, nearly all the stockholders being present. The directors made a complete showing of the receipts and disbursements of the club in detail.

Charges were made against Phillips of gross extravagance in the management of the club, and reflections were made upon his character from hearsay evidence. The stockholders, after hearing all the charges, adopted a resolution expressing their confidence in Phillips by almost a unanimous vote. It is believed that the club will do better since the agitation that has been getting on has ceased. The Sporting Life July 15, 1883

Horace Phillips resembles a cat in one respect—no matter how far he falls he comes down upon his feet. They've been investigating him at Columbus and he came out of the ordeal all right. The Sporting Life July 15, 1883

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

how Doug Allison was discovered

Date Sunday, July 29, 1883
Text

[See TSL 7/29/1883 for an lengthy, and likely fictional, account of how the Cincinnati Club discovered Allison.]

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

how to curve a ball

Date Wednesday, December 26, 1883
Text

The following is the method of delivery generally used for the incurve to a right hand and the outcurse to a left hand batsman: The pitcher closes the third and last fingers, and holds the ball with the first and second and the thumb. Raising his hand nearly to the height of his shoulder and back of him, he takes a step forward, and bringing his hand down with a wide swing, delivers the ball with his wrist turned well back and a sort of snap motion which can be compared to nothing so well as the “cracking” or a whip. The whole point of this delivery is to have the ball leave the two fingers last. It should, if fact, roll off those fingers, as one might say, and thus get a rotary motion, which will give it the curve. This will be made clear enough by taking a ball in the hand and allowing it to roll off the fingers to the side. The method of delivery used in the outcurve appears more difficult than the other, but it is much more common in practice. The swing of the arms is of course nearly the same in both cases, but for the outcurve the ball should leave the ends of the fingers last, and the thumb should be kept out of way. By conceiving of the ball as leaving the forefinger last a clear idea of a circular motion opposite to the former one can be gotten. It is plan, of course that the rotary motion of the ball in this case must be exactly opposite to that which would produce the incurve.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Hugh Nicol jumps to the St. Louis

Date Sunday, January 7, 1883
Text

The trouble between the Chicago club and Nicol, who has signed with the St. Louis Browns, arises from the fact that Anson at the close of the season told Nicol that he would give him $1,100 to play ball for him (Anson) during the season of 1883, Nicol to go where Anson saw fit to send him, and Nicol was induced to sign an agreement to this effect, with the express understanding that Nicol should play regularly on some nine, and not as a substitute. Nicol received no form of contract to bind Anson to his agreement to pay the $1,100 or to insure his not being played as a substitute, but simply had his word given to that effect; whereas Anson had Nicol's written agreement to play for him wherever he should see fit to sign him. Under this agreement Anson now requires Nicol to play with the Chicago team, and, of course, as a substitute. Anson had been offered $50 for a release by Nicol, but wants $100. The Philadelphia Item January 7, 1883

Anson has given up his fight over Nicoll and the latter will play in St. Louis. The Philadelphia Item February 4, 1883

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

inconsistency in scoring errors

Date Sunday, July 1, 1883
Text

The official book of base ball rules is designed to promote uniformity in the method of playing and of scoring championship games, and yet the diversity of style is almost as great as the scorers are numerous. Scarcely two men score exactly alike the difference in opinion becomes more marked when the subject of errors is broached. The books says: “An error should be given for each misplay which allows the striker or base-runner to make one or more bases when perfect play would have insured his being put out.” also that “an error should be given to the pitcher when the batsman is given first base on 'called balls.'” Notwithstanding this plain language a large majority of the scorers do not score an error for each misplay which allows one or more bases to be made—passed balls and wild pitches, for instance—and yet they do give errors for a muffed foul fly, on which nothing is make, though a life is given to the batter. It is an error, though the rules do not cover it as such. Comparatively few score an error to the pitcher for giving a base on “called balls,” although the book of rules expressly provides that it shall be so scored.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

inconsistent scoring 2

Date Saturday, July 21, 1883
Text

In Wednesday’s game Traffley reached first base but once, and that was on a grounder to Latham, who threw Corkhill out at the home plate. The official score next day had a base hit credited to Traffley. Inquiry of the official scorer of the St. Louis club developed the fact that he is and has been giving a batter a base hit on any hit that another base runner, whether the batter reaches first base or not. This accounts for the undeserved standing of the St. Louis players in the official averages. It is clearly against all rules of scoring, and Secretary Williams should give it his immediate attention. There are several other official scorers who make equally as bad breaks. One gives a base hit and an error on the same play. Another does not give a muffed foul fly an error if the batter does not afterward reach first base. Such scoring is simply diaphanous, as Secretary Williams knows, and should be renovated by him.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

increased supply of players the answer to the reserve system

Date Thursday, December 27, 1883
Text

The idea forwarded by the Post-Dispatch [is] that the proper and legitimate way to break down high salaries is not through any unjust enactment, such as the reserve rule, but by the creation of new talent in such lines of competition as will be engendered by the reserve nine system... St.

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

intentionally damaging the ball

Date Sunday, July 22, 1883
Text

[Cleveland vs. Chicago 7/6/1883] Anson tried to cut the ball and Williamson was caught seeking to tear it with his teeth. Their object was to get a new one, which McCormick cannot pitch as well as an old one.

Anson's effort to cut the ball, and Williamson's endeavor to tear it with his teeth, are willful and silly falsehoods. No such occurrences, or anything in manner resembling them, took place. The Sporting Life July 22, 1883 [quoting the Cleveland Herald and American Sports respectively]

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jimmy Williams loses his day job; will manage the St. Louis Club; St. Louis Club finances

Date Monday, October 22, 1883
Text

The election of a Democratic Auditory of State for Ohio at the late election deprived Secretary Williams of an important berth. He has been an important person in the Auditor of State's office for the last thirteen years. Now, like the Chinese, he had to go. Just at this moment President Von der Ahe, of the St. Louis Club, stepped to the front and engaged Mr. Williams to act as manager of the St. Louis Club. He is to receive a salary of $3,000 and a large sum of money is placed at his disposal to secure the best talent that money can procure. Mr. Von der Ahe says he cleared over $70,000 this year, and this sum he declares himself willing to spend in order to secure the coveted championship. Whether MR. Williams will be a success as a manager is, of course, a problem. That he has been a most efficient and obliging secretary, however, is true, and the American Association will find it a difficult matter to replace him. We wish him success as a manager.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

John L. Sullivan as pitcher

Date Sunday, June 3, 1883
Text

The Athletic managers...imported John L. Sullivan, the pugilist, to pitch for them in a gate-money game against a picked nine. Sullivan as a fighter is worth money to see, but as a ball-player he is not; yet curiosity drew about 3,000 people, of whose shekels Sullivan carried away about $400.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

John L. Sullivan as umpire

Date Monday, August 27, 1883
Text

John L. Sullivan as an umpire was a success. It was very kind of him to stand in a hot sun for two hours and a half and officiate in a thankless position. It was very amusing to see how his decisions were received. There was probably never a game where the umpire was not treated to more or less exposulation—generally more. But not one decision of John's occasioned a murmur. When a poor ball was called a strike, under circumstnaces that would have occasioned lively kicking, the victim looked at John mildly, timidly and appealingly, like a lamb led out for slaughter. Without joking, John would make a splended League umpire. There would be no kicking or squabblng, no bandying words or bulldozing with him. A glance of that eye qnd a gesture of that arm would go farther than all the bravado of some of the umpires of the day. John attends many of the League games on the grounds, and has doubtless often said to himself or to a friend on witnessing the awful and soul-harrowing exhibitons of would-be umpiring on the grounds this season: “Why, I could do better than that duffer myself.” How Anson's jaw would drop and Dunlaps chin would fail; how Purcell would let his mustache droop and slink away with his tail down; how Bob Ferguson's tongue would cleve to the roof of his mouth, and Blonde Shaffer shiver in his tracks when placed in juxtaposition with John Lawrence Sullivan? Where would Lane, Bradley, Kelly and Daniels be, compared with him?, quoting the Boston Globe

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

jumping the gun on a New York-Metropolitans transfer

Date Thursday, November 29, 1883
Text

In turns out after all that the management of the St. Louis nine has secured O'Neill to succeed Mullane as pitcher. O'Neill is the man who did such good work for the New Yorks last season. When the New Yorkers released him he was quickly captured by the Metropolitans and signed before the time during which, under the rules, he could not sign had expired. This being made known there was a general rush for O'Neill, the principal competition for his services being between Cincinnati and St. Louis. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Justus Thorner applies for admission to the AA

Date Thursday, December 13, 1883
Text

Justus Thorner, ex-president of the Cincinnati league club, applied for reinstatement as a member of the American association. He was a member until a year ago, when O. P. Caylor of the Commercial Gazette worked him out and was elected in his stead. The association refused to interfere and Thorner has commenced the organization of a new Union association nine. He is backed by John McLean, editor and proprietor of the Enquirer, the Street railroad company, Hon. Andrew Hickenlooper and other capitalists. They are determined to get together one of the strongest nines in the country, and already hold leases on the grounds the present American association club have been using and two other parks. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Justus Thorner excluded from the AA

Date Wednesday, December 19, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA annual meeting of 12/12/1883] The application of Justus Thorner, formerly President of the Cincinnati Association, to be reinstated was denied.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

keep a substitute in uniform

Date Sunday, August 19, 1883
Text

The Boston Globe gives the following good advice: “Every club should have a player ready in uniform to take the place of another, in case of accident. Boston audiences have twice been kept waiting thorugh failure to have a substitute ready. The reserve player should also be where the field captain will not be obliged to hunt him up.

Source Cincinnati Eqnuirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

keeping the pitch count down

Date Monday, August 6, 1883
Text

In all the points of play that go to make a great pitcher Radbourne is a proficient. Consequently he is a great pitcher. … harry Wright's work is clearly shown in Radbourne's pitching. “Rad” never wastes his strength on a multiplicity of balls, when four or five can do the work as well.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

keeping unpaid players reserved

Date Wednesday, December 5, 1883
Text

President McKnight is up in arms against what he considers some of the bad features of the reserve rule. In expressing his objection, he said: “There are two or three clubs in the North-western League that have not paid their players for last season, and they are still holding these players on the reserve list. Now, I think this is wrong, and the National League should put its foot down on such action. I wrote to President Mills, of the League, to that effect. I hold that when at the end of the season a club cannot pay its players for work already done, they have no right to reserve any of its players. There is the Springfield Club; they are still holding their reserve players and have not as yet paid their players for last season. Further, they have not even reorganized for next season, and I don't think they will. Notwithstanding this, we can not approach one of their men, and I tell you that there are two or three very good ones in that club, who would greatly strengthen the Alleghenys. Another bad feature of this is, that by their action,s they are forcing these players into clubs in the Union Association. Whey, they are forcing men to act dishonorable instead of trying to make them stick to our rules. If the question is left entirely to the North-western Association, they, of course, will not expel the club, for when so many clubs are backing their salary they would break the association up if they were to expel all who were backward in paying salaries. At the meeting of our association I intend to bring the matter up, and will try to get both the American and League to adopt a rule whereby that evil will be remedied.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

kids' day

Date Saturday, February 3, 1883
Text

On Saturdays a “kid’s day” will be inaugurated next season at the St. Louis grounds, when a charge of 15 cents admission will be made for boys.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Larkin attempted murder-suicide

Date Wednesday, April 25, 1883
Text

and TSL 4/29/1883

Source CE 4/25
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Larkin in prison

Date Sunday, August 5, 1883
Text

Frank Larkin, the base ball player, who some time ago attempted to murder his wife and commit suicide at his house on North Eighth street, Brooklyn, E.D., was sent to the penitentiary on Wednesday for six months, on the charge of having again cruelly beated [sic] his wife.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Larkin in trouble again

Date Wednesday, August 1, 1883
Text

Frank Larkin, the base-ball player, was arrested this afternoon. A few months ago, while drunk, Larkin shot his wife Kate, and then, after cutting his throat, fired two pistol shots trhough the door at the policemen who were trying to get into the room. He was a member of the Baltimore Club, and had intended to start for that city on the day he shot his wife and wounded himself. While in St. Catharine's Hospital he jumped head first off his bed, his head struck an iron register and he was severely hurt. On his recovery the young wife, who had carefully nursed him, refused to give the evidence on which alone he could be convicted, and, as he declared that her injury was caused by the accident discharge of the pistol, he was discharged from custody.

Since then Larkin was been drunk much of his time, and has frequently been in jail. He was arrested this time on complaint of his wife, whom he had beaten in a most brutal manner.

“I am afraid of him,” she said, “and I fear that he will be the death of me.”

Mrs. Larkin has gone out of town to live with her relations. Cincinnati Enquirer August 1, 1883

Frank Larkin, the base-ball player, who some time ago attempted to murder his wife and commit suicide at his house in North Eighth street, Brooklyn, was t-day sent to the penitentiary for six months on the charge of his having again cruelly beaten his wife. Mrs. Larkin pleaded for her husband's release, but the Magistrate said: “It will be better in the end for you, madam, if he is put where he can not treat you so cruelly.” Cincinnati Enquirer August 2, 1883

Chicago Unions disband

The Union Base-ball Association, which went to the expense of erecting expensive buildings for playing non-league clubs in this city [Chicago], has proved a non-paying investment. The club has been disbanded and the project abandoned. Cincinnati Enquirer August 3, 1883

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Larry Corcoran, switch pitcher

Date Wednesday, December 26, 1883
Text

Larry Corcoran thinks of pitching left-handed next season. He says he is expert with either hand.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

League hypocrisy, encouraging revolving

Date Sunday, January 21, 1883
Text

At the time the League sat down on all crooked playing and ended the evils of revolving, they inaugurated a new era in the National game and restored to the public the confidence in the game that had for some time been lost. No one attempted to question them whether this movement sprang from a pure love of the game or a selfish commercial interest to increase receipts by increased attendance at the contests. In the light of recent events, however, it certainly looks as if the League had taken the baser and more sordid view. When it monopolized the professional ball playing of the country it could do as it pleased, but when a new organization, with advanced ideas, and representing the largest cities in the country spring into existence, the League showed the sordid view it took of the pastime, by encouraging all sorts of crookedness on the part of the players when such conduct inured to their own benefit. Contract breaking was smiled at and the offender patted upon the back and called a devilish good fellow, and when the machinery of the court was put in motion to restrain these contract breakers, the funds of the club were used to defend him. Players, especially young men who were just entering on a professional career were shown by this action that contract-breaking was commendable, especially when the club harmed was not connected with the League. So great has this evil grown that there are to-day, at least twenty well known professionals, who had accepted advance money from two clubs and neither club knows in which the double contractor will enroll himself when the season opens. Especially hard has this evil fallen upon the weaker clubs of the new organizations, and unless it is stooped at once, it will take no prophet to predict the downfall of the game.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

left handed batters switching

Date Sunday, July 8, 1883
Text

There is a good deal of nonsense in the idea among many left-handed batsmen that they must bat right-handed if they face a left-handed pitcher. Shaffer and White are among those who think it ridiculous.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

legalizing overhand pitching

Date Wednesday, November 28, 1883
Text

[reporting on the NL meeting] These rules [limiting the pitching delivery[ have been practically a dead letter and their repeal is wise. In the League now overhand throwing, or any sort of throwing, is legalized.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

lending a player

Date Saturday, August 11, 1883
Text

[Louisville vs. Cincinnati 8/10/1883] Tom Sullivan, one of the change catches of the St. Louis team, who, by permission of the American Association Clubs, was allowed to join the Louisvilles temporarily, arrived last night, and was put in to support Weaver's delivery behind the bat.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Lew Simmons retiring from show business

Date Sunday, March 25, 1883
Text

Lew Simmons has withdrawn from the Arch-street Opera-house Minstrels, of Philadelphia, and will hereafter devote his attention to the Athletics.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Louisville drops the 'Eclipse' name

Date Wednesday, December 19, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA annual meeting of 12/12/1883]The Louisville Club was given permission to change its name from the “Eclipse” to “Louisville.

Source The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Lucas defends his club; the prospects of the UA

Date Wednesday, December 5, 1883
Text

[from an interview of Henry Lucas] ...although President Mills, of the League, says I am doing more to injury honest ball-playing than anybody else, the club that I will put in the field will cost less than two-thirds of the clubs in the League and American Association. The only regret that I have to express over my action is that I did not start a week earlier. If I had I would have had my pick of the best ball players in the country. President Mills may think his League is doing great work in the interest of base ball, but he will sooner or later learn that the ball players think differently. It is only a question of time until the players revolt against the reserve rule, which they despise, and will no more submit to than to have rings put in their noses and belled by them. The only question players ask when approached for terms is “What kind of backing has your club?” Dunlap, when he signed with me, said he did not care anything for the reserve rule, and intended to treat it as an imposition, and his remarks convey a good idea of how the entire profession feels about it. The public, too, sympathize with the players and with every movement to organize associations that are hostile to the reserve rule. You would be astonished to hear the encouragement I have received, and that I know is being extended to everybody interested in Union Association clubs. The association is booming, and the whole country is enthusiastic over it. Its clubs have plenty of capital to back them, and they have come to stay.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Lucas denies investing in other clubs

Date Monday, December 3, 1883
Text

[from an interview of Henry Lucas] “Are you interested financially in any of the other clubs or in the proposed club in Cincinnati?” was asked. “Most emphatically no. my hands have been pretty well filled with one club, and you can depend upon it that I can find plenty to employ me in St. Louis without going elsewhere for it.” St.

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Lucas on the reserve rule

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

[from an interview of Henry Lucas] “You have ignored the reserve rule held so sacred by the three older organizations. Are you not afraid you will get yourself into trouble?” suggested the reporter.

“That,” said Mr. Lucas,” is the most arbitrary and unjust rule ever suggested, and out to be broken. I cannot see how a body of men has the right to dictate when another man shall do. It is all right when a player signs a contract. Then I have nothing to say; but as long as the reserve clause is the only thing hanging over him it will not deter me from hiring a player if I want him. The players seem to appreciate this fact, and if I dared show you all the letters I have received you would be surprised to see the names of some League players who want to go with me.

Source The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Matthews on the various curves

Date Monday, August 27, 1883
Text

[describing an article in the Philadelphia Press] [Bobby Mathews] hooted at the idea now prevalent that some pitchers are able to deliver an “up-and-down” curve, a “zig-zag” and a double curve. “It is all a mistake,” says Matthews. “I never saw but one curve, and never made any more. Of course, a ball will shoot in a little distance, but you can't call it a curve, because you can't hold that kind of a ball so as to make a curve out of it. The only genuine curve is the one which turns out from the batsman, but after two or three of that kind a straight balol, if it is properly pitched, looks as if it was turning the other way. 'Drop' balls, or balls which apparently shoot or curve downward, are all deceptive work, and are thrown from the highest start the rules allow. Risign balls are the same thing—started from as near the ground as possible and pitched upward. 'Slowed' balls are started slow, with an apparently fast flourish, for if they were ever started fast I don't know what skill could hold them back, and, as to balls which go both in and out, why that is a manifest impossibility. I know there have been several tests made of that, on particularly at Cincinnati, where four posts were put up, and the pitcher required to make the ball go on one side of one and the other side of the next, but I don't think he did it. If he did, it was through some decpeiton in regard to the place where he was standing. No, sir. Good, straight pitching, thorough command over the ball, a good out 'curve' and a good in 'shoot' are what the great pitchers are working with to-day, and I, for my part, don't believe in any thing else.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

McKinnon's expulsion case

Date Saturday, February 24, 1883
Text

Alex. McKinnon says he has asked for reinstatement by the League in order to rehabilitate his reputation, but, he adds, he is now in business in Boston, Mass., and it is not his intention to play again. The facts of McKinnon’s expulsion by the League in 1879 are briefly as follow: By a combination of circumstances he was placed in such a position that he was doomed to an expulsion by either the League or the National Association. The latter had a prior claim upon him, and, recognizing this fact, after taking time for deliberation, he acted the part of an honest man, returning the advance-money paid him by the Troy Club, accompanying it with a letter that ought to have been satisfactory, and remained true to his first contract with the professional club of Rochester, N.Y. The League expelled him, but this punishment was not at all warranted by the facts, and McKinnon was upheld by the National Association.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

McKnight calls for the Athletics' expulsion

Date Sunday, June 10, 1883
Text

he American Association Directors met in Cincinnati on Monday last, to take action on the charges preferred by the Allegheny club against the Athletics. All of the Directors, excepting Mr. Appleton, of the Metropolitan club were present. McKnight was on hand and preferred the terrible charge that the Athletics had played Bradley before notice of his release by the Cleveland club had been received by Secretary Williams. Upon this charge McKnight demanded the expulsion of the Athletics from the Association. After fuming and fretting about for a half hour like an old woman, he sat down, and Mr. Simmons, of the Athletic club, stated his side of the case in a plain manner, and the Directors sat down on McKnight in a vigorous manner, not one of them favoring his demand for an expulsion. McKnight then demanded that the games in which Bradley played be forfeited to the Allegheny club.

After some discussion it was decided that if Secretary Young of the League had received notice of Bradley's release by the Clevelands at or before 2.30 on the afternoon of May 21, the games should remain to the credit of the Athletic club.

