Clippings:1874

From Protoball
Jump to: navigation, search
Clippings
Scroll.png

Clippings in 1874

Add a Clipping
1874Clippings in 1874

Clippings in 1874 (267 entries)

Contents


the admission fee; division of the gate receipts

Date Tuesday, August 4, 1874
Text

The Mutuals and Atlantics being desirous of returning to the old admission fee of 25 cents, will only charge that amount for admission on all games in which the visiting clubs do not insist upon 50 cents. The Atlantics were desirous that the game on Monday should have been a 25 cent game, but the Bostons declined to accede to their sensible proposition unless they, the Bostons, received half the proceeds.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

organizing the Philadelphia Club

Date Tuesday, November 17, 1874
Text

A meeting of those favorable to forming a new professional club in this city...took place last Friday evening at W.C. Gillingham’s, Fifth and Locust streets. A large assemblage was present, including many prominent members of the Athletics, Frank McBride occupying the chair, and after selecting “Philadelphia” as the name of the new organization, the meeting adjourned until tomorrow (Monday) evening, at No. 243 South Fifth street. ...

Philadelphia is amply able to support two professional nines, and this new organization should be encouraged by all; and we would suggest that the Athletics lease them a day or two each week next season, as, besides giving both nines plenty of practice, their contests would attract large audiences. All who wish to see another first-class professional nine in this city, should attend the meeting at the above-mentioned place. The club will be a stock concern, and nor on the co-operative plan. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury November 17, 1874

It has been often suggested, in these columns and elsewhere, that another first-class club could easily be organized in this city; and the new movement, which has gone forward with great eclat during the past few days, promised unquestionable success. It is all nonsense for Philadelphia to keep on providing other cities with talent when there is so much room for her players at home; and we are glad to see the Philadelphia club placed on so good a basis at the start. The second informal meeting was held on Monday evening last ...and a large number of prominent admirers of the national game were in attendance. A subscription list was opened–stock to sell at twenty-five dollars a share. In a very short time over eighteen hundred dollars worth of stock was subscribed for, and notice given that an election of officers would be held on Friday evening last. Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch November 24, 1872

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

grossly unfair play of the batter allowing a ball to hit him

Date Sunday, May 31, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs. Mutual 5/24/1874] [McGeary on first base] Anson now came to the bat, and as a storm began to threaten about this time, and the wind to blow across the pitching, Mathews failed to deliver with his accustomed accuracy, and one ball he sent in Anson allowed to glance off his legs, hoping thereby to allow McGeary a chance tor un down from first, which he did. Mr. Powers [umpire] very properly ordered him aback, and thereupon Hicks and Dick [the captains] held a consultation. Some words of protest were uttered, but the umpire acted under his power of “sole judge of fair and unfair play;” and if it be anything but grossly unfair play for a striker to allow a ball to hit him, and glance from his person out of the reach of the catcher in order to allow a base-runner to make a base, then nothing is unfair. The rules expressly make a ball dead when it glances from the striker’s bat or the umpire’s person, and the same application is fair in regard to the batsman’s person. It is the imperative duty, however, of the umpire in all cases where the striker allows the ball to glance from his person when a partner is running the bases, to decide the striker out, as it is fair to infer that it is done designedly. All obstruction is willful, in the meaning of the rules, which the player could readily have avoided, and umpires should especially consider it so in such cases as that of Anson.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The power divide in the NA

Date Saturday, January 3, 1874
Text

The laws of the game governing the eligibility of the players of a professional club, and the rules affecting the responsibility of players to clubs, and of clubs to players, need more careful revision this year than any other portion of the code. It must be remembered that while the organization of the Professional Association is of necessity such as to leave its government almost entirely in the hands of the club managers, thereby insuring their special interests being well looked after, there is positively nothing but the code of rules and regulation to give any authority for the protection of the inherent rights of the players. To a certain extent this is right; for it is but just that those who expend their capital and incur the risk of its loss should have the power to render those risks as few as possible. But it is also nothing but justice that the Association code of rules should guard the players from any oppressive enactments which would give only to one party–and that the more powerful–a despotic control over the services of the player.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a gentleman’s club: the Athletic Baseball Association

Date Saturday, January 3, 1874
Text

An organization bearing the above title [Athletic Baseball Association], and composed of members of the Athletic Baseball Club and prominent professional and business men of Philadelphia, was recently formed, and on Christmas their club-room was formally opened at Chestnut and Eleventh streets. On the evening of Dec. 23 an election for officers was held, with the following result: D. F. Houston, president; Jos. S. Allen, vice-president; A. C. Johnson, secretary; William Warnock, treasurer; Charles Spering, Wm. Warnock and D. F. Houston, trustees.

This Association is one entirely distinct from the Athletic Baseball Club, although a large majority of its members belong to that organization, and it offers unusual inducements for their members to join. Fronting on Chestnut and Eleventh streets is the reception parlor, which is about 30 by 40 ft. The walls are finished in light pearl-colored paper, and the rooms are handsomely carpeted and furnished. Immediately in the rear of the parlor, and connected with it by two doorways, in the billiard-room. There are also dressing-rooms furnished with marble-top washstands, and everything is supplied that will tend to the comfort of the members. The cost of fitting up the rooms was about $2,500, a large portion of which was contributed specially by several of the prominent members. There was a constant stream of visitors on Xmas, who did full just to the sumptuous collation provided. Sam Arrison has been installed as superintendent. A special meeting of the Association will be held Dec. 31, when the constitution and by-laws will be submitted, and the committee on rooms will make their report.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a ten-man ten-inning game

Date Sunday, January 4, 1874
Text

The remarkable weather we are having this winter cannot be better illustrated than by the fact that on Christmas day the weather was fine enough in Boston to admit of a match at baseball on the Boston Club Grounds, in which two tens of the Boston Baseball Association were contestants. The game was played under the new rule of ten men and ten innings, and the novelty of the contest and the holiday occasion led to the gathering of over 500 spectators within the enclosure.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no sixty day rule for players from amateur clubs

Date Sunday, January 4, 1874
Text

[discussing the rules proposed by Chadwick] The rule, if adopted, will make a very important change in one respect–that of players joining professional clubs–as it gives clubs the privilege of engaging any player who has not been connected with a club belonging to the association, and putting him on the field immediately.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a resume of the history of pitching

Date Saturday, January 10, 1874
Text

In the early history of the game a medium speed in delivery was in vogue, and strategy was employed to make this pitching effective; those two veterans of the early days of baseball–Tom Van Cott and Frank Pidgeon–being the two most noted exemplars of the old style of delivery, the ball at the time being fairly pitched. It was larger, however, and softer than the present ball, and the outfielders did the most work, as a general thing. As a matter of course, the scores were large and the games long. But little of such fine fielding skill as we see now was then witnessed even in the best of matches, and the game lacked, therefore, the attraction it now possesses... A square pitch rule the play until the advent of Creighton in 1858, when mere speed became the desideratum and the disguised underhand throw came into operation; and this method of delivery has practically been the rule ever since. It is impossible to deliver the ball swiftly and at the same time accurately by a square pitch. Such a delivery of the ball, too, would enable the batsman to drive it with ease out of reach of the fielders, and to score twenty home runs where one is now obtained, thereby making the game decidable by heavy hitting alone, and not by skillful fielding and scientific batting. The introduction of underhand throwing by Creighton, fifteen years ago, had just such an effect in revolutionizing baseball as that of round-arm bowling by Lillywhite had in cricket twice as many years ago. Underhand throwing has practically been the rule since 1858, and legally since 1871 [sic]. It has worked to the advantage of the game, and experience has shown it to be the only rule that affords the pitcher a fair chance for a full use of strategic play.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

wides and called balls; the purpose of the distinction

Date Saturday, January 10, 1874
Text

In reference to the penalties for an unfair delivery, we have found it absolutely necessary to introduce the cricket rule of “wide” balls. No one will for a moment argue that any ball sent in out of the reach of the bat is other than an unfairly-delivered ball; and, as such, it should be ruled out as not being a fair delivery. We have, therefore, specially provided that all such balls shall be called “wide,” and three such wides shall give a base. There are certain balls, however, which, though not out of actual reach of the bat, are nevertheless not exactly fair balls, and these come under the head of “called” balls. We divide the two classes of balls purposely to relieve the umpire from the responsibility hitherto attaching to him in calling balls. By the new rule, he must call all “wides” whenever delivered; while in regard to “called” balls he has a certain degree of option, governed by the peculiar circumstances of the case. The object of the sections inflicting penalties on the pitcher in the case of “wide” and “called” balls is to insure for the batsman as fair a delivery as possible. There can be no question as to the justice of punishing the pitcher every time he sends in a ball out of reach of the batsman; nor can there be any question as to obliging him to send in fair balls, provided that in the latter case a due latitude is allowed the pitcher for using strategy in his efforts to confuse and deceive the judgment of the batsman. In the early days of the game the batsman was punished for not striking at good balls; but there was not the slightest penalty inflicted on the pitcher for sending in wide balls, because they well knew that no squarely-pitched ball could be sent in accurately unless simply tossed to bat. In the case of the Creighton delivery, however, however, there was a degree of accuracy of aim and command of the ball that rendered it necessary to inflict the same penalty on the pitcher for unfair pitching as on the batsman for unfair play at the bat. Hence the origin of calling balls on the pitcher.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

what is a legal delivery

Date Saturday, January 10, 1874
Text

A “square” pitch is made by the swing of the arm while it is kept as nearly straight as possible, and while it swings perpendicularly to the side of the body of the pitcher as he himself stands in an upright position. This is an underhand pitch. A “round-arm” pitch–as in cricket–is made by a similar swing, so far as the arm being nearly straight, but with the arm swinging at an angle of forty-five degrees from the body–or of less of a side-swing, but nevertheless such a swing as to take the arm from the perpendicular motion of a square underhand pitch. A “jerk” is made when the arm is swung forward, as in the case of an underhand pitch, but at the same time is allowed to touch the side of the body, by which means an additional impetus is given it. By jerking, however, the ball can never be delivered so swiftly as by an underhand throw, nor so accurately. But as jerking can never be brought in use advantageously, its prohibition is needless. Any style of overhand throwing, however, should be rules out, as it enables a man to send in a ball more swiftly and accurately than any other style of delivery. We have consequently, stopped at this point; and in addition, in order to enable the umpire to decide clearly as to the legal style of delivery, we have allowed the ball to be delivered in any way that the pitcher chooses, except by a direct overhand throw, and except by the round-arm style of the bowling delivery peculiar to cricket–the latter being ruled out for the rules that in the perpendicular swing of the arm the pitcher has all the latitude for underhand throwing he needs for speed in strategic pitching, without getting in a disguised overhand throw, as he might were he allowed a round-arm swing.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

what is a balk

Date Saturday, January 10, 1874
Text

In regard to balking, it should be clearly understood that a balk is committed whenever the pitcher makes any motion to deliver the ball to the bat, and fails so to deliver it. Every pitcher has a certain series of movements in deliver; and if he makes any one of these movements with the arm with which he delivers the ball, whether the ball is in his hand or not, he commits a balk. He also commits a balk whenever he delivers the ball by an outward swing of the arm, as in round-arm bowling; whenever he throws a ball by an overhand throw; whenever, in making any movement to deliver, he steps outside the lines of his position. Within the six-foot square of space he has ample room for any movement for a fair delivery, and within this space he must be from the time he makes his first motion to deliver the ball until the time the ball leaves his hand, or he commits a balk. New York Clipper January 10, 1874

batter intentionally letting the ball hit him

In reference to dead balls, it will be seen that, by the new reading of the rule, every ball is considered dead that accidentally touches the bat, or that hits the person of either batsman or umpire. It is time that the contemptible style of play some batsmen indulge in, of trying to assist base-runners by standing so as to allow the ball to strike them, should be put a stop to. To leave it to the umpire to decide whether the obstruction on the part of the batsman was intended or not, affords no remedy for the evil. The only way is to make the ball dead, and then neither the fielding nor the batting side gain anything by the decision. New York Clipper January 10, 1874

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the championship for 1873 finally officially awarded; the judiciary committee ducks

Date Sunday, January 11, 1874
Text

Hicks Hayhurst, on the 2d of this month, signed the above document [awarding the championship to Boston], after waiting a couple of months to see what action, if any, the Judiciary Committee would take in regard to the charge made against the Boston club for the alleged illegal playing of Addy. [Harry Wright also signed it; Frank McBride of the Philadelphia Club refused.] Philadelphia Sunday Mercury January 11, 1874

The Judiciary Committee met last Tuesday evening... The Philadelphias...produced documents stating that Addy had played in games as a member of the Rockford club, and was therefore not eligible to play with the Bostons in some ten or more games. A communication, however, was read from Harry Wright, protesting against any action being taken by the Judiciary Committee that should affect the Boston’s claims to the championship already awarded to them by the Championship Committee, and to the surprise of the uninitiated, the Judiciary Committee then unanimously resolved not to take any action on the matter; and... the farcical proceedings terminated. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury January 25, 1874

[from a long ranting piece] The Philadelphians persisted, and through persistence exposed the whole animus of this outrageous face. At Baltimore, on Tuesday evening last, those appointed to “thoroughly investigate all charges” deliberately refused to listen to the complaints referred to for the reason, as one of the committee confessed in our hearing, that not an idea was entertained of the tenable ground of the Philadelphians were occupying, and that “a hearing would certainly have cuased trouble.” Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch January 25, 1874 [see also PSD 2/22/1874 for affidavits from the Bostons and a rebuttal to them]

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

batted unfair balls now live

Date Saturday, January 17, 1874
Text

In hitting at unfair balls–viz., wides and “called” balls–the batsman is now open to the same results as if he were to hit a fair ball. Thus, according to the new rule, if the batsman strike at and miss a ball on which a “wide” is called, the umpire must reverse his decision of “wide” and call “one strike;” and if the batsman hit a “called” ball, a similar reversal must be made, and the ball decided fair or foul, as the case may be. This is but just; for if the batsman thinks the ball is one he can hit, it of course ceases to be “wide” or one to be called.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

baseball and rounders; the upcoming English tour

Date Sunday, January 18, 1874
Text

In the year 1858, while reporting the English international cricket matches at Montreal, we had a conversation with the late Tom Locker, which was, as near as we can remember, as follows: We were speaking of cricket in the States, and Tom Locker had just asked us how cricket stood in Yankee land, when the subject of baseball was broached. Said Tom: “Baseball is our game of rounders, they tell me.” “Well it is, as far as its origin is concerned,” we replied, “but no more like the original than modern cricket is like the game played with a wicket in 1680.” “Rounders,” added Tom, “Is a school-boy’s game in England–even girls play it sometimes.” “All I have to say,” we responded, “is, that I don’t believe your eleven could play our American game in a year’s practice.” Tom laughed incredulously at this, and said, “We’ll show thee what we can do with yer Yankee rounders when we get to New York.” To which we replied, “Some of these days, Tom, we’ll be sending a baseball team to England, to show you Britishers our game, as you come here to show us yours.” “That’s right: send ‘em long,” he responded, “and we’ll polish ‘em off for you.” The idea referred to was actually entertained by some enthusiastic ball players a couple of years afterwards, when the Excelsior Club was in the heyday of its successful career. That was fifteen years ago, when the conversation took place. Now it is soon to be un fait accompli, as the French say, for arrangements were last week completed to send a party of representative players over to England in August next to show our English cousins how we enjoy ourselves on the ball field, not by a three days’ match at the scientific game of cricket, with its needless and tedious delays and its old fogy rules, but in playing an exciting game, marked by beautiful displays of fielding, requiring manly pluck and endurance, and mental judgment and intelligence, in as many hours as cricket requires days.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Spalding appointed agent in England for the Athletic Club

Date Sunday, January 18, 1874
Text

[reporting the monthly meeting of the Athletic Club] The report of the Board of Directors was received, stating that a communication had been received from Mr. Spalding, of the Boston Club, who said he intended making a trip to England for the purpose of ascertaining the feasibility of arranging for exhibitions of the American national game in that country by his own club, and to make the exhibitions more complete, another club would be required to accompany the Bostons. He therefore offered to act as agent of the Athletic Club, if so directed, for a joint trip with the Boston nine. The adoption of the report created considerable discussion, but a large majority favored the idea, both as concerned the great prestige to be acquired, and also in a pecuniary point of view. The directors were instructed to pay a portion of Mr. Spalding’s expenses, and await the result of his report. Such report to be submitted to the members.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

cricket matches planned for the baseball tour

Date Sunday, January 18, 1874
Text

In addition, too, the team will be so organized as to make up a very strong twenty-two of American cricketers, so as to play a series of matches at cricket with the crack amateur eleven of England, and the All England professional eleven. These games will be played at Lord’s celebrated cricket ground, England, the charge for admission to which is an English shilling, special seats costing half-a-crown.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the state of the Atlantic Club

Date Sunday, January 18, 1874
Text

This old organization, at its eighteenth annual election for officers last week, with one exception, re-elected their old officers, the exception being Mr. Alex. Samuells, who is too busy to be able to attend to baseball this year. Mr. E. W. Stafford was, therefore, chosen as president in Mr. Samuells’s place. Captain Ferguson will be well backed up with funds in raising a stock company team for the Atlantics for the coming season, and with a capital pitcher–not Rule–whom he as got hold of, he will have a stronger team than before. Barlow, Dehlman, and Pearce, are widely retained, and there is a probability of Hall and Pike returning to their old club. Arthur Allison, too, will also play with the Atlantics, and Mills, of Baltimore, to form the team. By a vote at the meeting in question it was decided to retain the old club title for the new team, instead of calling it the Brooklyn ten, as before proposed. New York Sunday Mercury January 18, 1874

The Atlantic ten will be a “pony” team, including several fine young players, and a very promising pitcher. New York Sunday Mercury February 22, 1874

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

eighty members in an amateur club

Date Saturday, January 24, 1874
Text

This young amateur club of Newark [the Union Club], said to be a worthy successor to the famed Eureka Club of that city, played some remarkably fine games during their season of 1873, as their record below shows. The club numbers nearly eighty members...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

tagging up on a foul fly

Date Saturday, January 24, 1874
Text

A new feature is introduced in Section 12, and that is in allowing base-runners to run a base on a foul-fly, as in the case of a fair-fly. This is not only an advantage given to the “in” side to offset the tenth man, but it is also something that common justice has called for for some time. A strong objection against the foul-ball feature of baseball has been that, while it prevents the batsman from scoring either a base or a run for his side, it gives his adversaries a chance to put him out. Now, by allowing the base-runner th3e same privilege of running a base after a foul-fly catch as after a fair-fly catch, a part of this objection is removed, and a new and good point of play is introduced. Under the new rule the ball will be in play quicker than before, and some lively work will follow a foul-fly catch by the more frequent throwing to the infield positions it will lead to.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the legality of underhand throwing

Date Saturday, January 24, 1874
Text

In the comments made on Rule Fifth by a writer in a Philadelphia paper, he mistakenly asserts that the rule of underhand throwing never has passed a convention. Now, the rule of delivery which unanimously passed the Baltimore convention of March, 1872, was as follows: “Rule Second.–Sec. 3. Whenever the player delivering the ball to the bat shall throw it by an overhand or round-arm throw, the umpire shall declare a foul balk.” Now, this is the only deliver which was then prohibited. As for returning to the old wording, that is useless, inasmuch as it opens the door to endless disputes as to what an umpire thinks constitutes a throw; and if square pitching were enforced, the ball would be knocked all over the field, and an end would be put to the fine fielding games incident to the underhand throw delivery.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jay Cooke, baseball magnate

Date Sunday, January 25, 1874
Text

Among the assets of Jay Cooke was a preferred share of the Olympic Base Ball Company, of Washington, which must be valuable at the present date.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

players on disbanded clubs immediately eligible

Date Saturday, January 31, 1874
Text

In relation to the players of a disbanded club, the [judiciary] committee was unanimously of the opinion that the precedent established in the case of the Troy Club was a good one, and that players were, and should be, eligible to play with any other club from the date of disbanding of the club of which they were members.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early use of “coaching”

Date Saturday, January 31, 1874
Text

Sec 13 [of the proposed rules] refers to the interference of players on the in-side with those on the field, such as is occasioned by the “coaching” of base-runners by the captain, and by standing close to the base-line to tell them when to run.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a tryout

Date Saturday, February 14, 1874
Text

Barnie, the catcher of the Nassau Club of Brooklyn, was reported as having been engaged as catcher for the Athletic Club for 1874. We can trace the rumor to no authentic source. A few weeks ago Barnie visited Philadelphia, and caught a “trial catch,” to show what he could do; but we believe that the catch was not considered “a good catch” at that time.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

salaries of professionals

Date Sunday, February 15, 1874
Text

By way of showing the outlays professional ball clubs incur in securing the services of the principal players, we give below a list of the salaries paid by four stock company clubs now in the arena ready for the coming campaign: [individual player salaries of the Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, and Athletic clubs follows]

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

cooperative teams get second pickings

Date Saturday, February 21, 1874
Text

Co-operative-club managers must not expect unreasonable things, one of which is that of relying upon players to stand by certain promises to serve in their tens when the temptation of joining a salary-paying club is offered them. The only chance for a co-operative company to obtain players is just when the season’s play is about to commence, and all the regular stock companies have engaged their full complement of players. Then a co-operative company can select a fair team from the players not engaged.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Barlow’s bunts

Date Saturday, February 21, 1874
Text

He is one of the best of the new style of strategic batsmen, and he last season earned many a first base through outwitting the pitcher by his peculiar style of making a base-hit. It was noteworthy how Tom was favored in this respect by the crowd at the Union Grounds. Whenever he made one of his patent hits–he simply allowed the ball to hit the bat–the crowd would laugh and applaud him; while, if any other club player of the out-of-town nines attempted such a thing, they would hiss him.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

constant appeals for judgment

Date Saturday, February 21, 1874
Text

One of the weak points in the play of several of the catchers of last season was the habit they had of making constant appeals to the umpires on “strikes,” “called balls,” and other points on which decisions are asked. Especially was this apparent in the way some would point out where a ball struck when a fair-foul hit was made, just to show to the crowd that the umpire had erred in his decision. Now, the umpire is obliged by the rules to call all foul balls, all wides and all strikes, whenever they occur; and the constant appeals made to him to decide in such cases must naturally irritate and prejudice him against the player who makes them. The best policy is to keep quit; or, if you do make an appeal on a ball or strike do it silently, by simply holding up the ball as you turn to look at him.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catchers playing too close to the batter

Date Saturday, February 21, 1874
Text

Another mistake made by catchers is that of standing up behind the bat throughout the inning. It depends greatly upon circumstances whether it is good or bad policy to do this. The chances of sharp fly-tips off the bat are but as two to five to those given for long bound-catches and for high foul-balls, and these latter are invariably sacrificed by standing close up behind the bat. There is far too little of sharp long-throwing to second from the catcher’s position. They all aim to throw to second only when standing close behind the bat, at which time the ball is most difficult to hold.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pre-printing the proposed rules draft; ten man rule, tagging up on foul flies

Date Sunday, February 22, 1874
Text

The work of the convention will be light, unless they proceed to introduce rudely prepared rules, inasmuch as a regular code, which has required some months of careful work, has been printed for the use of the convention in which but two changes have been introduced, viz., that of the ten men rule, and the rule allowing bases to be run on a foul fly catch the same as a fair fly catch. All the other amendments are but alterations of the wording of the sections with a view of making the definitions plainer. It is important to a professional code that every point of play on the game should be duly covered by the rules. The order has been changed somewhat, the code now consisting of seven rules, viz., those relating to the material of the game, the players, the game itself, the pitching, the batting, the base-running and the umpire.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ten men ten inning rule a dead letter

Date Sunday, February 22, 1874
Text

The “ten-men-ten-inning” clause, which attracts considerable attention, is dead before it is offered; as, after a very thorough canvas, we have not found a single club in favor of it, or a single person likely to be a delegate, who gives it any support whatsoever.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

proposed rule dropping a superfluous bottom of the ninth inning

Date Tuesday, March 3, 1874
Text

[reporting on the NA meeting of 3/2] One of the sections of the [proposed] code, providing that, in order to shorten a game, it should be left to the option of a club ahead at the [end of] the first half of the ninth inning to play out the inning, was discussed somewhat unfavorably, and was stricken out of the code, which, as thus amended, passed by a unanimous vote.

