Clippings:1862

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1862Clippings in 1862

Clippings in 1862 (43 entries)

Contents

'fly tips' definition

Date Tuesday, July 15, 1862
Text

...we have again to award high praise to Leggett for his splendid catching. He took four balls on fly tips, two right from the bat, he standing close behind the striker... [i.e. a “fly tip” is both a foul tip and a foul pop-up] New York Sunday Mercury July 15, 1862.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a 'point' of the game:

Date Sunday, June 8, 1862
Text

[a picked nine of Philadelphians vs. a picked nine of Newark players, in Newark 6/2/1862] In the third inning the Newarkers taught their visitors one of the “points” they had come to get posted up in, it was as follows. Johnson was on the third base and Loughery was the striker, Loughery struck a foul tip which went out of the reach of the catcher; in returning the ball to the pitcher, Osborne thought [sic] it rolled to short-stop who threw it to the third base man, but in such a way as to miss him; whereupon some one called to Johnson to run home, and, forgetting that the ball had not been in the hands of the pitcher, he did so–the consequence being that the ball was promptly forwarded to the pitcher, and by him to the third base man again, thereby putting Johnson hors de combat and giving the Philadelphians a capital illustration of a fine “point” in the game which they themselves had learned from their old opponents, the Gothams. A noticeable feature of the incident was the action of McKeever, the umpire, who, forgetting that he was not a player, instinctively called Johnson to go back. It put us in mind of the time when Mat O’Brien while acting as umpire, asked for judgment on a play on the home base, forgetting he was umpire. New York Sunday Mercury June 8, 1862 [see also Enterprise vs. Gotham 8/20/1861]

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a ball off the club house

Date Saturday, September 13, 1862
Text

[Resolute v. Star 9/9/1862] One [foul] ball that [the catcher] caught as it bounded from the club house, before it had touched the ground, was objected to as being against the rules of the ground, but the umpire correctly decided it to be a fair catch, as there were no rules at all being applicable in making it otherwise. Had the ball first struck the ground, and then been caught, as it rebounded from the house, why then the question of its being a rule of the ground, or not, could have been brought in; but as it was, it was a fair bound.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a four-base strikeout

Date Sunday, July 20, 1862
Text

[Union of Morrisania v. Harlem Club in Morrisania, 7/18/1862] The seventh inning, on the Harlem side, was marked by a peculiar strategy on the part of Liscomb, which happened to prove very successful. He resolved to trust to luck, made three feint strikes at the ball, and ran. The third ball passed the catcher, and Liscomb was well on his way to the second base before Abrams secured the ball, when he threw wildly to the second Liscomb keeping on the run, and a wild throw to the third allowed him to carry his point, and get home safe in his stocking feet.

...

In the ninth inning, however, with the game so certain, the Union side slackened up in their endeavors, and Abrams, the catcher, who was somewhat tired from exertion, and whose hands were much swollen, seemed to play carelessly, and let eight balls pass him, on which bases were made, before the inning was closed on the Harlem side. The inning was commenced by Liscomb, who attempted to again carry out the role in which he had been so successful in the seventh. He struck three times and ran, and as luck would have it, the ball passed the catcher and he made the first base. By a wild throw to the second he made the third, and was only put out on the home base by [pitcher] Hannegan.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a game on ice broken up by competition from outside skaters for the pond

Date Monday, February 24, 1862
Text

The match, as announced, came off the day after the carnival on the Nassau pond, the club kindly allowing the ball players the use of their pond, promising to keep the ice field clear during the contest. The game was called at about two-o'clock—an hour later than intended, owing to the non-arrival of some of the players. A game of four innings was played, the playing at this juncture being interrupted and stopped by the interference of three or four of the members who wishing to bring themselves into notice, and not possessing the ability to do so as superior skaters, they very rudely skated arm in arm with the females accompanying them through the field, between the bases, and even before the bat. This placed the ball players in a very awkward position, each fearing he was intruding upon the club, and disconcerted them very much in their playing, they being afraid to bat the ball and skate swiftly to the bases, lest they might come in contact with the ladies who were so rude as to interrupt them, and finally this being the case the game was closed at the end of the fourth inning...