On Tuesday Secretary Williams, of the American, telegraphed to Secretary Young for information on this point, and received the following dispatch:

… The release of Bradley, of the Cleveland club, was received by me at one o'clock on the afternoon of May 21. N. E. Young.

This settles the whole business, and if McKnight desires to defeat the Athletic club it will have to be done by his club playing ball, and not by any sneaking schemes unworthy of a gentleman.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

most expelled players reinstated

Date Saturday, March 17, 1883
Text

With the ratification of the Conference Committee’s report the list of expelled players has been reduced to a small number, to wit: Bechtel, Devlin, Hall, Nichols and Craver of the old Louisville Club; Higham, expelled for dishonest umpiring; and Doscher, newly added to the list, from the League. The American list is comprised in J. Berg, expelled by the Allegheny Club, and Keenan, suspended from the same club.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

NL and AA men at the UA meeting

Date Wednesday, December 26, 1883
Text

During the meeting of the Association the corridors of the Hingham House were packed with prominent men of all the Associations. Harry Wright, of the Philadelphia Club; Robert Ferguson, of the Union League; John B. Sage, of Buffalo; Lew Simmons, Vice President of the American Association and of the Athletic Club; H. A. Ditsen, of Boston; John T. West, of Wilmington; Horace B. Phillips, ex-Manager of the Columbus Club, and Harry Spence, Manager of the Monumental Club, of Baltimore, were among the most prominent.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

NL and AA salaries

Date Sunday, February 4, 1883
Text

As a rule the League clubs are not paying much bigger salaries than the Athletic, Cincinnati or St. Louis clubs, and have no better nines.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

NL encouraging AA expansion

Date Tuesday, December 11, 1883
Text

The league has been quietly at work ever since the new associations have been organized trying to induce the American association to increase its membership to twelve clubs, on the plea that this will weaken the new associations. Now, this undoubtedly is a fact, but it will also weaken the American association to take in more than eight clubs. The league has worked very industriously to have Brooklyn and Indianapolis admitted to the American association, but it strikes me very forcibly that if there was any advantage to be gained in increasing the number of clubs the league would not wait for the American association to act, but would at once scoop up the new material. As it stands the league is making a cat-s-paw out of the American association. (St. Louis) Missouri Republican December 11, 1883

Some of the delegates are opposed to the admission of any new clubs, as it will lessen the profits of the organizations at present composing it. Other delegates think it absolutely necessary that the clubs should be admitted because if they are refused they will join the new Union association. (St. Louis) Missouri Republican December 12, 1883

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

new Cincinnati grounds

Date Friday, December 7, 1883
Text

The Cincinnati Club has at last secured grounds to play on next season, and yesterday a contract was closed for the lease of a piece of property that can, by the expenditure of a considerable sum of money, be transferred into a ball park.

It is situated on Western avenue,just north of Findlay street, and is what is known as the Hulbert property. At present it is occupied by several dwelling-houses, a brick-yard, and part of it is under cultivation, being used for “truck patches” by gardeners. The present occupants, it is understood, have no stipulated lease on the grounds, and it is said that they will remove their effects to some other place in time to let the Cincinnati Club begin the necessary improvements as early as January.

The lot extends from Western avenue through to McLean avenue, and runs from Findlay street nearly as far north as York street. It is 750 feet long by 450 feet side. Cincinnati Enquirer December 7, 1883.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

new owners in Pittsburgh

Date Wednesday, November 21, 1883
Text

Denny McKnight is in charge of affairs, having been delegated by the new owners of the club to settle up its old accounts and get matters in shape for next season. The new owners have not as yet organized and whether Mr. McKnight will continue permanently in charge of the affairs of the club has not yet been determined., quoting the Pittsburgh Times

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

new sporting journal

Date Saturday, March 10, 1883
Text

The first number of the new sporting weekly, “American Sports,” of which T. Z. Cowles, late night editor of the Chicago Tribune, is editor, was issued this afternoon [3/9]. The paper presents a very creditable and attractive appearance. Detroit Free Press March 10, 1883

League can now negotiate terms with outside clubs

...League clubs are permitted to play non-League clubs from the opening of the season to its close upon such terms as they may mutually agree upon, in writing, by either letter or telegram. New York Clipper March 10, 1883

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

newspaper criticism of umpires; critique of Chadwick

Date Sunday, August 19, 1883
Text

[The] theory that umpires must be looked upon as infallible and all their decisions received with either applause or respectful silence, whether right or wrong, and that newspapers have no right to criticise or condemn umpires, is silly twaddle. The newspapers have a perfect right to criticize umpires and will continue to exercise that right despite the senile bosh of old man Chadwick. Reporters have been the cause of sending numerous umpires this season to more congenial work and will continue to do so until fair, honest and competent umpires are selected.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

newspaper overestimate crowds

Date Sunday, April 8, 1883
Text

The tendency in newspapers to overestimate base ball attendance is very general. In few cities outside of Cincinnati is any effort made to estimate truly. In Cincinnati the papers are as nearly correct as it is possible to be. All of last season the numbers in attendance on games here as announced in the papers could be depended upon, for it was made from the count of tickets in the boxes. When the papers stated that over twenty-four hundred people had been in attendance at a certain game it could be depended upon as the truth. This year the count will be more accurate, for turnstiles do not lie.

All this time we were reading about attendances on games in other cities numbering six, seven and ten thousand, when in reality they were no larger than in Cincinnati. The eight and ten thousand crowds in St. Louis could always be discounted fifty per cent. and then be above the truth. According to receipts there were not quite five thousand four hundred people in the Cincinnati grounds last 4th of July; and everyone remembers what a multitude that made, filling the seats and spreading all over the field. That was an immense crowd. The Athletics took away as their share of the receipts that day $1,632. the Philadelphia papers announced that ten thousand people saw the Cincinnati-Athletic game in Philadelphia on Decoration Day. Yet the Cincinnati Club got for its share the receipts less than $900 from that game, showing that there were not six thousand out. This tendency to overestimate crowds ought to be condemned, and D. L. Reid, who exposed the trick in St. Louis, deserves applause. Very few five-thousand crowds assemble in a year on any base-ball grounds. Club will make friends by furnishing newspapers with actual figures as the Cincinnati Club has been doing, and will continue to do.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no foul pole

Date Tuesday, June 5, 1883
Text

Denny made what looked like a home run hit in Monday's game. As the ball struck foul, the hit was not allowed. Last week the Clevelands got a home run on a similar hit, the umpire declaring that he made his decision on the ball as it went over the fence, not as to how it struck the ground. If such is the ground rule, then Denny lost a fine home run hit through misfortune, Umpire Burnham deciding just the opposite from Umpire Decker.

Source Providence Morning Star
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no more AA Alliance; applicants should join the National Agreement

Date Wednesday, December 26, 1883
Text

[from a letter from Secretary Wikoff] The American Association, at its annual meeting at Cincinnati, decided to abolish the American Alliance and withdraw its protection from Alliance clubs. The “National Agreement” between the National League, Northwestern League and American Association permits any other association of clubs to become a party to it and entitled to all its privileges upon the president of the such of such association signing it and binding its clubs to comply with its provisions in all respects. This is the most advisable thing you can do, as it puts you on the same basis with us as far as contracts are concerned, and it is the desire of the three older association to take in all reputable associations.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no reserve team in Baltimore; three man rotation

Date Sunday, December 9, 1883
Text

Mr. Barnie of the Baltimore club has given up his idea of having a second or auxiliary nine, and expects to retain his list at just fourteen players, including three batteries. (St. Louis) Missouri Republican December 9, 1883 [N.B. In the event, Baltimore had a two man rotation.]

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no tickets at Mets games

Date Saturday, February 10, 1883
Text

No tickets will be sold by the Metropolitans at their games on the Polo Grounds next season. A man will be at the box-office to make change, and the quarter of a dollar necessary for admission will be dropped in the self-registering turnstile at the entrance.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no turnstiles at the Athletic grounds

Date Sunday, December 16, 1883
Text

There are no turnstiles at the Athletic Grounds, but the managers, Messrs. Simmons and Sharzig, prevent any manipulation of the pasteboards and loose change by running the gates themselves.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no umpire register

Date Saturday, May 26, 1883
Text

[Columbus vs. Cincinnati 5/25/1883] Umire Magner, who keeps no register of the balls and strikes he calls, sent Carpenter to his base on six balls by mistake, and then recalled him. Cincinnati Enquirer May 26, 1883

Nolan suspended

Manager Pratt has suspended the “Only Nolan,” of the Alleghenys, for “outrageous conduct.” Temperance lectures are evidently unfruitful. Cincinnati Enquirer May 27, 1883

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

No-reserve contract clauses prohibited

Date Thursday, October 11, 1883
Text

Chairman Mills has issued a circular advising club members to the tripartite agreement not to sign players by contract that are reserved, and warning them against contracting with players who demand that the reserve do not govern them longer than the coming season. It sounds a little like weakening on the business as some modifications in it are suggested. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Nolan goes on a spree

Date Sunday, May 27, 1883
Text

Nolan's suspension was caused by most dastardly conduct on his part. While in New York he was fined $10 for infraction of the rules of the Club. In revenge, he went on a spree, and charged the expenses to the Club. He was then fined $100 and suspended. He ought to remain suspended.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Nolan suspended, reinstated

Date Sunday, June 10, 1883
Text

The “only” Nolan, who was suspended some time ago for drunkenness and insubordination, was on Friday reinstated by the Alleghenys, and Secretary Williams received a telegram to that effect. It is said the Columbus club wanted him.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

northerners playing Southern winter ball

Date Saturday, March 17, 1883
Text

[Bill] Phillips has been having a great time in Florida this winter, playing with the Orange county club. During the winter the Orange county team visited Jacksonville to play a game with that nine. The first game created great excitement in Jacksonville, which was then crowded with visitors from the North, and so confident were the citizens that a nine from away back in the country could not down the Jacksonville pets that bets at long odds were freely offered and as freely gobbled by the Orange county boy.s the game was called and Orange county had a walk over, much to the discomfiture and a lightening of the purses of the Jacksonvillians. Another game was made up and the Orange county team, thinking they had a soft thing again, were not very strict in keeping themselves in good trim; but they took in all the bets they could get on themselves. It was thought they would have the same team to play against, and in fact saw the same players land from the boat; but when they reached the grounds and prepared for play, what was their surprise to see Flint and Quest step out of a buggy and get ready for action. Phillips knew what was coming, but he could not refrain from taking a hearty laugh to see his old-time friends of the League drop in so mysteriously. The game resulted in a walk-over for the Jacksonville's, and the Orange county boys went home with a flea in their ears, and a good share of their previous winnings in the pockets of their contestants.

Source Cleveland Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Northwestern League Alliance

Date Friday, April 27, 1883
Text

The Indianapolis is an alliance club of the Northwestern League.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Oakdale Park closed

Date Saturday, March 3, 1883
Text

Oakdale Park, Philadelphia, for several seasons occupied by the Athletic Club, has been purchased by Joseph D. Thornton, who will erect 116 houses thereon, three streets having also been cut through.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

official scorers 3

Date Sunday, December 23, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA convention] Secretary Williams complained of the difficulties he had encountered in preparing the annual club statistics of the season from the incorrect data furnished him by the so-called of some of the clubs. The president inquired why the delinquent clubs had not been fined as required by the constitution, and on learning that the kindly secretary had “let up on them” he gave him a dose of censure, with a hint not to do it again. Consequently no such clemency will be shown hereafter. The Metropolitan Club in 1883 will have to go to the expense of an official scorer, instead of depending for club records on the city reporters, as hitherto.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

openly mocking Chadwick

Date Sunday, May 27, 1883
Text

A New York exchange says:--”The old man,” in his dotage, has the gall to say that Mr. Day offered him the position of official scorer on the Polo grounds, and he declined on account of having so much reporting and corresponding to attend to. This is one of the most ridiculous things that the “old man” ever got off, as he hung around Mr. Day's office from last October until the season opened this spring trying to get the official scoring to do. When he found he could not get the League, he put in his “best licks” for the American Association, but again was sadly left. To counteract his great chagrin he now has the audacity to say that he declined the position as official scorer for the League.”--Of course Chadwick is the “old dotard” alluded to.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

opposition to alliances

Date Sunday, July 29, 1883
Text

The League and American Association, judging from the tone of prominent officials of these organizations, will have nothing to do with alliance clubs next season. They say that they work more harm than good to the regular organizations, for while receiving all protection they are of no use to either organization. With these alliance clubs out of the way the regular clubs will be able to strengthen their nines from players that are now bound up in these small clubs.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

opposition to the reserve system 3

Date Sunday, August 5, 1883
Text

Last week the editor of this department had a very interesting talk with Manager Butler, of the Allegheny club, concerning the Reserve Rule. “There are many hardships in it,” said Mr. Butler, “but I can’t see how the game will be improved by doing away with it. The competition for players will be so great that it will be impossible to get a decent nine together short of $25,000, and a really first-class nine will be run up to $40,000. Of course, Philadelphia and one or two other cities would be able to make money at the latter figures, but it would sweep away Pittsburg, Columbus, Louisville, Baltimore, Buffalo, Detroit, Cleveland and other small cities that now run professional clubs. These cities could not afford to pay such salaries. I am therefore of the opinion that the Reserve Rule had better not be touched.”

The argument advanced by Mr. Butler is the argument of small cities. They want big nines but do not want to pay for them. Under this rule, no player can receive more than $1,000 a year [N.B. This was not true.] and must remain with the club that reserves him until that club is ready to let him go. In this way the small cities of the League can retain all the best players, while the big cities like Cincinnati, St. Louis, New York and Philadelphia, where thousands visit every game, must be content with what they have. The argument is a bad one, and we shall be greatly surprised and disappointed if it is not proven so before many weeks elapse.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

outfield assists at first

Date Thursday, April 12, 1883
Text

[Boston vs. Metropolitan 4/10/1883] Radford, Boston's right-fielder, covered himself with glory last Tuesday. He threw three men out at first base, w hen everybody supposed the batsman had made a safe hit, and he assisted in a beautiful double play with Morrill [third base].

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

overdue reserve lists

Date Saturday, September 22, 1883
Text

Six out of the eight association teams have file dlists of the men they will reserve for next season. They should have all been filed by the 20 th, and Secretary Wiliams has written to President McKnight about the matter. The names will not be ready for publicaiton until he receives a reply from that official. Cincinnati Enquirer September 22, 1883 [See CE 830924 for the reserve list from all eight AA clubs CE 830929 for NL and NWL.]

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

overhand pitching

Date Wednesday, May 2, 1883
Text

[St. Louis vs. Cincinnati 5/1/1883] McGinnis openly violated the pitching rules by throwing on a level with his head during the last half of the game. Umpire Becannon was reminded of this several times by Captain Snyder, but refused to enforce the rules. A rule was made at St. Louis to especially keep the arm below the shoulder, and made so it could be enforced. No umpire will do his sworn duty unless he enforces all the rules. He is under oath to enforce all of them.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

overhand pitching fatiguing

Date Sunday, June 24, 1883
Text

Legitimate pitchers, such as Matthews and White, find their arms strengthen as the season progresses, while the high-hand throwers weaken just as surely as their work increases. This was the case with Mullane and McGinnis last year. Both pitched their best games in May and June, as the record will show.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

paying for Bradley's release

Date Sunday, May 27, 1883
Text

It is said that the Athletics paid $500 to Cleveland for Bradley's release. Third-basemen come high, but the Athletic managers were determined to have one.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

paying for a release 2

Date Sunday, June 17, 1883
Text

Barnie was paid by the Cincinnati Club $500 to release Corkhill. Now Mutrie, of the “Mets,” has offered $1,500 to release him, so that he can play first base in New York, but the offer was not accepted.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Phillies lobby for a reduced admission fee

Date Tuesday, June 5, 1883
Text

The manager of the Philadelphias are making vigorous efforts to obtain the consent of the other clubs in the league to reduce the price of admission from fifty cents to twenty-five cents. They agree to give the visiting club 40 per cent. of the gross receipts instead of 30 per cet., as they now get. The managers say if they are allowed to do this they can fill the now empty benches. The cheap admission to association games has made sad inroads on the incomes of the league teams, and it is intimated that by next season both organizaitons will charge but twenty-five cents admission.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Philllies admission reduced to 25 cents

Date Sunday, June 10, 1883
Text

For some time Manager Reach has made a persistent fight to regulate the price of admission to games on his ground, and yesterday he succeeded in gaining the point. Providence, the last club to hold out, giving away. Hereafter the admission to all games at Recreation Park will be 25 cents. It is said that New York has asked for the same privilege, and that it will be granted.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitcher backing up first base

Date Monday, September 24, 1883
Text

[Baltimore vs. Cincinnati 9/23/1883] Montjoy [Cincinnati's new pitcher] is also a fine fielder in the position, and backed up first base by his rapid running in fine shape every time there was likely to be an assist to that position.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitching underhand to a weak hitter

Date Thursday, May 17, 1883
Text

[Cincinnati vs. St. Louis 5/16/1883] Deasley then came to the bat—the weakest hitter in the nine. He had two strikes called o him, with two out, and Gleason on first. White began to pitch underhand slow balls and Deasley surprised everybody by a hit, sending Gleason to third.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

players jump to the UA for higher salaries

Date Wednesday, November 14, 1883
Text

[reporting the players signed by the UA St. Louis club] These players are all to receive large salaries and considerable advance money. The two catchers [Rowe and Gross] are to get $2,600 a year each. Mullane and Reccius, $2,5000, and Taylor, Dickerson and Mansell, $2,200 each. Tony Mullane, who breaks from the reserve list of the St. Louis Club, is in luck as Von der Ahe will not have him blacklisted, having been conscientiously opposed to the reserve rule, but Gleason and Row will, no doubt, be blacklisted. Gleason says the reason he broke the reserve rule with Louisville is that the directors of that club wanted to reserve him at a salary of $1,000 for the season. Three thousand dollars were offered to Deasly, and Tom was about to jump at the bait, but his wife interfered, and the result was that Tom was signed by Von der Ahe for $2,500. he is now the highest salaried man in the St. Louis team. Henry V. Lucas, the president of the new club, is abroad and the engagements were nearly all made by him personally.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

players manning the turnstiles

Date Saturday, June 30, 1883
Text

[Metropolitan vs. Cincinnati 6/29/1883] On account of the wet condition of the ground it was decided not to pitch White, and run the risk of injuring his arm with a heavy ball. In conseequence he and Snyder took charge of the turnstile, and the pony team, Deagle and Traffley, were substituted.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

playing clubs off each other for salary

Date Sunday, April 15, 1883
Text

. ..the [Columbus] club opened negotiations with Harry Wheeler, of Cincinnati. On the evening of the 11th they telegraphed him offering him a certain amount if he would report for duty the next day. He answered that he would report next day, and did so. Immediately upon his arrival he had himself measured for a uniform, and went out to practice with the other members of the team; but yesterday evening, having learned that Smith would probably not come, and thinking that the Columbus Club would be compelled to keep him, he announced that he would not sign a contract for less than $1,200, which was considerable more than was offered him by the telegram above referred to. He claimed that he could get more than this amount of the Eclipse Club, of Louisville. The club here [Columbus] were of the impression that this was simply a bluff to get more money, and refused to give it to him. What makes it seem probable that he expected to accept the original offer made him, are the facts that he ordered his uniform, had written for his clothes to be sent here form home, and never said anything about any increase in salary until yesterday afternoon.

This morning Wheeler received an offer from the Brooklyn Club, and upon the Columbus Club again refusing to pay him the $1,200 asked for, left for home. It looks as though Wheeler was trying to come Buck Ewing's game of last year in playing the offers of clubs off in order to secure a raise of salary. The Columbus Club are of the opinion that they can hold Wheeler under Section 5 of the American Association Constitution, which provides as follows:

“That any offer made by a club, and accepted by a player for his services, in writing, either by letter or telegram, shall be as binding as though said parties had executed an official contract as above specified.”

They claim that Wheeler's answer to their telegram, and his subsequent action, clearly make out a case under this rule, and it is not improbable that if Mr. Wheeler does not see fit to keep his contract with the Columbus Club, he will be expelled. This action may not be taken, but a great deal of indignation is expressed by the Directors of the Club at the treatment received at his hands. Cincinnati Commercial Gazette April 15, 1883

Harry Wheeler's contract with the Columbus Club has been field with the Secretary and he reported for duty Thursday. Cincinnati Commercial Gazette April 15, 1883

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

playing for a release, better offers from the AA

Date Sunday, July 8, 1883
Text

There is a growing impression here that two or three members of the Detroit team are playing for a release. It may not be well founded, but there is certainly cause to think differently. They are playing in an indifferent manner, and when two members have been remonstrated with they have replied: “If you don't like my play, you can give me my release.” To this one of them added, “I can get $500 more than I am getting here.” The reason of this is possibly found in the fact that at least two managers of American Association clubs have already, regardless of the pledge given in New York last spring when that association was received into the fellowship of the League, sought to induce League players to break their contracts. In this connection it may interest the public to know that manager Chapman says in a very decided tone of voice, “I shall release no one, but shall suspend them instead!