Source Boston Globe
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the second baseman chiefly tags runners

Date Saturday, March 7, 1874
Text

The duty of the first-baseman is mainly to securely hold balls thrown to him, while he has one foot touching the base; while that of the second-baseman is chiefly to touch players as they run from first to second...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

left-handed infielders

Date Saturday, March 7, 1874
Text

The first base can be best occupied by a left-handed player, as the hand most at command with such players faces the balls going close to the line of the base; while a left-handed player is decidedly out of place at either of the other infield positions.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the positioning of the second baseman off the bag; remedy for fair-foul hits

Date Saturday, March 7, 1874
Text

Of late seasons it has been the custom to cover the open gap between first and second bases by making the second-baseman play at “right short;” but this has left a safe sport for sharp grounders close to second base, while it has also drawn round the short-stop to second, and the third-baseman to short-field to such an extent as to make fair-foul hitting a sure style of play for earned bases. By the introduction of a “right-short” this “fair-foul”advantage would be put a stop to, and moreover, it would enable all three of the basemen to attend to their duties better, and thereby give them greater facilities for attractive base-play and strategic operations. In fact, the ten-men rule is the only effectual remedy against bases being earned by fair-foul hits, besides placing the infield in proper form and giving base-players better opportunities than they now possess for fully covering their positions.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Charles Porter the new NAPBBP president

Date Sunday, March 8, 1874
Text

The officers were chosen as follows: Chas. H. Porter, of the Bostons, was chosen president...

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the reorganized Baltimore club

Date Sunday, March 8, 1874
Text

The Baltimore Club is to enter the championship arena this season, being reorganized on the co-operative plan. Messrs. Hauck and Hadel are most prominent in the efforts to raise a good nine for Baltimore this season, the former being well known as the proprietor of the ball ground in that city, and the latter having a favorable reputation as the Secretary and Manager of the defunct Baltimore nine.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

debating the ten man rule, exhibition games

Date Sunday, March 8, 1874
Text

[reporting on the professional convention] ...Aleck Davidson, of the Mutuals being the only one that favored the useless and visionary innovation of the ten men and ten innings; and when he was asked where he would place this extra man, he replied, that he could occupy any position in the field, right, short stop or any where else where he might prove useful in keeping down the score of the club at the bat, and thus improve the game; and he stated that it was needed in New York to renew the interest in the game. David L. Reid [delegate of the Philadelphia Club] effectually answered his arguments by stating that the true cause of the decline of the game in New York and vicinity, was the suspicious playing of some of the professionals connected with their clubs, and that in Philadelphia, Boston, Baltimore and Washington, where the game had been played on its own merits, there was fully as much interest taken in base ball as ever, and as ninety-nine out of every hundred of professional and amateur players were opposed to the ten men and ten innings rule, it was useless wasting time talking about it, and he moved the Mr. Davidson’s amendment be tabled, and it was by the decisive vote of six to one. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury March 8, 1874

[The report of the professional convention] After the election [of officers], Mr. D. B. Reed, of the Philadelphias, presented a long and elaborate series of playing rules and championship code, prepared with great care by Mr. Henry Chadwick. It involves several changes, which were generally received with favor.

...

...all exhibitions are prohibited until each club has played its championship game to a close, except when clubs play exhibition games under the ten-men rule, so that, after all, the new game has received a semi-endorsement. New York Sunday Mercury March 8, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitching delivery rule

Date Sunday, March 8, 1874
Text

...overhand throws in pitching are not to be allowed. The ball must be delivered with the arm swinging nearly perpendicularly to the side of the body. An underhand throw from the wrist is allowed. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury March 8, 1874

The pitcher is allowed to deliver the ball in any way, provided his arm swings perpendicularly to the side of his body; but if he swings his arm out sideways to throw or deliver the ball, except by the underhand throw, which the perpendicular swing admits of, he commits a “foul baulk,” and three such baulks forfeit the game. New York Clipper March 14, 1874

the ten man rule and tagging up on foul flies voted down; all other changes adopted; a vote of thanks to Chadwick

The only radical changes introduced were those recommending the ten-men rule and allowing a base-runner to make his base on a foul fly catch the same as on a fair fly. When the question came up on the adoption of these amendments, Mr. Alex. Davidson of the Mutual Club was the only man who saw the advantage of the new rule, and he accordingly voted for it. Both of these amendments were then defeated by a vote of six to one. With the exception of the two rules above referred to, all the suggestions presented in the new code were very generally approved and endorsed. Realizing the work that had been saved the delegates by the preparation of the new rules, by a unanimous vote the following resolution of thanks to Mr. Chadwick was adopted... New York Clipper March 14, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

attempts to eliminate fair-foul hits

Date Saturday, March 14, 1874
Text

It is a little singular that the delegates who worked all day, recently, in trying to improve the code of rules sent in for adoption by the Convention, should have spent so much time in trying to find out some way of putting a stop to the effects of “fair-foul” hitting, while they had in their own hands the most effectual remedy that can possibly be devised, viz., the addition of a tenth man to the field, which addition would enable the third-baseman to fully cover the open space now left available for the fair-foul style of hitting.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the mayor and governor members of the Athletic Club

Date Sunday, March 15, 1874
Text

[report of the monthly meeting of the Athletic Club] A large number of prominent and influential gentlemen were elected members, including Governor Hartranft, Mayor Stokley and the Presidents of Select and Common Councils of this city.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the championship pennant

Date Sunday, March 15, 1874
Text

The Bostons have received the championship flag awarded them by the Championship Committee of the Professional Association, and it is now on exhibition at their headquarters. It is a handsome affair, being thirty feet in length and ten feet wide at the end next to the pole. The flag has a broad white centre, with edges of red, and bears the following inscription in letters of blue: “Boston–1873-1874–Champions of the U.S.” This flag is the property of the Club, which they will fly the ensuing year, together with the silken whip-pennant, the property of the Association, of which they are the custodian.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the organization of the Baltimore club; sustained by the Houck brothers

Date Sunday, March 15, 1874
Text

A club is to be organized in Baltimore, but as yet material has not been engaged. Twenty-seven gentlemen have subscribed to a fund of $200 each to start the club, and it is proposed to engage good men and pay fair salaries, but to give none of the ridiculous presents of last year, which did so much to demoralize the Lord Baltimores. Mr. A. T. Houck, of the old Baltimore club, has been elected secretary, and Simmons, Brainerd, Holly and Belaski have been engaged, and negotiations are now being made with several other professionals. Mr. Houck thinks that by April 1 his nine will be ready. We are sincerely glad to hear that Baltimore will thus have a nine that will probably do her honor. Philadelphia Sunday Republic March 15, 1874

Despite the prognostications to the contrary, Baltimore will have a first-class “nine” this season, composed of a number of the most noted professionals. The enterprise of Messrs. A. T. Houck & Bro., proprietors of Newington Park, where so many base ball battles have been lost and won, should commend itself to all lovers of this manly game...

...

The Messrs. Houck exhibit a degree of nerve in essaying thus individually to sustain a base ball club in Baltimore. It is a piece of daring which has no precedent in the annals of the game in this city; but they say they have great faith in the co-operation of our citizens, for iti will only require subscriptions to the amount of two thousand dollars to secure the enterprise against any possibility of loss at the close of the season, and they have no doubts about the success they will meet with in this respect. Philadelphia All-Day City Item March 15, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

legal pitching delivery under the professional and amateur rules

Date Sunday, March 15, 1874
Text

The amateurs will hold a convention in New York some time this month, when it will be decided whether they will adopt the professional code of rules... At the December convention they resolved to re-adopt the old rule governing the delivery of the ball, so as to read as follows: Should the pitcher deliver the ball to the bat either by an underhand or overhand throw, or by a jerk, or by any form of a round-arm delivery, as in bowling in cricket, the umpire shall promptly call “foul balk.”...

The above materially differs from the rule of the newly adopted professional code, which is as follows:

Should the pitcher deliver the ball by an overhand throw, a “foul balk” shall be declared by the umpire. Any outward swing of the arm–as in round-arm bowling in cricket–or any other swing of the arm save that made with the arm swinging perpendicularly to the side of the body, shall be considered an overhand throw.

This rule admits of the style of underhand throwing indulged in by McBride, Matthews, Cummings, Spalding, etc., but it does not allow of the side throw which amateur players introduced last season. Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch March 15, 1874, quoting the Brooklyn Union.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Louisiana Club applies for membership in the N.A.

Date Sunday, March 15, 1874
Text

In the recent convention at Boston an application was received from the Louisiana club, of New Orleans, for admission to the list, but it was closed, and she could not at that time be received, but there will be no trouble in admitting the new constellation when the proper fee is sent on. They have a very good nine, made up from the Robert E. Lee and other clubs of that vicinity. We hardly approve of the admission of this club, as it is a repetition of the old system of co-operative clubs which have caused so much trouble during the past three seasons, and we will be glad to hear on that account of their failure to procure admission, while, had they a really first-class club, we would like to seem them as participants, as it has long been our wish to see the game extend in its professional ramifications all over the country.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Al Reach the Athletics manager

Date Sunday, March 15, 1874
Text

With Commodore James M. Ferguson as president, and Al Reach as manager of the Athletics, we predict a brilliant season for them.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Philadelphias’ pearl stockings

Date Sunday, March 22, 1874
Text

The uniform adopted [by the Philadelphias] will be similar to that worn last year, with the exception of light pearl stockings in place of the old white stockings.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

gymnasium practice

Date Sunday, March 22, 1874
Text

...the guns of our two professional clubs in this city devoted themselves to every morning, which, to them, is rather a new thing, for all the warning of the press in previous years have not sufficed to drive our men into this much-needed practice, and defeat has, therefore, been invited and came.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the status of players for a club

Date Sunday, March 22, 1874
Text

In the Philadelphia [Club] the “petting” system, which was so disastrous last year, has been abandoned, and now players are taught to know that they are but employees, and not the club itself.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a rejected proposal to play championship games in England

Date Sunday, March 22, 1874
Text

The proposition that the Boston and Athletic clubs play several of their championship games while in England will not be generally entertained. At first it was thought that it would add greatly to the interest of the game there, but a sober second thought convinces that such would not be the case. The English people would have no feeling in our championship matter, and will go to the games to see them as a matter of curiosity and as an American national amusement. Besides this the people in this country will be especially anxious to see these games, and they will be the most lucrative played. The holders of club tickets in this city and Boston have a right to see them, and hence they will be played in this country. The English games will be exhibitions. Philadelphia Sunday Republic March 22, 1874

Knickerbocker games closed to the public

The veteran Knickerbockers will open ball-tossing at their private inclosed ground, at Hoboken. This field on Tuesdays and Fridays is used by club members and invited guests, and public having no access to it. The club, however, are always glad to see their friends, but they do not propose to be annoyed by any outside crowds. New York Sunday Mercury March 29, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new Prospect Park parade ground fields

Date Sunday, March 29, 1874
Text

Regular organized amateur clubs, of Brooklyn, who are responsible for their members, should make application for an assignment to one or other of the ten regular ball-fields at the Parade Ground which are to be laid out this season. This season New York baseball parties will only have access to the Parade Ground when unoccupied by Brooklyn clubs. It is not the right thing that the City Park over the river should be occupied by out clubs when we have a park of our own.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the ten-men game in the country clubs

Date Sunday, March 29, 1874
Text

The ten-men game meets with great favor among the country clubs, and last week the Actives and Whitecaps of Rondout opened the season with a match-game under this new rule, the Actives winning in a ten-innings game of two hours duration.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

outfielders responsible to back up other fielders

Date Sunday, March 29, 1874
Text

...it has become the duty of the outfielders to “back up” more than was formerly deemed necessary, it now being regarded as very loose fielding for any outfielder to fail to be active in backing up the moment any ball goes outside the infield.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the “new styles” of twist pitching

Date Sunday, March 29, 1874
Text

We hear from Baltimore the following details of the game there: Asa Brainerd will be the regular pitcher, and intends, with hard practice, to put himself in something like his old form, and include also all the new styles of twist in his delivery.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a reduction in the Athletic ground

Date Sunday, March 29, 1874
Text

Master street has been cut through the Athletic grounds, taking off the slice back of the pavilions to the south side, and compelling, probably, the closing of the gate on that side.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the dimensions of the Hartford grounds

Date Sunday, April 5, 1874
Text

The ground of the Hartford Base Ball Club was staked out on Monday. The straightaway course from the striker’s position to the fence will be over 400 feet.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chadwick and the new balls and strikes and wides rule

Date Sunday, April 5, 1874
Text

[from a letter from “Old Atlantic” describing how Chadwick umpired the Atlantic practice game of 3/30/1874] Every ball which went beyond the reach of striker’s bat, or over his head, or too close to base to be struck at, he called “wide,” and one time he gave a man his base on three “wides” called in succession, and they were wide, too, beyond a doubt. In calling balls I noticed that when a ball was not “wide” but yet not over the base he did not call it, but simply counted it by passing a penny from one hand to the other until three such balls had been pitched when he would call “one ball;” then he would count two more that were similarly pitched–that is not “wide” but either not over the base or not at the height the striker called for–and when the next third ball was pitched he would call “two balls.” In the meantime, he called every wide ball as soon as delivered, he not counting “wides” among balls to count as called balls.

At one time he called two “wides,” and before another “wide” was called he called “two balls,” but before either a third “wide” ball was called or a third “ball,” the ball was hit fairly. All balls which hit the striker’s person he called “dead.” ... I noticed also that Chadwick did not call many strikes. He says that no strikes can now be called on a batsman unless he refuses to strike at a ball sent in over the home base and at the height called for. Philadelphia All-Day City Item April 5, 1874 [See also PSD 4/12/1874 below.]

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ten-men exhibition games

Date Sunday, April 5, 1874
Text

The subject of the proposed exhibition games to be played by the Athletic during the next few weeks is creating considerable talk among the more knowing in base ball circles, and its pros and cons are being discussed rather animatedly. There are two sides to the question, of course, and nothing but experience will enable us to learn whether this action will be beneficial or not. The lesson given the Philadelphia club on this score is one that would prompt an abolition of exhibition games; but the directors of the Athletic seem to think that it is good to give their men practice against professionals, ere entering upon work that counts in the championship records. They also think that the fact of games being played early in the spring, combined with the new plan of ten men and ten innings, will attract large audiences, and yet not detract from the size of succeeding audiences on championship games. On the other hand, however, it is contend, and, we must acknowledge, with great force, that the carelessness generally displayed over exhibition games will disgust many people with the game, and so initiate a littleness that will prevent many from taking that ardent interest that makes up and draws large audiences to the grounds, and also in addition to that, there is the liability of players becoming injured in such games, and the clubs thus being deprived of their services when actually needed. Then, again, by playing a man as right short, it confuses the first and second basemen and induced them in regular games to play too near their bases, and not cover ground enough. We believe that the experiment will be detrimental to the interest of the club, and it had better be abandoned while there is time.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

amenities at the Chicago park; seat backs; reserved seats

Date Sunday, April 5, 1874
Text

The arrangements made for the convenience of spectators at the ball grounds on Twenty-third street are of a kind which will be duly appreciated by those who attend ball matches. Upward of 1,300 comfortable seats are being placed in the grand stand, each seat having a back support for the weary ones. The old grand stand is being overhauled, and will be enlarged with an additional story. Adjourning the grand stand will be the stockholders' temple, with seats for 225 of the “higher order of fellers.” Chicago Sunday Times April 5, 1874

Season tickets for the new grand stand on the Base Ball Park will be fore sale next Saturday monring at the store of Kelley Bros., No. 88 Madison street. Only 288 seats will be sold, and they will be among the choicest on the stand. Chicago Daily Inter-Ocean April 17, 1874

Source ” Chicago Sunday Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitch delivery rules; called balls

Date Sunday, April 12, 1874
Text

...in regard to delivering the ball, and the new rules, while allowing an underhand throw, require that the arm in delivery must swing perpendicularly. Any side throw is a “foul ball” and three foul balls give the game as forfeited. The umpire is now obliged to call “wide ball” whenever the ball is sent in out of the batsman’s reach. And he must count–but not “call”–every ball that is not “wide” and yet not over the base or “high” or “low,” as called for as one of the class of balls to be called one ball for every third ball of the kind delivered. This new rule gives considerable latitude to the batsman, and puts a stop to a wild, unfair delivery of the ball by the pitcher.

The umpire now can only call strikes on the batsman when the latter refuses to strike at a ball sent in over the home base, and high or low as called for. He cannot, however, call strikes for refusing to strike at any other kind of ball.

...

Three wide balls in succession give a base, but no base can be given on called balls, until nine such balls have been delivered, not including wides; which are separate from called balls. New York Sunday Mercury April 12, 1874

A LEGITIMATE DELIVERY.–In regard to whether the ball is delivered to the bat by a legitimate delivery or not, the umpire must be guided by the relative positions of the wrist and hand when the ball leaves the pitcher’s hand. If his hand be not extended out sideways from his body while he is an upright position, the swing of the arm is a legitimate one. It does not matter what the angle of the arm from the elbow to the hand is, so long as the hand is not swung out from the body.

Any style of round-arm delivery is prohibited. The delivery must be by a nearly perpendicular swing of the arm, and this delivery admits of an underhand throw, or what is called a “wrist-throw.” Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch April 12, 1874

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

proto-umpire’s indicator

Date Sunday, April 12, 1874
Text

In counting balls unfairly delivered, the umpire should be furnished by the club with a counting tally, consisting of pieces of wood moving on a wire, like a billiard tally. It should be made small, so as to occupy but three or four inches in length. In calling wides and balls, he should designate each as “One wide,” “two wides,” “three wides–take a base;” or “one ball,” “two balls,” etc. Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch April 12, 1874 [see also PCI 4/5/1874 above.]

Source Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the batter’s box

Date Sunday, April 12, 1874
Text

The umpire must now see that the batsman, when striking at the ball, is standing within his new position, viz.: within a space of ground six feet long by three feet wide, located at one foot distant from the home base. Should the striker step outside of this position while striking at the ball the umpire must call “foul strike” and three such strikes puts the batsman out; and if by such a foul strike he hit the ball fair or foul, he shall be declared out.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a suggestion to extend the foul lines, remove the foul flags

Date Sunday, April 12, 1874
Text

We would suggest to friend Riffert, the new and energetic superintendent of the Athletic Ground, that the foul ball lines be extended to the fence at left and right fields, and thus do away altogether with the foul ball flags. By doing so, many fair hits, that otherwise are decided foul, might be seen by the umpire. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury April 12, 1874

...Superintendent Riffert, who we are pleased to see attending promptly to our suggestion in regard to extending the foul ball lines. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury April 19, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Fitzgerald has second thoughts about a Europe tour

Date Sunday, April 12, 1874
Text

We find a great many of the Athletic club–perhaps a large majority–are opposed to the trip to Europe. The argument runs in this way: The club is already in debt. Under the most favorable circumstances this debt cannot be paid before the time for starting. Now, shall we borrow money to send our servants to Europe on an experimental pleasure trip, which may result disastrously, especially when we need their services at home? Remember, the Athletic club is an incorporated body, and the President, the Vice Presidents, and the members are individually and collectively responsible for its obligations. The ten are the servants of the organization, and they are bound to obey every proper order. Therefore, if the club says to the players, you shall not go abroad this year, that ends all controversy and settles the matter finally.

For ourselves, having originally proposed the European trip, we are in favor of it, if it can be carried out profitably and honorably. But, the members say, the club must minister to our pleasure and pride. We subscribe to see the club play here, not in Europe. The trip will cut us out of two months of entertainment, when we are most in need of entertainment...

Let it be remembered that the players and the officers are the servants of the club, and are bound to do the bidding of the majority of the organization. Philadelphia All-Day City Item April 12, 1874

[a letter from “Good Sense”] Will you spare me a corner of your paper to ask the Athletics to pause? I am an amateur Base Ball player, and I have visited England (although I did not go professionally as Mr. Spaulding did). I am quite sure the visit will be a failure. They have no money to take them over, nor to make a success. They must not think that merely landing there will create an interest in a game that is unknown in the country. The show wants more working than a theatrical company. How are they going to do it? If I should get up a cricket match in a field next to their base ball grounds, I should have spectators while they have none!

If they are going to borrow money they will get into the hands of speculators, who will consider the most important part of the business, is the swallowing of the oyster, while the players will get the shells. Philadelphia All-Day City Item April 12, 1874

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

new rules prohibit interference by the batting side; coaches

Date Saturday, April 18, 1874
Text

The umpire shall require the players on the batting side who are not at the bat, nor running the bases, to keep at a distance of not less than fifty feet from the line of home and first base and home and third base, or farther off if the umpire so decides, except the captain and one assistant, such only to be permitted to approach the foul line not nearer than fifteen feet to coach the players running the bases...