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a proposed charity match

Date Friday, August 22, 1862
Text

Mr. Cammeyer, President of the Union Association, desires us to state that his grounds are at the disposal of the parties who are getting up the match between the heavy weight ball players of New York and Brooklyn, any day they select for the match. The proceeds derived from the entrance fee are to be devoted to some charitable purpose–as suggest by us, to aid the Board of Supervisors in raising the $240,000, appropriated at their least Meetings towards encouraging enlistments. This liberal offer we feel confident will be immediately accepted, and the sooner the match comes off the better.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a run down 2

Date Saturday, June 7, 1862
Text

[picked nines Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn 6/6/1862] T. Bomeisler, on a hit, passed third base, gained his first, giving Anspach his third, he watching his chance, came in the striker making his third base. While here, he endeavored to run in, running a fair chance of being caught between the bases, Masten and Mills exchanging the ball in th emost approved style, but Bomeisler managed to elude Mills, and ran in tumbling him over. (Aplause)

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a runner put out on a foul ball

Date Sunday, July 27, 1862
Text

[Atlantic vs. Eckford 7/21/1862] [Manolt on third base, two outs] Beach now went to the bat, but struck the ball just outside the foul-ball line; and though the umpire called foul, and loudly, too, the moment the ball was struck, the voice of the applauding crowd, and the calls made by the players, prevented Manolt from hearing the cry of foul, and before he could get back the ball, which [third baseman] Smith had passed to [first baseman] Start, thereby putting Beach out at first base [this is incorrect], was quickly passed by Start to the pitcher, and by him to Smith again, Manolt being the third hand out instead of Beach; and being very much “put out” was Manolt.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a steal of home on a offer to fight

Date Sunday, August 24, 1862
Text

[Mutual vs. Eureka of Newark 8/21/1862] [Brown at first base, bottom of the tenth inning] Brown, by a passed ball...reached his second, and ran for his third, when he... narrowly escaped being put out; so close was this, that the crowd began to dictate and act as umpires, calling “out,” “out,” hearing which, Gavigan [the batter] gave them warning, and so did Brown, that further such remarks would elicit coercive measures of a pugilistic character, whereupon the Eurekas stepped forward to expostulate with their Newark friends, seeing which Brown, who, as we have before remarked, is up to all kinds of snuff, ran in for home, and got in before the ball could be used to put him out, thus winning the game...

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a ten cent benefit match

Date Friday, July 11, 1862
Text

Eckford vs. Atlantic—The match between these Clubs will be played to-day on the Union grounds, and if the interest felt in it by the community may be taken as a criterion, it will prove a decided success. The proceeds derived from the entrance fee are to be devoted to the aid of the U.S. Sanitary Committee, and though small (only 10 cents), it is hoped, through the patriotism and humanity of the public, it will amount to a large sum.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a third nine

Date Tuesday, August 12, 1862
Text

Atlantic Second vs. Third Nine. There was a contest between these nines of the Atlantic Club yesterday, upon their grounds. Several first nine players were on both sides, and some splendid batting was displayed. The score at the close of the ninth inning was 45 for the second nine to 16 of their opponents.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

acceptance of the New York game in Massachusetts:

Date Tuesday, July 15, 1862
Text

The contests on the Common, between the Excelsiors and the players of the Boston clubs, cannot but have a beneficial effect on the interests of our National Game in Massachusetts. The prejudice against the New York game, as it is called, is fast disappearing, and the absurdity of calling it “child’s play” has been fully proved by the manly qualities it has been shown to require to excell [sic] in the game.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

advice to umpires

Date Saturday, July 12, 1862
Text

Of course, an umpire can only decide upon such points as he can see, and can take no one's opinion on the matter at all, save in cases of catches on the bound, when he can take the fielder's word for it, but in all cases of players being touched on bases, he must decide for himself, no statements being worthy of credence, as no player can rightly judge in the matter.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an assist from the crowd on a passed ball; block ball

Date Sunday, August 24, 1862
Text

[Mutual vs. Eureka of Newark 8/21/1862] [Burroughs on second base] A ball then passed Wansley [catcher] which would have brought Burroughs home, but a boy caught the ball and passed it on to Wansley, and Burroughs only made his third.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

An early appreciation of Chadwick

Date Saturday, July 26, 1862
Text

Every Base Ball player in the country has heard of Chadwick, the Reporter. He is a lover of manly sports, and we doubt it there was ever a more upright and impartial chronicler. “Honor to who honor is due,” is his motto, and he does not hesitate to censure all who deserve it.-- Perhaps no man has done more to make Base Ball a National and successful game, and to support it by the best of principles. Such a man deserves a handsome compliment—his services deserve flattering recognition—a Gold Watch, or something of that sort, worth $250. Who'll move in this matter? We give notice that if the proposal is not carried out now, we'll move it at the next Base Ball Convention in New York.