Source The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

playing in undershirts

Date Wednesday, July 4, 1883
Text

[Allegheny vs. Indianapolis 7/3/1883] Two of them [the Alleghenys] played in their undershirts; of course, they had other clothes on.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pool selling in Detroit

Date Sunday, May 27, 1883
Text

During the past winter the State Supreme Court rendered a decision holding that pool selling was not gambling, and since the base ball season commenced nearly a score of pool rooms have been established in this city, their patrons being principally men and boys who were interested in the game. Manager Chapman has steadfastly refused to give any information as to the disposition of his players in advance of the game, in order to prevent, as far as possible, the sale of pools on the game. Recently the police raided the pool rooms, and the President of the Detroit Club authorized the statement that he and his colleagues will do all in their power to drive the pool sellers out of town.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

poor attendance for the Philadelphias

Date Friday, May 4, 1883
Text

[Providence vs. Philadelphia 5/3/1883] The defeats and the fifty cent admission fee is telling against the Philadelphia Club, not over 500 being present yesterday.

Source Philadelphia Inquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

poor behavior by the Brown Stockings

Date Sunday, June 17, 1883
Text

About the toughest and roughest gang that ever struck this city is the nine of the St. Louis Club. Vile of speech, insolent in bearing, impatient of restraint, they set at defiance all rules, grossly insulted the umpire and excited the wrath of the spectators. For the scenes at the Athletic ground they are alone responsible, as they by their actions invited the reception they met with. The captain is an illiterate individual named Comisky, whose sole claim to distinction rests upon his glib use of profane language.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

post-season exhibitions unprofitable

Date Monday, October 22, 1883
Text

At the next meeting of the American Association an effort should be made to have the championship season extended to October 10. This would do away with unprofitable exhibition games.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

practice uniforms 5

Date Sunday, March 11, 1883
Text

The uniforms decided on by the Athletic club will consist of white shirt and pants made from English cricket flannel, dark blue stockings, belt and cap. Across the breast of the shirt will be the word “Athletic.” The will be of gray flannel. The uniforms are now being made by Hyneman, of North Eighth street.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

price of season tickets

Date Wednesday, April 11, 1883
Text

Season tickets [in Cleveland] will sell at $18 and will be placed on sale next week. Cleveland Plain Dealer April 11, 1883

The sale of season tickets [in Chicago] promises to be a large one. Two or three hundred have already been secured. After this week the price will be raised to $20. after April 28 no season tickets will be sold. Cleveland Leader April 18, 1883

Source Cleveland Plain Dealer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

private security at the Cincinnati park

Date Sunday, May 13, 1883
Text

An objectionable feature of the Cincinnati Ball Park consists in the deportment and over-officiousness of the private policemen attached to the grounds. These parties have hitherto acted as “bouncers” in disreputable “variety dives,” and have been before the police court on several occasions on varied charges. They carry their “dive” bullying into the base ball ground. They should be fired.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

proto-infield fly rule

Date Sunday, June 3, 1883
Text

It should be borne in mind, in criticizing the rulings of League umpires, that these officials are specifically instructed by the League Secretary, Mr. Young, how they shall construe certain rules. For example, the rule relative to the dropping of fly balls for double plays. The umpires' instructions on this question are such as to defeat almost any play of the kind that can be attempted. They are required to rule that if a fielder even stops the force of the fly ball, with the object of effecting a double play, the ball shall be decided as having been caught and held. If a fielder were to put up his open hands and bounce the ball off them to the ground it would be ruled a catch, and a runner having left a base on such a play may be put out by return of the ball to the base. To illustrate: A runner is taking ground between second and third, and a fly ball is hit to the left-fielder, who holds the open palms of his hands so as to meet and stop the force of the ball, and it drops to the ground. The runner, thinking it a missed fly, starts for home, whereupon the left-fielder picks the ball off the ground, throws to the second-baseman, the fly is decided to be caught, and the runner who left second is held to be out. The only way to defeat such a play is for the runner to hug his base until the ball touches the fielder's hands.

But it is very certain that such an instruction as this is a mistake and a detriment, and will lead to mischievous results. A fielder who is clever enough to break the force of the ball and to recover it in time for a double play ought to be allowed to make the play, and to deprive him of that right is to diminish the fielding beauties of the game. In all such cases the umpire is qualified to judge whether the ball is “momentarily held” or not, but no umpire is qualified to determine whether a ball is “intentionally” muffed or not, and that is what an umpire is expected to do under present instructions. A hot line ball is driven to short stop—so hot and so high that he could not possibly hold the ball, but manages to “break its force,” pick it up, and thereby effect a double play. How shall the umpire decide in such a case? He cannot possibly know whether the short stop's intention was unless he puts the short stop on oath, and he is equally liable to give the ball caught when it was unintentionally and unavoidably missed. An umpire has all he can properly attend to when he undertakes to judge the facts; he should not be permitted, much less required, to rule on the question of intention. The tendency of the League is altogether too much in the direction of restricting clever play in the field—as in abolishing the foul-bound catch, and in declaring a man out for failing to run after a missed or called third strike. The ruling upon fly catches the League umpires are required to make is in the same direction, and ought to be changed.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Providence Club finances 4

Date Sunday, January 14, 1883
Text

The Providence Base Ball Association have re-elected Henry B. Winship president, with last year's board of officers. The treasurer reports the receipts as $41,217 and the expenditures $36,592 in 1882. The Philadelphia Item January 14, 1883

The treasurer reported the receipts for 1882 as $42,217; expenditures, $38, 118.80, leaving a balance on hand of $3,098.19. In the 42 games played on the grounds at Providence the receipts were $23, 327.64. The club’s share of the gate-money in games with other clubs amounted to $14,720.66. Of this amount $2,943 were received from the 12 games played in this city with the Metropolitan Club. The players’ salaries aggregated $18,256.90. New York Clipper January 20, 1883

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Providence Club finances 5

Date Sunday, January 21, 1883
Text

At the recent annual meeting of the Providence Club, the treasurer reported the receipts for 1882 as $41,217; expenditures, $38,118.80; leaving a balance on hand of $3,098.19. In the forty-two games played on the grounds at Providence the receipts were $23,327,64. Of this amount $2,943 were received from the twelve games played in New York City with the Metropolitan Club. The Players' salaries aggregated $18,256.90.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

racial humor

Date Friday, May 11, 1883
Text

The Black Stockings [colored, from St. Louis, on tour] will probably all call for high balls. Then if they are hit it will be in the head and will not hurt. Low balls are liable to have in shoots, which endanger the shins.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Radbourn reverses his pitching position

Date Sunday, April 29, 1883
Text

Radbourne, the Providence pitcher, now reverses his position while delivering the ball when a runner is at first base. This is to enable him to throw better to the base.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rain checks 3

Date Monday, June 25, 1883
Text

An exchange says: At St. Loluis will be issued. Should the weather appear doubtful checkes will be issued to every one paying admission. Should the weather be fine and the rain come up while the game is in progress, will then be issued, and these wil be honored on the following fair day should five innings not have been played. In other words, no charge will be made patrons unless a game which consists of fine innings or more is played. This, it would see, is nothing more than fair. There seems no reason why a base-ball association should retain the money and give no exhibition any more than any other organization.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rain checks 4

Date Friday, June 29, 1883
Text

Spite of the threatening weather, eleven hundred people were present to see the game. The rain was approaching when the time for beginning the game arrived. The club could have started the game and played an inning, but in that case the visiting club could have claimed the $65 guarantee, and the Cincinnati Club had no desire to keep the gate money without giving a proper recompense. They, therefore, waited to see results, and in ten minutes the flood came. The crowd was then dismissed, each getting a ticket as he left the ground good for some other game. Every one was satisfied except a Hamilton man, who wanted his quarter back.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Reach balls are inconsistent

Date Tuesday, June 26, 1883
Text

[Allegheny vs. Cincinnati 6/25/1883] ...when Umpire Kelly opened Jimmy Williams’ prize package, he drew out a “mush” ball. That fact became apparent before an inning was played. It is a peculiarity of the Reach ball that it is in the nature of a lottery ticket–one doesn’t know how much it is worth till the drawing comes off.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Reach favors 25 cent admission

Date Friday, April 13, 1883
Text

Manager A. J. Reach, of the Philadelphia Club, in a communication to The Inquirer, places himself on record as in favor of twenty-five cents admission to all base ball games. The rumor that fifty cents admission was to be charged at the Athletic Philadelphia games, he says, is unfounded.

Source Philadelphia Inquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reaction to the expanded reserve

Date Saturday, March 3, 1883
Text

The clause suggested by the Conference Committee, giving each club the right to reserve any of its players, not to exceed eleven in number, has awakened indignant protests from the press, public and players all over the country as being the old reserve-rule revived in a more virulent form. The American Association at its annual meeting will doubtless reject this clause as being most unjust and illiberal... New York Clipper March 3, 1883

[reporting on the AA convention] The conference report was the subject of hot discussion, as the chief point was the adoption of the eleven-men reserve rule, whereby a player is cut off from the baseball field if he refuses to fulfill his contract with a club, provided his pay amounts to $1,000. No club under this rule can accept a player who breaks his contract, and hence there can be no bidding for players during a season. There was considerable opposition to the rule, because it was believed it would give great advantage to certain clubs, and would operate unjustly against others and against many old players. Messrs. Barnie, Phillip and Von der Ahe strongly opposed the reserve-rule, but finally withdrew their objections, and the report was then unanimously adopted. New York Clipper March 17, 1883

The reserve-men clause in the tripartite agreement adopted by the American Association, League and Northwester League in an injustice to the professional players. The fundamental principles of the American Association, the injustice of the reserve-rule, the rights of players to protection and to obtain all that their services are legitimately worth and that other clubs are willing to pay for them–are now summarily swept out of existence. It is an old axiom that a man’s services are worth to him what he can get for them, and this clause is manifestly unjust to the men whose active service is the life and hope of the national game. New York Clipper March 17, 1883

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reasons to eliminate the foul bound out, to increase offense

Date Friday, December 7, 1883
Text

We hope to see the Association adopt the “fly-game” in its entirety by eliminating the foul-bound catch from its code. It is all very well to say that the catch in question admits of some very pretty plays; but this is more than offset by its tendency to weakening the batting by increasing the chances for outs. The batsman now has enough to contend with without putting him out on a bound-catch as well as one on the fly. St. Louis Post-Dispatch December 7, 1883

a justification of the reserve

The Association holds–with the League–that reserving a player is, to a limited extent, an extension of his contract. Of course, in cases where players are reserved by clubs who have not fulfilled their part of the contract by paying them all arrears of dues, the reserve should be regarded as null and void after a due investigation of the player’s complaint. But in all other respects the rule itself must be either held valid or repealed entirely. St. Louis Post-Dispatch December 7, 1883

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

renting cushions

Date Sunday, May 6, 1883
Text

[Detroit vs. Chicago 5/5/1883] The cushion offices did a huge business, nearly a thousand being rented.

Source Chicago Inter Ocean
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reporting attendance

Date Sunday, July 1, 1883
Text

Every one is interested in knowing just how many persons attend base-ball games, and in League contests the exact figures are easily obtained by use of the turnstiles. In Boston the gatekeeper chalks up the turnstile count where the reporters can see it as they pass out. This is a good thing for Philadelphia to imitate.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reserve club in Boston

Date Monday, September 10, 1883
Text

A club has been organized in Boston which will be called the Boston Reserves. Fox, pitcher, Donnelly, catcher; Bresnaham, first base; Tierney, second base; and W. Radford, Quinn and Kelly in the outfield, have already been engaged.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reserve players under contract

Date Friday, April 20, 1883
Text

Lewis Simmons, of Philadelphia, was in this city Thursday, endeavoring to hire Mulvey, the short stop of the Providence reserve nine, to play third base in the Athletic nine. Mulvey is under contract with the Providence Association for the entire season.

Source Providence Evening Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reserve teams

Date Monday, May 14, 1883
Text

Yesterday afternoon the Shamrocks, the Cincinnatis' reserve team, and the Kentons, a strong organization from Covington, played the second game of their association aliance series at the Cincinnati Ball Park. Cincinnati Enquirer May 14, 1883

The Grand Avenues, the reserve team of the St. Louis Club, will play the Shamrocks at the Cincinnati Ball Park next Sunday afternoon. Cincinnati Enquirer May 17, 1883

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reserved players as slaves

Date Sunday, December 23, 1883
Text

The reserved players in the League and American Associations should wear high dude collars to hide the iron band put around their neck by the reserve rule.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reserved players sign with the UA

Date Wednesday, November 7, 1883
Text

Tony Mullane, the pitcher for the Browns last season, signed yesterday with the Lucas-Wainwright club, the consideration being $2,500 and an advance of $500. This offer is a very large one, much larger than the offer of the St. Louis club, which was $1,900. Mullane's action in signing may lead to serious complications. It is one of the regulations among all associations that each club has a right to reserve eleven men at the end of the base-ball season, and no one of the eleven men can sign with another club without the consent of the reserving club. The punishment for violation of the urle is expulsion from the reserving club and the party so acting is debarred from playing with any of the twenty-four clubs embraced in the American association, the League and the Northwestern league. Mullane has according to this rule come under the expulsion clause. The result will be watched with interest by ball players and lovers of the game who do not play. (St. Louis) Missouri Republican November 7, 1883

Jack Gleason has signed with the Lucas-Wainwright club for the coming season, thus violating the reserve rule, he being one of the men reserved by the Louisville club. Gleason was seen a couple of days ago by Dunkelspiel of Louisville, who wanted him to play for a paltry $1,000 during the coming season, and Jack, becoming hot, told the Louisville manager to get to a place that was hotter. (St. Louis) Missouri Republican November 8, 1883

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

retaining the reserve; a rumor of dissolving the tripartite agreement

Date Monday, September 10, 1883
Text

The American Association at its special meeting at Pittsburg, Sept. 1st, concluded to stick by the reserve rule. The League will undoubtedly follow suit. The players, however, need not despair, as a good many loopholes are still open for breaking it, and a great many things may happen between now and December. It has leaked out that the League and Association calculate to uphold the reserve rule, by combining perfidious treachery with boundless greed. In order to hold the players whose work is making fortunes for the managers at nominal salaries, these honorable managers propose to break faith with their allies, the Northwester League and Inter-State Association. The clubs of these two bodies contain some fine players, and in order to stop the clamor of those weaker League and Association clubs for new material it is said to have been determined to dissolve the alliance, so that the desirable players of the allies may be stolen or coaxed away. If these reports be true, we plainly tell the “bosses,” that they will commit a most egregious blunder. Might does not make right, and it is a poor rule that won't work both ways. The Northwestern League directly, and the Inter-State Association indirectly, are parties to the tripartite agreement, and should have something to say about its abrogation. If the two senior bodies disregard their obligations, and break faith, what right have they to demand rigid respect for contracts by the players over whom they have established a sort of protectorate? The Sporting Life September 10, 1883

The Inter-State clubs of the American Alliance have been roused up to quite a pitch of indignation at the fact of their treatment at the hands of the parent Association in withdrawing from them the protection of the reserve rule. They see plainly enough that the move has been made to rob them of their best players, thereby breaking them up for next season's work. Fortunately the Brooklyn Club has taken time by the forelock, and engaged the nucleus of their team for 1884, but it will go hard with the Trenton, Reading, Pottsville, and Wilmington clubs. The Sporting Life September 10, 1883

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

revised National Agreement

Date Wednesday, November 7, 1883
Text

[reporting on the meeting of 10/27-28/1883 of the Arbitration Committee]A congratulatory address upon the success of the tripartite agreement was formed, and the tripartite agreement revised, after which the meeting adjourned. … The agreement will not be known hereafter as the tripartite agreement because more than three parties may become members of the Union. The instrument has therefore been christened the National Agreement of Professional Base Ball Clubs...

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rivalry between the New York and Metropolitan clubs

Date Sunday, April 8, 1883
Text

There is considerable rivalry being developed between the New York and Metropolitan teams. The former call the latter the second nine. Whichever of the two teams win the most games in April, are to have the choice of the two dressing-rooms on the grounds, one room being better fitted up than the other.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rumor of a players' association; labor versus management

Date Sunday, July 15, 1883
Text

A Pittsburg paper has a startling rumor in its capacious grasp that the base ball players are abut to start a protective association in opposition to the eleven men reserve rule. The rumor has not penetrated beyond the smoky confines of that city and has probably no foundation. The Arbitration Committee has provided to meet any such scheme and the fellows who ever attempt to start the “old thing” will wish they had not. The better quality of professionals have no need of a protective association. So far as the Cincinnati Club players are concerned, none will be the losers on account of the reserve rule. Not one man of the present team who remains will be asked to play for less the he gets this year, and some will be paid more. We should like to see a list of the protective fellows when they get organized. Also a diagram of what they intend to do. All who think they can get through the winter without advance money should by all means subscribe. It will amuse them until spring comes, when they will either sign with the club that has reserved them or go to work at something else—cashier in a bank or a brick-yard. Let us organize, by all means. The Sporting Life July 15, 1883, quoting O. P.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rumor of an Australian tour

Date Monday, October 22, 1883
Text

Rumors have been floating around that the Chicago team was to go to Australia this winter. Al Spalding emphatically denies this.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rumored cutting the Northwestern League out of the National Agreement

Date Sunday, August 19, 1883
Text

The Northwestern League is destined to have considerable trouble this Fall with its players. The League has about decided to restrict its recognition of contracts to the American clubs and cut free from all other alliances. This action would force the American Association to pursue the same course and the result would be that the Northwest would become a grant hunting ground for players. It is evident that with the Reserve Rule in force, there must be some supply for clubs that need strengthening and just now it looks as if the Northwestern League would be the victim. There are dozens of fine players in these clubs and with open competition they would certainly all be grabbed up by American and League clubs.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rumors of impending market intrusions

Date Sunday, July 1, 1883
Text

The League threatens that if an American Association club is put in Chicago next season that League clubs will be put in Cincinnati and St. Louis. Well, there is nothing startling about that.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rumors of shady dealings by Horace Phillips

Date Monday, May 28, 1883
Text

There have been some very ugly things said in some of the Columbus papers about Manager Phillips and the members of the Columbus team. The lack of success of the team on their Western trip has been laid at Phillips' door. It is claimed that he will not strengthen the weak places in the team—short stop, second base, first base, and center field—for the reason that he received a bonus from Richmond, Kuehne, Straub and Mann, and will, therefore, not replace them. It is also charged that the Directors of the club will send one of their number of the Eastern trip with the club, because they do not want to allow Phillips to handle the money. Phillips will publish a card in the morning denying all the charges, also, stating there are no dissensions in the club. This will be signed by all the players. The Directors deny that they are sending any of their members with the club to watch Phillips.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

sacrifice hits; scientific batting; early spray chart

Date Monday, June 11, 1883
Text

These can be termed sacrifice hits, but without any sense of reason because the batsman does not live who can “place the ball” with the present style of swift curve throwing. The most that the surest batter can hope to do is to hit the ball hard and if he succeeds in doing this his chances of making a safe hit are perhaps about one in two. There are batsmen—Anson, for example—who claim to be able to hit a ball to right field every time, but who do not claim to be able in so doing to hit it to the ground or in the air at will. But Anson's record at the bat does not bear out this claim. A careful minute has been made of the direction of Anson's hits in the fifteen games played on the Chicago grounds this season. Out of 65 times at bat he has made 14 clean hits—6 to right field, 5 to left field and 3 to center field. Out of his remaining 51 times at bat, on which chances for outs were offered he hit 11 flies to center field, 6 to left field and 3 to right field; 5 foul flies and 4 infield flies. 5 grounders to right field, 8 to second base, 5 to short-stop, 2 to third base; and once struck out. He has made 25 hits in the direction of right field, or an average of a fraction less than 40 per cent. it will thus be seen that Anson, who is recognized as the leading batsman in America for the past seven years and whose proportion of right field hits is probably greater than that of any other right-handed batsman, has not succeeded notably in “placing the ball” and has made a small percentage of so-called “sacrifice hits.” On the whole we believe that there is a great deal of stuff and nonsense current about batsmen controlling the direction or character of their hits, and that more mischief than benefit is created by this foolishness. The thing for a batsman to do is to learn to get the ball fairly on his bat and hit it hard, trstuing to luck in the matter of direction, and to the fielding errors which hard hitting produces., quoting American Sports

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

sales of baseball equipment; catchers' gloves

Date Wednesday, January 24, 1883
Text

Nearly 40,000 copies of the Base Ball Guide were sold in 1882, 5,000 catcher’s masks and over 15,000 catchers’ gloves.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scorecards

Date Tuesday, May 1, 1883
Text

The score-sheets which are now sold on the seats at the Cincinnati Ball Grounds are a great improvement over the poor apologies that were distributed last season. In addition to being neat and pretty, they are reliable, being published daily under the direction of the club. On the back of the sheet will be kept a table, corrected every day, showing the relative standing of the clubs, both in the national League and American Associations, in their respective races for the championship. It will also give a list of the games played by the nines in both associations on the day of the issue, as well as the dates of the local team at home and abroad. They are in use in all the base-ball cities in the country.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scorecards, both official and unofficial

Date Sunday, April 22, 1883
Text

Hereafter the only complete and official score-card can be found inside the Athletic ground. To avoid the many mistakes which have frequently occurred, we advise all patrons of the game to purchase no other.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring a base hit for advancing a runner

Date Monday, August 20, 1883
Text

St. Louis should not be in the lead at the bat, although the official averages makes her so. They are there clearly because the St. Louis official scorer has been scoring base-hits to every man who advanced a base runner, whether he reached first base or not. It is safe to say that were it not for this outrageous system of scoring in St. Louis the St. Louis would not to-day be leaders in batting.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring sacrifice hits 2

Date Sunday, February 4, 1883
Text

Whenever a batsman is seen to neglect opportunities for safe hitting he is either a player who has not brains enough for scientific batting or he is striving solely to excel in the season's batting averages, and therefore is playing only for his record, irrespective of any thought of what good team-work play requires. Club managers should make it a part of a batsman's duties as a team-player to make sacrifice-hits whenever an extra base or an extra run can be scored by such a hit. Sacrifice-hitting at times is just as effectual in scoring a run as a base-hit, and every time a run is scored on such a hit the batsman should be credited with a base-hit. To see skillful batsmen facing for the right position in batting and trying to place a ball when men are running bases is to see batting in its proper form. When no man is on a base then a home-run hitter can indulge in his pet hit without cost. When all the bases are occupied, too, it is perhaps worth while to go in for a long hit, but even then it depends upon the effectiveness of the pitching opposed to the batsmen.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring sacrifice hits 3

Date Friday, May 25, 1883
Text

Colonel Reed, of the St. Louis Republican, says he scored a hit for any man who, by an “out,” advances another man a base. Will somebody please fetch us the hartshorn bottle? [smelling salts]

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring the general average

Date Thursday, November 22, 1883
Text

The New Orleans papers have a queer way of estimating the abilities of a ball player. They take his batting average and his fielding average and add them together and divide them bytwo, and that gives his general average as a player. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

season ticket prices 4

Date Sunday, March 25, 1883
Text

The price of season tickets to the Boston base ball grounds this season has been placed at $15 to all who purchase on or before April 5 (Fast day). After that date they will be sold for $20. The tickets will admit the bearer to all games of the season, and to the privileges of the grand stand.