The object of the rule is to prevent any such interference with the field side as used to be indulged in when the “in” side would crowd round the bases, and by their language and noise either intimidate or bother a base-player or fielder so that he could not really play his game.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no appeals on wides and strikes

Date Saturday, April 18, 1874
Text

“Legal appeals” do not include asking for judgment on wides or strikes, as the umpire has to go by the express rules in this respect, and he has no option but to obey them, or be dismissed as incompetent.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catcher’s gloves 2

Date Saturday, April 18, 1874
Text

[Hartford ten vs picked ten 4/8/1874] Scarcely a base-hit had been made off Fisher’s rippers. “Cherokee” going in to intimidate the field side with his speed. [Catcher Scott] Hastings faced the music well for a few innings, and then gave Tommy Barlow a chance. Tom put on his gloves and took them in quite naturally.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cummings’ poor hitting and fielding

Date Sunday, April 19, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Athletic 4/18/1874] It is a question whether Cummings’ pitching compensates for his want of ability as a batsman and player. He made three absurd muffs, and struck out twice. This sort of play will risk the success of every important game. The Athletics did not seem to have much trouble in hitting his balls, getting 13 clean hits, with a total of 16 bases. We fear Cummings is not in good condition this year. Would it not be well to give Bechtel (a superior player) a trial.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a slam of the City Item

Date Sunday, April 19, 1874
Text

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

placing pitches

Date Sunday, April 19, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Athletic 4/16/1874] We think the strictness of the new rules is against his [Cummings] method of pitching, as he cannot play his favorite trick of putting the ball just a little too near or too far out from the batsman, and to do it necessitates a foul being called.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

platforms outside the Athletic ground

Date Sunday, April 19, 1874
Text

The erection of large platforms in wagons outside of the fence of the Athletic grounds on the sidewalk is a violation of ordinance and should be prevented.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

using the old rules at the clubs’ request

Date Sunday, April 19, 1874
Text

[Atlantic vs. Powhattan 4/18/1874] Mr. Carey umpired the game, and on this occasion observed the new rules, calling wides and balls in correct order. He states that he should have umpired the game in Philadelphia [between the Philadelphia and Athletic 4/16/1874] the same way, but that McBride and Hicks wanted the old rule of calling balls to be observed, as their players were not yet posted in the new rules. New York Sunday Mercury April 19, 1874

[Philadelphia vs. Athletic 4/16/1874] Now in this instance, not only were the lines of the striker’s position not laid down, but it was mutually agreed upon to ignore the new rule by calling “wide balls.” If rules are violated solely by the umpire, his dismissal is the penalty inflicted; but no forfeit can be claimed for any failure of the umpire to discharge his duty. But no two clubs can mutually agree to ignore a single section of the code of rules without rendering the game they play under such circumstances null and void. We trust the Judiciary Committee will at once take action upon this matter, as it is important. New York Clipper April 25, 1874

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

groundskeeping; a safe field for sliding; foul lines extend through the outfield

Date Saturday, April 25, 1874
Text

The field of the Athletic Club never presented a neater appearance. In fact, it is now the best as regards its condition, of all fields outside of Brooklyn. The turf is smooth and level, and it is to be kept down by constant cutting; and the ground on the line of the bases and around the base-bags is soft and dry, so as to prevent injury in sliding in on the bases. The foul-lines, besides, extend the whole length of the field, thus enabling the umpire to decide correctly on long foul-balls.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

simultaneous games on the Capitoline Grounds

Date Sunday, April 26, 1874
Text

The novel sight of two match-games being played at the same time on an enclosed field was witnessed last Wednesday, on the Capitoline Grounds, Brooklyn, when the Atlantics and Mutuals played amateur nines, the former defeating the Washingtons by a score of 26 to 9, and the Mutuals beating the Powhattans to the tune of 38 to 1.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Tommy Barlow's tricky little bat

Date Sunday, April 26, 1874
Text

[Hartford vs. Yale 4/18/1874] “Tommy” and his tricky little bat, as usual, were noticeable features of the game. He struck five fair fouls, and made his base four times.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

playing under the old rules

Date Sunday, April 26, 1874
Text

A statement is made in the New York Clipper that Carey, the umpire of the Philadelphia-Athletic game, declares that prior to the game the captains of both nines requested him to umpire under the old rules, and that, if this is so, the game is null and void. We don't think it will amount to much, however, even if this be so, for every year we hear of a dozen alleged violations of the rules, which amount to naught.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new Baltimore uniform

Date Sunday, April 26, 1874
Text

The new uniform of the Baltimore club consists of white flannel shirts, with a letter B, in black, bordered with yellow, on the breast; white pants and caps, red stockings, and belts.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

using boards to mark the batter’s box; position of the batter

Date Saturday, May 2, 1874
Text

The Philadelphians referred to the decisions of the umpire in the Baltimore match [4/22/74 in Baltimore] and according to their account he must have queer notions in regard to interpreting the new rules. They stated that pieces of board were laid down on the ground to mark the striker’s position. This is not right. The lines of the positions on the field–pitcher’s and striker’s–should be laid down in chalk lines, or some other white substance. The striker is at perfect liberty to stand anywhere within the six-feet-by-three space of his position, no matter whether he stands across the base-line running through its center or not.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Boston club practicing cricket

Date Saturday, May 2, 1874
Text

In the afternoon, members of the Boston nine assembled at the gymnasium of the Young Men’s Christian Association, of which they are all members, and Schaffer and White practiced defending a wicket against Harry Wright’s bowling, a soft rubber ball being used. O’Rourke and Leonard have developed excellent bowling powers since practicing at the gymnasium, and Spalding is rapidly becoming a good cricketer. They are all splendid fielders ,and will soon be able to defend their stumps well.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a composite bat; the cost of broken bats

Date Saturday, May 2, 1874
Text

While at Geo. Wright’s store, I was shown a new baseball bat. It is a rather expensive bat as regards first cost, as the price is $4; but, as it is alleged that it will last a season without breaking, it is cheap. It is made with a cane fitted through the whole length of the bat, which makes it proof against breaking from hitting a ball with it. And the cane imparts an elasticity to the bat, which is a great aid in batting. The bat weights a little over two pounds only.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cammeyer managing the Mutuals

Date Saturday, May 2, 1874
Text

[Montague vs. Mutual 4/21/1874] Manager Cammeyer was on hand to see how his men worked together, but, unluckily, they did not show up to special advantage.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ten cents admission to the Capitoline Grounds

Date Saturday, May 2, 1874
Text

[Mutual vs. Powhatan 4/22/1874] The weather being mild and some good play being anticipated, there was a numerous gather of spectators, especially as the admission to the Capitoline fields on match days is only ten cents this season.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chadwick’s theory that hard hitting reduces power

Date Saturday, May 2, 1874
Text

[Powhatan vs. Mutual 4/22/1874] Like most other amateurs they take heavy bats and strike with full force at swift pitching; and hence either strike under the ball or hit it with such force that they really deaden the blow. Swift pitching needs to be faced with a light bat, and a quick but not heavy stroke. Many are surprised to see how far some boys can hit a swiftly-pitched ball, the cause simply being that they have not the strength to hit it with such force as to deaden the reaction of the blow.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a balk called for a sidearm delivery

Date Saturday, May 2, 1874
Text

[Powhatan vs. Mutual 4/22/1874] [Hartman of the Powhattan] having a a “foul balk” called on him for delivering the ball by a side-throw. New York Clipper May 2, 1874 [Note: Chadwick was the umpire.]

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Massachusetts amateurs playing for gate money

Date Sunday, May 3, 1874
Text

By the laws of the Massachusetts Amateur Association the amateur clubs of that State can play for gate-money, and share the proceeds. Wherein this differs from regular professional play, we are at a loss to conceive.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Baltimore team “inexpensive”

Date Sunday, May 3, 1874
Text

Those in Baltimore who patronize the game are well satisfied with their working team, which, while it is inexpensive, is strong enough to play excellent games with the professionals of higher grade, and keep alive the interest in that city until the season of 1875, when a nine of increased strength will be placed in the field.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the pitcher positions the catcher

Date Sunday, May 3, 1874
Text

We are sorry to notice that McBride persists in the “ignorant” practice of calling the catcher up under the bat, when two strikes have been made, and there is nobody on the base. A little reflection would show him the absurdity of this notion. However, he was ever wrong-headed and stubborn in this particular.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the umpire confused about the new balls and wides rule; appealing to the reporters

Date Sunday, May 3, 1874
Text

[Baltimore vs. Athletic 5/2/1874] ...the Umpire got rather “mixed” in regard to the rules regulating “wides” and “called balls.” Mr. Fulmer called “1 ball” on the second pitch, “2 balls” on the fourth, and “3 balls” on the sixth, and ordered the batter (Ryan) to take his base.

The rule in regard to “called balls” is as follows:

Sec. 6. –All balls delivered to the bat which are not designated as “wide” balls, and yet are not sent over the home base, or at the height from the ground called for by the batsman, shall be called in the order of every third ball thus unfairly delivered, and when three such balls, etc.

It will be thus seen that Mr. Fulmer did not properly understand the rule, which plainly says that only every third ball can be called. This error led to confusion, and the “box” of the press reps was appealed to so often by players and audience that a miniature Babel ensued. Mr. Fulmer, however, acknowledged his error by calling Ryan back, and the excitement subsided.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the umpire confused about balls hitting the batter being dead

Date Sunday, May 3, 1874
Text

[Baltimore vs. Athletic 5/2/1874] The only noticeable point was Mr. Fulmer’s error in forgetting the rule in regard to dead-balls. This rule says: “All balls delivered to the bat which shall either touch the striker’s bat, without being struck it, hit the batsman’s person, * * * * shall be considered dead balls,” etc. Mr. Fulmer insisted on “calling” these deceased balls!

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a triple reversed on a foul strike

Date Sunday, May 3, 1874
Text

[Baltimore vs. Athletic 5/2/1874] Gedney made a tremendous hit between centre and left, (a 3d baser) on which Clapp ran home [from first], but as Gedney did not run, it became evident that “something” was wrong, and this something proved that Snyder (the catcher,) had called for judgment on Gedney’s “position” when he struck, and Fulmer [umpire] decided the strike “foul,” as the striker had violated the rule in stepping outside the “line.” This decision caused great excitement, and for a while it looked as if Fulmer would be asked to “quit.” McBride ran forward in a heated manner, and ordered Gedney to run, while the other players crowded around excitedly, and the audience made all sorts of remarks, some to the effect that Fulmer was trying to “throw the game away for the Athletics.” As the audience were unprepared for this decision, it presented Fulmer in an ugly light, (indeed a very ugly light,) but, as we happened to see that Gedney did step forward, as Snyder asserted, the fairness of the decision was beyond question. The remarks from the audience were shamefully rule and vulgar, while we regret to say that some of the gentlemen in the reporters’ box joined in the row in a manner at once unnecessary and improper. After the excitement and discussion had abated, Clapp returned to 1st base, and Gedney to the bat, but bitter remarks were constantly blurted out during the rest of the inning, “order” being needed in the Athletic pavilion.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Hadel of the Baltimore goes into theater management

Date Sunday, May 3, 1874
Text

Mr. Charles A. Hadel, who is well-known by his connection with the Baltimore club, has become one of the proprietors of McDonough’s & Earnshaw’s Royal Marionettes, and will hereafter devote his time traveling with and making still more interesting this entertaining exhibition. Mr. Hadel is one of the few gentlement who have endeavored, by careful and correct scoring, to improve and elaborate base-ball. His score-sheets are marvels of ingenuity and completeness. In his new enterprise we wish Mr. Hadel every success. He has shown such talent and enterprise in base-ball matters, that he cannot fail to succeed in anything he undertakes.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no preseason practice for the Mutuals

Date Saturday, May 9, 1874
Text

[Mutual vs. Hartford 5/1/1874] The two nines entered the field on rather unequal terms, inasmuch as the Hartfords had played several practice matches, and had benefitted from gymnastic training... And the [Mutuals] had had neither practice on the field–of any account–and no training whatever.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the batter can be put out on a foul strike

Date Sunday, May 17, 1874
Text

A decision was rendered in the Mutual and Boston match of May 2 which calls for special comment. The was this: Nelson, who was at the bat, had made one strike without hitting the ball; another strike had been called on him, when, in making a third strike–again missing the ball–he stepped outside his position–six feet by three, and one foot distant from the base–whereupon the umpire called “Foul strike,” in accordance with Section 3 of Rule V. A question was then raised as to whether Nelson was out on the third strike, as referred to in Section 14 of the same rule, the umpire deciding him out, and then not out.

The intention of the rule of “Foul Strikes” was to prohibit the batsman from either running in to meet the ball, and thereby gaining one advantage, or, by standing too far bak, to gain another. The penalty consists of his being decided out on three such foul strikes–that is, supposing he should not offer the fielders any other chance to put him out. Should he do so, however, he must be decided out, according. Thus, if the ball be hit on such a foul strike, and caught, fair or oful, he is out; also, if he strike at it, and fail to hit it on such “foul strike,” and it happens to be the third strike called–as in Nelson’s case–he should be decided out. That is the spirit of the rule, and its letter does not say to the contrary, though a correction in the wording is needed. At any rate, as it is, the case is one of those which the umpire is at liberty to decided by his right as sole judge of fair and unfair play; and fair play undoubtedly would decide the striker out on the third called strike. New York clipper May 16, 1874

the ideology of low scores and fielding

The chance of seeing a fine fielding game, marked by a small score, is the great incentive to the gathering of paying crowds at professional games this season, heavy batting games with large scores no longer being tolerated by the best judges of the game.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

retouching first base after overrunning it

Date Sunday, May 17, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Atlantic 5/11/1874] ...a decision of the umpire in regard to overrunning first base prevented the Atlantics from adding a run to their score, Burdock deciding that Dehlman had to come back and retouch the first base after overrunning it. The rule has not required this for the past two years. The rule is as follows:

“The player running to first base shall be privileged to overrun said base without his being put out for being off the base after first touching it–provided that in so overrunning the base he make no attempt to run to second base; but if, in so overrunning first base, he also attempts to run to second base, he shall forfeit such exemption from being put out. After overrunning such base, the base-runner must return and retouch such base at once, and after retouching he can be put out as at any other base.”

The clause referring to returning to touch the base is simply inserted to require the base runner to come back at once to the base, otherwise he might take an unfair advantage. Of course, if he does not choose to return at once and retouch the base he forfeits exemption from being put out when off the base. The first part of the rule governs its interpretation, and the penalty of a failure to observe it is simply a forfeiture of exemption from being put out after overrunning. Any other interpretation would make the rule an absurd one.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

confusion over wides and called balls

Date Sunday, May 17, 1874
Text

It is really surprising to see players who are paid for the performance of special duties as umpires now are so incompetent to perform such duties. They either will not study the rules from the official book, or they lack the sense to comprehend them. In the interpretation of the rule of calling wides, and in the face of the plain wording of the section, two umpires last week called every ball a wide that was not over the base or where the striker called for it; moreover, they counted wides as balls, and instead of calling every third such ball they called balls on one. The rule of wide balls actually prohibits the calling of wide on any ball that is within fair reach of the bat, and it only allows of the calling of wides on balls which are out of possible reach of the batsman while he stands within the lines of his position. Thus every ball which touches the ground in front of the home base must be called a “wide.” Also every ball sent in over the batsman’s head that is out of reach. Also every ball sent in on the side opposite tot hat he bats from. Also all balls which are sent in over the striker’s position. All these, and none other, are wide balls, and any umpire who calls wides on balls which should only be counted as “balls,” is required by the rules to be promptly dismissed from his position unpaid. New York Sunday Mercury May 17, 1874

[Mutual vs. Athletic 6/5/1874] York’s umpiring was impartial, but, it is evident, this handsome young gentleman has not read the rules carefully. He falls into Clapp’s error of calling “1 ball” on the second pitch; the rule says it cannot be called until the third pitch. Perhaps Mr. York thinks “a wide” and “a ball” mean the same thing? We imagine this is so, as he gave McGeary a base on one ball and two wides! This is a new interpretation, and it is hardly according to the rules. We hope Mr. York will be more careful in the future. Philadelphia All-Day City Item June 7, 1874

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Chicago ground

Date Sunday, May 17, 1874
Text

In the afternoon they [the Athletics] drove out to the ground, which is pleasantly located on the outskirts of the city, and will comfortably seat near four thousand persons. The ground is laid out running from north to south and is remarkably good in the in-field, and the out-field will soon be in a similar condition.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The City Item’s reporter on the England tour

Date Sunday, May 17, 1874
Text

To-morrow our special correspondent, Mr. James Kelly, sails from New York to England. Mr. Kelly will be present at the various base ball and cricket matches that are to be played in England by the Athletic and Boston clubs, and being an amiable gentleman and experienced correspondent, he will report them well for The All-Day City Item.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a late question about tagging up

Date Sunday, May 17, 1874
Text

Will you please answer the following query in the column devoted to the National Game? There was a player on third base trying to get home, and a strong batter at the bat; the batter knocked a very high ball down to the centre fielder, who caught the ball, putting the batter out. The man on third ran in, and touched the home plate before the ball was caught. Was he out? The Umpire decided he was. There had been one player out before this ball was knocked, and the centre fielder threw the ball to third base, claiming a double play. By answering whether the runner was out or not, you will oblige Yours, &c., AN AMATEUR

[Answer:] The runner was out; Sec. 11, of Rule 6th, says...

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

coaching on the bases

Date Sunday, May 17, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs. Chicago 5/16/1874] It was observed that the Athletic players acted with much more caution than in the previous game, while the coaching on bases was much better.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

bunts; early uses of “bunt”

Date Sunday, May 10, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs. Hartford 5/5/1874] Barlow, the first batter on behalf of the Hartfords, poked one in front of the home plate, and Clapp [catcher], fielding the ball to first base, struck the runner in the back... Philadelphia Sunday Mercury May 10, 1874

[Athletic vs. Chicago 5/13/1874] McMullin poked the ball down to his feet and earned his base. McGeary endeavored to do the same, and would have suffered an out if he had not, either purposely or accidentally, hit the ball as it bounded with his knee, thus knocking it far beyond the reach of Malone [catcher]. Philadelphia Sunday Republic May 17, 1874

[Philadelphia vs. Chicago 7/18/1874] Craver, after bunting the ball in front of the plate and reaching his base in safety, allowed himself to be caught napping by the ever-watchful Zettlein. Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch July 26, 1874, quoting an unidentified Chicago newspaper

[Baltimore vs. Chicago 8/26/1874] Meyerle made a fair foul bunt and took first. Chicago Inter-Ocean August 27, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

runners take a lead; a pick off

Date Sunday, May 17, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs. Chicago 5/13/1874] [bases loaded] Anson, the terrible hitter, was the next man at the bat, and as only one man was out, it was big odds the Athletic would get that run. The Iowa boy nerved himself for a heavy hit, and the men on the bases played out well so as to have a good start. Noticing this, Malone [catcher] sent the ball as quick as flash to Levi [Meyerle, third baseman], and before McMullin could possibly get back to third, he had been touched and the umpire beckoned him off the bag.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

preparing for the England tour

Date Monday, May 18, 1874
Text

On Thursday Athletics and Bostons will play the Germantown or Young America C.C. a cricket match if it can be arranged. Mr. Ferguson will try and [arrange] it tomorrow. Several of us were on board the Steamer Illinois this morning. The State rooms looked very comfortable. Plenty of room to exercise on deck–when you feel like it. We have done nothing in regard to selection of state rooms, but will Wednesday. We have on [sic] side of the vessel they have the other. [from a letter from Harry Wright to Frederick Long written in Philadelphia May 18, 1874]

Source From a letter from Harry Wright to Frederick Long written in Philadelphia
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

live and dead balls

Date Saturday, May 23, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Atlantic 5/15/1874] The champions presented the same nine as in the game of Thursday, but a non-elastic ball was used, and they showed a marked improvement in fielding. The rules cannot govern this point of dead and lively balls more than they do. Both are made with the same materials, viz., one ounce of moulded rubber, covered with woolen yarn, and a leather out covering; but a dead ball is not would so tightly as a lively one, and poor fielding nines generally prefer lively balls.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a sharply hit fair-foul

Date Saturday, May 23, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Mutual 5/14/1874] Carey opened on the Mutual side with one of his pretty sharply-hit fair-fouls, on which, by Schafer’s [third baseman] easy style of field, he reached his second.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire not calling balls or strikes 3

Date Sunday, May 24, 1874
Text

[Flyaway vs. Rose Hill 5/19/1874] [The umpire] called balls very irregularly, allowed ball after ball sent in over the base to go by without strikes being called, and allowed over fifty wide balls, out of possible reach of the bat, from being called either balls or wides, thus giving great latitude to wild pitching and making the game long. New York Sunday Mercury May 24, 1874 [time of game: 2:40]

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

too many balls called in an at bat

Date Sunday, May 24, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Athletic 5/20/1874] George Wright...had been presented by the umpire [William White of the Baltimore Club] with a base on “called balls” illegally, as not over nine balls had been pitched to him, and on one of them a strike had been called.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the price of a seat at the Athletic grounds

Date Sunday, May 24, 1874
Text

The price for entrance and a seat is fixed at $1.50. An overcharged and outraged public will take notice. Thus, a game of Base Ball requires an afternoon, 50 cents admission, $1.50 for a seat, two fares out and two in!

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Barlow hits a line drive

Date Sunday, May 24, 1874
Text

[Hartford vs. Athletic 5/23/1874] ...Barlow sent a liner to centre that earned one base...

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Tommy Bond's underhand throw

Date Sunday, May 24, 1874
Text

[Atlantic vs. Boston 5/22/1874] The truth of the matter was that Bond's pitching, which, by the way, was an underhand throw of the most palpable kind, proved most difficult to bat with any degree of success.