Source Fitzgeralds City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an early player eligibility dispute

Date Sunday, December 14, 1862
Text

[reporting on the NABBP convention] A communication from the Empire Club in relation to some action taken by the Mutuals was referred to a Committee, consisting of Messrs. E.H. Brown, J.B. Jones, and J.W. Mott, whose decision is to be final in the case. [see also NYSM 12/13/1863]

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an early proposal for the Union Grounds

Date Wednesday, February 12, 1862
Text

The indomitable skaters of the Union Club have started a new idea and it is in this wise: They propose to organize “the Union Skating, Riding School, Base Ball, Gymnastic and Boating Association,” under a charter to be applied for at the present session of the Legislature. They estimate the cost of the enterprise at $60,000—that is as to the construction account, the annual expenses at $9,000. They estimate the annual receipts at $22,000. The projectors intend that under the organization contemplated, each shareholder will every five years receive in dividends the entire amount of their capital stock. Brooklyn Eagle February 12, 1862 [See same issue for a prospectus.]

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Creighton's pitching; calling for high and low balls

Date Saturday, August 2, 1862
Text

The modus operandi is this: -- Suppose you want a low ball and you ask him to give you one...in comes the ball just the right height, but out of reach for a good hit...in comes another, just what you want, save that it is too close...This goes on until he sees you unprepared to strike, and then comes in the very ball you want, and perhaps you make a hasty strike and either miss it or tip out.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Creighton's swift pitching; catcher's sore hands limits pitching speed

Date Sunday, June 29, 1862
Text

[Excelsiors vs. Charter Oaks 6/26/1862] In the third inning Creighton had again resumed his position as pitcher, and hence the single run instead of five in that inning. In the fourth, though, he had to slacken his speed, the catcher’s hands being puffed up terribly with stopping such swift balls as Creighton sent in–want of practice making his hands tender. For this reason only can we account for the Charter Oaks obtaining nine runs off Creighton’s pitching in this inning. New York Sunday Mercury June 29, 1862

[Excelsiors vs. Charter Oaks 6/26/1862] Leggett, as catcher, was far from being in his usual good play; he did not attempt to throw to the bases in consequence of his arm being lame, and Creighton could not pitch with his usual swiftness, as his hands were too tender to stop his balls. Wilkes Spirit of the Times July 5, 1862

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

crowd control

Date Tuesday, July 15, 1862
Text

[a game played on the Boston Common] Considerable annoyance was occasioned to the players by the crossing of pedestrians through the field during the game. If the authorities have the power to grant the use of the ground to the club, we should think also that they have the right to prevent people from crossing, at least for the few hours a match occupies. But for the police the crowd would have prevented the match from being played, so much at times did they interfere with the movements of the players in the field.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

crowd control on the new Union grounds:

Date Sunday, June 8, 1862
Text

The arrangements to keep the crowd from interfering with the players were excellent, and were in striking contrast to the neglect shown by the New York clubs on Hoboken in this respect, the Gotham Ground Committee entirely neglecting their duties on Tuesday last. But for the good order of the crowd that day, great inconvenience would have resulted from the want of proper arrangements. We hope our clubs will manifest an improvement in this respect in their next matches, as Brooklyn–which has hitherto not been celebrated for the order of its assemblages, especially in the Eastern District, where the veriest lot of blackguard boys ever seen, collect on these occasions–has got ahead of New York in these games. This, by-the-by, is one of the advantages derived from the inclosed grounds at Williamsburgh; the noisy, rag-tail boys are thereby kept from annoying the players as they did on the Eckford grounds at Greenpoint.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

difficulty procuring grounds

Date Monday, April 7, 1862
Text

The great disadvantage attached to the Ball Clubs–which every year is increasing–is that of procuring grounds. The vacant lots and unfenced fields in the suburban districts and the vicinity of the city are every year becoming in more demand, and the Ball Clubs have to make way for the giant of Time–improvement–and as he makes rapid strikes, are deprived of their grounds. But still, notwithstanding this onward movement–an every day evidence of Brooklyn’s rivaling its neighbor over the water–there are enough ball grounds remaining to accommodate the clubs, as three can easily occupy the same ground, and each practice two days in the week. And with the growth of our city, the more necessary does out-door exercise become, and the advantages of ball playing grows daily apparent.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