The stockholders of the Boston club will be compelled to pay for admission to the games this season, either by the purchase of season or single tickets. This plan worked so well last years to the financial benefit of the club that there will be but little opposition to it except on the part of a small minority of the stockholders. Boston Herald March 25, 1883

Season tickets to the Chicago Base Ball Park are now for sale. The price will be $15 until the 20th, when $17.50 will be asked. Another raise will be made to $20 by May 1. Boston Herald April 11, 1883

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

seat cushions

Date Sunday, May 20, 1883
Text

[Allegheny vs. Athletic 5/19/1883] An amusing incident was the rain of cushions at the conclusion. An enterprising speculator has provided several hundred of these, which he rented at five cents apiece. Some excited individual threw his cushion onto the field and this action became contagious and in a short time the air was thick with flying cushions, to the damage of a number of silk hats and frontispieces and to the great amusement of the crowd.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

seats to entirely surround the field in St. Louis

Date Friday, April 13, 1883
Text

A row of skeleton seats, three tiers high, is to be built entirely around the St. Louis ball park, accommodating 7,000 people. Cleveland Leader April 13, 1883

the governor of Pennsylvania a former Olympic

Gov. Pattison, of Pennsylvania, used to play first base for the Olympics of Philadelphia, not many years ago at that. He has accepted a season ticket to the Athletic grounds, and says he will score whenever his official duties permit. Cleveland Leader April 14, 1883

Source Cleveland Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Sensenderfer receives a political appointment

Date Wednesday, January 24, 1883
Text

Governor Pattison sent three more nominations to the Senate this morning. They were... John P. Sensenderfer... for Sealors of Weights and Measures for Philadelphia. … Sensenderfer was a member of the old Athletic Base Ball Club and Secretary of the Democratic City Committee...

Source Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

signals 2

Date Saturday, January 20, 1883
Text

Pitching by signal has come to be a brand opf the art, and unless the catcher is in perfect rapport with the pitcher in this respect the full advantage of the latter’s strategic play cannot be obtained. It is almost impossible for a catcher to back up his pitcher with the best effect unless he is thoroughly posted in the signaling, so as to know what kind of ball to be prepared for, whether an in-curve, an out-curve, a swift ball or one dropped short, or for a ball to throw to bases, or one to be quickly returned. In fact, the catcher should be perfectly familiar with all the points of play of the pitcher, or it is next to impossible for the latter to deliver the ball with his best effect.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

signing with the NL for less than the UA offered

Date Sunday, December 9, 1883
Text

The news that Hackett had signed with the Bostons is confirmed by a letter received by Mr. Lucas from his agent in Boston. In the epistle the agent states that Hackett asserted his willingness to sign until the last moment, but, when the contract was presented to him, weakened and refused to attach his name. There was nothing in the document itself to cause this sudden change of mind, as it was a very simple contract drawn up in the usual form. Hackett was to have received $2,500 from the Lucas nine, and he has signed with the Boston club for $1,600. Mr. Lucas, who would never give the name of the catcher he expected to engage, well knowing the uncertain character of the man with whom he was dealing, yesterday admitted that it was Hackett. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

skepticism about the two-man pitching rotation

Date Sunday, June 3, 1883
Text

The custom—first introduced a few years ago by the Chicago Club, when they had two first-class pitchers—of alternating pitchers in every game has been generally adopted during the present season, but has proved to be a very costly mistkake save in those very rare cases where the two pitchers are equally matched in point of playing ability. The Providence Club have presented Radbourn in the pitcher's position in almost every game, and have been remarkably successful—a result that probably would not have been reached if they had used a change pitcher. Other club shave almost invariably won with one pitcher and lost with the other., quoting the New York Clipper

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

spacing right-handed and left-handed batters

Date Sunday, May 13, 1883
Text

Wright has arranged the Providence batting order so that the right and left-handed men alternate.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

spectators calling 'out' or 'not out'

Date Sunday, July 8, 1883
Text

The Cincinnati management intend to strictly enforce the Association rule about hissing or calling to an umpire or a player. The first person caught in the act of hissing or crying “out” or “not out” will be ejected from the grounds.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

spectators prefer high scoring games

Date Sunday, June 17, 1883
Text

Last season many games were played with such scores as 1 to 0 or 2 to 1, and many persons still look upon games of this sort with apparent rapture, even where the low scores are produced chiefly by striking out or failing to hit ball out beyond the range of the fielders. But spectators in general like to see both free and hard striking and alert, accurate fielding., quoting the New York Sun

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

spectators stretch

Date Sunday, July 22, 1883
Text

In most of the large cities there is a peculiar practice in vogue at base ball games. At the end of every few innings some tired spectator, who has been wrestling with the hard side of a rough board seat, gets up and yells “Stretch!” A second after the entire crowd will be going through all the movements of a “stretch.' This isn't stretched.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

speculation about Justus Thorner and the UA

Date Wednesday, November 28, 1883
Text

The supposition in Cincinati is that if a new club is started there, Justus Thorner, ex-president of the Cincinnati Club will be found behind it. Revenge is sweet.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Spering wants to reclaim the Athletic name

Date Monday, September 24, 1883
Text

A number of individuals in Philadelphia who claim to have the original charter of the Athletic Club, granted in 1876, are indulging in a great deal of talk about organizing a club and taking the name from the present Athletic Club. When the rumor was first started it was regarded as a hoax, but later developments indicate that there are people in Philadelphia insane enough to contemplate such a step. Chas. Spering, a dealer in calico, at one time president of the old Athletic Club, and one of its heaviest stockholders, is said to be the most prominent in the movement. He is reporting as saying to a Record reporter:

“We have not yet decided just what course to take, but certain it is that we alone have legal right to the name “Athletic.” We were incorporated in 1876 and still have the charter. The club was somewhat in debt when it disbanded, but the amount of the indebtedness was small, and would have no weight whatever either one way or the other should we decided to take the field again. Six hundred dollars would square us up, even if we were forced to pay everything, and the chances are that a part of the debts are outlawed. We shall do nothing until after the championship season. I don't think we shall claim damages of the present Athletic Club for using our name, although we could if we were so inclined.”

It is possible that these people may have a legal right to the title, although that would perhaps have to be determined in court. But what of that? Suppose they do take the title and organize a club, do they think they will be admitted into the American Association? Do they think their club will receive popular support? The present Athletic Club under its present management is the favorite in this city, and any attempt to injure it in the manner proposed will only result in disaster to the schemers engaged in the plot. The old Athletic Club went out of existence under a cloud, leaving numerous debts unsettled. Should the club be reorganized it would find itself swamped at the start with a suit about the title and also with numerous claims on its treasury by reason of outstanding judgments. The club owed Al. Reach considerable over $1,000, and salary to a number of its players, besides other debts to private parties, the whole aggregating a large sum, and satisfaction for these would at once be demanded. The Athletic managers need give themselves no unnecessary trouble over the scheme. They hold the fort, and “possession is nine-tenths of the law.” In base ball circles, everywhere the scheme is denounced the mean contemptible work of a lot of speculators, who think that the present management is making too much money, and that because they were at one time connected with the club (to its discredit) they ought to have a finger in the pie. When base ball in Philadelphia declined, through the general rottenness into which the game had sunk, and from which these same people, who were that at the head of affairs, had not the ability or the will to rescue it, they resolutely shut their pockets and let the club die, not even paying the just debts incurred. Now, after new men had come to the front, and, by hard work, purified the game and elevated it to a plane where it could secure enthusiastic popular support, these old “Monsieur Tonsons” turn up again, eager for a share in the spoils. The scheme is entirely too thin. The people who support base ball will easily see through what looks like pure blackmail, and the club, even should it get so far as to start, will be a miserable failure under these people, just a it was when they had control before. The American public like to see fair play and will not support those who try to rob others of the fruit of honest work and liberal enterprise.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Spering's claim on the 'Athletic' name

Date Friday, September 21, 1883
Text

The proposed revival of the original Athletic Base-ball Club [illegible] considerable comment. It is well known that the old club was considerably in debt when it went to pieces: that the salaries of some of the players were in arrears and that something was owing for other matters, such as base ball supplies, etc. The club drew so poorly toward the latter part of the season of the last year of its existence that many [illegible] dates were canceled. Charles Spering, President of the old Athletic, and one of its heaviest shareholders, said yesterday that it had not been decided just what course would be taken; “but certain it is,” sid he, “that we alone have legal right to the name Athletic. We were incorporated in [illegible] and still have the charter. The club was somewhat in debt when it disbanded, but the amount of the indebtedness was small, and would have no weight whatever either one way or the other should we decide to take the field again. Six hundred dollars would square us up even if we were forced to pay everything, and the chances are that a apart of the debts are outlawed. We shall do nothing until after the championship season. I don't think we shall claim damages of the present Athletic Club for using our name, although we could if we were so inclined.”

Al. Reach says that the old Athletic Club owes him about $10000 in salary beside a considerable amount for base ball goods, and that if it be revived e shall put in a claim for his money. Sutton, now of the Boston Club, has obtained judgment for his salary arrears, and probably would be only to glad to hear that the club was once more in existence.

Lew Simmons of the present Athletic management, say he has it on good legal authority that the old club would have no certain thing of it if it should bring suit against him; that there are many Athletic Clubs. We he under the impression that the old club's indebtedness amounted to from $12,000 to $15,000.

Source Philadelphia Record
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

St. Louis Reserve nine a counter to the UA

Date Thursday, November 1, 1883
Text

[from an interview of Von der Ahe] the President stated the new Lucas-Wainwright Club was organized to play games during the absence of the St. Louis nine. It has good financial backing. To offset the new club the St. Louis Browns will organize a second nine similar to the one Cincinnati will have next season. From this reserve club the regular club may take players in a case of necessity.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

St. Louis and the Union Association

Date Sunday, November 4, 1883
Text

The gossip of the past week in base ball circles has centred about the new club, which, if managers assert, has come to stay. It will be heartily welcomed and be a favorite from the start. St. Louis is large enough for two clubs and will give both abundant patronage if both play good ball. What affiliation the new club will have has not yet been officially announced, but the probabilities are that it will join the Union association. … With regard to the Union association, but little as yet can be ventured. Its projectors claim to have clubs anxious for admittance at Chicago, Pittsburg, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, New York and Washington, but there is a secrecy about its movements that is suspicious. It is time for it to show its hand if it means business and intends to enter the arena in 1884 to divide the patronage with the older associations. Unlike the others it will not observe the reserve rule, although it will respect contracts entered into between players and the other organizations. If the latter will not play with clubs which have reserved players in their ranks the Union association will be compelled to “go it alone,” and this it cannot successfully do unless it has well-equipped nines in at least four Western and as many Eastern cities. If it can get clubs with large capital in these cities the success is assured. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

strategic pitching 2

Date Saturday, January 20, 1883
Text

The pitchers of the professional teams have been taught by experience tha, while mere speed and the curve may be effective against weak batsmen, these features of pitching are of secondary important to strategic play, or “headwork,” in the delivery of the ball. The old plan of sending in swift curved balls, without any idea in their delivery save that of pitching as swiftly as possible, and as near the plate as the strictness of the umpire may require, has seen its best day, and new mere speed in pitching has been replaced by effective strategic combinations, by means of which a competent “headwork” pitcher contrives to out-manoeuvre the most experienced of batsmen.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

striking workers play a benefit game

Date Sunday, July 29, 1883
Text

Nines slected from the striking linemen and telegraph operators played a match game of base ball on the Polo Grounds Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock. The use of the grounds was tendered to the telegraphers by the managers. Members of the brotherhood were admitted free of charge, an admission fee of 50 cents being charged to others. The entire proceeds will go into the treasury of the organization. The telegraphers had the grounds thronged by their friends, so that a good sum was realized, the game netting about a thousand dollars. The Operators defeated the Linemen by 18 to 17. … when the announcement was made that the American Rapid Telegraph Company had acceded to the demands of the brotherhood a cheer was sent up that could be heard for blocks away.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

substitutes to be in uniform

Date Tuesday, December 18, 1883
Text

American Association clubs will have ten or eleven players in the field in uniform in order to avoid delay in case of a player being injured. St.

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

superintendent of the Athletic grounds

Date Wednesday, December 5, 1883
Text

Johnny Ryan, the Superintendent of the Athletic base ball grounds, got about $25 by the game played for his benefit Thanksgiving Day...

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

suppression of intentionally dropped or juggled balls

Date Friday, March 23, 1883
Text

Under the rules for umpiring which will be observed this season the catcher will not be allowed to momentarily hold the ball, then drop it in order to make a double play, nor in case of a long hit will the out-fielders be allowed to hold the ball and then let it rebound in to the air for the purpose of catching a base runner leaving his base after the ball is caught. Such a dodge will be sat down upon and the umpire will decide that in momentarily holding the ball it is caught under the rules.

Source Cleveland Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

switch hitting within an at bat

Date Tuesday, November 20, 1883
Text

[St. Louis players in New Orleans] Mullane bats either right or left handed, and jumped from one side of the plate to the other yesterday when he desired to puzzle the pitcher. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

taking a forfeit to make the train

Date Friday, July 6, 1883
Text

Our dispatches of yesterday told the story of a game forfeited by Harry Wright’s Providence club in Philadelphia, in the forenoon of the Fourth. They were scheduled to play in New York in the afternoon, and for fear of missing the train Harry called his men from the Philadelphia field at the end of the seventh inning, when the score stood eleven to nine in their favor. The Philadelphia club protested, and the umpire declared the game a forfeit of nine to nothing to the home club. The Providence team went to New York and were defeated, but got their share of the big receipts. The latter consideration was what induced Harry Wright no doubt to choose the forfeit rather than a possible loss of his share in the New York receipts, for he must have known that his actions gave Umpire Lane no other choice than to declare the game a forfeit. ... The wonder is that Harry did not play the game out and charter a train for New York. He could not possibly afford to lose his share of the New York receipts. Neither is the position of his club in the race such that he can afford to lose a game.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Ted Sullivans breaks with Von der Ahe

Date Friday, August 31, 1883
Text

A serious difficult has been brewing for some time between the manager and President of the St. Louis Club, and it has at last come to a head. It seems that on Wednesday night President Von der Ahe made an examination of the men's rooms at the Grand Central Hotel to see that they were all in bed at the proper hour. For some time, he claims, they have not been looked after sharply enough, and have been allowed priileges which interfered with their discipline and field work. This, he thinks, was the cause of Wednesday's defeat. Mr. Sullivan retaliated warmly, and to-day [8/30] they had a very passage of wors in one of the rooms of the hote, Mr. Von der Ahe alleging that Mr. Sullivan's extreme strictness at times was followed by laxity and carelessness, and that the management of the nine has mostly fallen on him. This Mr. Sullivan says is not true, and that the success of the team is due to his hard work. The result was that Mr. Sullivan has severed his connection with the club. He took the train for his home to-night. The nine in the future will be under the management of Charlie Comisky, who will look after then on and off the field.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

territory rights and the right to switch leagues

Date Wednesday, November 7, 1883
Text

[reporting on the meeting of 10/27-28/1883 of the Arbitration Committee] The agreement of the three Associations to strictly refrain from encroaching upon each others' territory is a concession all aorund which shows plainly how earnest the three Associations are in bringing about mutual good. This puts an end to all the idle gossip about League clubs locating in Baltimore, St. Louis or Cincinnati, or of Association clubs locating in Chicago or Boston.

A further provision is made that, if desired at any time by any club, it can transfer itself from one association to another, and still maintain its right of territory. For instance, if a vacancy should occur in the League and the Cincinnati Club should deem it advisable to take the vacancy, the American Association could not put another club in Cincinnati.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Terry Larkin's court date

Date Monday, June 11, 1883
Text

Frank Larkin, the base-ball player, recently attached to the Baltimore team, was before Judge Nacher in New York Friday, charged with having recently shot at his wife and attempted suicide. Larkin, who was in Court, was a physical wreck, and as he sat on the prisoners' bench gazed steadfastly at his wife, but did not speak to her. Larkin had been married to his wife but seven months, but during that time she had been a most faithful and devoted helpmeet. The policeman who arrested Larkin after the shooting was the complainant, and he made three charges based on information and belief against the prisoner. The first was for attempting to shoot him, the second for attempted suicide, and the third for felonious assault on the wife. Larkin asked to be examined on the charges separately, but Justice Nacher refused the request. Mrs. Larkin refused to make a statement, and Frank was held to await an indictment by the Grand Jury.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

tests of the curve ball

Date Monday, August 20, 1883
Text

Test test at Lancaster of the curve delivery of a ball by Hofford, pitcher for the Ironside Club of that place, noted recently in The Record, did not result in a double curve, as was claimed by a Lancaster paper; but an ordinary single curve of unusual extent was thrown. Such experiments have been repeatedly and successfully made. On one occasion Critckley, formerly of Albany, N.Y., threw a ball clear around the corner of a hotel in Geneva, N.Y., and Purroy, a New York pitcher, threw a ball from the centre of the pitchers's box, which went over the home-plate and struck the catcher's fence, 135 feet distant, twenty-two feet to the left of the point where a straight line produced from his stnadpoint throught the home-plate would reach the fence. Wldman, of Detroit, and McCormick, of Cleveland, can cause a ball to deflect six feet from a straight line in passing through the fifty feet between pitcher's point and home base, and there are probably others who can perform a similar feat.

Source Philadelphia Record
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA adopts the five-mile rule

Date Thursday, December 27, 1883
Text

The adoption of the five-mile rule by the American Association leaves the Brooklyn Club in a better position regarding the playing of League teams than it had occupied before. Heretofore no League club could play in Brooklyn without the permission of the New York League Club, but as the case now stands the New York men will have to secure the permission of the Brooklyn Club to play American Association teams in New York, so that if the New York men refuse to allow League clubs to play in Brooklyn the Brooklyn Club will not give the American Association clubs permission to play on the Polo grounds. St.

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA attempts to poach from the UA

Date Monday, October 22, 1883
Text

[reporting on a UA meeting 10/20/1883] Much indignation was caused among the delegates, by the reading of a letter of President McKnight's, from which it appeared that he had approached certain players signed by the Unions Association, and urged them to violate their contracts and sign with the Allegheny Club. The contemptuous manner in which he wrote of the Union Association particularly aroused the ire of the delegates...

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA championship pennant

Date Sunday, April 29, 1883
Text

The American Association championship flag was received in Cincinnati last Thursday. It is of fine blue and white bunting, 9x18 feet, burgee pattern. Dyed in the fabric are the words “Champions of 1883.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA declares war on the UA

Date Wednesday, December 19, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA annual meeting of 12/12/1883] ...the constitution was discussed. A long discussion ensued, but few changes were made. The only real important measure was the one which declared war to the knife of the Union Association. It was inserted in section 7, of article 3, and reads as follows:

“Any Association club shall be subject to expulsion for playing any game of ball with any club that employs or presents in its team any player who has been reserved by any club of the American Association, National League or North-western League and not released; or any club that plays with such club so employing any such reserved player unreleased; or any club which belongs to any association where a club belonging to either of said associations is located.”