Source Chicago Sunday Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Barlow’s blocking hit

Date Saturday, May 30, 1874
Text

[Hartford vs. Philadelphia 5/21/1874] Barlow, the first striker for the Hartfords, also made a run after getting first by “blocking” a ball in front of the plate, and then being sent in by Pike’s good hit to right.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

getting to third on a walk

Date Saturday, May 30, 1874
Text

[Hartford vs. Philadelphia 5/21/1874] Stearns scored the tying run for the Hartfords, after getting to third on three wides–the last ball rolling behind the Philadelphia’s pavilion.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Mathews’s speedy curves; striking out the side

Date Sunday, May 31, 1874
Text

[Mutual vs. Atlantic 5/30/1874] Farrow was the first to face Mathews; and, after having two strikes called on him–Bob sending them in very accurately–he retired on the next strike. Bond was next, and good bat as he is, he succumbed to Mathews’s curves, as did Dehlman... Three of the Atlantics striking out was a rather singular beginning... New York Sunday Mercury May 31, 1874

[Mutual vs. Atlantic 5/30/1874] Bobby Matthews [put] in his bothering “curves” with great speed. This was rather a surprise–as it was a novelty to see three Atlantics strike out in succession; but Matthews was “on his pitch” in this game, if he never was before. New York Clipper June 6, 1874

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Knickerbockers plan a trip

Date Sunday, May 31, 1874
Text

On the 5th of June this club [the Knickerbocker] take the 8 A.M. train for New Haven, to play the Yales. Some of the players will take the 11 P.M. boat the night before. They will have a good time, and a hearty welcome from Yale. New York Sunday Mercury May 31, 1874 [see NYSM 6/7/1874 for results: game played 6/6/1874, Yale won 9-5; also NYC 6/13/1874]

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a ball goes under the fence

Date Sunday, May 31, 1874
Text

[Hartford vs. Chicago 5/30/1874] Shaffer followed him with a hit to right, which under ordinary circumstances would not have yielded more than two bases. The ball got lost under the fence, however, and as there was no apparent error on the part of the fielder the striker must be credited with a home run.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an attempt to use a non-regulation ball

Date Sunday, May 31, 1874
Text

[Hartford vs. Chicago 5/30/1874] Capt. Pike, of the Hartfords, had provided two balls, neither of which were marked as the rules provide, and manager Young refused to accept of them. Pike said he would play with no other, although Mr. Young had in hand two balls properly stamped. When Mr. Young heard that Pike would play with no other ball than one of those presented, he said; “Mr. Pike, unless you at once agree to play with a ball properly marked, I will order the gates closed, and I will announce that no game is to be played.” Thus threatened, Pike gave way, and the game commenced...

Source Chicago Sunday Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a difficult foul bound catch by the catcher

Date Monday, June 1, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs. Baltimore 5/30/1874] The first striker went out on a brilliant one-hand foul bound catch, taken on the run by Snyder [catcher], and which brought down the house.

Source Baltimore American
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

confusion over a substitute runner leads to a protested game

Date Thursday, June 4, 1874
Text

The Athletic Club intend claiming the game which was won by the Baltimore on the Newington Grounds on Saturday last. Their complaint is that the Baltimores violated section 15 of rule VI, in the fourth inning, when Snyder, after striking the ball, ran the bases himself although a substitute was ready to run for him. The only portion of the rule which could possibly apply to their case is that “The substitute shall be the player running the bases.” The Athletics, unfortunately for their claim, did not discover that Snyder was running for himself until he had reached the third base and sent two men home. Then the ball was put to the first base, and the striker might then have been properly decided out under their construction of the rule, but still two men had scored before the third hand was out, and their claim amounts to nothing so far as it could affect the result of the game, Snyder being left on third base and not making his run. Baltimore American June 4, 1874

[Athletic vs. Baltimore 5/30/1874] The Athletics claim the game by one run, and will, we are told, appeal to the Judiciary Committee in consequence of the decision... that gave the Baltimores two more runs than they were, it is alleged, entitled to. Snyder, while at the bat in the fourth inning, asked for a substitute to run the bases for him, saying that he was lame, and McBride consented that Manning should run; therefore, according to Section 15 of Rule VI, Manning was the player running the bases. Snyder made a good hit, and, forgetting that he had feigned lameness, ran himself; Manning, the substitute, only running halfway to first base, and then finding he was outrun, he retired. McBride, immediately on receiving the ball from the outfield, fielded it to first base and asked judgment on Manning’s out at that point; but the umpire decided “not out;” and as this hit of Snyder’s brought home two men, those two runs would not have been counted had Manning been decided out at first base, as the Athletics claim he should have been ; Section 7 of Rule VI covering this point explicitly by saying: “and if the third player is put out before reaching the first base, the run shall not be scored.” Snyder, having obtained a substitute to run for him forfeited all claims to consideration, and therefore the Athletics feel justified in taking advantage of this point. New York Clipper June 6, 1874. See also PSM 5/31/1874

Mr. Martin, the umpire in the Baltimore-Athletic game of the 30th ult., states that he was ignorant of that section of Rule VI which says that “the substitute shall be the player running the bases,” and says he would have reversed his decision had known of its existence. He will appear before the Judiciary Committee when the case comes up, which will be soon, and then reverse his decision. No game can be forfeited by the failure of the umpire to discharge his duties. New York Clipper June 20, citing the Philadelphia Mercury

Source Baltimore American
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

gate receipts in St. Louis

Date Saturday, June 6, 1874
Text

The players all returned from St. Louis this morning in good health and spirits. Not feeling very well on Thursday night I did not go. The boys speak very well of their reception, but there was not much of a crowd on either day to see them play. The 60% gross did not amount to $300– but they made up the deficiency. [letter from Harry Wright writing from Chicago to Frederick Long dated June 6, 1874]

Source Letter from Harry Wright writing from Chicago to Frederick Long
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a prospect for two professional clubs in Chicago; enthusiasm in C hicago

Date Saturday, June 6, 1874
Text

Next season there will be two professional clubs in this city. This is a great B.B. city and no mistake. They all have it on the brain very heavy. All the reserved seats are sold for this afternoon’s game–over 800. [letter from Harry Wright writing from Chicago to Frederick Long dated June 6, 1874]

Source Letter from Harry Wright writing from Chicago to Frederick Long
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ruffians running the Philadelphia Club

Date Sunday, June 7, 1874
Text

How’s This?–A Philadelphia paper of June 5, in commenting on the Philadelphia and Mutual match assemblage, says that in Philadelphia baseball among the professionals “is now in the hands of low-browed ruffians–at least it is largely controlled by them–and the respectable element of the city holds aloof. The interest in the game has not decreased in the least; on the contrary it has shown steady increase; but the respectable part of the community decline to appear in the presence of the blackguards.

“These remarks apply particularly to the Philadelphia Club. The management of the Athletics is feeble enough, but it is not as coarse, as vulgar, as profane, as ribald, as shocking, as that of the Philadelphias. How can a father who loves his child permit him to go to the matches of the Philadelphia Club? How can he permit him to go within hearing or sight of the Philadelphia pavilion, where curses are heard every minute, and where gambling is as open as day?”

We heard nothing of this kind when we saw the Athletics and Philadelphias play their first match. Surely things must have changed. We have nothing of that kind of conduct here on our professional grounds.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

double play on a foul tip bound

Date Sunday, June 7, 1874
Text

[Mutual vs. Philadelphia 6/4/1874] Mack and Cummings, of the Philadelphias, made clean hits; the latter, however, being “doubled up” while running on a tip-bound neatly captured by Higham [catcher].

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catcher blocking the plate 2

Date Sunday, June 7, 1874
Text

[Mutual vs. Athletic 6/5/1874] ...Gedney was decided out by the umpire at the home base on Hatfield’s throw, the decision being an erroneous one, as Higham [catcher] purposely prevented the base runner from reaching the plate.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

anyone can field; batting is the key

Date Sunday, June 7, 1874
Text

...[the Chicago] nine is practiced chiefly in fielding, when they need practice at the bat, it being a well recognized maxim of the game that anybody can field reasonably well, but that batting is what wins the games. … Let the members of the nine practice at the bat to the exclusion of fielding, when they practice at all, and they may yet rank well; but let them continue their present course of training, and at the end of the season they will drop to a position very low in the scale.

Source Chicago Daily Inter-Ocean
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the catcher too far back to field a bunt

Date Saturday, June 13, 1874
Text

[Hartford vs. Mutual 6/6/1874] Barlow now took the bat in hand, and, in his peculiar style, allowed the ball to drop from the bat just in front of him, and in such a way that it was almost impossible for the pitcher–the catcher was way back–to throw the ball to the first baseman without striking the base-runner, as he did, Barlow thereby earning his base.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

confusion for foul-strike rule

Date Saturday, June 13, 1874
Text

[Hartford vs. Mutual 6/6/1874] ...Barlow had started, after hitting a called “foul-strike,” and though he stopped half way between the base, and the fielder had the ball in his hand and oculd have readily passed it to Start in time, when Barlow stopped, no one seemed to know that a chance was offered to put the hitter of the foul-strike out. When the batsman steps out of his ground to hit at a ball, and thereby makes a foul strike, if the ball be not hit, he must make three such strikes before he can be given out; but if the ball be hit, and a chance to given thereby to put the striker–but not a base-runner–out on such foul-strike, he can be put out, just as Barlow could have been in this instance.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chadwick refuses to umpire; reporter of the the Herald

Date Saturday, June 13, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Mutual 6/2/1874] The game did not commence at the usual hour because the two clubs could not agree upon an umpire, every man each proposed being refused by the other. As a dernier resort they went for the reporters and solicited Mr. Chadwick to act, “Barkis being willin’” on both sides; but Mr. C. positively declined, on the ground of alleged incompetency to act in the position except in practice games, he being too nervous a man for an umpire. Finally they induced Mr. Carpenter of The Herald to act, and at 3:50 P.M. “Play” was called...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

explaining the rules to the umpire

Date Saturday, June 13, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Mutual 6/2/1874] ...the umpire–who had been calling balls in violation of the regular rules–gave Eggler his base on three called balls, although but six balls had been pitched, and two of them were wide. Time was called by Carey, and he came in and explained the fact that no man could be given his base on called balls u n less nine such balls as those referred to in the section had been delivered. The umpire then reversed his decision, and Eggler came back to strike. The next ball being wide, he then had his base properly given him on “wides.

Source ” New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

“Boss” Cammeyer

Date Saturday, June 13, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Mutual 6/13/1874] ...at 4 P.M. Harry and Cammeyer tossed for the inning, the “Boss” winning and sending the Reds to the bat.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cummings’ swift and slow curves

Date Sunday, June 14, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Philadelphia 6/11/1874] Cummings again had theory knocked out of him, and the shrewd batsmen of the Boston ine took every advantage of his slow balls, which lose most of the curve imparted to his swift puzzlers. His system is simply an imitation of Spalding’s, and, while that pitcher makes an improvement by changing pace, Cummings invariably loses on it. We are surprised he does not see this himself, as it is remarked by almost every professional player in the country. If he were to make an analysis of his pitching, as we have done for many games, he would discover that nine-tenths of the base hits made from him are from his medium-paced balls.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

keeping the reporters’ stand clear of outsiders

Date Sunday, June 14, 1874
Text

On the afternoons of Monday and Wednesday last the place set aside for the especial convenience of reporters was overcrowded with those who had not a particle of right to use it. In New York the strictest surveillance is used in this particular, and those who had work to do are not constantly annoyed by the noisily-expressed opinions of those about them. We were, therefore, gratified on Thursday to find that the Philadelphia directors had placed an officer at this post to protect “ye scribes,” and he was shrewd enough to keep out those who “would blandish sweetly.” Consequence–General joy and congratulations among the ink-throwers.

Source ~
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Athletic Club finances

Date Sunday, June 14, 1874
Text

[report on the monthly meeting] The Directors reported that the receipts for the five months past of the present year were $12,601.13 and the expenditures $10,461.50, leaving a balance on the 1 st of June of $2,139.63. The Athletics have paid 25 per cent of the expenses of the European trip, and yet show an increase of over three thousand dollars over the receipts for the corresponding five months of last year.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the umpire admits ignorance of the rules

Date Sunday, June 14, 1874
Text

Mr. Martin, the umpire in the Baltimore-Athletic game of the 30 th ult., states that he was ignorant of that section of rule VI, which says that “the substitute shall be the player running the bases,” and says he would have reversed his decision had he known of its existence. He will appear before the Judiciary Committee when the case comes up, which it soon will, and then reverse his decision.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitch count, pitches called balls and strikes

Date Sunday, June 14, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Athletic 6/8/1874] As a matter of comparison, it may be found interesting to know that during the game McBride pitched 151 balls; of these 102 were “fair” balls, 27 were “foul,” 18 “wide,” and four “called.”Cummings pitched 178 balls; 132 were fair, 23 foul, 19 wide, and 4 called.The Philadelphia batters had 5 strikes “called” on them, and made 12 strikes (failures to hit the ball,) while the Athletics had 13(!) called strikes, and 15 strikes–this analysis showing that the Philadelphias batted with the most freedom and certainty.Philadelphia All-Day City Item June 14, 1874 [Note: per the box score the Philadelphias got 6 hits, the Athletics 16; 1 Philadelphia batter struck out, 2 Athletics; 1 each took first on wides, no bases on balls; Phillies had 3 batters got on base on errors, the A’s 8; Phillies left 4 runners on base, A’s 10.]

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scientific batting

Date Sunday, June 14, 1874
Text

Our players are beginning to appreciate the necessity and importance of . What can be more absurd than to see two or three men left on the bases, or even one at third, merely for want of a knowledge as to how and where the hit the ball? How it makes us laught to watch a big athlete step up to the plate, whack away with strength enough to fell an ox, and pop up an easy fly for the outfielder. How much more sensible to combine judgment with strength–to hit just hard enough to put the ball in a safe place! As nearly all our players have yet to the science of batting, a few “point” that have come under our constant observation may be found useful:

It is an error to try to hit with all your might; this prevents your hit from having any certainty whatever.

The safest hit is a sharp grounder to right field, just far enough from the 1st baseman to prevent his fielding the ball. This is an easy hit if the batter is sharp, and specially valuable when two or three men are on the bases; he should stand well forward toward the direction the ball is intended to take, and avoid getting too close to the plate; call for a waist high ball, and hit down on it, instead of making the usual round swing with the bat.

Another useful hit is what we would call the “square” hit: The batter stands close to the plate, calls for a low ball, and hits the ball (as far as his bat will reach,) in front of the plate. In this hit, everything depends on meeting the ball as far in front of the plate as possible. If the ball is a grounder, the pitcher will not attempt to make a stop, while the short and second will not have time to cover it.

A very useful–though hazardous–hit is what is known as the “fair-foul.” This hit is made on low balls, delivered close to the batter. All the best batters makes the same mistake on this hit; they acknowledge that it is most surely made on a low, close ball, yet they fail to take advantage of opportunities to get such a ball, preferring to trust to a chance delivery by the pitcher. This his is easy, if properly “played;” stand as close as possible to the plate; hold the bat well forward, and push down, rather than hit, at the first low ball that comes, inclining bat and body toward 3rd base. While not one of the most certain, this is one of the most effective hits, and particularly serviceable when there is a runner on 1st. McGeary is a bright exponent of this hit, and it is also successfully made by McMullin, Barlow, Fisler, Pearce, Hatfield, and others.

We hope soon to be able to see a game with some show on this much neglected respect. Although the exception now, is destined to become imperative and universal.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

forgetting there is a courtesy runner, and running on the hit

Date Sunday, June 14, 1874
Text

The last game lost by the Athletic to the Baltimore will be decided in favor of the former on the point raised by Manning's running for Snyder. The latter made a good hit and Manning, who had been selected as substitute for him, started for first, but Snyder, encouraged by the hit, ran himself, and passed Manning. The ball was fielded in, and as Manning had slacked up he was touched. The umpire decided it not out, but since then the rules have been shown him bearing on substitutes, and he says that had he known of such rules he would have decided Snyder out. The Baltimore club does not dispute this, and the umpire has signed a paper stating his mistake, and the facts will be laid before the judiciary committee, who will decide the two runs made on the hit as null and void, and give the game to the Athletic, or else order the game to be played over.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early use of “coacher”

Date Saturday, June 20, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs Mutual 6/12/1874] The umpire allowed too many players to act as “coachers.” The rules prohibit any but the captain and one assistant from acting as coachers. In this game, however, Anson made himself prominent, and kept too near the base-lines, as did others of the nine. This, umpires should stop.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

coach interference with a batted ball

Date Saturday, June 20, 1874
Text

[Mutual vs. Baltimore 6/9/1874] In the sixth inning it was thought the game would be brought to an abrupt termination. Burdock was at the bat, with Hatfield on second base. Burdock hit outside of third base, where Carey was standing for the purpose of working his men, and he, thinking the ball a foul one, struck it with his right hand. Burdock after striking the ball went to first base, and before Ryan of the home club could secure the ball Hatfield reached the home plate. Warren of the Baltimore Club objected to the run of Burdock and Hatfield, on the ground that the ball, having struck Carey, became a dead ball, and consequently neither Burdock nor Hatfield had the right to score. Higham of the Mutuals became greatly excited, and claimed that if Hatfield was deprived of his run the Mutuals would withdraw from the game. The umpire finally decided that the ball which struck Carey was a dead one, and ordered Burdock back to the plate and Hatfield to second base. New York Clipper June 20, 1874, quoting the Baltimore Sun.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cummings' delivery; six strike outs in a row; a dissenting opinion

Date Sunday, June 21, 1874
Text

[Chicago vs. Philadelphia 6/15/1874] For the first, second, and third innings six men of the Chicago struck out in succession–a remarkable thing. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury June 21, 1874 [Cummings was the pitcher for the Philadelhpias.]

[Chicago vs. Philadelphia 6/15/1874] ...the White Stockings being unable to hit Cummings, six men striking out in succession. ... The wonderful pitching of Cummings alone won the match for the Philadelphias... New York Clipper June 27, 1874

[Chicago vs. Philadelphia 6/15/1874] Cummings pitched with immense effect, but analyzed, and it wasn't pitching at all, for it was bowling a round armed and illy disguised throwing and it is a mystery that the Whites did not see it, for hundreds of others did. Philadelphia Sunday Republic June 21, 1874

[Philadelphia vs. Athletic 6/27/1874] Cummings, we suppose, was trying his “peculiar delivery” early in the game, for the way he was hit must have been galling to his pride and taken down much of his very large stock of conceit. After the second inning he changed his tactics, and very few clean hits were made on him. Philadelphia Sunday Republic June 28, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

coach interference

Date Saturday, June 27, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs. Hartford 6/15/1874] ...the Hartfords, although Schafer and Boyd had made good hits, should have been blanked in the third inning, as Fisher got in the road of and intercepted a ball thrown to head of Schafer at home-plate, and a long and unseemly dispute ensued, the Athletics claiming that the ball was dead from hitting Fisher, who had no business to be standing so near the base-paths. The umpire, however, allowed the run, and the game proceeded...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

refusing to allow abuse of substitute runners

Date Sunday, June 28, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs. Mutual 6/23/74] McBride, as the captain of the nine, had refused to allow any one to run for Matthews, as the latter was not ill or injured, and this made McBride the unfortunate target for abuse from all parts of the ground. Matthews, for the last two years, has been shamming illness, so as to save himself for pitching; and the managers of three or four of the leading professional nines have determined to stop this and make him run for himself in the future; and Bond, of the Atlantics, will be dealt with in the same manner, the practice of getting substitutes to run for slow runner or pitchers now being a thing of the past. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury June 28, 1874

[Athletic vs. Mutual 6/23/74] The Athletic gained a considerable point by compelling Matthews to do his own running. Here before the Mutes have always obtained permission for a substitute to run for him, the result being that he was kept fresh. The crowd did not like this rough infringement of Mutual tactics, and hooted and yelled disgracefully. Philadelphia Sunday Republic June 28, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

admission charged for a match between colored clubs

Date Saturday, July 4, 1874
Text

At the Newington grounds to-day...at ten o’clock a very entertaining game will commence between the Oriental and Atlantic colored clubs, which promises much sport. Both nines are heavy batters, and run bases like thoroughbreds, and a full twenty-five cents worth of fun may be experienced.

Source Baltimore American
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

interracial matches

Date Sunday, July 5, 1874
Text

June 29 the Carlisle amateur club of Philadelphia played a match with the colored nine of the Williams club on Columbia avenue and Twenty-fourth street, in the presence of a large crowd of interested spectators. The Carlisles anticipated considerable fun in the match and an easy victory. To their chagrin and surprise, however, the colored men whipped them handsomely by the appended score... [17-6] New York Sunday Mercury July 5, 1874

On the 30 the first of a series for the championship of Chicago city, was played on the White Stocking’s Grounds, between the Uniques, and colored club, and Garnets (white follows) resulting in a victory for the former by a score of 18 to 9. New York Sunday Mercury July 5, 1874

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a cutoff man

Date Sunday, July 5, 1874
Text

In regard to the Hartford-Boston game, and the disputed decision of the umpire, it appears that after one hand was out in the last inning, and Harry Wright occupied the third and Hall the second, that Barnes hit a high ball to Pike, and as soon as it touched his hands both of the base runners instantaneously attempted to steal their bases, Pike fielded the ball home, but Fisher stopped it, and threw it to Boyd to cut off Hall, and the umpire decided Hall out, but declared Wright had made his run, the decision according to Harry Wright, being in the following words, he had crossed the home plate, and the run counts.” The run, however, did not count, unless Wright had crossed the home plate before Hall was put out, and it is only reasonable to suppose that Wright, being a slower runner than Hall, could not have reached the home plate before Hall was put out.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

baseball in England

Date Sunday, July 5, 1874
Text

A game of base ball was recently played near Manchester, England, between a nine of students, including three Americans, and a nine of cricketers, the former winning by a score of 22 to 9.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catcher blocking the plate; a collision at the plate

Date Sunday, July 5, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Mutual 7/2/1874] Higham and Allison led off freely with fine hits. Start sent a scorching grounder past Craver [second baseman], and Higham made a bold dash for the home base. Hicks [catcher] was standing on or near the plate waiting to receive the ball from the outfield, when Higham ran against him heavily, and knocked him out of time. In the scene of excitement which followed, Messrs. Allison and Start both scored their runs. For some time Hicks was unable to stand, but finally, having recovered somewhat, resumed his post behind the bat, though evidently suffering considerable pain. Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch July 5, 1874

[Philadelphia vs. Mutual 7/2/1874] [bases loaded, Higham on third base, Hicks the catcher] ...Joe [Start] hit to right field, Higham ran home; and as Hicks stood right in the way at home base to receive the ball, well thrown in by Eggler [center fielder], a collision naturally occurred, and both Higham and Hicks fell as they met, the ball rolling off out of reach, while Hicks turned an involuntary somersault and came up decidedly groggy. At this moment the Philadelphias lost their heads, for had they called “time,” as they were entitled to, but one run would have been scored. This they failed to do, and as Joe hurried the base-runners round, three runs were scored by the collision, and “the country was safe.” “Time” was called when too late, and Hicks’ bottle-holders attended to him and brought him round; and with his usual pluck he shortly afterwards again faced the music. New York Clipper July 11, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cummings curve balls ineffective; switches to fast balls

Date Sunday, July 5, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Athletic 7/4/1874] The Athletics were blanked [in the seventh innning], Cummings pitching with more speed, his “rotary twist,” which he was so faithful to, having been pretty well poulticed.