financial provisions at the new Union grounds

Date Thursday, April 10, 1862
Text

The [Union] grounds are under the supervision of Mr. Cammeyer, and the work on them is progressing favorably. The arrangements are such as cannot fail to meet the approbation of all. The grounds afford sufficient accommodation for three clubs, and those desirous of playing upon them should send in their applications immediately to the President. None but first class clubs need apply. On match days we understand a small fee will be charged for admission.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

futile pick-off attempts

Date Saturday, May 3, 1862
Text

[Star first vs second nines 4/19/1862] We would advise Kelly and Skaats to let the bases alone, for here is small chance of getting any player out after he has reached his base, by throwing there, and there is a great chance that by an over-throw the player will get his run. Although both these pitchers are very quick in throwing to the bases, yet they did not succeed in getting out a single man, but, on the contrary, each over-threw the first base, and made at least half a dozen baulks between them. Let the bases alone, is our advice, and if you will content yourselves with delivering the ball to the bat with regularity, and with the velocity which your are both capable of, you do all that is required of a pitcher.

Source Wilkes Spirit of the Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

hit batsman

Date Sunday, July 6, 1862
Text

[Picked Nine of New York vs. Picked Nine of Philadelphia 7/2/1862] In the sixth inning, while T. Bomeisler was at the bat, several balls struck him, and on one or two of them the players ran bases. A question then arose as to the liability of the striker being given out for infringing Rule 20 of the laws of the game, which states that “any player who shall intentionally prevent an adversary from catching or fielding a ball, shall be declared out.” This pitcher is required to deliver the ball “as near as possible” over the home base. Few, however, have the requisite command of the ball to do so, and occasionally it must be likely to hit the striker, unless he gets out of the way, and this he is required to do by the above rule.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no admission charge for the games in Philadelphia

Date Saturday, June 21, 1862
Text

A large Convention of Base Ball players was held at the Commercial Hotel, on Tuesday evening, June 17th. ... Committees were appointed to make every arrangement for the distinguished players from all the Brooklyn Clubs. The four games will take place at Camac’s Wood’s, two each afternoon–play to begin at 12:00 o’clock. No charge for admission.

Source Fitzgeralds City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

outside clubs providing crowd control

Date Sunday, August 24, 1862
Text

[Eckford vs. Newark on the Gotham grounds 8/19/1862] The crowd encroached on the players considerably, despite the commendable efforts of the members of the Gotham and Mutual clubs to keep them back.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitcher throwing to the bases

Date Tuesday, July 15, 1862
Text

One thing apparent was, that the pitcher did not care to throw to the bases often, of did not deem the play safe enough; for the Excelsiors had had no difficulty in running their bases in the early part of the game. He changed his tactics, however, at a later period, and the result was the fewer runs were obtained.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitching and catching on a muddy field

Date Sunday, August 3, 1862
Text

The muddy state of the ground at the catcher’s position proved to be a benefit rather than a drawback, as far as the play was concerned; for it necessitated cautious play on the part of the pitchers, and obliged them to pitch well over the home base, and more for the striker than is ordinarily done; consequently, though the catchers had an arduous task to perform, the brunt of the battle fell upon the fieldsmen–and well did they do their duty, one and all.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

playing with eight players

Date Sunday, October 19, 1862
Text

[Union of Morrisania vs. Excelsior 10/14/1862] It was not until nearly half-past three that the game was commenced, though the time appointed was 2 P.M.–not a minute too soon, at this period of the season. The delay was occasioned by the absence of players on both sides; the Unions beginning with but eight men, and thus played two innings, when F. Durrell, of the second nine, happened along, and was seized upon to fill the nine. New York Sunday Mercury October 19, 1862

calling strikes an appeal play?; waiting game

In regard to strikers waiting at the bat until players make their bases, the remedy lays in the pitcher’s hands, not the umpire’s. The umpire has no right to say anything to the striker in such a case, unless he is called upon by one or other of the fieldsmen for judgment on the striking. If the pitcher, when he sees the striker waiting at the bat until the player running the bases gets home, will ask the striker where he wants a ball, and when he points out the right ball he requires, all the former has to do is to pitch him the ball he wants, and if he then refuses to strike, why, the duty of the umpire is to call one strike for the first ball that comes to him where he directed. But if the pitcher does not send him in the balls he requires, he is right in refusing to strike. New York Clipper October 25, 1862