This also practically aims a blow at the Union League, which was represented by Bob Ferguson. Bob attempted to get a hearing, but was excluded. There was some opposition to that portion of the amended clause of the constitution which prohibits any American Association Club from playing with a Union League club located in a city where there is already a National League or American Association club, but it was not powerful enough to overcome the other side.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The AA expanding to block the UA

Date Monday, September 24, 1883
Text

It may be said, however, to be absolutely certain that the American Association will contain ten clubs. This is felt to be necessary to impart strength to the Association and to shut out the proposed new Association from desirable localities.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA poaching players

Date Monday, September 24, 1883
Text

The American Association clubs are still continuing their disreputable work. The latest offender is the Columbus Club, which has signed Morris and Carroll, of the Reading Actives, for $1,000 each, with $300 advance money. This is the same American Association that filled the world with its howls two years ago when the League stole its players.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Allegheny Club is bought out

Date Wednesday, November 7, 1883
Text

...on the 29th, the stockholders met again. It was found that it would require about $10,000 to put the club upon its feet again, and therefore the proposition by several of the wealthy stockholders that the balance of the stockholders assign all their stock in trust to them, upon condition that they assume all the liabilities of the club, was accepted and Mr. A. K. Scandrett was selected as the party to whom the transfer in trust should be made. The syndicate that took of the stock is composed of Messrs. Henry Brown, S. J. Jones, W. Nimick, Henry De Camp, J. D. Convers and Andrew Fulton—the last named is the probable next Mayor of the city—and all are men of means and enthusiastic admirers of the national game. Everything being arranged satisfactorily, on Wednesday all the players of the club were paid their back salaries, amounting in all to $2,500. … It does not appear yet what interest President McKnight has in the new management. It is considered certain, however, that he will continue to vote a good block of the stock.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Athletics ground superintendent

Date Sunday, February 4, 1883
Text

The Athletics of Philadelphia have secured a lease of the old ground at Twenty-sixth and Jefferson streets, and intend making it one of the finest in the country. John J. Ryan, a veteran professional, has been engaged as superintendent of the grounds.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Baltimore-Chicago UA connection

Date Tuesday, June 5, 1883
Text

Some time ago a syndicate of prominent capitalists of Baltimore conceived the idea of embarking in the base-ball business in Chicago, and to attempt to monopolize all games in the city outside of the regular league games. If the property can be secured for a period of three years, it is understood to be the intention to fit up the ground in a style that may even surpass the league park, and to furnish other attractions that will insure a monopoly of all games outside of the jurisdiciton of the league. The syndicate is said to have any amount of financial backing, and they are believed to mean business. Cincinnati Enquirer June 5, 1883

The Union Base-Ball Association, with a capital of $20,000, was formed here [Chicago] today [6/6]. Grounds have been secured in the southern part of the city limits. It is the intention to play with the clubs in the American Association. Cincinnati Enquirer June 7, 1883

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Boston reserve club

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

The reserve idea has struck Boston. There are now fourteen men under engagement, and enough are to be added to start a “college.” “If not, why not?” Boston claims to be the centre of culture and education, and since Chicago has started a base ball “college” the home management will undertake to display its skill in a similar undertaking. Young men who can come well recommended...who think they are cut out for ball players, and will be willing to take a year's undertaking at a nominal salary, are invited to make application to the Boston Base Ball Association. The reserve team will give practice to the regular team during the preliminary season. When the latter is in the West or away, the reserves will play local and State clubs at home. When it is away [sic], the reserves will tour throughout New England. The admission to the games of the reserves will be 25 cents.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Brown Stockings abandon the brown stockings

Date Saturday, February 3, 1883
Text

The St. Louis Club, it is said, will drop the brown hose the coming season. This policy is questionable, as the professional club there has been identified with this color for eight years, and the local public allude to it affectionately as “the Browns.” If a rival League club should enter the field and adopt the discarded colors it will take great prestige with it. New York Clipper February 3, 1883 [The returned to brown stocking for 1884.]

[from an article about new manager Ted Sullivan shaking things up] The old name of “Brown Stockings” has been abandoned, and the organization will henceforth be known as the St. Louis club. Not only that, but the old brown stockings are to be discarded, and the hosiery of a bright red to be substituted. Cincinnati Enquirer February 18, 1883

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Chicago Union Club

Date Friday, August 31, 1883
Text

The Chicago Union Base Ball Association has released all its players, and will not have a nine in the field during the remainder of the season. The association is sound financially, but it ihas determined to devote the remainder of the season to securing a first-class club for next year, when it expects to belong to the American Association.

Source Philadelphia Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Chicago Unions a joint Baltimore-Chicago effort

Date Friday, June 8, 1883
Text

The Union Base Ball Association of Chicago, is the name of an organization backed by a combination of Baltimore and Chicago capitalists, who have taken a long lease on the vacant block on 38 the street, between Wabash and Michigan avenues, which they intend to convert into a fashionable base ball ground. A grand stand will be erected for 3,000 people, and instead of ordinary hard benches will be furnished with comfortable chairs. The association intends to be ready for business by June 18, and with the best nine that money can procure at this season of the year. They will play games in the American Alliance series.

Source Providence Morning Star
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Chicago Unions; the Union grounds

Date Sunday, July 1, 1883
Text

The new Union Base Ball grounds at Thirty-ninth and State streets were formally opened Tuesday by a game between the St. Louis Browns and the Chicago Unions, the latter being a new organization. The grounds are excellently located and in very good shape, even at the present time, when it is taken into consideration that one week ago not the slightest preparation had been made for the establishment of grounds of this description. Since then a high fence has been placed around the entire grounds, which are considerably larger than the White Stocking Park. A grand stand has been erected capable of seating 3,000 people, and also two other stands, which can accommodate about 7,000 more. Probably 1,500 people were at the grounds yesterday [6/27/82].

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Chicago turkey-cock uniform; officers' box

Date Sunday, May 20, 1883
Text

Mayor Thompson, of Detroit, President of the club occupied the officers' box during the Chicago games and greatly enjoyed the defeat of the champions. He declares himself deeply grateful to President Spalding for not having introduced the Chicago turkey-cock uniform in the games here, for those fiery red pants would have thrown the esthetes of this Michigan metropolis into fits and broken up base ball forever.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Cincinnati Club loses its ground

Date Friday, November 16, 1883
Text

Just now the Directors of the Cincinnati Base-ball Club are all torn up over a few developments that have come to light in the past few days, and it looks as though an almost insurmountable obstacle had fallen across the path of this organization, which has had nothing but continuous successes since its inception. The Cincinnati Club will more than likely be compelled to seek new quarters, and the Bank-street grounds which it has used to have been leased, or at least another party has the refusal for next year.

The original lease under which these grounds were secured for five years, and will expire next April. The Cincinnati Club up to within the past few months did not anticipate the slightest trouble in renewing their lease under the terms of the old one, and made no special effort to obtain a new contract. In view of the changes and improvements they contemplated making during the winter, however, the management thought it would be policy not to begin work before the lease was renewed for another term of years. Negotiations have been pending for a few weeks, but while the Directory of the Cincinnati Club was resting there were other parties at work, and yesterday when they called at the office of Mr. Mullane they were informed that the grounds had been rented, or at least another party had taken the initiatory steps toward securing the Cincinnati Park for a term of years.

The directors of [the] Club then made an effort to get another location, and called on the owner of the land in the rear of Lincoln Park. They also found that parties had been in advance of them here and secured the refusal of renting this lot, also. This last discovery spread consternation in their camp, and the first conclusion arrived at was that the Lucas-Wainwright St. Louis combination was not the only one making a strenuous effort to put the new Union League Association on a solid basis.

President Stern was all broken up over the discovery, and said “he could find no reason for the organization of a rival club in this city unless it was organized for the purpose of entering the Union League.”

Another official of the Cincinnati Club said they can hope to get in no other association, as the terms of the last agreement entered into by delegates from the three older associations at the last meeting of the Arbitration Committee prohibit the admittance of a new club in a city which has a club already a member of one of the three organizations. “This, you see,” he continued, “bars a new organization out of gaining admittance to either the League, American Association or North-western League.” President Stern, who was present, said: “Well, if they have secured a lease on the Cincinnati Ball Park, and intend to organize a club, I guess we can stand it. If the worst comes to worst, why, we will rent the Avenue grounds and throw open the gates to the public to our games for twenty-five cents admission all around. We have made some money this year and we will spend every dollar of it, and more, too, if necessary, to keep the team in the field. Whatever organization it is, and however much money they may have at their back, they will have a busy time getting together as good a team as I have. I would like to see when they will secure another Snyder or a White or a Reilly. I tell you the Cincinnati team is a strong one, and it took money and time to get it together. If it comes down to fight the Cincinnati Club will make it an interesting one for all concerned.”

If it impossible to predict what the outcome of this new move will be, but one thing is certain, that Cincinnati will have one base-ball club next season, and possibly two. In any event the Cincinnati Street Railroad Company will not suffer, as both he grounds will more than likely be located on one or more of its routes.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Cincinnati Unions

Date Thursday, December 13, 1883
Text

Cincinnati will have a Union Association club next season beyond a doubt, and Mr. Justus Thorner, formerly President of the Cincinnati Club, will be the leading spirit in it. Mr. H. V. Lucas, of the Lucas-Wainwright club, of St. Louis, will stop here on his way to the inaugural meeting at Philadelphia, and a conference will be held in regard to securing players and making other arrangements for putting the new club on an equal footing as far as strength is concerned with the older teams in this organization. The new club has good financial backing, and will go to work at once to put every thing in order for next season's campaign. Mr. Thorner last night closed a contract with a well-known base-ball man w3ho will represent the new organization at the meeting, as well as do the bulk of the work in securing the players for the team.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Cincinnati grounds keeper

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

Dutch Oehlers, the ground keeper at the Cincinnati Ball Park, has been fitting up the dressing-room into a comfortable apartment, and will make it his sleeping quarters this winter.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Cincinnati reserve nine

Date Wednesday, November 14, 1883
Text

A second nine, composed of professionals and home talent, will be signed under the Cincinnatis' contract, and will be known as the “Reserve Team.” By doing this the regular nine may be strengthened my members of the reserve team, should necessity ever call for such a change. The reserve nine will play away from home while the Cincinnatis are in town, with the exception of Sundays While away games will be played with the Indianapolis, Toledos, Evansvilles and other clubs of the Northwester League. On Sundays games will be scheduled for the local championship. It is the intention of the Cincinnati Club to receive applications from city clubs who wish to play in these games. The Cincinnatis will organize, name and furnish with uniforms and schedule their games. One professional will be with each club to coach them in their endeavors to win the championship.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Day resolution

Date Friday, December 14, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting] The constitution was amended so as to agree with the National agreement in whatever particulars it had conflicted. Another blow was aimed at the new Union Association by the insertion of the substance of what is known as .

It is a condition measure, giving the deserters under the reserve rule a chance to come back to the fold of the clubs that reserved them. In fact, the Association offers a premium for the commission of the very act they have always claimed to condemn, namely, contract-breaking. These players, while not under contract to the American Association, are bound by a written contract to the Lucas-Wainwright Club. The measure provides that if the deserters make application to return to their old clubs before they participate in a game with the Union Association they will be accepted; if not before that time they will be expelled.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Eastern League submits to the reserve

Date Monday, October 1, 1883
Text

[reporting on the organizational meeting of the Union League, later renamed the Eastern League] The above [resolution] was adopted in pursuance of the predetermined policy of the new body to work in harmony with all other organizations, in the interest of the National Game. While the reserve rule was regarded with disapprobation, as an unjust and arbitrary measure, yet it was deemed unwise to resist it, as that would lead to a breach with the older organization and open the door to revolving, and kindred evils, which would entail lasting injury to the game. It was decided also to send representatives to the annual meetings of the League and Association to see what relationship can be established with those bodies.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Eclipse changes its name

Date Tuesday, December 25, 1883
Text

The Eclipse Club of Louisville changed its name to the Louisville Club at the recent meeting of the American Association. St.

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The Lancaster Club the Athletics reserves

Date Wednesday, November 14, 1883
Text

For some time past F. R. Diffendorfer, late manager of the Ironsides Base Ball Club, has been active in the organizatin of a new club and matters have now taken the definite shape of a stock company, with a capital stock of $2,000. The new organization will be known as the Lancaster Base Ball Club, and will have as its players the best material that can be procured. Among the players will be the reserve club of the Athletics of Philadelphia.

Messrs. Mason, Simmons and Sharsig, of the latter club, are stockholders in the Lancaster concern. They reserve the right to take at any time what players they choose from the local club, but will supply their places so that a good nine will always be in Lancaster. It is the intention of the local club to get into an alliance with the Athletics and two good games with the League clubs are promised each week.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the League liberalizes its policy on outside games

Date Sunday, March 11, 1883
Text

[reporting on the NL meeting of 3/5/83] The amendment to the rule allowing League clubs to play non-League clubs I cities where League clubs exist, upon the consent of the resident League club, is thw rok of Messrs. Reach and Day, and its object is to allow the Athletic and Metropolitan clubs to play League clubs during April and October, while the Philadelphia and New York clubs will play American Association and Inter-State clubs. This will be an admirable arrangement and will prove profitable to both our home clubs.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Metropolitans must sever ties with the New Yorks

Date Monday, September 10, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA special meeting of 9/1/83] The secretary was ordered to notify [the Metropolitans] that if they wish to retain their membership in the Association next year, they must at once cut loose from every other club, and have a separate and distinct management, and a separate and individual ground. This means that unless the Mets pull away from the New York League Club, and get grounds other than on the Polo Grounds for 1884, they must step down and out. The Association have been grossly imposed upon by the Metropolitans' management, which, it has been discovered, is but a secondary part of the League Club. If they remain a member for next year, they will have to vacate their present grounds and locate away from the League club. The secretary was also requested to notify the Mets that if any one connected with the Mets had anything to do directly or indirectly, in organizing or giving encouragement to any other club, a member of any other Association, they would be promptly expelled. This grew out of a rumor that Mutrie was about to remove his Newark Club to Hartford, to join the Independent organization. The Sporting Life September 10, 1883 [N.B. No Metropolitan delegate attended.]

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the NL and AA accept the tripartite agreement

Date Sunday, March 11, 1883
Text

[reporting on the NL meeting of 3/5/1883] The conference committee appointed to confer with other associations submitted their report, which was unanimously accepted, and the president was authorized to sign the agreement on behalf of the League. Messrs. A. G. Mills, A. H. Soden and John B. Day were appointed an arbitration committee on behalf of the League. The disability of the following named persons were removed: Alexander McKinnon, C. W. Jones, Philip Baker and J. J. Gerhardt. The Philadelphia Item March 11, 1883

[reporting on the AA meeting of 3/12/1883] Immediately after assembling, the delegates went into executive session, and the conference report came up for adoption. There was an earnest debate over the reserve clause in the agreement, but it was finally unanimously adopted and signed by the President, and once more peace reigned between the two organizations. The Philadelphia Item March 18, 1883

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The NL and AA continue to recognize the NWL

Date Sunday, October 28, 1883
Text

[reporting on the meeting of the Arbitration Committee] Among the things that were talked over was the great question, “Will the North-western League be recognize by the Arbitration Committee?” There, of course, was nothing in this, as the committee was compelled to recognize the North-Western; how could it do otherwise? as the said committee was partly formed by the North-western League, and should a movement be made to drop the younger league it would most certainly have resulted in the rupture of the tripartite agreement; and as a consequence in a few hours one organization would have been stealing the other's players.

The committee saw this, and instead of dropping the North-western they decided to allow all organizations similar as themselves to become members of the committee and be represented by three delegates, who shall have full power to act for the organization which they represent, and they to receive the same protection as the organizations now represented therein.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the NL vs. the AA in New York

Date Wednesday, December 26, 1883
Text

[from an interview of James Mutrie] Base ball will be more popular in 1884 than it was in 1883, and the 'Mets' will ride much higher on the wave of popular favor. In 1883 the cry along the line was 'the League and nothing but the League.' Despite this fact, and that the Mets played on the same grounds as the New Yorks, me made money. Now, if we could make money under such conditions in 1883, we can do ever so much better in 1884 on new grounds.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Northwestern League joins the League Alliance

Date Saturday, January 27, 1883
Text

The Northwestern League has joined the League alliance, and all American clubs will be cut off from playing games with them unless the existing prohibitory law of the American Association is repealed at the March meeting.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Northwestern League schedules around the NL

Date Saturday, January 20, 1883
Text

[reporting on the Northwestern League convention] ...a schedule of championship games will be made as soon as practicable after the National League issues their, so as to secure the “off days.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Northwestern League sends a delegate to the conference committee

Date Saturday, January 20, 1883
Text

[reporting on the Northwestern League convention] As the National League and American Association had each appointed a conference committee, Elias Mather [president of the NWL] was instructed to be in attendance when they meet as the representative of the Northwestern League.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Olympic ground available to rent

Date Sunday, June 3, 1883
Text

The Olympic Ground, at Seventeenth and Columbia Avenue, has been placed in first-class condition and can be leased for base ball purposes and athletic sports generally, by applying to Charles Buob, 341, Fifth Street Market.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Phillies the last to get into the League

Date Sunday, April 1, 1883
Text

[from an interview of Al Reach] You know the Philadelphia club was the last to get in the League, and there was no chance to get such a nine as I probably would liked to have secured, but I must confess that I am surprised that I was able to secure as good a team as I have.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the UA St. Louis club ownership, incorporation

Date Wednesday, November 14, 1883
Text

The St. Louis Athletic Association filed articles of agreement in the recorder's office Nov. 2d. The capital stock is $15,000, divided into 600 shares of $25 each. The sharehodlers are: Henry V. Lucas, 200 shares; Theodore Benoist, 50 shares; Fred F. Espenschied, 350 shares. The shareholders form the board of directors.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the UA playing rules

Date Wednesday, December 19, 1883
Text

[reporting on the UA convention] The playing rules were so changed that the batter has full latitude to stand as he chooses, while the pitcher is restricted in his delivery, as in the American rules. The foul bound is done away with, as in the League rules, and batsmen have to run on a missed third strike. As for the ball and rules book, Wright and Ditson of Boston were awarded the contract to furnish the same. There will be a staff of three umpires appointed at a salary of $140 per month, and substitutes at $10 per day and expenses when in service. St.

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the UA poaches the Cincinnati grounds; war talk

Date Wednesday, November 21, 1883
Text

Just now the directors of the Cincinnati Base Ball Club are all torn up over a few developments that have come to light in the past few days, and it looks as though an almost insurmountable obstacle had fallen across the path of this organization, which has had nothing but continuous successes since its inception. The Cincinnati Club will more than likely be compelled to seek new quarters, and the Bank Street grounds, which it has used, have been leased, or at least another party has the refusal for next year.

The original lease under which these grounds were secured was for five years, and will expire next April. The Cincinnati Club, up to within the past few months, did not anticipate the slightest trouble in renewing their lease under the terms of the old one, and made no special effort to obtain a new contract. In view of the changes and improvements they contemplated making during the winter, however, the management thought it would be policy not to begin work before the lease was renewed for another term of years. Negotiations have been pending for a few weeks, but while the directory of the Cincinnati Club was resting there were other parties at work, and yesterday when they called at the office of Mr. Mullane they were informed that the grounds had been rented, or at least another party had taken the initiatory steps toward securing the Cincinnati Park for a term of years.

The directors of club then made an effort to get another location, and called on the owner of the land in the rear of Lincoln Park. They also found that parties had been in advance of them here and secured the refusal of renting this lot, also. This last discovery spread consternation in their camp, and the first conclusion arrived at was that the Lucas-Wainwright St. Louis combination was not the only one making a strenuous effort to put the new Union League Association on a solid basis.