...

Cummings’ medium pacers were, as they have been and always will be, nice as pie crust. He put on more speed towards the close, and the result was a single run in four innings.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a pot shot at Fitzgerald as umpire

Date Sunday, July 5, 1874
Text

Colonel “Tom F.” undertook to umpire an amateur game in Washington a few days since. By private advices we learn that it was a fearful exhibition, and that the remarks passed were so uncomplimentary that the unfortunate “authority” could have crawled through a knot-hole.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

out on a foul strike

Date Sunday, July 5, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Athletic 7/4/1874] Now McMullin came to the bat, and his well-known predilection for foul striking soon got him in trouble. Several times the umpire warned him, and at last he sent out a ball that York took on the bound. As he was running to base the umpire called him back and decided him , which it certainly was.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire confused about wides and balls

Date Monday, July 6, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Athletic 7/4/1874] The umpiring of Mr. Patterson was very bad; Mr. P don’t [sic] know the difference between a wide and a ball, and while trying to be sharp on the “points” of the game, fails miserably in almost every respect.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the cost of attending a game

Date Monday, July 6, 1874
Text

Sir: On the Fourth, I felt rich, and I concluded to take it on the shell, no matter what the price. Well, the game–Athletic-Philadelphia–cost me nearly $2, as follows:– Entrance 50 cents, seat $1, fares 25 cents, four beers 20 cents. This will last me until next year. If they would reduce the price to a reasonable figure, I would go out accasionally [sic]–but, it is really too heavy.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a plate fastening the base

Date Thursday, July 9, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Chicago 7/7/1874] In the first inning Glenn had his fingers very badly cut, by coming in contact with the plate which fastens the base. Philadelphia All-Day City Item July 9, 1874 [Note: the game account is signed “Horace N. Phillips.]

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a ball of Ferguson’s own make

Date Saturday, July 11, 1874
Text

[Atlantic vs. Mutual 7/4/1874] The ball used was one of Ferguson’s own make, and a decidedly dead ball.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

intentionally dropped third strike an old Red Stocking point

Date Saturday, July 11, 1874
Text

[Atlantic vs. Mutual 7/4/1874] In the fourth inning Ferguson and Dehlman were on earned bases, when Hodes struck out; Allison did not hold the ball, however, in order to force off Ferguson at third, which he did neatly–an old Red Stockings “point–and as Burdock promptly forwarded the ball to Start, Hodes was also retired on the double play...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

time not called for an argument, the runner put out

Date Saturday, July 11, 1874
Text

[Atlantic vs. Mutual 7/4/1874] [Hodes reaches third as third baseman Burdock receives the ball; the umpire called Hodes not out, leading to a general argument] While this was going on, Burdock had quietly held on to the ball, and Hodes, forgetting the important fact, and seeing Matthews walk back to his position apparently ready to deliver the ball, walked off his base, and then Burdock touched him with the ball, and the umpire decided him out. On the principle that all tricks are fair in war, this was “a point to play;” but it did not raise Burdock in the estimation of the reputable portion of the spectators. When appals are made on decisions in regard to a reversal, or when any player is hurt, the umpire should promptly call time, so as to make the ball dead until the talk is over, or the injured player can resume his position. Twice this week have the Mutuals benefitted from the failure of the umpire to attend to this part of his duties.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

suspicion of shady betting

Date Saturday, July 11, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Athletic 7/4/1874] The betting was at odds of 100 to 50 on the Athletics, and a great deal of money must have changed hands on the result, a party of New York betting men who were present being suspiciously anxious to back the Philadelphias, and leading many to believe that there was something “wrong.” [The Athletics won.]

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a bad call on a slide

Date Saturday, July 11, 1874
Text

[Baltimore vs. Chicago 7/8/1874] In the fifth inning Bulaski was running to second when Malone threw the ball to Myerle, who was standing to the left of the base. Bulaski slid under him when Myerle tried to touch him as he passed, and although he did not come nearer than one foot to Bulaski the umpire decided Bulaski out. Philadelphia All-Day City Item July 11, 1874 [Note: the report signed Horace R. Phillips]

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Nick Young quits the Chicagos

Date Sunday, July 12, 1874
Text

Nick Young has returned to Washington, resigning his position as manager of the Chicagos.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a foul ball blown into fair territory

Date Sunday, July 12, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Athletic 7/11/1874] York sent up a foul ball, that Sutton immediately took. There was a peculiarity about this. The ball went up foul, and was so declared, but a wind carried it fair, and Sutton missed it on the fly and took on a bound two feet inside the foul line. It was, however, declared a foul bound.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

profanity in Boston

Date Tuesday, July 14, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs. Boston 7/13/1874] The policemen on the ground endeavored to restore order, but their efforts were unavailing, for the crowd continued to make all sorts of remarks–one of which (“the G–d d–m s–n of a b–h,”) revealed the “loud-mouth betters [sic] and low-browed ruffians” who have been endeavoring to kill the game in your city [i.e. Philadelphia]. It looked, in this game, as if their debut in Boston was a great success.

...

The behavior of the crowd on the Athletics’ last inning, was one of the most disgraceful ever witness, while at the conclusion of the game, more than a thousand persons rushed on the field, to Murnan [the umpire], shouting “Kill the s–n of a b–h.” Murnan was rescued by the police, aided by the Boston players, but not before he had been struck by some miscreant. Jim White and Al Spalding behaved nobly, threatening to brain anyone making a movement to attack Murnan, who was escorted off the field under the protection of the players and the police. Thus ended this vile blot on the fair escutcheon of Boston. Philadelphia All-Day City Item July 14, 1874 [from a report signed by “C.W.W.”]

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire not calling balls and strikes 2

Date Tuesday, July 14, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs. Boston 7/13/1874] [The umpire] failed also to keep either of the pitchers as close to their work as an umpire should, and wonderfully few wides, balls or strikes were called during the game.

Source Boston Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

tossing versus throwing the ball

Date Sunday, July 19, 1874
Text

Yale has been and gone and done it after all, and Boston is in despair. “It was the underhand throwing that did it,” say the Boston papers. “If they had only tossed the ball to the bat we’d have knocked them all over the field,” say the Hubbites.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Tommy Barlow tardy playing billiards

Date Sunday, July 19, 1874
Text

[Atlantic vs. Hartford 6/13/1874] The game was called for half-past 3, but owing to the basence of Tommy Barlow, who was enjoying a game of billiard at Mattie Hewit’s (pretty business for a ball player at such a time), it was a quarter to 4 before it commence, the Nutmegs going to the bat.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the legality of underhand throwing 2

Date Sunday, July 19, 1874
Text

Underhand throwing is not allowed.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a valid excuse for cancelling a game

Date Sunday, July 19, 1874
Text

It is claimed by the Hartfords that the Athletics lost a game with them by a square forfeit, on Tuesday last. Pearce was mutually agreed upon as umpire, and he and the Hartfords and an expectant crowd of spectators were awaiting the arrival of the Athletics, when a telegram came stating that they could not play on account of three of their twelve players being disabled. This is not considered a valid excuse, on account of their victory over the Bostons the next day. The Hartfords placed their men in position, waited the expiration of the legal time, and then Pearce, the umpire mutually agreed upon, awarded the game to the Hartfords by 9 to 0.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a disgraceful crowd in Boston

Date Sunday, July 19, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs. Boston 7/13/1874] The conduct of the crowd was very disgraceful, and the Athletic and Boston nines had to use their bats to keep the former from injury. A strong force of officers was necessary to keep Murnan [umpire][the Athletics' substitute] from suffering personal violence at the hands of the scoundrelly gamblers, who were infuriated at a decision at second which Fisler afterwards declared had been mer perfectly justly. Over 1,000 persons gathered, yelling and blaspheming around the Athletic coach, and, for a time, progress was impossible, and it was only with great exertions that the crowd was cleared, and, as the coach left, a volley of stones was sent after it. Most of those indulging in the manifestations were well dressed men, who, from their outward appearance, might have been taken for gentlemen. The Boston newspapers are very cautious as to their acts, but attempt faintly to justify them. Philadelphia Sunday Republic July 19, 1874 [Note: Boston won 7-6.]

[Athletic vs. Boston 7/13/1874] When the game was over the crowd rushed in, and it became a serious questions whether the umpire would get of unharmed. The crowd shouted, jeered and insulted him in every way. This, of course, was inexcusable, and the conduct of the crowd was as much to be condemned as the course of the umpire. He had certainly decided every doubtful point, and some about which there was no question, in favor of the Athletics, but that was no reason why the crowd should have taken up the matter and wantonly insulted the umpire of the Boston's own selection. It was a scene which in the interests of the game should not be repeated again in Boston. Boston Daily Advertiser July 14, 1874

[Athletic vs. Boston 7/13/1874] An umpire is always allowed in Boston the greatest freedom, and is generally treated with more courtesy than is usual on base ball fields in any other city, but the decisions were too much for the temper of the crowd, who were wrought up to an unusual pitch of excitement. They “chinned” him unmercifully, and when the game closed he was surrounded by five or six hundred men and boys, and he was hustled and pushed about, and it was with the greatest difficulty that he reached the coach which conveyed the Athletics from the grounds, It was only the intervention of members of the Boston club and some of the sturdy Athletics and the vigorous movements of the police that gained him an avenue to the carriage. As it was, he was followed by a hooting crowd, some of the “hoodlums” and gamins following the coach far from the grounds, and spitefully following it with occasional projectiles. The whole affair was an unusual one for Boston. Boston Journal July 14, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

roping off the outfield crowd

Date Sunday, July 19, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Athletic 7/15/1874] A rope was placed about the outfield to stop encroachments, and although the throng was very deep, encircling the entire ground, no trouble was experience on this account.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Nick Young leaves the Chicago

Date Sunday, July 19, 1874
Text

There are various stories circulating as to the reason why Nick Young left the Chicago ball club. He was engaged at a large salary as executive manager of the White Stockings, and his sudden departure from the city is not generally understood. It was been ascertained that Mr. Young left because Secretary of the Treasury Bristow offered him a good situation in Washington. Feeling assured that he could better his prospects by going to the capital, Mr. Young resigned his somewhat doubtful position in Chicago and started at once for Washington.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the colored Mutual Club

Date Tuesday, July 21, 1874
Text

Some six or eight years ago, we organized in this city [Washington, D.C.] a colored club composed of some of the finest players this country ever produced, and being men of talent and high standing in the community, it was not long before they commenced to measure arms with the then strongest white club in this city, being pitted against such players as Malone, Fergy, Force, Reach, Bob, Hurley, of Red Stocking fame, and several others, now professionals, and more recently we encountered last year’s Washington nine, and though we were defeated, we had the consolation of knowing that our conduct on the fied as players, gained for us a reputation that will certainly outlive our defeat.

But a year or two ago, at the repeated solicitation of several clubs North, we left home for a two weeks’ tour, playing nearly every day, and on one occasion we played two games in one day, journeying as far as Buffalo, and playing in the following named cities: Baltimore, Lockport, Niagara Falls, Buffalo, Rochester, Utica, and Troy, winning every game. We intend making the circuit again next month, and would like to play in the following named cities, if within your power to arrange such games for us, or advise us as to the propriety of playing in such places:

We desire to visit Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Troy, Rochester, Chicago and Cincinnati; if possible, to arrange for two games in your city. We would like it, and perhaps I might as well state that we would prefer, to play strong and well organized clubs, for we believe, by so doing, we will soon be in a condition to cope with the best clubs in the country. We wish to start on the tour about the 15th of August, and all communications must be sent in as early as possible.

Any remarks relative to the enclosed in your valuable paper will be construed as a lasting favor.

Please state that any communication addressed to Charles R. Douglass, Washington, D.C., new National Era office, will receive immediate attention, and by so doing you will confer a great favor upon Your humble servant, CHARLES R. DOUGLASS, President Mutual B.B.C.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an early attribution of town ball as an intermediate game between rounders and baseball

Date Tuesday, July 21, 1874
Text

Col. Fitzgerald–Dear Sir:–Please answer through your ever-welcome all-day paper, if your National Game of base ball is an English game, or if it was ever played in England under the title of Rounders. Yours, truly, Jas. K. McAlees.

N.B.–The above question is to settle an argument between a cricketer and a base ball player.

Ans.–The game was originally rounders, then it became town-ball, (an elaboration of rounders,) and then base ball, which marked the advent of our National Game, as, by the introduction of bases, and special rules for play, it acquired characteristics that made it distinctly an American pastime.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a sacrifice bunt up the first base line

Date Saturday, July 25, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Mutual 7/14/1874] [The Mutuals leading 6-3 after four innings] This should have been a winning position, which it did not turn out to be. In the next inning the “Reds” recovered their lost vantage-ground in the highest style of the art, and they gave the New Yorkers a lesson in scientific batting and base-running which it would be worth their while to remember. ... [two runs had scored, with no outs, when] Harry Wright then came to the bat, and, seeing three men on the bases, he wisely dropped a ball from his bat so that it ran towards Start [first baseman], and before Joe could put the striker out another run had been scored, and the base-runners had been sent forward each a base, no chance being given for any doubling-up process. This was scientific play, and it elicited a buzz of admiration from the crowd. ...the Reds not caring about being put out at first-base, so long as every such out yielded also a run in. New York Clipper July 25, 1874

Bob Ferguson switch hitter; batting left side against a lefty pitcher

[Atlantic vs. Mutual 7/18/1874] Ferguson, however, did as he should always do when facing Matthews, viz., took his bat in his left hand–he can use both hands with equal facility–and for the first time he made a base-hit... New York Clipper July 25, 1874

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a collision at home

Date Saturday, July 25, 1874
Text

[Chelsea vs. Arlington 7/16/1874] [from a letter from the Chelsea secretary] The Arlingtons...then went in for their eighth inning. They had a player on third and one on second base, and two hands out, when the striker hit to the Chelsea pitcher, who fielded the ball to the catcher. He held it, waiting for the player on third, who had started to run home, the catcher putting the ball on him as he came to the plate, the ball being knocked out of his hand by the runner. The umpire decided the player not out. As this was the fourth glaring decision against the Chelseas by the umpire, the Chelsea captain took the nine off the field, refusing to play any longer with an umpire who was either prejudiced or sadly deficient in the rules of the game.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

low attendance for tail enders

Date Sunday, July 26, 1874
Text

[Hartford vs. Philadelphia 7/24/1874] The weather was delightful, but the attendance very small indeed; in truth the public seems to take little or no interest in professional clubs when they have to all intents and purposes fallen out of the “championship race.” Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch July 26, 1874

a resume of the recent history of the Athletic and Philadelphia clubs; relative importance of batting and fielding averages; the deficiency of Cummings' delivery

The season is half over and the present is a good time to review the operations of our two local clubs. The Philadelphia club started its existence last year with as fine material as there was in the country. It was animated by a desire to make a name for itself so as to live down the adverse criticisms and sneer of those who predicted a premature death for it., and more especially did its players feel a deep and bitter hatred for the Athletic club, engendered by the captain's policy and selfishness of the managers of that club. This inspired them with an activity and care perhaps never before known in base ball, and they went through and ended the spring season in a style to crush all opposition. The Athletic club was nowhere along side of it, and even the haughty Boston quaked and doubted whether their newly won laurels were not to be suddenly and rudely snatched from their brows by the infant Hercules. The wonderful triumphs, however, were too much for the elated directors, and they patted the players on the backs, while the members beslobbered them with fawning and ridiculous encomiums until the vain glorious nine thought they were invincible. Next they were paraded at Cape May, and the two weeks of riot did for them what any sensible man should have foretold. The fall season beginning they encountered defeat after defeat and in a short time the wily Boston club had crept up to them, and finally passed them. Then, and when too late, the folly was seen and curses took the place of praise. Several of the players, already crusty, if they did not yield to the blandishments and cash of gamblers, as was well suspected and openly charged, became sullen. A schismatic feud broke out, and still more games were lost, and the season closed with the trophy considered won, in the hands of another club. The Athletic, on the contrary, played steadily, but were cursed with bad management. The mischief was not repaired, games were made injudiciously and the players were allowed to become inoculated with the idea that they could not beat the Philadelphia, and they rapidly fell into third place. Later in the season, however, they rallied, and not only brought themselves up, but proved a most formidable for to the Red Stockings.

When the present season started, the members wisely saw the errors of the past, and elected an entire new management. These gentlemen, while too parsimonious and still infected with some of the timid policy of the old management, have greatly improved on former times. The players no longer rule, but are taught that they are servants employed and paid by a club, and bound to do its bidding. Excuses for bad play are heard no longer, but reprimands follow. Discipline is much better enforced, and dissipation is forbid. The result is that the club has been playing most splendidly. Their fielding averages are excellent, while their batting is the best in the country. The games between them and the Boston give the latter their lead, both clubs being able to defeat all others. The tables are turned on the Philadelphia, who have lost seven games to the Blue Legs; and, although the latter may not win the pennant, yet they will, undoubtedly, give the Boston a tight race for it.

Now let us look at the Philadelphia club. They recreant members of the old nine were gladly allowed to go to Chicago, and then the reorganization of another nine began. Here obstinacy and favoritism began to show. Men were engaged without that careful scrutiny of their batting as well as fielding averages. Some were taken against the advice of the experienced members, and merely because they were “good fellows;” and every one knowing anything about players predicted a weak nine as soon as it was announced. Little sympathy did they get but at once were cried down as mischief-makers, and a glorious season predicted for the model nine. The conceit of these members was soon lowered. The first game with the Athletic opened their eyes, and then defeat after defeat followed. Occasionally a fine victory would be obtained, and again the old boasting would be heard only to be hushed by more bad luck, and during the last three or four weeks a victory has been a rare thing. The fielding is good enough on average, but woefully deficient is the batting, and just there lies the secret. A poorer batting team could not be got together. Two or three do well, but they are so sprinkled around that their clean hits are of no account. The great Cummings, the theoretical pitcher, is punished dreadfully. Nearly every opponent gets in on him in two or three innings, and hit him with tremendous effect all around the field. He can pitch, but stubbornly keep to his peculiar delivery, and away goes the game. This discourages his men, and two-thirds of the defeats analyzed show that his men have become demoralized when he drops his swift twister and puts in medium pacers. The management is injudicious, and allows the players too much liberty. Dissipation and carousing never made a nine victorious, and until it is stopped, the Philadelphians can expect no better luck. A general upheaval is needed, and, if the directors rigidly inquire into the qualifications of their players for next year and keep them to strict discipline, much better success will follow. Stop the open gambling on the ground, clear our the corps of gamblers who follow the club, and better audiences will attend. If these fellows cannot be excluded from the grounds, which, we admit, is impossible, eject them from the pavilion as soon as their trade is started, and force them out in the field or compel them to cease. Philadelphia Sunday Republic July 26, 1874

Source ” Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Date Sunday, July 26, 1874
Text

Wm McLean, the Philadelphia umpire, was...burned out at the Continental Hotel [in Chicago]. … In the safe of the hotel he had deposited some $135, his earnings while West, and, as the proprietor says his safe is thoroughly fire proof, he will probably not lost it.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early word of the Centennial Club

Date Sunday, July 26, 1874
Text

There is really truth in the rumor that a third professional nine will be located here next year. Its formation if adhered to will be very praiseworthy. Its features will be 25 cents admission, low salaries, and players to be Philadelphians. Several fine amateur players have partly been engaged already, it is said.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips goes to England

Date Wednesday, July 29, 1874
Text

Horace R. Phillips, formerly manager and catcher of the Zephyr B.B.C., sailed for Europe on Saturday, August 1st, in the steamship Samaria, of the Cunard line. Having received an offer in the office of a large shipping firm in Liverpool, he goes there to take the position. He expects to return to Philadelphia during the Centennial, providing his duties in Liverpool do not detain him. He will be accompanied by J. J. Dunn, of Star B.B.C., of Syracuse, N.Y.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the colored Mutuals challenge the Americus and Eureka clubs

Date Friday, July 31, 1874
Text

We, the Mutual B.B.C., of Washington, do challenge the Americus B.B.C. to a match game of base ball, to be played in Philadelphia on any enclosed grounds, we to receive one-half of the gate money.

If this challenge is accepted, we will play any day after the 20 th of August, that may suit their convenience. Charles R. Douglass, President Mutual B.B.C.

Direct answer to Charles R. Douglass, 1116 F street, Washington, D.C.

We also challenge the Eureka B.B.C. to a game, to take place after the 20 th of August, on the same conditions. An early answer is requested.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

receipts down; the poor reputation of the Mutuals

Date Saturday, August 1, 1874
Text

[Hartford vs. Mutual 7/26/1874] The sixth game of the series between these clubs took place on the Union Grounds, Brooklyn, on July 26, in the presence of about three or four hundred spectators only, the trip of the Connecticut team to this city and Philadelphia this month not paying expenses, as their Philadelphia game did not yield over fifty dollars, and their two New York matches but little more. In fact, professional contests do not pay in this city about this period of the season,... and the little power the Mutuals have left themselves to attract a large crowd, they being now very generally regarded as the least reliable nine of the fraternity–a reputation they have brought upon themselves by their lack of harmony in their play, and the peculiar tactics of two or three members of the nine. The fact is, a new New York nine is wanted.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

playing in defending against the fair-foul

Date Saturday, August 1, 1874
Text

[Atlantic vs. Chicago 7/22/1874] In the ninth inning Captain Ferguson of the Atlantics was also disabled. He was standing midway between the home plate and third base, in expectation of a fair-foul hit from Force, who was striking; but instead he found he was in the way of a terrific hot liner, which he stopped from going in the outfield by having a finger-joint knocked out of place.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Sunday ball play in St. Louis

Date Sunday, August 2, 1874
Text

[Atlantic vs. Red Stockings of St. Louis 7/26/1874] On the Sunday previous [i.e. 7/26] the Atlantics played before a large crowd of spectators at St. Louis, Sunday being the ball players day in that city among the masses.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Bond’s pitching claimed to be underhand throwing; the side underhand throw

Date Sunday, August 2, 1874
Text

[Atlantic vs. Red Stockings of St. Louis 7/26/1874] [quoting the St. Louis Republican:] “The Reds could do nothing with Bond’s pitching, except to send short flies right up over the basemen, who took them all in. There was much complaint about Bond’s pitching, on the ground that it was underhanded throwing instead of stiff-elbowed tossing as prescribed by the old rules. It seemed to suit the umpire, however, and the Reds got no satisfaction except the privilege of grumbling, which they exercised without limitation.” “Stiff-elbowed tossing” is good. Does not the Republican known that the side underhand throw has been practically the rule of pitching since Creighton’s day, who was the first to introduce it? And is it not aware of the fact that “stiff-elbowed tossing” has long ago been a played-out style of delivery, fit only for young school boys, country club nines and muffins to bat against?