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

poor behavior by Charlie Bomeisler

Date Sunday, July 6, 1862
Text

We have to comment in terms anything but praiseworthy on the action of C. Bomeisler, not only in his obstinate refusal to permit members of the clubs to save time in passing up passed balls to the catcher when no one was on base, or in cases of foul balls, but also in his trying to irritate the catcher, by chafing him in the last inning. Bomeisler’s remark ridiculing the idea of courageous conduct in an exciting contest, was a much out of place as was his whole conduct on the ground on the occasion in question. We trust he will never again be the means of marring the harmony of a match as he was in this game. We regret to have occasion to allude to him thus. We simply do it to prevent any recurrence of the same thing elsewhere. Every player in a match renders himself amenable to public comment, the mantle of privacy being thrown off on all such occasions.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

preparing the Carroll Park grounds; club day games

Date Thursday, March 27, 1862
Text

The Carroll Park grounds have been rolled and leveled, and upon the southeast corner of the lot there has been erected a large and commodious club house, which is to be occupied by the Star and Excelsior clubs, and ruing the game, the National ensign floated from the roof of the club. Extensive preparations have been made by both clubs, and this season there will be a game played upon these grounds every day.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rules of conduct while on tour:

Date Sunday, June 22, 1862
Text

The same rules of conduct that guided them [the Excelsiors] on their last tour will be adopted on this. They will pay their entire expenses. No liquor is to be used by the members, and no public bar-room will be patronized by them during their absence. It is by such rules, and such only, that health and true pleasure can be secured on their tour, and the credit of the club, as an association of gentlemanly ball-players, sustained. They have our heartiest wishes for the success we well know they will merit, if not obtain.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

runners must touch the bases

Date Sunday, August 3, 1862
Text

[from a letter to the editor] Can an umpire make a player running for a home run touch his bases? And if he goes over the first base without touching it, and makes a home run, can he be put out at first base by the baseman holding the ball on the base after the run was scored? I make a home run the other day in a match, and because I did not touch the base (though I passed outside of it) the ball was sent there, and I was decided out. Was it is fair decision?

[answer:] It is absolutely necessary that every base should be touched, but especially the first base. The umpire was correct in deciding you out.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The Excelsiors' tasty uniforms

Date Tuesday, July 15, 1862
Text

[The Excelsiors visit Boston] After dinner on Thursday, the players and their friends wended their way to the Common, the scene of the day’s match, and on arriving on the ground, the players of the club, in their tasty new uniform of blue pants, pink belt, white shirt, and blue-check cap, at once became the cynosure of all eyes. Questions were asked as to which was Creighton, which Leggett, and which Pearsall, those three being the notabilities of the club in Boston eyes.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Union grounds

Date Sunday, July 27, 1862
Text

The preparations made on the ground for the convenience of the spectators and players were admirable. The former were supplied with three rows of seats on each side, out of the way of the catcher in taking foul balls, and no one was allowed to encroach upon the field anywhere, an uninterrupted and fair field being given the players. The chalk line, for foul balls, was extended beyond the bases into the field, on each side, so that there could be no mistake as regards foul balls–the umpire and spectators alike having a fair view of the ball when it struck near the line. The outside crowd, occupying the hill-side surrounding the inclosed grounds, was an immense one; but nevertheless there was a goodly number occupying seats inside, there being seats furnished for over 1,500 people. The scorers and reporters had a place to themselves, and the entire arrangement was excellent and highly satisfactory.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the game spreads to Rhode Island:

Date Sunday, May 11, 1862
Text

We are glad to learn that our national game is becoming popular in Rhode Island. One or two new clubs have recently been organized in Providence, under favorable auspices, and we have no doubt, before the close of the season, that we shall have to record several interesting matches in that locality. ... By-the-way, we learn that the noted catcher of the Putnam Club, of Brooklyn, Mr. Masten, recently joined in with the Providence club on one of their practice-days, and gave them quite an insight into the beauties of the game; so much so, indeed, as to create quite a spirit of emulation among the admirers of the game in that locality–the result being the proposed organization of more clubs.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the opening of the Union Grounds

Date Friday, May 16, 1862
Text

The Eckford, Putnam and Constellation Clubs have engaged the grounds for the season–each having the use of them two days in the week, Mr. Cammeyer reserving the use of the grounds one day each week, to be taken in rotation from the clubs. Brooklyn Eagle May 16, 1862

On Thursday, May 15, the newly-laid-out ball grounds, on the site of the Union Skating Pond, in Williamburg, were duly inaugurated by a match game of ball between sides chosen from among players of the Eckford, Putnam, and Constellation Clubs, which clubs are to be regular occupants of the grounds during the season. The game was witnessed by an assemblage numbering between two and three thousand persons, among whom the fair sex were very prominent, as they occupied seats in a building especially erected for the use, from which an unobstructed view of the field is had. A band was present, and performed favorite airs during the afternoon. Altogether, the scene was quite an attractive one, and the proceedings very creditable to the gentlemen under whose immediate supervision the arrangements were made. Wilkes Spirit of the Times May 31, 1862

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the price of swifter pitching

Date Saturday, November 1, 1862
Text

...M. Rogers [of the Resolutes], who, in trying to get greater speed on his pitching, sacrificed his accuracy of delivery, and gave changes for running bases that he had not done before.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the runner thrown out on a foul ball 2

Date Tuesday, July 22, 1862
Text

[Atlantic vs. Eckford 7/21/1862] Manolt on a right field hit secured his 3rd base... and Reach batting a foul ground, and Manolt, not hearing the Umpire's decision, but the ball being procured, was fielded to Smith [i.e. by O'Brien, the pitcher] on 3rd base, and the ball reaching there before Manolt, who had returned, put him out and closed the inning, amidst the cries of the outsiders, “Not out,” “Hold your base,” etc., which at one time caused such a tumult, that had not the players endeavored to appease the criticising public, a row seemed inevitable.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the second year of the war:

Date Sunday, June 1, 1862
Text

BALL-PLAYERS OFF TO WAR.–But few of the fraternity, in comparison with the number who left in May, 1861, have gone off to war this time in the militia regiments. Of the first nines of the Brooklyn clubs, the Eckford lose Sprague, the Enterprise, Cornwell; the Star, Kelly; the Hamilton, Bergen; Holt, too, the catcher of the Henry Eckford’s, has left. All the clubs have their representatives in the several regiments, especially the Thirteenth Regiment; but the hegira of warlike ball-players is nothing near as great as in 1861, the necessity not being as pressing as it was a year ago, or otherwise the clubs would have suffered considerably in the loss of members through the departure of the State Militia.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

tips on rules, offered to Philadelphia clubs

Date Saturday, July 12, 1862
Text

On the first day's play, there was no chalk line made between the home and 1st and 3d bases, as the rule requires. This should be attended to at every match. It would be well, too, to mark the home base line of six feet in length on which the striker is required by the rules to stand. Every player running the bases should be required to touch them. Section 18 says, “players must make their bases;” now a base is not made, in the sense of the rule, until it is touched. In cases of foul balls, too, the player running the bases should remain on the base, after he has returned to it, until the ball has been settled in the hands of the pitcher. When a ball is caught on the fly, however, the moment he has touched his base, provided he does so after the ball has been caught, he can try to make the next base without waiting for the pitcher to get the ball.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

wild pitching

Date Thursday, October 9, 1862
Text

[Union of Morrisania vs. Eckford 10/7/1862] The game, taken throughout, was rather an interesting contest, and but for the tiresome pitching on the Union side, the match would have been played in much less time. Hannigan is pre-eminently master of the style of pitching he has adopted. But this style is by no means popular; on the contrary the cry against it is almost universal. Strictly speaking it is a pitch, but conscientiously it is not. Nothing can be gained by it. In the end it will injure ball playing more than is thought. It is not only bothersome to the striker, who is kept waiting for a ball, but delays the game, and deadens all the interest manifested therein. This new style of pitching is daily gaining ground, and the only reason for which we can assign is that every player, if he can throw a ball, is capable of mastering it. For this reason—that of checking its progress of this faulty style of pitching—has we thus criticised Hannigan's play, and our ball readers will doubtless concur in the same opinion.

What a vast difference there is between Hannigan's pitching and that of Creighton, and Sprague? Had we space we would draw the comparison. In the match on Tuesday, in the third inning, Hannigan pitched 60 balls, 25 of which were over the striker's head; 13 medium height; 12 low. In the fifth inning 26 balls were pi5tched; 9 were high; 5 low, 3 medium, 9 struck at. To conclude, the objections to Hannigan's pitching, on the new style, are the following: First—Accuracy is sacrificed to swiftness. Second—It annoys the striker by giving him unfair balls, and thereby much prolongs the game. Third—It is a clearly palpable violation of the rules, and unless stopped, it will ultimately ruin the game.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

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