President Stern was all broken up over the discovery, and said “he could find no reason for the organization of a rival club in this city unless it was organized for the purpose of entering the Union League. … Well, if they have secured a lease on the Cincinnati Ball Park, and intend to organize a club, I guess we can stand it. If it comes to the worst, why, we will rent the Avenue grounds and throw open the gates to the public to our games for twenty-five cents admission all around. We have made some money this year, and we will spend every dollar of it, and more too, if necessary, to keep the team in the field. Whatever organization it is, and however much money they may have at their back, they will have a busy time getting together as good a team as I have. I would like to see when they will secure another Snyder or a White or a Reilly. I tell you the Cincinnati team is a strong one, and it took money and time to get it together. If it comes down to a fight the Cincinnati Club will make it an interesting one for all concerned., quoting the Cincinnati Enquirer

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The Union Alliance

Date Wednesday, December 26, 1883
Text

[reporting on the UA meeting of 12/18/1883] A number of letters were read asking if there was a probability of the establishment of a Union Alliance. It was the unanimous opinion of the delegates that the most liberal course should be pursued with all clubs that showed a disposition to join forces with their Association, and that eery chance should be given outside clubs to exchange games with the Association clubs. It was agreed that any club whose organization and conduct were not inconsistent with the object of the association might be admitted to the alliance by an application to the Secretary in writing, accompanied by the initiation fee of $10.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Union Association organizes

Date Monday, September 17, 1883
Text

Last Wednesday afternoon and evening a meeting of base ball men was held at the Monongahela House, Pittsburg, to form a new base ball association, separate and distinct from the National League and American Association. The following well known persons were present and enrolled the names of the clubs they represented in the new league: A. H. Henderson, Chicago; Thomas J. Pratt, Philadelphia; B. F. Matthews, Baltimore; M. B. Scanlon and W. W. White, Washington, D.C.; W. G. Seddon, Richmond, Va.; T. P. Sullivan, St. Louis; Jas. Jackson, N.Y., and A. G. Pratt and W. H. Camp, Pittsburg. Communications were read from Hartford, Conn., Brooklyn, Milwaukee and Indianapolis, asking the Association to consider the applications of the writers for membership. The requests were complied with and the writers were admitted into the new League Association. After some discussion the constitution of the American Association was adopted with a few amendments relative to organization and other minor matters. It was also resolved to style the new body the “Union Association of Base Ball Clubs.” One of the changes in the rules adopted was that the visiting clubs shall receive $75 guarantee instead of $65, as paid by the American clubs. The following permanent officers were then elected: President, H. B. Bennett, Washington, D.C., Vice President, Thomas J. Prattt, Philadelphia; Secretary and Treasurer, William Warren White. Directors, A. H. Henderson, Chicago; M. B. Scanlon, Washington, D.C.; Thomas J. Pratt, Philadelphia, and Al. G. Pratt, Pittsburg., outside of the routine work disposed of the most important was the unanimous adoption of the following resolution:

Resolved, That while we recognize the validity of all contracts made by the League and American Association, we cannot recognize any agreement whereby any number of ball-players may be reserved for any club for any time beyond the terms of their contracts with such club.

Notice was given that any clubs desiring to join the Association must make application to the secretary, Wm. Warren White, Treasury Department, Washington, D.C. After the transaction of a quantity of business pertaining to the organization, the Association adjourned to meet in annual session at the Bingham House, Philadelphia, in December.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Union Association organizes 2

Date Wednesday, December 26, 1883
Text

The first annual meeting of the new Union Base Ball Association took place at the Bingham House, Philadelphia, Dec. 18 and 19, and was a success in every way. The attendance was full, six clubs being represented. The proceedings were conducted with discretion and in a careful manner, the enthusiasm was unbounded, and there was every indication that the men who had the thing in hand knew what they were about and were in earnest. The session occupied two days. Although the bulk of the work was done the first day a supplementary session was held the next morning, to round up the work, as it were. The meeting was called to order shortly after eleven o'clock in the parlor of the hotel, with President Bennett, of the Washington Club, in the chair, and Mr. Warren White, of the same city, acting in his capacity as official secretary of the association. The following clubs were represented by delegates: Chicago, A. H. Henderson and E. S. Henle; Baltimore, B. P. Matthews and J. W. Lowe; Philadelphia, Thomas Pratt and H. L. Shetzline; St. Louis, F. S. Espeaschied and H. V. Lucas; Washington, D.C., M. B. Scanlan and H B. Bennett.

The first work was the consideration of the application of the Cincinnati Union Club for admission. This was soon settled, as the sentiment for admission was unanimous and the delegates, Mr. Justus Thorner and Mr. Weldon, of the Cincinnati Enquirer, were admitted.

The committee appointed at an informal meeting the previous evening to prepare a report on the adoption of a constitution and by-laws then made a report. They presented the constitutions of the elder organizations, with the recommendations that they be read through by the Secretary, and such amendments and changes be made in all parts that in any way conflicted with the policy of the new organization. The reading of the constitution brought out a lengthy discussion, the clauses relating to the division of receipts and the admission of new clubs receiving especial attention.

The reading was a tedious work, but was gone through patiently and with care, and the older bodies' work was adopted almost in entirety. One of the changes made related to the vote on applications of new members, and provides that the vote shall be by yeas and nays, instead of by ballot, and that a majority vote shall admit an applicant.

The question of division of gate receipts was discussed at length. There seemed to be a disposition on the part of several of the Eastern representatives to compel Western clubs to pay visiting clubs 30 per cent. of the receipts of games played on Sunday, and one or two clubs favored the percentage plan. They finally withdrew their objections and the guarantee plan was adopted, with a fixed compensation for visiting clubs of $75 for every game played away from home. This gives visiting clubs an advance of $10 on each game over what is now paid by the American Association. On holiday contesting clubs are to divide receipts equally.

A rule was also adopted by which a player released by a club is not eligible to sign with another before the lapse of 10 days....

Section 2, Article VI, relating to exhibition games and the five-mile clause, was amended; exhibition games with Association clubs are absolute forbidden; the five-mile rule was adopted.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the backers of the UA Cincinnati Club

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

The past week has developed who is at the bottom of the movement which shut the Cincinnati Club out of its park, and also develops that there is every probability of a strong Union Association Club in this city next season. The principal men concerned in the movement of John McLean, proprietor of the Cincinnati Enquirer, and Mr. Justus Thorner, ex-president of the Cincinnati Club. These it was who leased the Cincinnati's ground. A new club in this city, backed by that great paper the Enquirer, will not be sneezed at, and that such a club will be started seems now assured. If Mr. McLean does not go into the scheme, it will at least have the support of his paper, as he is very friendly to the Union Association and not at all friendly to Stern, Caylor & Co., and other prominent gentlemen will take the matter up.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the base coach drags the runner onto the bag

Date Tuesday, June 5, 1883
Text

[Buffalo vs. Providence 6/4/1883] Radbourn, who went to third on Richmond's hit, fell over the bag and went headlong on th4 turf. Rowe fielded the in to White, but, before “the deacon” could put out Radbourn, Denny, who was coaching, grabbed Rad by his clothing, and got hi upon the base just in the nick of time. Providence Morning Star June 5, 1883 [Denny played third base during the game.]

Source Providence Morning Star
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the baseball reporter of the Boston Herald

Date Sunday, July 8, 1883
Text

R. E. Stevens, the well known base ball editor of the Boston Herald, was sunstruck on Wednesday. His condition at one time was very serious.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the batter no longer out for not running

Date Wednesday, November 28, 1883
Text

[reporting on the NL meeting] The rule was abolished by which, the bases being full, a batsman after three missed strikes, the ball being purposely not caught by the catcher, was not required to run unless he chose, and thus by allowing himself to be put out, could save his side from the loss of a double or triple play in consequence of all base runners being forced, as they must be if he should run to first bse. Now the catcher is at liberty in such a case to drop the ball, pick it up, touch the home plate, and pass the ball to third baseman, who throws it to second, thus putting out three men, if the players are smart enough to accomplish this feat.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the bidding for Harry Wright; Philadelphia Club finances

Date Monday, October 22, 1883
Text

Mr. Harry Wright, the distinguished manager, who in his time has brought the Cincinnati, Boston and Providence up to high rank in base ball has concluded to see what can be done for Philadelphia next year and last week signed with that club. He has had offers from many clubs, some of them very tempting, and the price paid for his services must be considerable. Although Messrs. Reach & Co. refuse to state the compensation, it is said, on pretty good authority, to be $3,000 salary, the score-card privilege and one-fourth the profit. Some people may be disposed to snicker at the last part of the bargain, but when it is taken into consideration that Mr. Wright ha refused $5,000 and a percentage of profits in New York, there must be something in it. It is known to but few people that the Philadelphia Club, which everyone thought was barely paying expenses, made $10,000 clear this year. Yet such is the fact. Seven thousand dollars of this was cleared in April, before the championship season opened. In the light of the foregoing, Harry Wright's move may be considered a shrewd one, as he will make, at the least calculation, $7,000.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the catcher's mask lawsuit

Date Monday, August 20, 1883
Text

Frederick W. Thayer and George Wright, of Boston, who claim to own the exclusive right to manufacture the safety masks used by base ball catchers, have begun a suit against the Spalding Brothers, of Chicago, for damages to their patent rights, and an injunction restraining them from manufacturing the masks was issued by the United States Court.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the chest protector

Date Sunday, December 9, 1883
Text

Charley Daniels, the well-known umpire, is endeavoring to introduce into general use an excellent safeguard for catchers when playing close up to the bat. It is known as the “chest-protector,” and has recently been patented. (St. Louis) Missouri Republican December 9, 1883

Charlie Daniels, the umpire, has patented a “chest protector” for catchers. The Sporting Life December 12, 1883

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the condition of the Beacon Club 2

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

Strong amateur clubs are very few, but Massachusetts boasts of a permanent organization—one of the strongest in the land—the Beacon Club. It is composed largely of Harvard men residing in Boston who love the sport enough to play occasionally after graduation. The team never or rarely gets a chance to train or practice. All the ball-playing indulged in by members is in match games.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the condition of the Excelsior Club 3

Date Sunday, February 18, 1883
Text

Clinton street is becoming a favorite thoroughfare for clubs. In addition to the Brooklyn, which still holds the foremost place among local organizations of the kind, the Excelsior Club flourishes only a few blocks away, at the corner of Clinton street, opposite St. Ann's on the Heights. The Excelsior was originally an outgrowth of the old Excelsior base Ball Club, but it has loomed up into large prominence as a social organization of the better class. Its membership is of a quality and its code of regulations or a character that insures sociability in abundance without the objectionable features to be found in some other organizations.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the condition of the Olympic Club 3

Date Sunday, March 25, 1883
Text

The Olympic club is fitting up its ground at Eighteenth and York streets, adjoining the old Lamb Tavern, so as to make a first-class ball field. Chairman of the Finance Committee of Councils, Mr. Henry Clay, is one of the oldest members. The club uses the ground on Tuesdays and Fridays, and a number of first-class clubs are negotiating for the other days of the week.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the condition of the Olympic Club 4

Date Sunday, July 8, 1883
Text

The Olympic Base Ball Club, the oldest ball organization in the United States, celebrated its fiftieth anniversary on Wednesday last. The first playing was done on the lots in Camden. In 1860 grounds were secured near Camac's Woods, which is now Twelfth street and Montgomery avenue. The club in 1864 leased the Athletic grounds at Twenty-fifth and Jefferson streets, where it played until 1878. since that time the club has been maintained simply for exercise, and has not engaged in any match games. At present it has under lease a handsome ground at Eighteen and York streets. The original members of the club now living are: Robert Lindsay, Peter C. Ellmaker, Kirk Wells, R. P. McCullough, W. Hart Carr and Joseph Mort.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the crowd circling behind the catcher

Date Sunday, June 3, 1883
Text

The [Athletics] game on Decoration Day drew the largest crowd ever witnessed on a ball field, the sale of tickets being stopped an hour before the game was called, when fully 15,000 were on the ground and at least 10,000 on the outside clamoring for admission. The crowd which was packed all over the infield and back of the catcher really lost the home club the game, by their interference with the catcher.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the division of players between NL and AA clubs

Date Tuesday, March 13, 1883
Text

New York will resign all claim on John Riley, who will play with the Cincinnati Club; in return, the Cincinnati Club gives up all claim on the services of Ewing, Welch and Gillespie. Boston similarly resigns Deasley to St. Louis and Dickinson to Allegheny, while St. Louis gives up Radbourne, Denney and Whitney, and Allegheny Williamson, Bennett and Galvin. Providence restores Baker to his former position of eligibility, and Detroit does likewise in the case of Gerhardt, while Boston restores Jones to his old standing.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the duties of the manager and captain

Date Sunday, April 8, 1883
Text

Last Tuesday the [Cincinnati] team assembled at headquarters and were formally turned over to Team manager Fulmer and Field Captain Snyder by the President. Fulmer's office is purely executive. He has been provided by the club with a very comprehensive and liberal set of rules to govern the players, and he has nothing to do but to see that the rules are all obeyed. The rules are not stringent, because the men are not of the kind that need strict discipline. The largest latitude is left to them, the rules merely defining certain duties for general conformity. The business management of the Club remains entirely in the hands of the President, Secretary, and Directors. Captain Snyder will have exclusive control of the men while at play and practice in saying who shall play and how they shall play. He will coach the men and be absolute in his authority at such times. There is no chance for him and Fulmer to clash in their authority, so clearly is the line of both laid out by the rules.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the editor of American Sports; support for the guarantee plan

Date Friday, June 22, 1883
Text

American Sports, edited and published in Chicago by “Tod” Cowles, late of the Tribune, has come out flat footed for the American Association guarantee plan for the League. He says that the system of each city supporting its own team with its own receipts is the correct one. This is undoubtedly true. The fact that the editorial probably bespeaks Al. Spalding’s views on the subject makes it a matter of importance, so much so that the Cleveland Herald fights the plan with a column of argument. The system is the true one, and the League will come to it in time. It will not be the first idea they have borrowed from the American Association.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the effect of the elimination of the foul bound out

Date Sunday, June 24, 1883
Text

The abolition of the foul-bound has had some effect on run-getting. Four to five foul-bound catches on each side in a game of nine innings was about the average between catcher, third-baseman, first-baseman, and the right and left-fielders—that is to say, 12 to 15 per cent. of the outs were by means of the foul-bound catch. By its abolition the chances for outs are materially decreased and the chances for runs in exact proportion are increased.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the experiment with the umpire calling the game inside the diamond

Date Monday, October 29, 1883
Text

[Buffalo vs. Cincinnati 10/20/1883] Gerhardt umpired from inside the diamond, and demonstrated that that system will never become practicable. It gave general dissatisfaction. He called one foul a strike, and a strike a foul, not being able to hear at the distance he stood from the batter. Jones [center field] complained that he at times could not see the batter because of Gerhardt and White both standing inside the diamond. By miscalling Corkhill's close two-bagger a foul when it struck fair, he deprived the Cincinnatis of two runs. There is no doubt about it, the system proved a failure.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the financial condition of the Inter-State Association

Date Monday, September 24, 1883
Text

The Inter-State Association had a stormy time last week, and it is, perhaps, lucky for all the clubs that the end of the season is close at hand. The only organization of the lot which seems to be on a sound financial footing is the Brooklyn Club, which, apart from the solid capital it started with, has made money this season. This is probably the only season of life for the Inter-State, as the new and powerful Union League will, no doubt, take its place.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the first UA meeting

Date Thursday, September 13, 1883
Text

In spite of the many discouraging expressions from the press of the country concerning the advisability of forming a new Base-ball Association, the scheme has assumed a definite form, and from present indications the new association may be regarded as one of the fixed facts of the future. This afternoon and evening [9/12] a meeting of delegates was held at the Monongahela House [Pittsburgh], at which an organization was effected, and the new association was formed. The following delgates were present: A. H. Henderson, Chicago; Thomas J. Pratt, Chicago; B. F. Matthews, Batlimore; M. B. Scanlon and Willim Warren White, Washington, William C. Sheldon, Richmond, and A. G. Pratt and W. H. Camp, Pittsburg.

Mr. Thos. J. Pratt was elected temporary Chairman. After the election of officers, the officers proceeded to adopt a constitution and by-laws for the government of the Association. The League and Association laws were both carefully reviewed, and after full discussion of the same the latter were adopted, with a few slight changes, the most important of which is that all visiting clubs shall receive $75 guarantee money, instead of $65, as paid by the American Association Clubs. Outside of the routine work disposed of, the most important action taken was the adoption of the following resolution:

Resolved. That while we recognize the validity of all contracts made by the League and Association Clubs, we can not recognize any agreement whereby any number of ball-players may be reserved by any club for any period of time beyond the term of his contract with said club.

The above resolution was offered by Mr. White and received the unanimous support of the delegates present. As will be seen it is a direct blow aimed at the eleven men reserve rule, and its power for good or evil will depend upon the strength developed by the new association.

During the session applications for membership from st. Louis, Milwaukee, Hartford, Brooklyn and Indianapolis were read and considered. Considerable discussion followed as to the number of cities to be represented in the assciation. No definite conclusion was reached, but the majority of the delegates seemed to favor the admission of eight, as follows: Washington, Brooklyn, P Hiladelphia, Baltimore, Pittsburg, Chicago, Indianapolis and St. Louis. A propsoiton to admit twelve was also considered, which would add Richmond, Hartford, Milwaukee and Toledo, but final action was postponed until a later date. The session adjourned to-night to reassemble in December, exact date not fixed, at the Bingham House, Philadelphia.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the first UA meeting 2

Date Thursday, September 13, 1883
Text

In spite of the many discouraging expressions from the press of the country concerning the advisability of forming a new Base-ball Association, the scheme has assumed a definite form, and from present indications the new association may be regarded as one of the fixed facts of the future. This afternoon and evening [9/12] a meeting of delegates was held at the Monongahela House [Pittsburgh], at which an organization was effected, and the new association was formed. The following delgates were present: A. H. Henderson, Chicago; Thomas J. Pratt, Chicago; B. F. Matthews, Batlimore; M. B. Scanlon and Willim Warren White, Washington, William C. Sheldon, Richmond, and A. G. Pratt and W. H. Camp, Pittsburg.

Mr. Thos. J. Pratt was elected temporary Chairman. After the election of officers, the officers proceeded to adopt a constitution and by-laws for the government of the Association. The League and Association laws were both carefully reviewed, and after full discussion of the same the latter were adopted, with a few slight changes, the most important of which is that all visiting clubs shall receive $75 guarantee money, instead of $65, as paid by the American Association Clubs. Outside of the routine work disposed of, the most important action taken was the adoption of the following resolution:

Resolved. That while we recognize the validity of all contracts made by the League and Association Clubs, we can not recognize any agreement whereby any number of ball-players may be reserved by any club for any period of time beyond the term of his contract with said club.

The above resolution was offered by Mr. White and received the unanimous support of the delegates present. As will be seen it is a direct blow aimed at the eleven men reserve rule, and its power for good or evil will depend upon the strength developed by the new association.

During the session applications for membership from st. Louis, Milwaukee, Hartford, Brooklyn and Indianapolis were read and considered. Considerable discussion followed as to the number of cities to be represented in the assciation. No definite conclusion was reached, but the majority of the delegates seemed to favor the admission of eight, as follows: Washington, Brooklyn, P Hiladelphia, Baltimore, Pittsburg, Chicago, Indianapolis and St. Louis. A propsoiton to admit twelve was also considered, which would add Richmond, Hartford, Milwaukee and Toledo, but final action was postponed until a later date. The session adjourned to-night to reassemble in December, exact date not fixed, at the Bingham House, Philadelphia.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the first baseman plays off the bag; pitcher covers first

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

The old style first baseman was required to play his base—this is, to hug it closely—attend to throwing, and but that. In the modern game the first baseman is required to play half of the right short field ground, to which the superior batting sends many hot, ugly balls, for the reason that it is regarded as safe ground. … not half of the first baseman understand, when in a game, the limit over which they must not step in going for grounders. Vulgarly it is termed “losing his head.” Lately pitchers have added to their play the part of covering first when the baseman has to leave his ground for a safely hit ball, but perfect first base play is that which judges a ball, and leaves it to the second baseman to handle if out of reach.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the groundskeeper in Baltimore

Date Wednesday, November 7, 1883
Text

Wednesday, Oct. 31, the Baltimore Base Ball Club and the amateur “Our Boys” played a game at Oriole Park for the benefit of the keeper, Mr. George Foy.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the invention of the curve ball

Date Monday, August 27, 1883
Text

The credit of being the first base ball pitcher to deliver curved balls—balls which seem to be going straight over the home base, but suddenly turn aside and go out of the batter's reach or smite his in the legs—is claimed in behalf of several players. Nearly all college men, except those from Harvard, insist that the art was discovered at Yale. Harvard men generously credit a Princeton player with being the father of curve pitching. It is held by others that deceptive pitching—in reality curve pitching, but not then recognized as such—was practiced by professional players some time before any amateur acquired it. A player who retired in 1874 says that he learned the secret from a veteran several years earlier than that season. Arthur Cummings was the first man to curve the ball.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the legal status of the Athletic grounds

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

The Counsel Committee of City Property met on the 7th to consider the leasing of the Athletic Base Ball ground, which is city property. The club had but a one-year lease, for which it paid $1,000 per annum rent. In order to receive a three years' lease, which would obviate the yearly renewal, the club offered $2,000 per annum. This offer was accepted by the committee and the three years' lease granted, subject to a proviso that should the new Central High School building be built before 1887, the possession of the grounds is to revert to the city on three months' notice. This disposes of a vexations subject, and the mangers can now rest easy without disturbing dreams about the old chartered club.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the legal status of the Athletic grounds; NIMBYism and an early spite fence

Date Wednesday, December 26, 1883
Text

The residents of Jefferson street, just back of the Athletic grounds, recently got up a long petition to Councils against the re-leasing of the grounds to the Athletic Club. The reasons alleged were that their view was obstructed, their pavements and steps dirtied by the crowds of the men and boys, and that the shouting and excitement disturbed the peace of the neighborhood. This petition was presented and considered at the meeting of the Council Committee on City Property Dec. 13. Short work was made of it as it was pointed out that the chief grievance of the neighbors was the placing of huge canvas screens over the fence, thus shutting out a free view of the game. So long as the neighbors confined themselves to a view of the games from the windows nothing was said, but when a regular practice was made of admitting men and boys to the roofs of these houses at a small fee the screens were put up, hence the petition of the poor, outraged (?) residents. They objected to the dirt on their steps and pavements, but had no compunction about letting people run all over their houses for a consideration. It didn't take the committee men long to make up their minds about the nature of the protest, and its further consideration was indefinitely postponed and it was agreed to recommend the re-leasing for three years at the rate of $2,000 per annum.. “All's well that ends well.