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the extent of “jockeying”

Date Sunday, August 2, 1874
Text

It is but justice to state that what “jockeying” has been done this season, if any, has been done by less than half a dozen players out of the eight odd professionals in the arena, and but one or two are regarded as “hard cases” in this respect. It is unjust to charge the whole eighty for the veil done by but two or three.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a failed quick throw play

Date Sunday, August 2, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Baltimore 7/29/1874] Another misplay occurred between Hicks [catcher] and Craver [second baseman], who tried to trick Gould, who was at third, by the throw to second and return, but the dodge only gave the man his run, so slowly was the ball handled.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Hartford on a “spree”

Date Sunday, August 2, 1874
Text

Mr. Hubell, of the Hartford club, has just returned from a trip to Martha's Vineyard to see what arrangements could be made for a series of base ball games there. He finds that the grounds of the trotting park can be obtained at a reasonable rate, and several of the amateur ball clubs of Massachusetts have expressed a willingness to engage in games with the Hartford. The Fall River, Taunton and New Bedford clubs stand ready to go at any time. It is proposed to start with the Nutmeg team in a week or two, and have a sort of base-ball carnival at the Vineyard, lasting a week or ten days. A number of those who are summering there promise the ball players a flattering reception.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

baseball fever in St. Louis

Date Sunday, August 2, 1874
Text

St. Louis has no professional club, but has the base-ball fever quite hard. The Brooklyn Atlantic played there with the amateur Red Stockings recently, and a crowd of six thousand spectators was present. Early in the season the Hartford expected to have some games in St. Louis, but on the representation of a member of the Chicago club that there was no base ball interest there, the project was abandoned. This looks as if Chicago wanted to keep that pasture for themselves.

The little game, however, will not succeed, for every club that has gone to St. Louis has made money, and the people here are determined to have a good club next year. Rivalry with Chicago would prompt this if nothing else, and that is just what ails the Chicagoites. It would be wisdom for all the professional clubs when they visit Chicago to take flying trips to St. Louis, and play the strong Empire and Red Stocking clubs. They would make money and foster such interest in the game as would certainly assure a professional nine there next year.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an accidental revival from the old game

Date Saturday, August 8, 1874
Text

[from answers to correspondents] Eagle, Louisville.–“A ball was batted to the pitcher, who picked it up short, and met the runner halfway to the first base; but, instead of touching him, passed across the line between him and first, as he had been accustomed to do at college, and started to return to his position; the runner had also played at the same college, and, believing that he was out, walked off. The crowd shouted, and his captain ordered him to run on; but the ball got there before he. Was he put out by crossing the line in front of him in the first instance?

Players running to first base must be touched by the fielder fielding the ball, if it is desired to put him out in the way you describe. The simple act of crossing the line in front of him is nothing; and there never has been a rule of the kind you mention in vogue.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a vicious fair-foul

Date Saturday, August 8, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Baltimore 7/29/1874] Hicks...after waiting for a good ball, hit a vicious “fair foul” for two bases. New York Clipper August 8, 1874

the Charter Oak bat

G. B. Hubbell, president of the Hartford (Ct.) Club, has in his possession a miniature bat made of Charter Oak and tipped with a diamond, which became his property at the time of the disbanding of the old Charter Oak Club of that city, of which organization he was also president. The bad had been held by that club as the State championship trophy. Mr. Hubbell intends to present the bat to the Hartford Amateurs, and a series of games is to be played for the possession thereof by the several amateur clubs of the State, the one winning the trophy to be recognized as the champions. New York Clipper August 8, 1874

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a ten-men ten-innings benefit

Date Saturday, August 8, 1874
Text

A ten-men and ten-innings game was played by [the Chicago and Atlantic] clubs on the grounds of the Chicagos, July 29, the proceeds to be given to unfortunate Jimmy Wood [who had recently had a leg amputated]. Not less than three thousand spectators were present...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

appealing to the umpire for a balk call

Date Sunday, August 9, 1874
Text

[West Philadelphia vs. Philadelphia 8/6/1874] In the first three innings no runs and but one base hit were made. This was by Bechtel, who was afterward caught napping at first, taking ground on a presumed balk of the pitcher, and appealing; but the umpire decided “No balk.

Source ” Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cummings’ pitching effective; many strike outs

Date Sunday, August 9, 1874
Text

[West Philadelphia vs. Philadelphia 8/6/1874] The pitching of Cummings was as fine an exhibition as we have ever seen. It is a great pity that he cannot always use the same style of delivery, as it is by all means his most effective. It is no wonder that the West Philadelphians could not bat it, as hardly any professional nine would be successful before it. Hicks seconded his efforts superbly, putting out fifteen men, most of these on strikes. Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch August 9, 1874

[Chicago vs. Philadelphia 9/6/1874] Cummings never pitched with greater effect. He made Hicks move about behind the bat, that player retiring no less than sixteen men, counting his assistances. The meagre exhibit of base hits for the visitors can be attributed to Cummings’ efforts–no less than seven men making three strikes! Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch September 6, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

charge of a thrown game

Date Monday, August 10, 1874
Text

[Mutual vs. Chicago 8/5/1874] A game of base ball was played in Chicago yesterday that will go far to bring what has hitherto been considered a national sport into utter disrepute. The contest was between a New York and a Chicago club. The spectators were not long left in doubt as to who were the better players. The men from New York were strong and confident in the field and at the bat; the Chicagos were weak and dispirited. When the game had advanced to a point at which victory for the Chicago club seemed impossible, a sudden change was made in their opponents' field by which the whole face of affairs was changed. With much difficulty, and in spite of themselves, the Chicagos won the game.

We have gone out of the way to notice this item of sporting news because it has a peculiar significance to the public in this city, which has been at some pains to encourage the game of base ball, and make it reputable. In the interest of the public, then, we say that this is the first instance in which a game of base ball in Chicago has been sold to gamblers. Furthermore, the Mutual Base Ball Club of New York is the only club which has earned a national reputation for such transactions.

The managers of the Chicago Base Ball Association are gentlemen: their enterprise is supported by gentlemen. They can do no less than investigate the charges which are in everybody's mouth, and if they are proven, refuse to admit the Mutual Base Ball Club again to their grounds. To gain the championship and lose the respect of decent men and women would be a fatal victory for the Chicago Base Ball Association. New York Sun August 10, 1874, quoting the Chicago Tribune 8/6/1874

The dirty piece of business was left to a club which has, for the past six or seven years, enjoyed a doubtful repute for unvarying honesty. As long ago as 1868 it used to be said and believed of the Mutuals of New York that they were governed by a ring of gamblers, and games were won or lost according as the gamblers had placed their money. That reputation has clung to the Mutual Club up to the present time, and yesterday’s exhibition will go far towards destroying what little confidence there remained in the integrity of the nine. It is said that one of the players (Allison), disgusted with the state of things which prevailed, recently declared that he would no longer be identified with such an organization, and should leave the nine as soon as their games were concluded in Chicago. This is a serious charge to prefer against a baseball club, and it is not done without seemingly conclusive evidence of its correctness. First, it may be noted as a significant fact that a prominent member of the nine, holding a responsible position, was on a “spree” Tuesday night in company with Mike McDonald. McDonald yesterday forenoon invested heavily in pools on the game, buying large numbers at an average rate of three and four to one, making the White Stockings the favorites. A Philadelphia baseball man also purchased many tickets on the same conditions. These extraordinary odds against a club which had already beaten the White Stockings in every game this season occasioned much surprise among betting mean, and an attempt was made to explain the inconsistency by the statement that Matthews, the Mutual pitcher, was sick, and could not play his position. By many this was believed; by others it was discredited, especially after having seen Matthews on the field, where he appeared to be in perfect health, and so far as he played (five innings) his pitching was as effective and difficult to bat as it had evern been found. Possibly it was too difficult to suit the schemes of gamblers, for Matthews retired from the field at the close of the fifth inning, and Hatfield finished the game as pitcher.

There is ample reason to believe that at least four of the players were hired to lose the game; the rest naturally were discouraged and dishearted by the fact. It is said that two of the Mutual men were aware of and denounced the contemplated fraud before the game began, but they were powerless to prevent its consummation. So far as known, there is nothing to show that either the management or the members of the Chicago Club were aware of, or pecuniarily interested in, the fraud. ... Previous to playing, Matthews appeared in excellent health and spirits, and devoted half an hour or more to throwing and pitching to get his hand in. The exercise did not appear to fatigue him, and he made no complaint of feeling unwell. After pitching five innings, however, he was suddenly taken ill, and allowed to leave the field, Hatfield, an inferior pitcher, taking his place. The other side of the story is that Matthews was really too ill to play, having a swelling in the groin, produced by a strain which pained him severely when he twisted his body in the act of pitching the ball. The winners admitted having been told in themorning that Matthews would not play, and that this information convinced them that the Whites would have a “soft thing,” and governed them in making bets. A fitting supplement to the foregoing is the subjoined card from Mr. Davison, manager of the Mutual Club, and the accompanying certificate of Dr. Baxter, which is certainly entitled to credit:

To the Editor of the Chicago Tribune.–Sir.–Having understood that some dissatisfaction exists in consequent of the action of the Mutual Club in changing pitchers in the fifth inning of the game of yesterday, played with the White Stockings, I respectfully request the publication of the certifcate of Dr. Baxter, under whose treatment Mr. Matthews has been, believing it to be in itself sufficient explanation. Alexander V. Davidson

Manager Mutual B.B.C.

334 West Monroe Street

Chicago, Aug. 5, 18743

I hereby certify that Robert Matthews has been ailing for the past two days, and that he was not sufficiently recovered to play ball to-day, and did so against my advice.

A. J. Baxter, M.D.

New York Clipper August 15, 1874, quoting the Chicago Tribune [The game was 4-2 in favor of the Mutuals after five innings; final score 5-4 Chicago.]

Source New York Sun
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a trophy bat made from the Charter Oak

Date Sunday, August 9, 1874
Text

G. B. Hubbell, president of the Hartford (Ct.) club, has in his possession a miniature bat made of Charter Oak and tipped with a diamond, which became his property at the time of the disbanding of the old Charger Oak club of that city, of which organization he was the president. The bat had been held by that club as the State championship trophy. Mr. Hubbell intends to present the bat to the Hartford amateurs, and a series of games is to be played for the possession thereof of the several amateur clubs of the State, the one winning the trophy to be recognized as the champions.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

shortstop covering second on a steal

Date Tuesday, August 11, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Hartford at Boston 8/12/1874] Tabor was put out on second trying to steal base; ball thrown by Barnie [catcher] to Barlow [shortstop], who covered base. Loud applause.

Source Hartford Daily Courier
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Barlow sick

Date Wednesday, August 12, 1874
Text

[Philadelaphia vs. Hartford 8/11/1874] Barlow of the Hartfords was ill, but played six innings, when his place was filled by Brady. Hartford Daily Courant August 12, 1874 [N.B. A game 8/10 was later identified by Barlow as when he received his injury leading to morphine addiction.]

Source Hartford Daily Courant
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

touch ball

Date Sunday, August 16, 1874
Text

Baseball is an American modification, and, of course, an improvement of the old English game of rounders; or, as it is called in West Riding, touch-ball. The children in these districts play it without a bat or club; they strike the ball with the open hand, and have posts or stones at the corners of the playground, which correspond to the ‘bases’ of the American game. If the ball was caught before it reached the ground, or the fielder could hit the striker with it before he reached the ‘touch,’ he was out., quoting the London Post 8/1/1874

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

seating at Prospect Park; a barrier to keep the crowd back

Date Sunday, August 16, 1874
Text

[Chelsea vs. Nassau at Prospect Park 8/14/1874] The arrangements for the match were excellent, Mr. Hunt providing not only rows of seats for hundreds of spectators, but thereby forming a barrier to any undue encroachment by the spectators on the field.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the reporters on the English tour

Date Sunday, August 16, 1874
Text

The “fourth estate,” to whom all yield precedence, had several representatives, among whom were H. S. Kempton, of the Boston Herald; F. D. Wilkie, of the Chicago Times; Dr. E. A. Pope, or the Boston Journal; F. Alden, of the New York Times; J. Weldon, of the New York Graphic; Counselor David T. Lynch, who will look after the interests of the Brooklyn Eagle; D. L. Howell, of the Cincinnati Enquirer; and Al. Wright, on behalf of the Philadelphia Sunday Mercury. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury August 16, 1874 [PSD 8/16/1874 lists “D.S. Howell” for the Cincinnati Enquirer.]

a triple play on a foul ball

[Philadelphia vs. Hartford at Boston 8/12/1874] An unusual event occurred in the last inning, when the Philadelphia made a triple play. Tipper and Brady, of the Hartford, were on first and second, and Stearns knocked up a foul fly, which Craver, who was catching, took and fielded to Cummings [pitcher], Cummings fielded to Mack [first baseman], catching Brady, who was returning to first, and then throwing it to Radcliff [second baseman], and making a third victim of Tipper, who was getting back to second. Philadelphia Sunday Republic August 16, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Gassette resigns from the Chicago Club; Chicago Club finances; Hulbert

Date Tuesday, August 18, 1874
Text

On Saturday a meeting of the stockholders in the Chicago Base Ball Association was held. Mr. Gassette called the meeting to order and gave a synopsis of his management of the club. The Treasurer's financial statement showed that after paying all the salaries up to date, the ground rent for the entire year, and all bills for posters, tickets, traveling expenses, etc., over $7,000 remained in the treasury. An estimate of the expenses for the remainder of the year was reckoned at about $5,200, leaving still in the treasury $1,800, without counting the receipts hereafter.

After thus showing the stockholders the result of his labors Mr. Gassette then presented his resignation as President and manager. Upon this the excitement of the stockholders was great, and it was some time before they realized the truth. In order to bring it before the meeting, a motion was made to accept the resignation, which resulted in laying it on the table. Mr. Gassette again spoke of his earnestness in the matter, and gave some of his reasons for resigning. Another motion was made to accept, but was lost.

This brought forth another speech from Mr. Gassette, in which he stated that he thought kindly of all the stockholders, and worked hard for the interest of the club. He thought they were not generous in refusing to accept his resignation when he offered it. If they would not accept it kindly, he would be compelled to resign without it. And so it was after the third motion and against the wishes of all present that Mr. Gassette formally severed his connection with the club. Mr. Hurlbut was then appointed chairman pro tem.

Mr. Gassette's reason for this action is, that as manager of the club his entire time is occupied and in consequence his regular business suffers. Chicago Daily Inter-Ocean August 18, 1874

A private meeting of the stockholders of the club was held yesterday afternoon, and Mr. George W. Gage was elected President of the association. Chicago Daily Inter-Ocean August 19, 1874

balls knocked over the fence, alternating balls

[Mutual of New York vs. Union of Pittsburg 8/18/1874] Since [Union Park] has been divided it has been spoiled for games in which strong batters engage, the part now used being narrow. The ball was frequently knocked over the fence, causing tiresome delays, and by using three or four balls alternately, only, the game could proceed with any degree of promptness. Philadelphia All-Day City Item August 21, 1874

Source Chicago Daily Inter-Ocean
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

fifty cent admission

Date Saturday, August 22, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Atlantic 8/15/1874] ...an audience of about 300 persons only, the majority of the patrons of the game now in the city preferring, apparently , to see the earnest contests between the leading amateur nines on free grounds, to paying half-a dollar admission fees to see displays at the hands of professionals which they regard as questionable so far as the effort to win is concerned.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

charges of thrown games by the Mutuals and Philadelphias

Date Sunday, August 23, 1874
Text

In regard to the charges against the Mutual club, Mr. Davidson explains the matter by stating that Matthews was physically unable to pitch throughout the game in which it was alleged that a fraudulent arrangement had been made, and Mr. Gassette shows by statistics that the Mutuals played better than they did in the game they won, and that the Chicago nine played with far better effect than in any previous contest with the Mutuals. It would appear, therefore, that in the case of the Mutual nine trouble it is probable that no unfair play was intended. In the case of the Philadelphia nine, besides the open charge of fraud at Chicago, a Philadelphia paper says: “ A well-known gentleman made affidavit on Wednesday against five of the players, and alleges that in one game in which he was umpire one player approached him and stated that he had $300 bet against the Philadelphia, and that if the game was close and he would give decisions against the Philadelphia he would receive $150. He also charges that the four other players received money at different times to ‘throw’ games, and asserts that he can prove this beyond contradiction.” New York Sunday Mercury August 23, 1874 [see NYSM 9/6/1874, the copy partially mutilated: the umpire was McLean, accused Cummings, Craver, McGee, Hicks, Radcliffe.]

[see also Philadelphia All-Day City Item 9/6/1874 for an interview of McLean.]

[from a sworn affidavit by McLean, regarding the Philadelphias in Chicago:] I was approached by John Radcliffe, one of the players of the Philadelphia Baseball Club; he took me one side, by the hotel (Clifton) where they were stopping, and told me that he had $350 which he gave to his brother to be bet in Philadelphia on the result of this game, stating that at the same time that was all the money he had, and that he would give me one-half if I gave my decisions in favor of the White Stockings. He also stated that there were four others in which him. He then named them, as follows: Cummings, Hicks, Craver, Mack and himself, and wanted the game to result in favor of the Whites, when he offered me one-half the $350. I told him I would have nothing to do with it, and I said I would umpire the game the same as I had done all the other games. He said they were all together, and that Cummings was to put the balls right on the bat. During the game I saw Craver go to Zettlein at the end of one of the innings. He raised his hand to his mouth, and said “If you cannot win this game you cannot win any, as you have got it all your own way.” I also saw Craver, at second base, pick up a ball, drop it, fumble it, and instead of throwing it to first, having plenty of time, he threw backwards over his head. He also picked up a ball close to Mack and threw hard and wide to first base, to prevent the runner from being put out. Cummings, Hicks, Craver, Mack, and Radcliffe did not play, in my opinion, as they ought to play. Cummings pitched during the game for the batter; I mean to say that he pitched the ball as if he wanted the batter to hit it. Hicks did not throw to second base as he can do, and ought to have done, the players stealing second base with impunity. What confirmed me in my opinion was a remark that I heard Hicks make to Cuthbert: “If you can show me any man that is wrong, I will give you $25.” [a response by Radcliffe denying everything then follows.] New York Clipper September 12, 1874

[multiple reports come out of the committee investigating the charges] There was considerable discussion on the different reports, and most of those present gave their opinions. After this a vote by shares on the resolution to dismiss Radcliff was taken, resulting–yeas, 26; nays, 15; or, as individuals, yeas, 12; nays, 9. So it was carried. Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch September 13, 1874

One of the most significant facts in relation to the Philadelphia Club “hippodrome” case is the retirement of honest Charley Pabor from the club team. There is no player in the professional fraternity whose record for integrity stands higher than Charley Pabor’s; and when called upon to testify against the players charged with fraud, he refused to say anything, resigned from the club, had his papers canceled, and an honorable discharge given him. New York Clipper September 19, 1874 [see later in the same issue for the results: Radcliff expelled, the others exonerated.]

The latest phase of the Radcliff case is the arrest of Wm. McLean, charged with slander, which took place last Monday morning. Radcliff swore that McLean, in charging him with having sold the Chicago-Philadelphia game, slandered him, and he, therefore, commenced a criminal prosecution. A preliminary hearing took place last Monday, when Fergy Malone and Dave Nagle entered bail to the amount of $2000 for McLean, to answer the charge at the October term of the Quarter Sessions. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury October 4, 1874

Source ” New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

charges of a thrown amateur game

Date Sunday, August 23, 1874
Text

As for the case of the Keystone nine in their game with the Nameless at Brooklyn last Tuesday, the decision of the umpire, John J. Burdock, speaks for itself, and that was as follows: “I do hereby decide the game between the Nameless and Keystone Clubs played this day a draw, and all bets off.” Evidently the fellows who dipped their hands in this dirty, mean business are green “hippodromists,’ for the work was too clumsily done to deceive even the blindest. Twenty-four errors were made in the six innings’ play by the Keystones, and of these the most numerous and palpable were those made by Conlin, the two Fallons, McCabe, and Ledwith, the others making but three. If the Keystone Club is a regular organization they owe it to themselves to take prompt action in this matter, or be debarred from play hereafter on either the Union, Capitoline, or Prospect Park fields. No reputable club will play with the Keystones until they clear themselves from the stigma of this charge. New York Sunday Mercury August 23, 1874

...Mr. Burdock came over to the reporters’ stand, and remarked: “Talk about hippodroming! I never saw anything so bad as this;” and he further stated that if they didn’t stop he’d leave the ground.

The secretary of the Keystone Club (C. Sands) has issued the following manifesto: “The Keystone Baseball Club, of New York city, at their meeting last night made a searching and thorough investigation of the charges of ‘hippodroming’ preferred against their members, and the meeting totally exonerated them from the aforesaid charges, thus hurling back the calumnies which the last few days has attached to them.” New York Sunday Mercury August 30, 1874

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the difficulty of proving thrown games

Date Sunday, August 23, 1874
Text

The trouble is that the club managers lack the pluck to face the music in this dirty business. They must know that one or two of their players are open to suspicion of unfair play, and yet they keep them in their employ, waiting, as they allege, for proof. The mischief of it is that actual proof is difficult to get. There is plenty of circumstantial evidence to be had, but since the Mutual and Eckford frauds of 1864 no proof has been at command, and not then would it have been had, but for the manly confession of the one least guilty in the fraud committed. The worst scoundrels are the fellows who tempt the players. We are glad to see that the public are gradually taking the matter into their own hands in this vicinity. The Mutual and Philadelphia nines have recently drawn but hundreds to their matches, when in the first part of the season they attracted thousands. Make the managers of clubs feel through their pockets that it won’t pay to have suspected or unreliable men in their employ, and the players who yield to the temptations to fraud now offered them will also find that it pays best to be honest. New York Sunday Mercury August 23, 1874

interracial play

[Mutual of Washington, D.C. vs. Americus of Philadelphia 8/22/1874] These clubs played at Twenty-fifth and Jefferson yesterday. The Mutuals (colored) are the champions of the South–but, they were badly beaten (27 to 9) by the Americus (white,) amateurs of this city.

...