Source The Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the limitations of fielding percentage and batting average

Date Monday, October 22, 1883
Text

Batting and fielding averages are valuable indications of the general skill of players, but are not conclusive. Fielders who try for everything will inevitably have lower averages than careful players who will not risk an error to save a base hit, and, similarly, batsmen who surrender the chance of a safe hit to send in a run by sacrificing themselves will be lower in batting rank than “sluggers”who hit certain pitchers safely almost every time, but fail utterly when confronted by a brainy pitcher.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the manager comes in from the stands to play

Date Sunday, July 8, 1883
Text

[Athletic vs. Louisville 7/4/1883] As the sixth inning was in progress O'Brien was prostrated by the heat and fell senseless at the home plate. He was carried off the field, and physicians were at once summoned. Everything that was possible was done for Jack, but he remained unconscious for several hours, and at one time we thought his case was hopeless. He recovered somewhat in the evening and to-day [7/5] is rapidly recovering. The members of the Louisville club have shown great solicitation over his condition and everything that was possible was done for him, Sam Weaver especially being very attention to his old catcher. The prostration of O'Brien made several changes necessary, Stricker going in to catch and Knight to second. Manager Mason, who had been holding down a seat in the grand stand, threw off his silk hat, put aside his seer-sucker coat, rolled up his pants, and took Knight's position in right, playing without an error and making a base hit. The Philadelphia Sunday Item July 8, 1883 [from an unidentified member of the Athletics sending regular correspondence to the Item]

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new Athletic grounds

Date Sunday, February 4, 1883
Text

Messrs. Simons, Sharsig and Mason, managers of the Athletic club, have signed a lease with the city for five years' occupancy of the ground bounded by Twenty-sixth, Twenty-seventh, Master and Jefferson streets. The ground adjoins that on which the old Athletic club won so many laurels, and for easiness of access is one of the best situated in the city. The ground in now in the hands of David Pooley, a landscape gardener, who put the Young American Cricket Ground in order. The plot is already covered with sod, and is quite level, but Mr. Pooley intends to make the entire field as level as a billiard table, so that it will be one of the best playing grounds in the city. Particular care and attention will be given to the infield. The work on the field will be commenced next month, as soon as the frost is out of the ground. In the meantime, however, about 100,000 feet of lumber are on the ground for the fence and stands.

The grand stand will be a model of comfort and beauty, and will contain 1,600 chairs. It will be erected at the corner of Twenty-sixth and Jefferson streets, which will be the principal entrance to the ground. Back of the stand will be a carriage way with accommodations for 260 teams. The grand stand will be elevated, and will be reached by easy grades of steps. On the top of this stand, each side of the reporters' stand, will be private boxes for the accommodation of one hundred person. These boxes will be fore the sole use of holders of season tickets. The reporters' stand will be a decided improvement over any yet seen, and will command an unobstructed view of the entire field. The open stands will have a seating capacity of five thousand, there will be additional room on the field for at least two thousand more. If necessary, at least fifteen thousand persons can be accommodated.

The accommodations for the players will be first-class, including every imaginable comfort. The private office of the managers will be on the ground, so that they can keep a constant eye on what is going around.

The superintendent of the ground, John Ryan, will also have an office, and will have complete care of all the bats, bases, suits, etc.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new Athletic grounds 2

Date Sunday, April 8, 1883
Text

In addition to being ample in proportions, landscape gardeners have made the entire field as level as the top of a billiard table. In the northwest corner has been erected a handsome semi-circular grand stand, seated with 1,600 arm chairs, with room for 400 more if occasion requires it. On top of this stand are 32 private boxes, each seated with five chairs, giving the whole seating capacity of the stand about 2,200. the stand is painted white and is handsomely ornamented with fancy cornice work. To the right and left of the grand stand are open seats holding about 3,000 persons.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new Chicago Union club

Date Sunday, June 24, 1883
Text

The St. Louis Club play in Chicago June 26 th, opening the new American Association grounds there, wit hthe new Chicago clubjust organized. The Union Base-ball Association is the name of the organization, backed by Baltimore and Chicago capital. … The club will play American Association clubs, thus enabling Chicagoans to witness other games than the league, at one half the price. The following are the officers: Presidnet, A. H. Henderson; Vice-President, Colonel John Marshall; Treasurer, W. C. Henderson; Secretary, B. F. Mathews; Directors, Colonel John Marshall, F. H. Gallagher and B. F. Payson. President Henderson managed the professional team in Baltimore in 1872-1873. The idea of organzing at this time of year is to pave the way to admission to the American Association next year. Cincinnati Enquirer June 24, 1883, quoting the St.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new Cincinnati Club grounds

Date Monday, December 10, 1883
Text

The new grounds are larger than the old ones, are four squares nearer the center of the city, and have much better street car accommodations. They extend from Western avenue to McLean avenue, east and west, a distance of 750 feet, and from Findlay street north 450 feet. They property is owned by one of Cincinnati’s wealthiest citizens, Wm. P. Hulbert. This gentleman heard of the game of freeze-out the Cincinnati Club’s enemies were playing, and, as he is interested in any and every enterprise that adds to Cincinnati’s credit, he made the club an offer of this tract. This club was surprised, because they had not dreamed the grounds could be had. Several cottages, two or three stables and several brick yards occupy the tract, and it was not in the condition of what was deemed available grounds. But Mr. Hulbert offered to give entire possession, remove every stick of timber and give a five years’ lease. He made the rent within reasonable bounds. Yesterday the act was consummated. The agreement to lease, with the various conditions thereto, was drawn up and signed by Mr. Hulbert and President Stern. The formal lease, with its technicalities, will be made out and executed to-day. St., quoting the Cincinnati Commercial-Gazette

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new Metropolitan grounds

Date Wednesday, December 19, 1883
Text

The new grounds of the Metropolitan Club were visited on Dec. 8th only to find the condition of things anything but promising for the completion of the field in time for next year's use by the club. The action taken by the aldermen in closing 108th street from First avenue to the river can easily be reversed by the incoming Aldermen of 1884, and the uncertainty in regard to the matter of opening or closing the street in question makes any large investment of money in constructing a new field a rather hazardous enterprise. The square selected for the grounds is but an accumulation of ashes and street rubbish, which will have to be covered up by a layer of good soil nearly two feet deep, and then it would require a year's time to give it a turf surface. The expenditure involved would exceed $10,000. In case of a failure to get it ready by May next the Metropolitan Club would have to lease their old field from the New York Club. Under these circumstances it would not be advisable to change the position of things on the old field, for it may be necessary to use it next April, if not through the season. If this should be, it is to be hoped that a permanent fence dividing the two fields will be erected, as the canvas fence was a decided failure last season. The Sporting Life December 19, 1883, quoting the New York Clipper

[from an interview with James Mutrie] On the plot bounded on One Hundred and Seventh and One Hundred and Ninth streets and First avenue and East river wok on inclosing and filling in will begin at once. On Nov. 27 the board of aldermen granted the privilege of closing up One Hundred and Eighth street to the river. The lease is for five years. The grounds can be reached by the Seven avenue road from the station in One Hundred and Fifth and One Hundred and Eleventh streets. They will be fitted up in the best style. Of course, they will not be nearly as large as the polo grounds, which are far too roomy for one club. The Sporting Life December 26, 1883

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new Oriole Park

Date Sunday, April 1, 1883
Text

Work on the new grounds, to be called Oriole Park, is fast progressing under the efficient management of Messrs. Houck and Barnie. The new park is situated at the corner of York road and Huntington avenue, and is easily reached from the central part of the city by four car lines—the City Passenger, Union, North Baltimore and York Roads—all of which will extend their tracks to the gate. The change of location from Newington to Oriole Park will largely tend to elevate the national game in Baltimore. The grounds are very near the fashionable portion of the city, and a better class of patronage will be the consequence.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new delivery rule

Date Wednesday, December 12, 1883
Text

Mr. Spalding, of the Chicago Club, in speaking of the new departure of the League in allowing pitchers to adopt any delivery, said that he thought it would not materially affect the result of the game; that is has always been a difficult thing for an umpire to just tell exactly where a jerk left off and a throw began; that this pitching question caused any amount of difficulty heretofore, and promised to do so in the future, if something definite was not done by the League, and the only solution of the question seemed to lie in the direction pursued.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new delivery; a proof of the curve

Date Monday, August 20, 1883
Text

Within the last few years the popular game of base ball has been completely revolutionized by the new methods of pitching, or delivering the ball to the batter. “Throwing” would be a more proper word for the new system, which allows the pitcher to deliver the ball in any manner he sees proper, so long as he keeps his arm below the shoulder. Under the new method many players have become adept in pitching what is styled the “curve” ball, delivering the ball towards the batter at what he regards the desired height but which, when nearing the home plate, through the power of a curve or twist given it by the pitcher, either drops or goes up or out from the plate, puzzling the batsman and often preventing him from hitting the ball at all. Lancaster city, however, according to the New Era, contains a number of persons who have refused to believe that such a feat is possible. Among these incredulous individuals was Robert J. Houston, who made an offer of $10 to anyone who would prove its possibility by accomplishing a test experiment which he would give him. Hofford, the Ironside pitcher, accepted the challenge, and accordingly, on the afternoon of the 10 th, Mr. Houston, accompanied by several friends, repaired to the rear of the Lancaster cemetery to have the question settled. The test prescribed was to pitch a ball on the opposite side of three posts placed in a straight line, the one twenty-five feet from the first, and the other twenty-two and a half feet from the second, in other words, to pitch the ball on the left side of the first, right side of the second, and left side of the third, describing a snake-like action and proving the existence of the curve. For a number of attempts Hofford failed to get the ball to curve from the second post to the proper side of the third, the ball frequently striking the second post. Finally he got it around to hit the third post, and with a few more efforts accomplished the task to the satisfaction of everybody present. Mr. Houston promptly paid the reward and wonders no more why ball players often fan the air in vain attempts to hit the ball, when it is delivered in such a deceptive manner.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the origin of the curve ball

Date Monday, August 27, 1883
Text

Just now the question of who originated the curved delivery in base-ball pitching is attracting the attention of Eastern papers, and the Philadelphia press published a long article on the subject one day last week. … Bobby Mathews was among the first to pick it up, and in an interview with a Press reporter he said he got his first lessons from Arthur Cummings, of the Mutuals, in 1873. Cincinnati Enquirer August 27, 1883 [See also St. Louis Post-Dispatch 8/25/1883 for a reprint of the Phila Press article.]

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The outfield fence advertising concession

Date Sunday, April 8, 1883
Text

S. B. Vandegrift, the well-known sign advertiser, of 1649 Park avenue, has the sole privilege of the advertising fence at Recreation Park. Secure a space at once, as he is selling them rapidly. Mr. Vandegrift will have a photograph taken of the entire grounds with the players in position during the action of the game between the Philadelphia and Athletics on the 16th. This photograph will include all the advertising signs. Don't fail to be present.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the ownership of the St. Louis UA

Date Saturday, November 3, 1883
Text

The St. Louis Athletic association field articles of agreement in the recorder's office yesterday. The capital stock is $15,000, divided into 600 shares of $25 each. The shareholders are: Henry V. Lucas, 200 shares; Theo. Benoist, 50 shares; Fred F. Espenschief, 350 shares. The shareholders form the board of directors. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the peace conference; the Northwestern League

Date Sunday, February 18, 1883
Text

A base ball convention was held this afternoon [2/17/1883] at the Fifth Avenue Hotel [New York]. Representatives were present from the National league, and American association and the Northwestern league. … A report which was submitted, governing the contracts for the engagements of players, was adopted. A list of recognized players is to be added to the report. The report provides that all contracts made are to be recognized by each club in the convention. The whole of the players hitherto on the black list are to be forgiven, and clubs wishing to reserve a man must pay him up to $1000 if they deem fit. On Sept. 29 in each year every club secretary is to forward to the secretary of his association the names of the reserve men, which must not exceed 11. No club is to commence engaging men until Oct. 10 in each year. … An arbitration committee is to be appointed to take cognizance of the cases of expelled players. Boston Herald February 18, 1883

The League and the American Associations are to be heartily congratulated on the good work, looking to the future welfare of all professional clubs, which the gentlemen of their respective conference committees accomplished at their meeting held at the Fifth-avenue Hotel, this city, on Feb. 17. The Conference Committee included Lew Simmons of the Athletic Club, Wm. Barnie of the Baltimore, and O. P. Caylor of Cincinnati, representing the American Association; A. H. Soden of Boston, A. G. Mills of Chicago, and Jno. B. Day of the New York Club on behalf of the League; and Elias Matter of the Grand Rapids Club as the delegate of the Northwestern League. A. G. Mills was chosen chairman, and O. P. Caylor secretary. The American Committee at first refused to allow the Northwestern League delegate to take part in their proceedings because they believed the Northwestern League to be members of the League Alliance. They claim, however, to be an entirely independent party, and have no connection to the League. Mr. Mills explained the origin of the conference. It was suggested by a communication to the League at its Providence meeting by the Northwestern League, who asked the former whether a common agreement between the two Associations could not be reached as to contracts and expelled and black-listed players. A lengthy agreement was adopted by the joint conference, to be signed by the presidents of the three Associations as soon as the Conference Committee’s work is ratified.

...

Considering the mountain of difficulties which had been suggested as an existing barrier to compromise, it was quite pleasant to notice how by one diplomatic stroke the barrier in question had been carried away. This was done by the prompt acquiescence in the proposition to reinstate every expelled and black-listed player on the books of both associations who was now under contract to any club of either association. Thus was the mountain removed from the path of advancement at one dash. This important point gained, it became an easy matter to settle all other questions. ...

...

New York will resign all claim on John Reilly, who will play with the Cincinnati Club. In return the Cincinnati Club gives up all claim on the services of Ewing, Welch and Gillespie. Boston similarly resigns Deasly to St. Louis and Dickinson to Allegheny, while St. Louis gives up Radbourn, Denny and Whitney, and Allegheny Williamson, Bennett and Galvin. Providence restores Baker to his former position of eligibility, and Detroit does likewise in the case of Gerhardt, while Boston restores Jones to his old standing. Moreover, the president of the Northwestern League–who was admitted to the conference as a committee of one from that organization–resigns all claim on Ringo and Coleman, who are to be held by Philadelphia. By this siple process of “letting bygones by bygones” was the path to peace so fully cleared that the route to the goal of friendly intercourse again was made plain. New York Clipper February 24, 1883

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the personality of Horace Phillips

Date Wednesday, November 21, 1883
Text

Horace B. Phillips is one of those unfortunates who have a faculty of making enemies and of whom many disagreeable things are said, and yet, in justice, one can't help admiring the able manner in which he piloted a new experimental club through all the trials and tribulations of a first season. … Phillips and Bancroft are considered among the best financial managers in the business, and both have made enviable records this year. Horace is now on his way East.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the pitcher a weak batter

Date Sunday, June 3, 1883
Text

[from a sketch of Robert Matthews] All his merit lies in his pitching, as he is a poor batter and base runner, being of slight physique.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the pitching revolution

Date Sunday, April 15, 1883
Text

Bobby [Mathews]...is the only one of the old-timers who has survived the changes that have revolutionized pitching. He is to-day as good as he ever was, and his record last season was away up.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the practice bell

Date Sunday, April 8, 1883
Text

[Yale vs. Athletic 4/7/1883] By the time the immense crowd had mentally inventoried the beauties of the ground, rand and the Athletics came out on the field, receiving a perfect ovation.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the prospects for an NL-AA peace agreement

Date Sunday, January 14, 1883
Text

The prospects of an amicable settlement of the differences between the league and American Association at the meeting of the conference committees soon to be held are not very flattering. The league will certainly refuse to give up the players that are claimed by the American Association, and it is upon that rock it is probable that all negotiations will split.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the reorganized Allegheny Club; the value of few stockholders

Date Sunday, December 2, 1883
Text

The Allegheny Club next year will not be hampered with 150 stockholders as was the club of 1883. there are but four men interested in the new club. H. D McKnight will have full control. The other three men, all wealthy, leave everything to him, and offer a carte blanche in all money matters. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the reserve rule preserved

Date Sunday, August 19, 1883
Text

All doubt concerning the Reserve Rule has at last been removed, and this week we can authoritatively announce that it will continue in force. While deprecating this and believing that it will not be to the best interest of our home clubs, it must be confessed that those upholding the rule use good arguments. The latest convert to the rule is Manager Barnie, of Baltimore. His conversion was brought about by his experience with the players of the defunct Merritt club. “If,” says Barnie, “players of the calibre of those of the Merritt club ask and obtain such outrageously high salaries, what would be the limit of first-class players when thrown on the market? It would make professional ball playing in most of our cities an impossibility and would bankrupt half of the managers that imagine they can pay any salary.”

Thus is will be seen the players have virtually defeated themselves, and by their greediness and exorbitant demands scared away their best friends. The Athletic club has wheeled into line for the reserve rule, and in the American Association to-day there is only one club–the St. Louis–that asks for its abolition. The (Philadephia) Sunday Item August 19, 1883

It is said that the disbanding of the Merritt Club was a lucky thing for the friends of the reserve rule, as it has given them a chance to point out the enormous increase in the salaries of the disbanded players. This they point to as an indication of what managers may expect if the reserve rule should be broken. The Sporting Life August 20, 1883

Source Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the reserve will kill the hot stove league

Date Monday, August 20, 1883
Text

If the reserve rule stands it will practically help to kill the interest in base ball. Variety is the spice of life, and one of the means of keeping the base ball fever at a white heat, even during the winter, is the speculation indulged in concerning the composition of the nines for the ensuing season, and their relative merits and demerits are canvassed and discussed throughout the idle months, and this makes people impatient for the season to open, and when it does open they flock in crowds to the grounds. This gives managers a chance to reap a financial harvest early, giving them a nest egg for the latter part of the season, when, in the cities where the clubs are hopelessly in the rear, the interest begins to flag. Now, let the rule stand and keep the clubs just as they are now, and not one-half the interest will be created and shown by the public. Everybody knows about what the clubs are capable of, and their relative standing at the close of the season is almost irrevocably fixed before the championship season opens. … Constant change is the order of the universe. Motion is life; stagnation, death.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the revised National Agreement

Date Wednesday, November 7, 1883
Text

[See TSL 11/7/1883 for the full text of .]

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the revived Olympic Club

Date Sunday, July 1, 1883
Text

The new grounds of the Olympic club at Eighteenth and Cumberland streets were formally opened on Friday. The ground has been nicely laid out and every improvement possible made. Grand stand and open seats have been erected, and in many respects it is one of the best arranged grounds in the country.

At the reunion Friday the members indulged in an exciting game of base ball. The nines were called respectively number one and number to, and consisted of the following twenty-six gentlemen...

The older members performed some remarkable work at the bat. Messrs. Richards, Borie and Clay making each four base hits. At the conclusion of the fifth innings the members sat down to a collation in the hotel adjoining the grounds.

Mr. Benjamin Dusenberry, in an address, related several instances of the old town ball days in the early period of the club's organization.

Mr. Henry Clay, president of the club, also made a brief address.

There are but six of the original members of the club still living. Their names are as follows: Robert Lindsay, Robert P. McCullagh, William Hart Carr, W. Kirk Wills, Joseph Mort, Colonel P. C. Ellmaker.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the rising delivery point

Date Sunday, March 18, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting of 3/12/1883] The rule requiring pitchers to keep the arm below the hip was modified, and the twirler will hereafter be permitted to throw from the shoulder, but not above it. In plain words, pitching has passed away, and throwing has become legal. The old foul balk was eradicated and a new style adopted. Now, if a pitcher gets his arm higher than his shoulder and the umpire calls a balk, the man at the bat and those on the bases are advanced a base.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the scorer for the Phillies

Date Sunday, June 24, 1883
Text

The official scorer of the Philadelphia Club is also the reporter of the Times, and in its columns continually complains of the umpiring, thus using a great paper to egg on the rowdyism at base ball matches.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the status of the UA; contract breaking

Date Friday, December 7, 1883
Text

A letter was received by Mr. Lucas yesterday from Wm. Warren White, secretary of the Union association. In it Mr. White states that the association is booming, and that applications for memberships have already been received from more clubs than they can accommodate. The writer complains that the older associations are howling that the new association is injuring base ball by disregarding the reserve rule. He says they themselves are doing far more to injure the case of base ball than the new association. As an instance he cites the case of Gunning of the Boston club. Mr. White says Gunning was signed by Mr. Henderson of the Baltimore and Chicago Union association clubs, and two weeks later he signed with the Bostons, and the fact was announced through the secretary of the league. The epistle concludes with a prediction of a very well attended meeting of the Union association at Philadelphia on the 18th instant. (St. Louis)

Source Missouri Republican
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the ten day rule

Date Wednesday, December 19, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA annual meeting of 12/12/1883]The League rule that no player released from the reserve can contract with another club before the expiration of ten days was also adopted.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the ten day rule, attempt to avoid paying bonuses

Date Wednesday, November 7, 1883
Text

The policy of buying players by big bonuses, such as was done by the St. Louis Club in the case of Lewis, is squelched by a clause providing that when a club releases a player, that player shall not be eligible for negotiation or contracting with any other club until ten days after the Secretary of the Association shall have mailed notices of his release to the secretaries of all the other parties thereto. This makes any contract invalid which may be made with such released player, prior to ten days after the notice of release is promulgated, and gives every club a chance to get at the released player at the same time.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the threat of the UA; expanding the AA

Date Saturday, December 15, 1883
Text

...the American Association has fully recognized the sense of recognizing in the Union Association an adversary which, if not dangerous at present, would be apt to prove so under certain contingencies.