To-morrow they will play at the same place, the Williams club–the leading Colored club of this city, and a very gentlemanly organization. The Williams boys expect to win. Philadelphia All-Day City Item August 23, 1874 [The Mutuals won 23-22 per Item 8/25/1874.]

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a second nine

Date Sunday, August 30, 1874
Text

The second nine of the Flyaways consists of young and promising players; several of them would play with credit in the first nine.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a double step pitching delivery

Date Saturday, September 5, 1874
Text

Their [Chelsea of Boston] pitcher [Egan] needs watching by opposing nines, as in his striving to deliver with a double step he places his feet not only back of his position, but also in front, thereby committing a balk each time.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the routine use of substitute runners for pitchers; courtesy runner

Date Sunday, September 6, 1874
Text

It has come to be almost a custom with some clubs to insist upon having a substitute to run for the pitcher, although no such privilege is allowed by the rules, no substitute being allowed to run for any player in a nine unless by consent of the opposite party, except in cases of positive inability to run from illness or injury. In the match at Hartford on Thursday–says the Hartford Times–“considerable delay occurred on the start because the Mutuals refused to play unless a substitute would be allowed to run for Mr. Matthews, whom they claimed was physically incapacitated for doing his own running. The Hartfords, very properly with think, insisted that Matthews should run. Because he happens to be a very skillful pitcher, and because he, unfortunately, is not physically strong, is no reason why the Hartford Club should save him to slaughter themselves with.” Of course the “illness or injury” which would disable a pitcher from running the bases would materially interfere with his pitching, and if he is able to pitch he generally is able to run. This substitute business has been run into the ground this season. In one amateur club they have carried it so far as to put forward their swiftest and best runner to act as base-runner for three or four of the nine, a most unfair proceeding, not to mention the direct violation of the rules it admits of.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

poor pitching straight on the bat

Date Sunday, September 6, 1874
Text

[Chicago vs. Philadelphia 9/5/1874] The pitching of Zettlein was straight on the bat, and thus the enormous quantity of base hits are accounted for.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitches not called either ball or strike

Date Friday, September 11, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Athletic 9/10/1874] McMullin then had a chance to save the game, and all eyes watched him eagerly; the first and second balls he received were “beauties,” but he did not strike; the third ball being also good, “one strike” was called on him; two more capital deliveries were made to him, but he did not attempt to strike; he then went out on a foul-tip, brilliantly taken by White!

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an English description of pick-off moves

Date Saturday, September 12, 1874
Text

Another remarkable feature of the game is the process which takes the place of stumping out by the wicket-keeper at cricket. If a runner unwarily advances too far from his base in order to gain beforehand some of the distance which he hopes to run, it seems competent for the bowler to put him out by throwing the ball into the base before he can return to it. This gives rise to the employment of the same kind of histrionic feints and ruses which make a distinguishing feature of American card-games. A bowler will watch his opportunity two or three times, and apparently abandon the idea of outwitting the runner. Then, as he seems about to deliver the ball, with a marvelously rapid change of action he will do his best to throw the runner out. This, amongst other things, lends a variety to the game, and helps to keep the spectator amused., quoting The London Saturday Review

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

English reactions to the American tourists

Date Sunday, September 13, 1874
Text

[from an interview of John Clapp] R.–How did they receive and treat you?

C.–Well, they seemed rather indifferent, just as if they didn’t think either we or our game amounted to much.

R.–You saw, I suppose, that they were slightly conceited?

C.–Slightly? Slightly ain’t the word for it! Confoundedly conceited!

R.–And you didn’t like it?

C.–No, none of us did. I’m every bit as good as any Englishman, I don’t care who he is. We outbatted them and outfielded them all the time, but they grunted about “form,” and called us “sloggers,” until we laughed more than we sneered.

C.–They didn’t seem about to appreciate our game?

C.–No, they were very slow and stupid about it. They were so much absorbed in their own game that they didn’t seem able to understand anything else. The Philadelphia All-Day City Item September 13, 1874

Rep.–Did the English treat you pretty well?

W. –Well–fairly. The truth is, they are a plethoric people, and well set in their opinions. Of course they think cricket “the thing,” and B.B., “Oh–ah–yes–you know–ah!”

[from an interview of Harry Wright] Philadelphia All-Day City Item September 13, 1874

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early use of “slugging” borrowed from cricket

Date Saturday, September 19, 1874
Text

[The American tourists play a cricket match in Dublin] The grounds here are the poorest we have yet played on, being very soft, and the grass in the outfield quite long; so our long hits that would have yielded four and five runs on other grounds have not been good for more than one or two, which will account for the unusually small score. The advantage was altogether with the crickets, as they get their runs more on singles, and we depend on slugging, as they call it here.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

facing to the opposite field; advice on batting order

Date Saturday, September 19, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs. Boston 9/12/1874] McVey opened the fifth inning, and getting a ball to suit him, he sent it short to centre field and earned a base. Then came Leonard, who, properly “facing” for right field–the point to play when there is a man at first or second–hit a beauty for two bases, and send Mack home with flying colors... O’Rourke followed with a telling fair-foul for two bases (these three fine hitters are too close together in the order of striking, Harry)...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a slide into second

Date Saturday, September 19, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Athletic 9/10/1874] Leonard [at first base]...ran to second, and slid in beautifully under Fisler [second baseman], who handled the ball rather slowly, which Clapp [catcher] threw to him, and, on appeal, the umpire said “Not out.” After listening to remarks by the Athletic players, he changed his decision, in direct violation of the rules, which prohibit any reversal of a decision on the testimony of players in cases of bases being run.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire still misinterpreting balls, strikes, and wides

Date Saturday, September 19, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Athletic 9/10/1874] Mr. Bomeisler, no doubt, did his best to act impartially, but his interpretation of the rules in calling balls, strikes, and wides was incorrect.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a bases loaded walk

Date Sunday, September 20, 1874
Text

[Chicago vs. Boston 9/16/1874] In the fourth inning the Bostons received a run on called balls. The bases were full, and White was at the bat. Mr. McLean called two wides and two balls, and then, after a long succession of bad pitches, he gave White the base, which brought O’Rourke home. The umpire was sufficiently lenient, but not too much so; but the error was very expensive to the Chicagos, as the inning did not close until six runs had been scored by the Bostons, although two hands were out when Zettlein made the error.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

sarcastic musical commentary

Date Sunday, September 20, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs. Boston 9/12/1874] As the Bostons went out with a cypher for the third time, the band offered its condolence by playing ‘Oh, dear, what can the matter be?’ and the crowd showed appreciation of the joke by hearty laughter and applause.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a suggestion for salaried umpires

Date Sunday, September 20, 1874
Text

[from an interview of Jimmy Wood] R.–Do you approve of the rule, paying the umpire?

Mr. W.–Unqualifiedly. It is putting the umpire on his mettle. He feels that the eyes of the country are upon him, and he would not dare to do otherwise than right, under the circumstances. I think that the next Base-Ball Convention should designate Six Umpires for the whole country, who shall be paid as they are now–their expenses and so much a game, or the convention might fix a certain salary per year for each. Philadelphia All-Day City Item September 20, 1874

a suggestion to abolish fair-fouls

[from an interview of Jimmy Wood] R.–One word more, what is your opinion of “fair-foul” balls?

Mr. W.–If I had my way, I would stop them altogether, for I believe that one-half of the “fair-fouls,” so called, are complete fouls escaping entirely the notice of the umpire. Our only way to correct fair-fouls is to throw them out altogether. Perhaps, the best way to stop the evil, would be to draw a line from the third base to two feet in front of the home-plate, requiring the batter to keep the position he now occupies. Philadelphia All-Day City Item September 20, 1874

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a suggestion to allow runner to over-run all bases

Date Sunday, September 20, 1874
Text

[from an interview of Jimmy Wood] R.–Have you any suggestion to make as to base running?

Mr. W.–I have. I would allow a runner to overrun the second and third bases, just as he does the first.

R.–Why?

Mr. W.–Because it would prevent a great many serious accident, both to the basemen and to the runner. This was Mr. Chadwick’s original proposition, and it ough5t to have been adopted at the time. As we have seen the wisdom of over-running the first base, so we should be allowed to over-run the other bases.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no money made in English; Athletic finances

Date Sunday, September 20, 1874
Text

The stated meeting of the Athletic club was held on Monday night last. The main matter of interest was the report of the treasurer, Mr. Cragin, by which it appears that no money was made in England, but that the expenses were realized from different sources. The club now has a balance of $2,000, and the many games to be played, several of which will draw very large audiences, will probably give a a balance of about $5,000 at the end of the season.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

disagreement over a substitute runner; courtesy runner

Date Thursday, September 24, 1874
Text

[Philadelphia vs. Athletic 9/23/1874] An amusing incident occurred in the 5th inning: a brief delay was caused by Clapp asking for some one to “run;’ objection being made to Murnan, McGeary, and several others, Clapp finally said “I’ll run myself!” A great deal of laughter followed when he went out on an easy foul fly, and the crowd “rigged” him good humoredly.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

attempting to hit a fair-foul

Date Saturday, September 26, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs. Mutual 915/1874] McMullen, after trying to “hit to leg”–that is, hit a ball “fair,” and yet so it would rebound short to the foul-ball field–sent a sharp bounder to Matthews [pitcher], and, of course, was thrown out at first base. New York Clipper September 26, 1874

umpire watching closely for fair-fouls

[Athletic vs. Mutual 915/1874] McLean [umpire] watched the fair-fouls so ably in this game that none of these hits were made which did not fairly give the strikers their base. New York Clipper September 26, 1874

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rumors of discord in the Boston Club

Date Sunday, September 27, 1874
Text

There is trouble in the Boston Club. The rumor was current on the street and at the ground yesterday, and I heard it again to-day. The recent defeats by the Athletics, Mutuals and Philadelphias have, it is believed, caused a feeling of uneasiness among the members of the club, who, as a matter of course, talked “seriously” with the managers, and the latter have in turn talked to the players. The trouble has spread rapidly, and has an unpleasant aspect for the future welfare of the club. If the Bostons do not hold the championship there will be no professional club in Boston during ‘75. Harry Wright, I understand, became quite angry when he was talked to about the loss of the games, and Dame Rumor says he has threatened to hand in his resignation. It is also stated that he and his brother George have received proposals to take charge of the new professional club of St. Louis, to start which $10,000 have already been subscribed. Should the Boston Directors “push” him, it is more than likely that he will accept the offer from St. Louis...

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the organization of the St. Louis Club

Date Sunday, September 27, 1874
Text

On Tuesday evening last a meeting of gentlemen prominent in base ball circles was held at the Southern Hotel, St. Louis, mainly for the purpose of organizing a professional base ball club, to represent that city next season. It was agreed that the capital stock should be $10,000, in shares of $50 each, with the restriction that no one person take more than ten shares, and fifty per cent. to be paid in by the first of March next. $5,800 of the capital stock was raised immediately, and a committee of three appointed to draft articles of incorporation for the club. The meeting then adjourned until next week.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

season tickets give reserved seats to all games

Date Monday, September 28, 1874
Text

Will you be kind enough to answer the following: Does the holder of a season ticket–say the Athletic–have a certain seat in the Athletics pavilion set aside for him? And is said seat his exclusively all season? Does the holder of said ticket have to pay to see games played on the grounds which the Athletic do not participate in?

[Answer:] At the beginning of the season it was agreed upon between the Philadelphias and Athletics that their “members’” tickets should be “good” on their days, or at any game that might be played on their days. A reserved seat–numbered–properly belongs to every members’ ticket, and he is entitled to said seat whenever he chooses to claim it.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a game stalled out

Date Tuesday, September 29, 1874
Text

[Chicago vs. Athletic 9/28/1874] The game was well contested up to the close of the 8th inning, when the score showed 7 to 7. On the 9th inning the Athletics went to the bat determined to “do or die.”

McGeary made first on drop by Glenn. Anson hit a two-gbaser to right field. McBride brought both in by a magnificent two-base hit to left field, and came in himself on Hines’ slow handling of Reach’s ball. Sutton was missed on an easy foul fly by Glenn, and it now became apparent that the visitors had determined to prolong the game so as to have it called by the umpire on account of the darkness, and the score to go back to the previous inning, when Reach scored, and Sutton struck three times in succession, Malone purposely mising the third and overthrowing to first. Anson, who was running for Sutton, stopped half way on the line of base, but no one would put him out. Reach got mad at him, and went to first himself, Gedney, Batten, and McMullen all got their bases on hits, aided by their opponents’ errors. No one would stop balls thrown, throw or catch them. Finally, Murnan was thrown out by Zettlein to Malone, the other three strikers scoring.

McGeary went out by Hines to Glenn, and then Zettlein, who, together with Malone, had been trying to have the umpire call the game, walked in from the pitcher’s place, and said “We might as well give up this game.” To this Malone assented, and immediately thereupon Mr. McLean, the umpire, walked over to the Athletic Pavilion, and declared the game forfeited to the Athletics by a score of 9 to 0.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a grand slam home run on a fair-foul under the seats

Date Tuesday, September 29, 1874
Text

[Baltimore vs. Boston 9/25/1874] In the third inning the home club lead [sic] off with three clean hits (the only good display at the bat on their side). McVey then followed with a fair foul (?), which struck within a few inches of his feet, and taking an eccentric bound was lost under the seats to the left. A “home run” was the resulting, bringing in the three others...

Source Baltimore American
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an early movement to abolish fair-foul hits

Date Tuesday, September 29, 1874
Text

The movement that originated in Baltimore in 1873 to abolish fair foul hits, but which was unfavorably entertained by the delegates to the convention that year, and which was also voted down in the meeting here last March, has been growing in favor. Harry Wright, of the Boston, who has done much to oppose this beneficial improvement, has at last seen the importance of this new rule. It is now proposed to place the intersection of the foul line three feet in front of the home plate, running them in a direct line to the bases. All foul balls bounding fair within the of the first and third bases to be fair hits, and bases can be run upon them. This rule is the most important of any yet made to improve the game, as it takes much out of the hands of an umpire. Base runners can then make their bases without waiting for an umpire to declare them foul balls; but all foul balls bounding fair beyond the first and third bases to be called foul balls, and no bases can be run upon them.; also Philadelphia Sunday Republic October 4, 1874

Source Baltimore American
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the proposed reorganization of the Pythian Club

Date Thursday, October 1, 1874
Text

[from a letter by J. W. H. Hacks, M.D., regarding Octavius Catto:] Now, friends of the lamented Catto, please help me in an honest and just cause, that is, to raise Money enough to erect a creditable Tomb Stone at, or as near the place where the body rested, as possible; I think we can find the spot. To further this object, I propose we reorganized the Famous, Reliable, and well-known PYTHIAN BASE BALL CLUB, and hire Ten of the best Base Ball players that can be obtained; pay them as much wages as possible; the same to be under regular base-ball restrictions and forfeitures, for non-compliance to the rules and law; said players to be ready to enter the field on or about the 1 st of April, 1875, and continue in our service until the middle of October following. All money accumulated from the games played, except players’ salaries and direct expenses of said club, shall be for the sole purpose of erecting a monument to the memory of our lamented Cato [sic.]. We have six months to hold meetings and form plans. I ask for your liberal co-operation. All true Pythians, remember, Valentine.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reduced attendance

Date Saturday, October 3, 1874
Text

[Chicago vs. Atlantic 9/25/1874] The Chicago White Stockings appear to be more successful in drawing their salaries than in attracting the equivalent to the treasury of their club. This fact was attested on Sept. 25, when an audience scarcely exceeding two hundred persons witnessed their seventh championship match with the Atlantics on the Union Grounds, Brooklyn, N.Y.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Mutuals a cooperative nine

Date Sunday, October 4, 1874
Text

A peculiar position of affairs will occur should the Mutual nine win the pennant, inasmuch as most of the nine have agreed to go to Hartford for 1875–being a co-operative nine, they can sign for next season now if they choose–that city being bound to have a champion team for Connecticut next season if money can get it.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the pitcher playing a waiting game

Date Sunday, October 4, 1874
Text

[Chicago vs. Athletic 9/28/1874] Zettlein, when McMullin came to the bat, commenced his old trick of teasing that striker by refusing to pitch the ball for a few minutes, and then when McMullin growing tired of waiting would put down his bat, Zettlein would deliver the ball. This continued for about ten minutes much to the audibly-expressed disgust of almost every person on the ground, only terminated by McMullin going out at first base.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rooting against Boston

Date Sunday, October 4, 1874
Text

[Mutual vs. Athletic 10/3/1874] Strange to say, a large portion of the audience favored a victory for the Mutual, for the reason that it would greatly help them against the Boston, and the Athletic having no chance for the championship. In all probably it is the desire of Philadelphia to see the pennant to go New York.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

confusion over a supposed dropped third strike

Date Sunday, October 4, 1874
Text

[Mutual vs. Athletic 10/3/1874] [bases loaded: McGeary on third; Anson on second; McBride on first] Gedney struck out, but Higham [catcher] too the ball on the bound. Gedney, believing he had missed it, started for first, and this confused Higham, who touched the home plate just as the umpire declared Gedney out. Anson believing also that there was a force, started for third and there stood with McGeary; Higham ran to third, and as he approached the base McGeary left it and ran under his arm. Higham touched anson on the coat and demanded that he be declared out, while in the meantime McGeary came in. The umpire rightly declared Gedney the only one out, but the Mutual could not understand this, and it was only after much talking that the difficulty was unraveled. The pint laid in the fact that McGeary left third before Anson was touched, and the latter could not be out, as he then had undisputed possession of the base.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a high underhanded delivery

Date Saturday, October 10, 1874
Text

[Baltimore vs. Mutual 10/2/1874] [The Mutuals] found Manning’s rather high underhand-throw delivery hard to punish.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

George Bradley’s delivery

Date Saturday, October 10, 1874
Text

In the person of Bradley they [the Eastons] have a very effective pitcher, who delivers a very swift underhand-thrown ball by a low and legal swing of the arm, the speed of which proves puzzling to the best of batsmen.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitching speed limited by the catcher

Date Sunday, October 11, 1874
Text

[Easton vs. Athletic 10/7/1874] [Clapp unavailable to catch] ...McGeary declined playing in the game as catcher, preferring to play his own position of short-stop, and Anson accordingly was substituted, and considering the little practice he has had in that difficult position he did remarkably well, McBride, however, failing to pitch as swiftly as he would with McGeary or Clapp behind him, and consequently being easily punished by the Eastons.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Bobby Matthews’ curvers; Mutuals depend on pitching

Date Sunday, October 11, 1874
Text

[Athletic vs. Mutual 10/6/1874] On this occasion Matthews put forth his full strength as a pitcher, and made the field’s work exceedingly easy. He is the strength of the Mutual Club, and on his efforts depend their chances for victory. He has several weak fielders back of him, while the batting of the nine is, as a rule, very poor indeed. The Athletics took a heavy trip to Chicago, being unable to combat the “Little Engine’s” curvers. Thirty-four men only went to the bat, seven being left...

Source Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the ill effects of cricket hitting

Date Sunday, October 11, 1874
Text

Both the Athletic and Boston clubs have very good reason to regret the European trip, not only on account of want of pleasure on the trip, and pecuniary losses, but far more so on the damage done to their batting, especially by so much cricket playing, as to this is the loss of so many games plainly to be attributed. Those who notice their batting will see how apt the strikers are to indulge in cricket hits, which are very unsafe in base ball.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the dissolution of the Baltimore club; the effect on the pennant race

Date Sunday, October 11, 1874
Text

The Baltimore club, as a distinct organization, ceases to exist, but the nine keeps together on the co-operative system, and will play all the games they can. The Boston and Mutual clubs have been assuring them their expenses and a share of gate money, and thus increasing their scores of games won. Wouldn't it be wisdom for the Athletic club to play a little of this dodge? They can afford it, with the surplus in the treasury that they have and the probable good receipts of the present month. Philadelphia Sunday Republic October 11, 1874

To day we are to play our last game with the Baltimores. Everything is in confusion with them and they say this will be their last game. White and Bieleski have left them, and to night others go, Houck having told them the best thing they could do was to go home. It is provoking to think that we should have had to come here at all. Yesterday, our receipts after paying the umpire was $5. To day they will be – nix. It is very cold here and I am afraid it will be uncomfortable for the spectators this afternoon. Yesterday we had about 70. It was 4 Oclock before we [began] playing, Snyder refusing to play unless he was paid some $5 due him. Houck refused to pay him, but a purse of $5.50 was made up for him by some persons–sports–who wished to bet on the game or runs, and he then dressed. [from a letter from Harry Wright to Frederick Long writing from Baltimore, dated October 14, 1874]

On Wednesday afternoon last the Baltimore club disbanded. For over a month the players had no club behind them, but kept together and went to Boston and played, receiving their expenses and one-third of the receipts, and did a similar thing in New York. The Athletic refused, hence the disbandment. This opens a very important question, on which two sides are taken. From our reading of the rather ambiguous rule, we believe that all games won from them by other clubs must be deducted from the lists of victories of the different club, as the Baltimore had played but four games with the Athletic, and the rules provide that no games between two clubs count unless each of said clubs play at least five games with every other club in the arena. Some believe this to mean that only the games between such clubs as fail to play the required number shall not be counted, but this would be unfair, and we cannot take that view of it. It is a matter that will have to be settled by the Judiciary Committee. Our views are generally supported, we find, and if they are right, then the deduction brings both the Mutual and Boston clubs down nearer to the Athletic; and had the latter a good nine, they would yet have a fair chance for the championship. But they have not, and all it can do from the present appearances is to leave them a much more respectable third. The deduction hurts both the Philadelphia and Chicago clubs, and throws them further behind the Athletic. Philadelphia Sunday Republic October 18, 1874

The Bostons, last week, went to Baltimore, and defeated the Baltimores of that city three successive games by the respective scores of 7 to 4, 14 to 7, and 15 to 2. The Baltimores disbanded immediately afterwards, and the Bostons, after keeping them in existence for a couple of weeks, at a considerable expense, are much chagrined to find that none of their victories over the Baltimores will count as legal. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury October 18, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

undress uniform

Date Saturday, October 17, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Atlantic 10/7/1874] The Bostons, in undress every-day uniform, presented a singular appearance on the field. The Atlantics were more particular about their personal appearance, and Dehlman had to tie a double bow-knot in his shoe-string and comb his hair before he felt disposed to appear on the field.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chadwick the “father of the game”

Date Sunday, October 18, 1874
Text

[Knickerbocker veterans vs. picked nine of veterans 10/12/1874] ...the umpire of the day [Chadwick]–yclept the “Father of the game”...

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the veterans insist on playing under modified current rules

Date Sunday, October 18, 1874
Text

[Knickerbocker veterans vs. picked nine of veterans 10/12/1874] It had been proposed to lay the game under the old rules, but the old duffers wouldn’t hear of such a thing. They wanted the improved game or none at all. Davis was indignant at the idea of playing under the boys’ rule of the bound-catch. “Give us the professional rules and we’ll show you how to play ball.” Of course, the umpire had to obey, and the game was played under the present rules, except that no balls or wides were called, as the old-fashioned pitch marked the delivery of the ball on both sides, and had “wides” been called half the nine would have gone to their bases on them in each inning, anything like accuracy of delivery being impossible under the rule of a square pitch unless the pace be slow.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

confusion around a blown foul call

Date Sunday, October 18, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Athletic 10/16/1874] A dispute arose in the second inning of the Bostons, which threatened at one time to put a stop to the game, it happening in this wise: McVey had reached first base by a good hit, and ran to second on Leonard’s hit to Battin that the umpire called “foul,” and the ball being fielded to McBride [pitcher] at first, McVey or Leonard if the ball was fair was certainly out; but the umpire said he had made a mistake and meant to call Leonard’s hit “fair,” and decided neither out, thus making the Athletics suffer for his mistake. Finally, after twenty minutes wrangling, the umpire reversed his first decision of foul, and therefore had no alternative but to give Leonard out at first base, and the game proceeded, the anything but honorable conduct of the Bostons in claiming and insisting upon a palpably unfair advantage thus given by an umpire’s mistake, thoroughly disgusting everyone on the ground and losing their many friends. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury October 18, 1874

[Boston vs. Athletic 10/16/1874] Here followed one of the most extraordinary scenes we have ever witness on a ball field. McVey hit a clean corker to right field, and took first base. Leonard then hit a ball, promptly called by the umpire [Nick Young] “foul.” McVey had moved to second, and Battin quickly fielded the ball to McBride at first. Leonard had not run, as a matter of course, and McVey was certainly out. Mr. Young declared, in the coolest manner possible, that no one was out, as he had designated the nature of the ball wrongly, and that Leonard was entitled to first and McVey to second. As a matter of course, fair or foul, either McVey or Leonard was out, and here a squabble ensued. Mr. Young continued unseemingly [sic] obstinate, and was urged to stand firm by the high-toned Boston players, who never take unfair advantages. His stand was so manifestly unjust that it can only be ascribed to Mr. Young’s well known partiality for the Boston Club. McBride very properly at the time refused to continue a game where the simplest rules were to be violated in such an open and barefaced manner, and for twenty minutes a confused parley ensued.

The Bostons and Mr. Young succeeded in carrying the point by a compromise, (there could have been no compromise, properly,) by which McVey was given second base, and Leonard declared out. This ridiculous conclusion seems satisfactory, however, and the game continued. During this episode the spectators behaved in a manner so orderly and quiet that it reflects credit upon their good judgement, where their prejudices had been so openly challenged and provoked. The inning resulted in a blinker for the Bostons, to the general satisfaction. Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch October 18, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the status of the pennant race

Date Monday, October 19, 1874
Text

In regard to the championship question, I think that will be decided before we reach home. The Mutuals at best can only win six more games, and to tie them we have to win but four, and then be entitled to the championship, we having the best record. The chances are they will lose two, very likely three of the six games they have yet to play. If our two games in New York were with the Mutuals in place of the Atlantics, we would be more certain of wining them, for there is more unity in the Atlantics. [from a letter from Harry Wright to Frederick Long written in Philadelphia, dated October 19, 1874]

Source From a letter from Harry Wright to Frederick Long written in Philadelphia
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

managers Davidson and Cammeyer of the Mutuals

Date Sunday, October 25, 1874
Text

Managers Davidson and Cammeyer, with such “vets” as Pearce and Start to lead...

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

strict and lax umpiring

Date Sunday, October 25, 1874
Text

[Boston vs. Philadelphia 10/19/1874] The Philadelphias would not consent to Dean acting again as umpire, as he was entirely too lenient in the two preceding games, and McMullin, of the Athletics, was consequently selected to fill that position, and his strict interpretation of the rules made Spalding pitch less wildly, and, therefore, he was easily punished.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Mutuals close the season early

Date Sunday, October 25, 1874
Text

The withdrawal of the Mutual from further play was a bomb-shell on many who had bet on their getting the championship. They have, for consolation, the knowledge that they would have lost their money in any event. Philadelphia Sunday Republic October 25, 1874

the colored championship of Philadelphia

We, the members of the Active Base Ball Club, of West Philadelphia, colored, want the public to understand that we claim the championship of this city, as we have played twenty games and lost two this year. It is rumored that the Williams Base Ball Club are champions, but they are not. The Williams have got the name but the Actives have got the games as they would not accept any more challenges. We have played twice and they disappointed us the third time, and we claim championship. Philadelphia All-Day City Item October 29, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Reid of the Dispatch resigns as Philadelphia Club secretary

Date Sunday, November 1, 1874
Text

David L Reid, who has most creditably acted as corresponding secretary since the organization of the club, resigned that position at the recent meeting [of the Philadelphia Club].

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the organization of the Centennial Club

Date Sunday, November 1, 1874
Text

The third club for this city has assumed definite form and is a fact. The fee for membership is $25, and nearly thirty gentlemen have signed the subscription rolls. It is unlikely that more than one or two of the players will be men who have before played as professionals, the effort being to obtain the best amateurs of the city, and by strict discipline and good management to bring out the fine qualities which it is so well known many of our amateurs possess. The club will be known as the “Centennial Base Ball Club,” and probably Mr. Charles Rollins will be elected president. An application will shortly be made to Councils for a least of the waste grounds of the Water Department, at Corinthian and Girard avenues, which the club will fit up in a simple but commodious manner. The idea is to charge but twenty-five cents admission and thus popularize the club. Philadelphia Sunday Republic November 1, 1874

The Centennial Base Ball Club was organized on Nov. 7th by the appointment of the following officers and managers: C. E. Rollins, President, W.D Allen, treasurer; J. Bard Worrell, Secretary; Mr. A. E. Story, Wm. F. McCully, A. E. Smyth and J. B. Cooke were elected Directors to serve for the ensuing year. The capital stock of the corporation was fixed at $10,000, divided into 200 shares at $50 each. Philadelphia All-Day City Item November 15, 1874

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

weak enforcement of the rule against engaging players before the close of the season

Date Sunday, November 1, 1874
Text

As far as violation of the rules prohibiting the employment of players as the end of the season is concerned, scarcely a club in the country is safe. The best way this year is to overlook all and to announce that next year the rule will be rigidly enforced.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Republic
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the earnings of the Atlantic Club

Date Sunday, November 15, 1874
Text

Tipper, of Hartford Conn., has received a letter from Van Delft, secretary of the Atlantic Club, inviting him to join the Atlantic nine for the season of 1875, on the co-operative plan. The net earnings of that club averaged more than $800 to a man this season.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

attendance down due to the economy

Date Sunday, November 15, 1874
Text

[from the annual report of the Athletic Club] As you are aware, owing to the dullness of the times and the consequent scarcity of money, as well as from other causes, the attendance at games was much smaller this year than the year previous. Yet, although our expenses were increased by thousands of dollars, we congratulate the club on its financial condition, notwithstanding the trip to Europe, which promised so much, was a financial failure.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Athletic Club finances 2

Date Tuesday, November 10, 1874
Text

Balance on hand last season........................$24.49

Rent from Philadelphia Club..................$1,000.00

Rent from refreshment stand.....................$150.00

Rent from sheep pasture..............................$40.00

Sale of 256 members tickets...................$3,840.00

Receipts from games in Unites States..$19,005.90

Receipts from games in Europe..............$1,799.60

Refunded by Hartford Club on account of

W.C. Fisher.....................................$71.00

_____________

Total $25,950.99

EXPENDITURES

Salaries paid to players........................$13.937.70

Rent of ground..........................................$200.00

Rent of room.............................................$201.25

Burial of H. Painter.....................................$59.00

Base ball materials, uniforms, etc.............$513.88

Traveling expenses in the United States$3,091.04

Traveling expenses in Europe................$3,396.55

Painter and Riffert’s salaries.....................$462.50

Ground and incidental expenses............$3,193.09

_____________

Total $25,955.01

balance in treasury...................................$875.98

; also PSM 11/15/1874

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catching the curve pitcher

Date Sunday, November 15, 1874
Text

The slate for the coming Mutual nine for 1875 replaces Hicks in his former position as catcher, and he will have the arduous task of facing the hot and lively music of Matthews’s curved-line delivery, the eccentricity of its lines requiring great activity and keen sight, and above all, an equable temper on the part of the catcher.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Athletics should have purchased their own ground

Date Monday, November 16, 1874
Text

If the club had taken our advice twelve years ago, and purchased the old playing ground, at Seventeenth and Master streets, it would to-day have been worth a quarter of a million dollars. We begged and implored; but so blind were they, so ignorant, indeed, that they could not see nor understand what we meant. Philadelphia All-Day City Item November 16, 1874 [N.B.–Fitzgerald did in fact make this suggestion in 1866. There is no known record of it from 1862.]

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

playing to the point spread

Date Saturday, November 28, 1874
Text

...there is too much reason to suspect that there still was considerable fraud indulged in by the small minority of unreliables who crept into the arena during 1874; the form in which this fraud appeared being chiefly in the “selling” of bets on contests being won and lost by so many innings’ runs. Thus, if it was found that pools were bought on a club’s winning a match in one or two innings, arrangements would be made by the knaves of the teams to “sell” th game to the extent of the innings’ play concerned, but not to “throw” the entire game. But it frequently happen3ed that the intended fraud on the single innings’ play could not be consummated except at the cost of the loss of the game itself. To this extend “irregularities” were as much a feature in three of the principal cities of the Union in 1874 as in 1873.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the effect of the economy on attendance

Date Saturday, November 28, 1874
Text

The fact is, we are in the midst of hard times; and half a dollar is more to us now–and will be for a year or two to come–than even a dollar was before the panic; and to this fact, mainly, is the falling-off in the attendance at matches during 1874 due. That there has been a loss of attraction through the doubt of fair and legitimate play between some nines, in unquestioned; but the main cause is the inability to meet the expense of witnessing two or three games a week at half a dollar admission. Most assuredly this cause has affect the attendance at matches in Philadelphia and New York, if not in Boston, Hartford and Chicago; and it will be well for club-managers this coming spring to think well on the subject of a reduction of the tariff of admission to championship contests during 1875.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

confusion between balls and wides

Date Saturday, December 5, 1874
Text

In regard to the rule which requires “balls” to be called, in addition to “wides,” in cases where the delivery is neither wide nor yet over the base, that rule has not seemed to work so satisfactorily, owing chiefly to the fact that it has a tendency to confuse the umpire in judging of “wides.” The latter class of balls can be readily distinguished, and there is no difficulty whatever in calling them. It is otherwise, however, in the case of calling balls; and it is questionable whether the punishment of an inaccurate delivery of the ball by the pitcher should not be limited to the calling of “wides,” especially as the season’s play has shown that this calling of “balls” rather cramps the pitcher’s movements for strategic play.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the principles behind rules changes

Date Saturday, December 5, 1874
Text

The principle to work upon, in amending the rules of play each season, is to equalize the powers of attack and defense as much as possible, so as not, in the one case, to allow the pitcher to have undue latitude for offensive operations, nor, on the other hand, the give the batting too much advantage. This, and the rewording of the different sections of the rules so as to make them easier of interpretation and plain to the simplest minds in their meaning, should be the end aimed at in the work of amending the rules.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

what should be the legal delivery

Date Saturday, December 5, 1874
Text

The only point to be decided...in regard to the delivery of the ball, is what shall constitute a fair underhand throw, and to make a rule clearly defining this is now needed. Any delivery of the ball should be regarded as fair that is marked by a swing of the arm which does not allow the hand holding the ball to be raised above the hip. This admits of a clearly defined rule prohibiting overhand throwing and a round-arm delivery.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the beauty of pitching; underhand throwing

Date Sunday, December 6, 1874
Text

Experience has shown that the beauty of pitching is strategic delivery, and this is impossible unless the player who delivers the ball is allowed a method of delivery which admits of a combination of speed and accuracy of aim, or command of the ball, and this the underhand throw alone does. Of course it is proper that overhand throwing should be prohibited, though in reality it would not be as effective as that of underhand. It is well too to prevent the round-arm style of delivery as in bowling in cricket. But the pitcher in baseball should be allowed the privilege either to pitch the ball–viz., toss it to the bat, jerk it–a less effective style than the underhand throw–or deliver it by an underhand throw, provided that in the movement in swinging his arm forward to deliver the ball by such a throw he does not raise his hand above the hip. This should be the rule. To liit the delivery of the ball to “a square pitch” would be to return to the old time rule of heavy batting, long games, large scores and the bound catch of our school-boy games of twenty years ago. In fact, no such splendid displays of the beauties of baseball as have been shown this past season could have been exhibited except under the rule of an underhand throw delivery governed by the rule “wide balls.

Source ” New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a discourse on fair-foul batting

Date Saturday, December 12, 1874
Text

A feature of the season’s play has been the success attendant upon the style of batting technically known as “fair-foul” hitting; that is, the hitting of balls which rebound from the bat so close to the home base and which take such a divergent angle from that of ordinary hits–to “foul”–as to render it almost impossible for any infielder to get at them in time to cut off the striker at first base. By players not well versed in what constitutes scientific batting, fair-foul batting is called “baby batting.” This comes from questionable consistency from batsmen who pride themselves on heavy hitting, a style of batting any player in the fraternity can readily excel in. Next to calculating the force of the stroke of your bat so nicely as to sent the ball to any part of the field you regard as safe, the most difficult style of hitting is that of fair-foul batting. It should be borne in mind, in estimating the skill of the batsman, that the style of hitting is the most skillful, and therefore the most “scientific,” which yields as its certain result the easy occupancy of first base without given any fielder a chance to throw or catch the batsman out. This is what “fair foul” batting does under the rule of nine men in the field. To the ordinary looker-on, a long, high hit to the outer field seems quite a brilliant thing to do in comparison to the short, quick hit of the ball, which sends it rebounding, from fair ground to foul, about twenty or thirty yards out of the reach of any fielder. But the former is a hit any muscular novice in the game can readily succeed in making; while the other is one that none but practised batsmen, possessing keen sight and plenty of nerve, can excel in. While it remains the primary object of skillful batsmen to wield he ash so as to secure first base by the least exertion and with the most surety, fair-foul hitting will ever be the skillful feature of batting; and it must prevail until the adoption of the ten-men rule affords the field an opportunity to cover the fair-foul part of the field more effectually than can now be done. There is one amendment of the rules which is applicable to this fair-foul style of batting, which seems necessary, if only to render the decisions of the umpire, given on fair foul hits, more correct and satisfactory than they were last season; and that is, the introduction of a rule which shall require the ball to be struck in front of the line of the striker’s position, or order to be fair. This would considerably reduce the number of opportunities for the least skillful of fair-foul hits, and remove those doubtful cases in which the ball so frequently strikes the front part of the home base as to render it difficult for an umpire to decide on the question of fair or foul ball. In doing this, too, it would be well also to place the home base, not as the other bases are, with their centres on the corner of the base lines, but with the out lines of the home base resting on the foul ball lines. This would be advantageous, however, only in case the previous amendment should not be adopted.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

proposal to allow all bases to be overrun

Date Saturday, December 12, 1874
Text

One of the best amendments made by the rules referring to base-running, was that which admitted of a player’s overrunning first-base. In every way has it worked satisfactorily, and especially so in prevent accident from spraining the limbs of base-runners. As it has worked so well on one base, we see no reason why it should not be made applicable to the other two. In applying this rule to second and third bases, however, it will be necessary to require the base-runner in every case to return and retouch each base after overrunning, before he can attempt to make the next base. Were any other rule to prevail, the umpire would be constantly puzzled to judge correctly in the matter of a base-runner’s intention to make another base after overrunning; and endless disputes would arise. The more we can amend the rules so as to lessen the chapter of accidents, without materially changing the character and beauty of the play, the better; and thus allowing the bases to be overrun does the one without any respect weakening the play. New York Clipper December 12, 1874

the amateur Shibe club played on an enclosed ground

...[The Shibe Club] played a great many games on their own grounds, and some clubs playing all the series there, just to receive the gate money. Philadelphia All-Day City Item December 13, 1874

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catchers playing close to the bat too often

Date Saturday, December 26, 1874
Text

The catchers, as a general thing, made several important mistakes in their position. They too often wasted their time and labor in unnecessary and dangerous work in playing too close up behind the bat, and, moreover, were too fond of making showy throws to the bases, which frequently proved very costly as well as useless. Pluck in a catcher is a quality to be admired, but it does not therefore follow that a player should be constantly seeking for opportunities to show his endurance and courage in facing the music of a swift delivery close up behind the bat, at the cost of a loss of frequent chances to take “foul tips” on the bound, which are not possible catches except when standing at full distance from the home base. When the striker has made his first base, or any of the bases are occupied, it may be necessary to stand up behind the bat; but when there is no one on the bases, it is poor play. The majority of chances for catches from foul tips are afforded at the full distance from the base, and not when the catcher is near the bat. Besides, the pitcher cannot deliver with his best speed while his catcher is close up, except at the risk of passed balls. It is not at all necessary for balls from “strikes” to be taken on the fly. It looks very pretty to take them short from the bat, but the wear and tear of an unnecessary amount of the “playing up close” is indulged by catcher, the incentive generally being because it is plucky, and the spectators applaud it. Catchers should “play for the side” more, and for the crowd’s applause less; and they would then help to win more games than was done last season.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Creighton did not have a curve

Date Saturday, December 26, 1874
Text

There was a peculiarity of delivery which Creighton had not, and which some of our pitchers now possess, which is worth mentioning, and that is the power to deliver the ball with that puzzling horizontal curve which marks the delivery of Mathews and Cummings.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Harry Wright proposes simplified balls and strikes rules

Date Sunday, December 27, 1874
Text

Harry Wright advances the following able amendments to the rule: First, to call wides only, adding, that rule can be improved in other respects; also, thusly: The first ball to count–that about the first ball pitched not counting being unnecessary–should it be where the striker called for it, “one strike;” then allow two balls to be pitched–not more–if not where the striker called for them, the third to be called “wide,” if not struck or a striker called, or in other words, if not fair for the striker. The rule so altered would work this way. The pitcher would know that after a strike, a wide or a foul, he could pitch two balls before the umpire could call “wide ball” again, making nine balls pitched, provided they were all wide, before a batter could be sent to his base.

Each and every fair ball, if high or low, as called for, by to be called “strikes.” I think, by so altering it as above, the umpiring would be more even and systematic. The umpire would be allowed no discretion as to the number of balls he should allow to pass before calling. The pitcher would know the number of balls he could pitch without being punished by having “wides” called. The batter would have to be ready for any and every ball pitched over the plate, and either high or low, as called for, should he not strike. The spectators would know just what to expect from the umpire, and there would be no calling out to him to “wake up,” “call something,” &c., &c.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the condition of the Excelsior Club, The condition of the Excelsior Club

Date Error: Invalid time.
Text

The Excelsiors, of Brooklyn, have elected that worthy “rowist,” Richard Oliver, as their President. The other officials are not known to us, owing to their having elected a Secretary who is not posted. The Excelsior will play ball–at their rooms–during their season, on the green cloth of their billiard table, instead of the green turf, the Club, Micawber-like, waiting for something to turn up in the form of an amateur revival, instead of following the example of the Knickerbocker and helping to bring it about.

,

The Excelsior Club.--This veteran base ball organization of Brooklyn—the oldest amateur club in existence except the Knickerbocker of New York—held their twenty-first annual meeting Monday night, at their elegantly fitted club room, corner of Clinton and Montague streets, and the principal business transacted was the election for officers, which resulted as follows: President, R. Oliver; Vice President, E. Arnold; Recording Secretary, G. B. Abbott; Corresponding Secretary, W. C. Little; Treasurer, D. Chauncy, Jun.; Directors, Messrs. D. Chauncey, W. W. Richards, C. Sharpe and W. T. Laurence. It is to be hoped that with such an efficient board that they will look sharp after getting up a good nine to play ball in the amateur arena at Prospect Park this season. The club now musters 122 active members, and has a $2,000 surplus in its treasury. Brooklyn Eagle March 10, 1875

The Excelsior Club.--This base ball organization, which has such honorable antecedents as the most influential amateur club in Brooklyn, is about to disband as a base ball club, by discarding the name of base ball in connection with the Excelsior Club. Let the veterans and all lovers of the good old times of the Excelsiors rally to prevent this lowering of the old flag to the mere social element. Brooklyn Eagle March 19, 1875

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item, Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catcher’s gloves, catchers’ gloves

Date Error: Invalid time.
Text

Reach is making a new catcher’s glove that is excellent. The left hand covering is a full one, the right or throwing hand being covered with a half glove to aid throwing. The palm and joint padding is of felt. Reading Times March 31, 1884

A Cincinnati firm is making a new catcher’s glove that is said to be excellent. The left hand covering is a full one, the right or throwing hand being covered with a half glove to aid throwing. The palm and joint padding is of felt. Cleveland Leader April 2, 1884

The catchers at the game yesterday [Cleveland regulars vs. reserves] worked without gloves and consequently could not stand close to the bat. It was, of course, easy to steal bases, which accounts in a measure for the large score [10-9]. Cleveland Leader April 4, 1884

A new style of left-hand glove for catchers has been brought out. The fingers are stiff cowhide, jointed at the bottom with buckskin. The finger-ends are stout enough to withstand the severest blow, thus preventing the breaking of joints, from which men behind the bat have so long suffered. Cleveland Leader April 4, 1884

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune, Reading Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

fielders’ gloves, fielders gloves

Date Error: Invalid time.
Text

[reporting on the baseball tournament in Detroit] We have noticed in all the matches played thus far that the use of gloves by the players was to some degree a customary practice, which, we think, cannot be too highly condemned, and are of the opinion that the Custers would have shown a better score, if there had been less buckskin on their hands.

,

In NY Giants vs. Philadelphia game - "All the New York players wore gloves except pitcher Mattimore, and he probably would too, except that he would not have been able to pitch if he had.  Someone has suggested that the New York players are getting their hands white and soft for their appearance in society next winter."  Close play at 3B where third baseman Ewing appeared to tag out Farrar, "in spite of Ewing's deliberate movements with his heavily gloved hands." New York Tribune June 15, 1887 [from David Aricidiacono]

Source Detroit Free Press, New York Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger
Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
Project
Toolbox