This, in short, accounts for the very wise and sensible action in admitting the four chief applicants, Brooklyn, Washington, Indianapolis, and Toledo. At least three of these clubs will have strong and powerful nines in the field, and they would have proven important members in the new Union Association, and excellent stopping places for the clubs of that body when on a circuit. The blow to them is a very serious one, and it can hardly be realized as yet. St.

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the travails of a catcher

Date Sunday, April 8, 1883
Text

Two weeks ago Manager Reach received a postal from a young man named Bair, residing up the State, asking to be given a trial as a catcher. The request was granted, and on Tuesday last the young man appeared in Manager Reach's office, where Tom Pratt appointed himself a committee of one on examination. Tom found the young man's hands about the size and shape of a ten-pound ham, and decided at once that he would make a phenomenal catcher. Manager Reach was not so sure that size of hands had anything to do with it, but Pratt was certain. The young man went out to the ground and began to catch Henderson, Coleman and Neagle. He stood it for about fifteen minutes and then mysteriously disappeared. At noon Wednesday he re-appeared at Reach's with his arm in a sling. He had passed the night in the Pennsylvania Hospital, where he had been doctored for two split fingers, a broken thumb and a contused wrist. He sorrowfully informed Manager Reach that he had had enough and guessed he would go back to the farm.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the traveling team

Date Sunday, May 27, 1883
Text

The Cincinnati Club leaves [Cincinnati] Sunday morning on their first Eastern trip, and will take with them twelve men, and probably thirteen men. It has not yet been decided whether the club will send a third battery in Deagle and Traffley, or their utility player, Maculler. Which ever Snyder deems to be most useful will be sent.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the umpire controlling the crowd

Date Sunday, May 20, 1883
Text

John Kelly on Tuesday last umpired the Eclipse-Cincinnati game at Louisville and showed what one man with sand can do with a crowd and gave a most successful illustration of the virtue of the order rule adopted last winter. A decision he made in the sixth inning didn't suit the hoodlums and a noisier crowd never occupied a ball field. They hooted and called names and pandemonium seemed to have broken loose. Kelly seemed to take no notice, but after about five minutes of the racket, walked up to the pavilion, pointed out two roughs by laying his hands on them and ordered them ejected from the ground. The St. Louis private police yanked the two unceremoniously, while the better part of the crowd stood up and cheered. Kelly had all this time been getting the dead wood on the ringleaders of the men. After this it was like a change from Hades to heaven. The mob were conquered. One man afterward started to say something and Kelly turned his eyes that way. The fellow cut it off short and the crowd game him a laugh. Kelly comes from New York, where he is one of the boys and is not afraid to enforce the rule.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the umpire now calling runners out without a call for judgment

Date Wednesday, May 9, 1883
Text

[Louisville vs. Cincinnati 5/8/1883] ...Becannon [umpire] made one of those rank mistakes of umpiring that so often turns the tide against the club, which suffers thereby. It was in the seventh inning. The visitors had been to bat, and the score stood three to four against the champions. Fulmer led off for the home club with a two base hit to right center, and by daring chance taking stole third clean and without a doubt. Browning got the ball after Fulmer had stopped upon the base. When Becannon called Fulmer in, nobody, not even the players, could realize that he had given it out for a while.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the visitors have to use a ladder to get inside the fence

Date Wednesday, June 13, 1883
Text

Decoration Day the Cincinnatis on arriving at the Athletic Grounds found the crowd so dense that they could not get in at the gates. A ladder was, therefore, set up against the fence and the boys scaled the inclosure.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

third base coach deeking the fielder

Date Sunday, May 20, 1883
Text

Hanlon played a clever trick on Burns in the Detroit-Chicago game of May 9. The Detroits were at bat, with a man on third and a man on first. The man on first ran down to second; Flint threw the ball to Burns, who could easily have touched out the runner, but instead held the ball in hand, watching the man on third and no man was put out. Hanlon's trick consisted in his peculiar way of coaching the man on third. He stood with his feet on the white line and as Burns received the ball from Flint, Hanlon made a swift dash toward the plate. Burns was confused into thinking it was the man on third who was making for home and so held the ball momentarily and lost the chance for an out.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Thomas Fitzgerald presides at the Athletics' championship celebration

Date Monday, October 8, 1883
Text

After the parade, about 150 invited guests, including Athletic managers and players, the Metropolitan, Baltimore and Philadelphia clubs, the committee of reception and members of the press sat down to a fine banquet. Col. Fitzgerald presided and made an excellent speech. A beautiful banner was presented to the club, by President of Select Council W. B. Smith. Mr. Heineman next presented each player with a handsome gold medal, and Councilman Hoffman, on behalf of Mr. Mason, presented Captain Stovey with a gold watch and chain. Thus ended the ceremonies of the evening an d concluded one of the most remarkable demonstrations in the history of Philadelphia, and one unprecedented in the annals of the game.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Thomas Fitzgerald presides over the welcome banquet for the Athletics

Date Tuesday, October 2, 1883
Text

The banquet at the Mercantile Club, directly after the parade, proved a pleasant ending of the evening's programme. There were plates for 160 persons, and seats were taken at about 11 o'clock, with Colonel Fitzgerald presiding. He rapped to order at 12 o'clock, and in his speech presented the Athletic Club with the championship banner carried in the parade. Each of the Athletic playes was also presented with a gold badge, commemorative of the championship. Harry Stovey received a fine gold watch from Manager Charles Mason. There were other speeches, and the party borke up at about 1 o'clock in the morning. Philadelphia Record October 2, 1883 [from a long article about the reception parade and festivities]

Source Philadelphia Record
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Thorner's suit against the Cincinnati Club

Date Sunday, February 18, 1883
Text

Justus Thorner, at one time President of the Cincinnati club, has secured a new trial in his suit against the club for the recovery of certificates of stock.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

three-man rotation

Date Sunday, March 25, 1883
Text

The Providence team will have three strong batteries this season, in Radbourn and Gilligan, Richmond and Nava, Smith and Robinson, with Fulmer for change catcher.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ticket prices, divided seats in Cincinnati; smoking and drinking

Date Sunday, March 18, 1883
Text

The Directors have decided at last to charge an admission fee of fifty cents to the covered stands, and twenty-five cents to the uncovered. The present size of the last stand will be increased considerably. In the pavilion slats will be nailed to the seats to prevent crowding and pushing. Chairs will be placed in the grand stand, to which an additional fee of tend cents (or sixty in all) will be assessed. These will be numbered, and seats may be reserved at Hawley's. It is the intention of the Directors to court the patronage of the ladies more than ever. The grand stand will be set apart especially for them and their escorts; but no gentleman will be admitted except he is accompanied by a lady or child. No smoking or drinking will be allowed, and every effort will be made to please the ladies. Cincinnati Enquirer March 18, 1883

Since the announcement has been made that no gentleman would be admitted to the grand stand except when accompanied by a lady or child, and that no smoking would be permitted, considerable ill-feeling has been aroused among some of the older and wealthier patrons. They have made such a strong case that the directors have decided to allow smoking in the right-hand side; but the left-hand portion will be sacred to the ladies and their escorts. Cincinnati Enquirer April 1, 1883

life-size advertising poster

The local club will have an entirely original advertising scheme. They are having a wood cut made to represent the home nine in life-size. By it McPhee, Reilley, Corkhilol, Powers and McCormick will be shown standing, with Carpenter, Snyder, Fulmer, White and Sommers sitting, with Jones and Macular reclining. The poster printed from it will be seven feet high and ten in length. Cincinnati Enquirer March 18, 1883

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

tie games count in the statistics

Date Saturday, March 17, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting] Another new rule makes it obligatory on the official scorer to send in all drawn games to the Secretary, and the figures in these will count in making up the official averages as in all other games.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

tie games to count in the statistics

Date Tuesday, March 13, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting of 3/12/1883] Another new rule makes it obligatory on the official scorer to send in all drawn games to the secretary, and the figures in these will count in making up the official averages, as in all other games.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

too many advertisements

Date Monday, August 27, 1883
Text

[from the Brooklyn correspondent] I hear complaints on all sides about the advertisements which are sandwiched in all over the face of the score cards sold on the grounds. In the early part of the season the cards presented a very neat and pretty appearance, the outside bearing a variety of spirited scenes from the game while the face of the card was free from advertisements of any kind.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

turnstiles at the St. Louis ground

Date Monday, December 17, 1883
Text

President Von der Ahe seriously considers the utility of putting up turn-stiles at his gates next year. This is the only scheme not apt to be beaten. St.

Source St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

twenty-five cent admission quadruples attendance

Date Sunday, June 17, 1883
Text

The attendance at the League games in this city has quadrupled since the reduction in the admission price to twenty-five cents. The Sporting Life June 17, 1883 [See also TSL 6/24/1883 p. 3 for a discussion of this.]

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

two sets of uniforms

Date Tuesday, April 3, 1883
Text

[from a letter from Bancroft on the condition of the Clevelands] The teams' new gray uniforms, manufactured by Kiffe, of Brooklyn, N.Y., arrive to-morrow and will be worn during the April games, they saving their white uniforms for their opening championship games in Cleveland.

Source Cleveland Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

types of curves

Date Monday, August 13, 1883
Text

Bobby Matthews ridicules the claim that certain pitchers make of having “all the curves.” He says there is but one—the out—curve. There is also an in-shoot, which is not, however, a curve.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

UA adopts rules favoring the batter; the Wright & Ditson a lively ball

Date Wednesday, December 26, 1883
Text

[reporting on the UA meeting of 12/18/1883] The Association, after mature consideration, enacted legislation favoring the batting department, which is calculated to increase the popular interest in the game. Under their rules there will be far better chances for heavy batting exhibitions then under the regime of the two older associations. The foul bound clause was abolished, thus making the game a fly game entirely and decreasing the chances of put out. The rule restricting the delivery of the pitcher, compelling him to keep his hand below the line of the shoulder, was adopted, and to still further help the batter, the ball of that enterprising Boston firm, Wright & Ditson, was adopted as the official ball. The special excellence claimed for this ball is that it contains more rubber than any other and is harder and larger, thus assisting hard batting.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire behind the catcher 6

Date Sunday, April 22, 1883
Text

[discussing interpretation of the AA rules] Section 4 of Rule 29. The runner is allowed to take one base if the ball hits the umpire after passing the catcher.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire behind the pitcher

Date Friday, October 19, 1883
Text

Joe Gerhardt will try a new plan of umpiring this afternoon. He will take a position in the center of the diamond, just back of the pitcher's position, instead of standing at the home, as is the usual custom. Cincinnati Enquirer October 19, 1883

The cricket style of umpiring is being tried, the umpire standing in the field just beside the pitcher. Kelly, Gerhardt and Harry Wright have tried it. It has its advantages and also its disadvantages. (St. Louis) Missouri Republican October 20, 1883

The umpire-behind-the-pitcher scheme was tried in Cincinnati on Sunday and was a failure. (St. Louis) Missouri Republican October 23, 1883

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire corps; uniforms

Date Tuesday, March 13, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting of 3/12/1883] It was decided to elect four regular and two assistant umpires. The regulars are to be paid $1400 a month [sic], and the others $10 a game. They are to be uniformed in double-breasted blue flannel coats and caps, trimmed with gold cord and buttons. There were 40 applicants for the positions.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire not wearing a mask 2

Date Sunday, September 9, 1883
Text

[Columbus vs. Athletic 9/7/1883] Michael Walsh, of Louisville, who umpired the Athletic-Columbus game at Twenty-sixth and Jefferson streets yesterday, was struck full in the face by a foul tip from Smith's bat in the fourth inning and knocked senseless. … One strike and three balls has been called when Smith struck a sharp foul, which shied over rowen's crouched form, barely grazing his mask. Mr. Walsh, who was directly in line behind and without a mask, was kncoked over as through shot and lay as one dead. Water and liquor were hurriedly fetched and a physician sprang over the grand-stand fence and came to the unfortunate man's assistance. The umpire was soon seized with convulsions, and his unconscious struggles were piteous to see. Then his limbs became rigid, and as he was carried off the ground many present were fearful for his life.

Source Philadelphia Record
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire not wearing a mask 3

Date Monday, September 10, 1883
Text

[Columbus vs. Athletic 9/7/1883] ...in the fourth inning Mr. Walsh, the umpire, received a fearful blow from a red-hot foul ball full in the mouth, which stretched him senseless. He had to be carried from the field, and it was some time ere he recovered consciousness and could be removed to the Bingham Hotel.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire uniforms

Date Sunday, March 18, 1883
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting of 3/12/1883] The section covering umpires and their duties was nearly reconstructed. According to the changed system the Association appoints four umpires and two substitutes, who are paid $140 and expenses, and wear a regulation blue uniform and cap, like the Pullman palace car conductors, except that the cap of the latter is white.

Source Philadelphia Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire's mask 2

Date Sunday, May 27, 1883
Text

What on earth makes Kelly wear a mask while umpiring? It would be impossible for a ball to spoil that mug of his, even if his breath did fail to change the course of the ball, which is hardly probable., quoting an unidentified exchange

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpires given the power to eject spectators

Date Friday, March 23, 1883
Text

The American Association has made a good rule to prevent players and umpires from being annoyed by insolent remarks and lout criticisms from spectators. It should be rigidly enforced: “Every club is bound to maintain order on its own grounds, and protect the umpire and the players from the insolence, insults, and aggravating remarks or actions of spectators. If at any time during the progress of a game any spectator uses loud, insolent, insulting, and aggravating language towards a player, or by act or word, directly or indirectly, purposely annoys or excites a player, such player may appeal to the umpire for protection; and it shall be the duty of the umpire to call time, and warn said offender that he will be expelled from the ground if the offense be repeated. Should the warning be not heeded, the umpire shall call upon the captain of the home club to compel the removal from the grounds of the offender; and if said offender be no removed, the umpire may declare the game forfeited to the visiting club. The umpire shall, in like form and manner, have power to protect himself and the dignity of his position from the same class of insults and annoyance.

Source Cleveland Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpires won't enforce the delivery rules

Date Monday, August 20, 1883
Text

Why is it that umpires will not enforce rules that were made for the to enforce. The Association last spring at St. Louis unanimously agreed that pitchers must keep their hands down to shoulder height, and for that purpose revoked the foul balk, substituting a penalty of a balk for eery offense at pitching above the shoulder. Complaint is universal that Mullane of St. Louis, delivers the ball with his hand actually above his head, and yet he isn't stopped by the umpire.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

unanimous consent for the Phillies to reduce their admission fee

Date Friday, June 22, 1883
Text

The Philadelphia League Club has at last got the universal consent of the other League clubs to reduce their price of admission to twenty five cents. This had to be done to keep them alive.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Union Association; street car company interest

Date Monday, September 10, 1883
Text

[from a Baltimore correspondent] Rumors concerning the organization of another professional base ball club in this city being prevalent, your correspondent has been to some trouble to run them to earth, with the following result: One of the street car companies is interested in the enterprise, and offer grounds and investment of capital if required. About $20,000 have already been pledged. Indeed, the question of capital may be eliminated from the problem, as I am informed more is offered than will be required, the stipulation being that first-class players be provided. It is intended that this team shall be either of the League or the proposed new association.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

unofficial scorecards prohibited

Date Tuesday, April 10, 1883
Text

The official score cards will be issued by next Sunday. None other will be admitted to the grounds.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

unpaid players try to break the reserve

Date Sunday, November 18, 1883
Text

Six of the reserved players of the Fort Wayne Club have filed with Secretary Young a petition for relief from reserve on the ground that the club failed to pay them in full up to October 15th: and also alleging that the club management is objectionable because of the prominence of the gambling element. It is understood that the Fort Wayne directors will fight the case to the bitter end, and are prepared to show that they fulfilled all their obligations, and that the club is not controlled by gambler.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

unrestricted delivery; elimination of the foul balk

Date Wednesday, December 5, 1883
Text

The question of the pitcher's delivery of the ball, which has been productive, possibly, of more turmoil on the ball field than any one cause, has at last been taken up, and the League, at its meeting last week, definitely settled the much-mooted point for one season, at last. The “foul balk” clause of the by-laws, which was the penalty to be imposed by umpires in case a pitcher should break the rule by raising his hand too high when delivering the ball to the bat, has been virtually a dead letter since its introduction. It is a question whether this penalty was ever inflicted by an umpire in a professional game. The League did well to take cognizance of this fact, but whether the plan they have adopted will prove satisfactory remains to be seen. Next season in the League, to use a common expression, “everything goes,” in the way of pitching. A twirler will be allowed to pitch, jerk or toss the ball to the bat. He can have his hand as high as it suits him when in the act of pitching, and it will be useless for the hoodlums on the bleaching board to try and break up the twirlers of a rival team by their hoots and yells of “Keep your arm down,” Don't pull off your ear, there,” and other expressions of this kind. Under these conditions a swift overhand thrower, with a knowledge of the different curves, will be placed on the same basis as a straight-arm pitcher or an underhand thrower, and will possibly have the advantage of great speed at his command. This new style of delivery, which will be a novelty, will doubtless have quite a serious effect on heavy batting, as it will take some time for batsmen to get used to the overhand method of delivering balls. George Wright is quoted as saying this concession to pitchers will eventually ruin the game, and he would not be surprised if at the close of next season the League retraced its steps and put restrictions on the pitchers' delivery.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Von der Ahe knows little about baseball

Date Monday, September 3, 1883
Text

Mr. T. P. Sullivan, the efficient manager of the St. Louis Club has fallen out with the irresolute, vacillating German with the unpronounceable name at the head of the club, Mr. Christ Von der Ahe, and on Thursday Sullivan asked the cranky president for his release, which that bull-headed man foolishly gave him. … After the game, it is said, the President spoke harshly to the manager. “I have brought this club up to its present standing,” said Mr. Sullivan Wednesday, “and it is hard, after putting it in a fair way to win the championship, to be treated thus badly. Mr. Von der Ahe understand but little about base ball, and if I had obeyed all of his orders during the season the club would be nearer the foot than the head in the race.” Von der Ahe has authorized Comisky, the first baseman, to take charge of the nine in future. All of which is good news for the Athletic, as we may look for speedy demoralization in a team run by Comisky and the whimsical Von der Ahe.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Walter Camp offered the management of the New Yorks

Date Wednesday, December 26, 1883
Text

Walter Camp, of Yale College, has refused the management of the New York League team. The offer made him was a very tempting one, but he preferred the study of medicine to that of professional base ball.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Ward planning on going to law school

Date Monday, September 3, 1883
Text

Ward, of the New Yorks, is an earnest worker, and can play any position for all it is worth. He is a first-class batter, and the highest salaried pitcher in the League, but gives up ball playing after this season and enters Harvard College to study law, preparatory to going into partnership with his brother.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Wes Fisler considering coming out of retirement

Date Saturday, March 17, 1883
Text

Weston D. Fisler is to be given a trial at first-base by the Philadelphias, and, in the event of his declining to pay professionally again, Roberts, the Rockford amateur, it is thought can fill the position. Fisler, who gave up playing in 1878, was connected with the Athletics for thirteen successive seasons, and had but few equals as a general player, being a magnificent batsman and thrower, while able to field finely in almost any position, especially at first-base, which he guarded in over five hundred games.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Whitney's curve delivery

Date Monday, October 22, 1883
Text

[from a letter to the editor] Whitney, of the Boston club pitches a remarkable ball. He seems a perfect master of it when it leaves his hand. Standing behind the catcher in the game last played between the Bostons and New York, I was amazed to see his wonderful “in” and “out,” and up and down sweeps of the ball, and singularly enough it was while the ball was under great momentum. I saw Whitney send a ball to home and as soon as it left his hand he called to Connor of the New Yorks, “Look out.” Connor, as he thought, was far enough away to avoid a hitting, yet the ball took a rapid sweep off its course and struck him full in the side, for the moment quite disabling him.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

William White baptized

Date Monday, August 20, 1883
Text

Will White, the Cincinnati's fine pitcher, was baptized last Sunday afternoon. The immersion took place in Ohio, near Dayton, Ky., where he resides. The officiating minister was the Rev. Wm. Smith, of the Second Advent denomination.

Source Sporting Life
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

William White baptized.

Date Tuesday, August 14, 1883
Text

Last Sunday afternoon Will White, the Champions fine pitcher, was baptised. The immerson took place in the Oion, near Dayton, Ky., where he resides. The officiating minister was the Rev. Wm. Smith, of the Second Advent denomination.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger