Clippings:1865

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1865Clippings in 1865

Clippings in 1865 (94 entries)

Contents

a 'pudding' ball

Date Thursday, June 22, 1865
Text

The slow, twisty pitching of Martin was not as efficient against the Atlantic batting as some supposed it would be. The ball, however, was “pudding” and soft, and it was almost impossible to drive it any great distance; nevertheless, the Atlantics punished Martin's pitching rather lively.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a balk not a dead ball

Date Saturday, August 26, 1865
Text

[Answers to Correspondents] In playing base ball a man is on third base, a baulk is called on the pitcher, which the striker hits to field, and is caught out on the fly. Is the striker out, and does the player on third base make his run? ... The baulk gives the player his run in this instance. According to the present rules the striker is out on the fly. The rules will be amended at the next convention so as to make a ball dead on which a baulk is called.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a base runner picked off; customary to steal second when a man is on third

Date Wednesday, June 7, 1865
Text

[Enterprise vs. Gotham 6/6/1865] A Gothamite was on the 3d base, another on the 1st, and the striker at the bat. As is customary under such circumstances, the man on the 1st put for the 2d base, but he had mistaken O'Neil [the pitcher], who, quick as lightning, let the ball go the 2d, and quickly the Umpire exclaimed, “Out.” No more attempts were made to reach the base in that way.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

A benefit match for George Wright

Date Sunday, November 12, 1865
Text

[Camden vs. Olympic 11/8/1865] The Olympic and Camden Clubs engaged in a social contest on the Olympic ground, on Wednesday afternoon. The occasion—designed as a testimonial benefit to Geo. Wright—brought out a goodly number of spectators.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

A bound game on ice

Date Thursday, January 12, 1865
Text

[Gotham vs. Atlantic on ice 1/12/1865] ...the rules of the National Association of necessity varied to suit the circumstances of the case, the old bound rule being observed in order to save time. Inasmuch as the Atlantics did not take a single fair ball on the bound, and their opponents only three in the whole game, but little time was gained by the change.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a club revived after the war

Date Sunday, June 11, 1865
Text

The Equity Club of this city, organized in 1860, but suspended operations during the war has reorganized, by the election of the following officers...

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a comment on Fitzgerald as umpire

Date Saturday, July 22, 1865
Text

[Lowell vs. Excelsior 7/21/1865] Col. Fitzgerald acted as Umpire, and had several very close points to decide. The Colonel's integrity is fully established, and of course no one would for an instant charge him with favoritism. An Umpire sees the play from an entirely different standpoint from the outside spectator, and render his decisions as he sees and believes it. If the Colonel would render his decision without essaying explanations therefor to the players who are the sufferers, it would be even better. It is an unthankful position, and deserves more charity than censure.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a definition of a jerk

Date Saturday, June 3, 1865
Text

We were several times question during the game in reference to the fairness of McSweeny’s delivery, some considering it a jerk. This question of jerking a ball is a rather difficult one to decide upon. A jerk, in the ordinary sense of the term, is made when the elbow of the arm, bearing the ball, touches the side of the person so delivering it, and we believe this is the definition applied in the case of the rules of the National Association. A ball can be sent with all the swiftness of this style of jerking without the elbow touching the side, but as it is difficult to see the motion, such style of delivery is not considered a jerk according to the rules in question, as we understand them. If McSweeny jerks a ball, so does Pratt, Sprague, and McBride. A jerk, in reference to pitching in base ball, is just as difficult of explanation of that of throwing in round arm bowling at cricket.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a game is thrown

Date Friday, October 27, 1865
Text

It will be remembered that at the time the Mutual and Eckford Clubs played at Hoboken, the latter winning, that it was rumored, and pretty strongly, too, that the game had been sold. All lovers of our national game were loth to believe such a report, and none more so than the Mutuals themselves. Even the newspaper writers, with one exception, refrained from commenting on the fact until the evidence should become so strong as to brook of no denial. The matter was referred to a committee of the Mutual Club to investigate, consisting of Messrs. Wildey, Burns, Lindsay, Brady and others, and the two first-named gentlemen have been assiduous in their efforts to ferret out the truth of the matter. It was hard to believe that any man, or set of men, could be so base as, for a paltry consideration, to entail infamy upon themselves, and discredit on the game.

The Committee set to work in good earnest, wisely keeping secret their deliberations, during the investigation, until the charge should be proven true or false to a certainty, and not until now has the result become known. It has at last been learned that not a single member of the nine was the “seller out,” but three players received money to throw the game. The Committee learned all sorts of facts and fictions before arriving at the truth, and finally amid the cloud of rumor and talk, they found the clear sky of truth. How link after link was found, until the chain of evidence is complete against these men, it would not be proper to divulge. The truth is known, however, beyond possibility of doubt, and “out of their own mouth have they been judged.” The truth is secured from admission on the part of the man who paid the money, giving time, and place, and amount, as well as by one of the parties making a “clean breast of the affair.” The arrangements were that these players were to receive $100, to be divided between them, and half of all the money won. The party making this proposition, claimed that he had won only $200, and had given them half. It is said that won much more, but the price of selling an important game, according to the evidence before the Committee, is $33.33 1/3 cents per man—rather a small price for honor and manhood.

Admission by one of the nine was made to the truth of the matter a few evenings since, under the following circumstances: The Committee after seeing the party who laid this scheme, visited a certain saloon in this city, and called out one of the parties accused. They there accused him of the whole matter, which at first he denied. They then told him that one of his “pals” had divulged, also telling how much each received, when the bargain was made, and that the odd dollar of the $100 was spent at the foot of Grand street for supper. So sudden was this avalanche of evidence, that this man then made a confession of the whole affair. The Mutuals intend publishing the entire affair, with resolutions, and after expulsion, they will send the resolutions broadcast through the press, and by mail, to every Base Ball Club in the country. This prompt and judicious action of the Mutuals, deserves praise, and it behooves ever lover of the game to give them their sanction and support.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a member suspended for delaying the game

Date Tuesday, August 8, 1865
Text

At a special meeting of the Star Club held last Thursday evening and called for the purpose of expressing their condemnation of the behavior of one of their nine during [their] late game with the Keystone Club, of Philadelphia, in that he intentionally played to delay the game, and acting in a manner prejudicial to the interests of the game; therefore, it was resolved that Thos. MacDiarmed be suspended from all participation in...games for the season...

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a pitcher's delivery

Date Saturday, July 22, 1865
Text

[Lowells of Boston vs. Excelsiors of Brooklyn 7/21/1865] [re G. Miller, Lowells' pitcher] For one who stands so erect, with no stride at all, he gets wonderful force on the balls, and should he take a wider stride, his pitching would prove more formidable.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a raid on Sunday ball players

Date Tuesday, September 26, 1865
Text

On Sunday afternoon about 500 persons were assembled at Fox hill, back of the Elysian Fields, to witness the base-ball games that take place there on every pleasant Sunday. On the two Sabbaths previous, the ball-players were notified by the police that they must desist, to which they paid but little heed. Accordingly on Sunday afternoon, Captain Davis, of the Hoboken police, accompanied by the entire police force, made a descent upon the Sabbath breakers, and succeeded in capturing about twenty of the ball-players, and the balance of the crowd escaped in all directions, some of them leaving behind their hats, coats, and vests. The prisoners were taken before Recorder Avery and fined one dollar each and costs, and at the same time were informed that ball-playing in the city limits on the Sabbath hereafter would not be allowed. There was a general scraping up of stamps to liquidate the fines, and some of the fancy-looking individuals were under the necessity of putting up their watches as collateral in order to raise the money.

Source New York World
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a resume of the history of the Minerva club

Date Saturday, May 13, 1865
Text

The Minervas held the Junior Championship from 1860 to 1863, when they disbanded, on account of the majority of their players joining a different kind of ball club, viz.: Uncle Sam’s Troops. Now, however, they have re-organized, selected a first rate nine, and, if anything can be gained by hard practice they will get it.–The Athletics have given them a day in each week on their unequaled ground, for practice. Their nine will probably contain the following players, who, it will be seen, constitute a strong team, and not to be easily defeated: Nicholson, Ayers, Thomas, Paul, Fox, Fitzgerald, Newman, Leonard, Culbert.

Source Philadelphia City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a runner allowed to return from third directly to first

Date Saturday, July 22, 1865
Text

[Lowell vs. Atlantic 7/20/1865] P. O’Brien...made his 1st base by a good hit... but Peter, while running from 1st to 3d on a hit by Sprague, which turned out to be a foul, returned to his 1st base without first touching his 2d on returning to his first; and though the ball passed by the pitcher to Adams was not held in time to put him out in one way, it was out, because of his failure to return to his base legitimately. An appeal being made to the umpire, he erroneously decided Peter not out...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a slow pitch with no twist

Date Wednesday, October 11, 1865
Text

[Enterprise of Baltimore vs. National of Washington 10/10/1865] Just as soon as Kinsley commenced to pitch it was apparent to all who had seen the Nationals play that the pitching would be completely used up, it being very slow and without a semblance of the “twist.

Source New York Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a third strike is equivalent to a foul ball

Date Saturday, March 25, 1865
Text

Every ball caught on the bound–unless the strike be a fair ball caught in the field–puts a player out just the same in the fly game as in the bound. Thus a player is put out on three strikes by a bound catch in the fly game; for although the ball is not called foul, it is equivalent to being so from the fact of its first touching the ground behind the line of the bases, like a foul ball. New York Clipper March 25, 1865 [see also NYC 6/17/1865 below.]

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a twenty-five cent admission

Date Tuesday, November 28, 1865
Text

[Atlantics vs. a picked nine 11/27/1865] The game was witnessed by a larger number of people than it was anticipated would visit the grounds, as it was supposed that the high charge for admission, (twenty-five cents), would keep many away. It is to be hoped that this is the last time such an entrance-fee will be asked to a base-ball match, save for a charitable purpose. New York World November 28, 1865

[Atlantics vs. a picked nine 11/27/1865] A large crowd of spectators were present, and the result proved to be very interesting to the club, inasmuch as they cleared over $600 by the speculation. The proprietors of the ground, with that liberality which has marked their course throughout the season, gave up the grounds to the club, for the benefit of the Atlantic nine, it being the second time they have done so this season. The club unwisely increased the charge of admission to twenty-five cents, greatly to the dissatisfaction of the hundreds to went up there supposing the usual fee of ten cents would only be demanded. The increased charge, of course, led to greater profits, but second experiment of the kind won’t succeed. New York Sunday Mercury December 3, 1865

Source New York World
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

abolishing post-game suppers

Date Saturday, March 4, 1865
Text

The New York, Brooklyn, and Newark clubs, have mutually agreed to do away with the custom of entertaining each other at the close of their games, and they have resolved hereafter only to extend such hospitalities to visiting clubs from other States, or from out of town localities. The regular suppers that followed the games played by clubs from Newark or Brooklyn visiting New York and vice versa were very expensive in the aggregate, besides being objectionable in other respects.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Date Wednesday, June 14, 1865
Text

[classified advertisement] Base Ball Shoes and Cricket Spikes, Patent Leather Boots and Shoes, Buckle Shoes in Every Variety at Slaters' 2 Courtlandt street, near Broadway, N.Y.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

advice to umpires 2

Date Friday, June 16, 1865
Text

Now a word as to Umpires. This position is certainly one of great embarrassment, and responsibility, and where an Umpire desires to act impartially, prompt and decisive, he is forced to watch every movement of the players, and keep his eye continually on the ball. To err is human, and hence when an Umpire, acting with a desire to discharge this unpleasant duty faithfully, commits an error, or renders a decision, which to a player may seem unjust, or even palpably wrong, have charity, and give him credit for the good decisions he has rendered, and let them counterbalance the errors. And it is a great error to suppose that when a decision is rendered through misapprehension, or a wrong impression, which afterwards exhibits itself, that a decision once given should never be reversed. If the Umpires sees he has committed error, he should promptly and decisively reverse his decision, and no player should be a loser through the stubbornness of the referee. Col. Fitzgerald sums up an Umpire's duty, under three heads. First, keep your eye on the ball. The second, is still more more [sic] important, keep your eye on the ball. The third, is the most important of all and sums up the whole—keep your eye on the ball. Then let him give his decisions in a clear, loud voice, promptly rendering his decisions the moment he forms the opinion in his own mind. Then, he should remain unmoved, if he thinks he is right, and correct them if he is wrong.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

allowable pitcher movements

Date Saturday, June 17, 1865
Text

[from Answers to Correspondents] Can a pitcher move in his position before a ball is delivered provided both of his feet are inside the lines of his position when the ball is delivered? Yes: except when a player is running his bases, where all movements looking like attempts to deliver the ball are considered baulks.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an early claim for an American origin of baseball; the status of the game

Date Sunday, June 11, 1865
Text

Base Ball is essentially an American game, being entirely characteristic of the [illegible] of the American people. Its origin, unlike cricket, cannot be traced to an ancient paternity, but is emphatically Yankee in its origin. No pastime has ever taken such a firm hold on the minds of the sporting public. Cricket in its palmiest days never attained in this country the universal popularity secured by this amusement. The ragged little orphan, armed with a broomstick and air ball, frequent the unbuilt lots scattered over the city and talk as knowingly of “foul outs,” and “out on the first,” as the “muffins” or the gentlemanly “seniors.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an early example of ascribing baseball's popularity to the Civil War

Date Saturday, August 12, 1865
Text

During the war, owing to the game being adapted to the army as a means of recreation, when soldiers were off duty, base ball was naturalized in nearly every state in the Union, and thus extended in popularity. It is no wonder that now, when peace reigns supreme, a game made as generally popular during four years of war, should become the prominent recreation of the season, or that thousands should be found gathered together a important ball matches where hundreds formerly congregated.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an ineligible player

Date Monday, September 4, 1865
Text

[Enterprise vs. Active 9/2/1865] ...[the Actives] were minus the services of Walker, their pitcher, his position being ably supplied by Stockman, while Hatfield played in the field as the extra man. Just here, one word is necessary: Already several times this season, one of the rules of the convention has been openly violated. The rule declares that “no person shall be permitted to play in any match game, unless he shall have been a member of the club in which he plays, and of no other club in or outside the Convention, for the space of thirty days.” But a week or so ago, Hatfield played in the Gotham nine, when [sic] he has played all the season and has been a member of the Active Club, by his own admission, but three or four days. Upon the plea that there was no other substitute present, the Actives asked permission to put in Hatfield for a few innings, until some one else should arrive. The Enterprise boys allowed it. Here is where they did wrong. Had they insisted that they could be not party to a willful breach of Convention rule, the matter would have not been pressed. They had no right to collude in breaking the rules, and no matter if both parties were willing, it is altogether probable that, like the Atlantic and Mutual game at Hoboken, when Thorn was permitted to play in violation of the same rule, both games will be thrown out by the next convention. If rules are made by the mass o f delegates represented in Convention, each and every club should do everything to make those rules binding. It won't do to say that unless Hatfield had played there could have been non game, for there were plenty of young Actives on the ground. To be sure, they could not have done as well as Hatfield, for few can do better than he, but still others could have filled the position and no rules would have been broken. It is high time this thing was put an end to, and if no other method obtains, the Convention should promptly censure the club so acting, and throw the games out altogether.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an umpire brought in from out of town

Date Saturday, May 13, 1865
Text

To-day, beginning at 3 o'clock, there will be a brilliant game of base ball, between the Camden and Athletic Clubs, at Fifteenth street and Columbia avenue. The public are invited. Seats provided for ladies. Mr. R. D. Sloat, of the Eagle Club, of New York, will act as umpire.

Source Philadelphia Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an unfair appeal to the umpire

Date Saturday, September 2, 1865
Text

[Empire vs. Keystone 8/26/1865] Malone played well behind, though disabled with a sore hand. We have one thing to censure him for and that was his unfair appeal to the umpire on the foul ball off Martin’s bat. Owing to the position of the players, the umpire was unable to see what was apparent to all around, that the catch was a second-bound one; and supposing the appeal all right and fair, he gave the striker out. There is not the slightest difference between action like this, and that of saying that you have caught a ball or touched a man when you know to the contrary. It was a thoughtless act, no doubt, but we trust never again to see any player guilty of it.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Athletics and Eckfords sharing Fisler and Reach?

Date Saturday, April 8, 1865
Text

The convention was unanimous in its condemnation of the practice of playing members of clubs in matches who were at the same time attached to other clubs, and the amendment putting a stop to the custom was adopted with one voice. This rule bears upon every club belonging to the National Association, and consequently will exclude Fisler and Theodore Bomeisler of the Philadelphia clubs playing in the Eckford and Eureka games, and likewise Reach from the Athletic, unless he decides to leave the Eckford club, as, we understand, he has done.

Source Philadelphia City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

base on balls

Date Tuesday, October 31, 1865
Text

[Atlantic vs. Athletic 10/30/1865] [See box score, Brooklyn Eagle 10/31/65, three bases on balls given, Thomas Knight of the Camden Club, umpire]

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

best of five series

Date Saturday, June 3, 1865
Text

This [victory by the Camdens] would usually conclude the series of games [with the Keystones] as the Camdens won two straight matches, but, we understand, that the test this time is to be the best three games out of five. This plan, ought also to be adopted in the series of games which are to take place between the Athletics and Keystone Clubs. This is a good idea, and will work well in Philadelphia, where, as there are so few senior clubs, it is necessary that they should play matches as often as possible to keep up the base ball interest.

Source Philadelphia City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Boss Tweed receives the ball

Date Saturday, July 29, 1865
Text

[Keystones vs. Mutuals 7/25/1865] Mr. John Lynch, the scorer of the Keystones, surrendered the ball with some well-timed and neat remarks. Supervisor Tweed received it for the Mutual Club, in an excellent and appropriate off-hand speech... New York Leader July 29, 1865

reporter for the Brooklyn Eagle

[Keystone vs. Star 7/28/1865] At the close of the 7th innings the game looked as if the Keystones were “gone up.” Sutton, of the Brooklyn Eagle, put up his score book in disgust. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury July 30, 1865

fan interference; championship games on public grounds; block ball

[Mutuals vs. Atlantics 8/3/1865] The crowd, yesterday, interfered greatly with the fielding, and once they opened for Sid Smith to get out, after kicking the ball away, and then closed up to prevent his return. When Peter O'Brien was prepared to catch a ball, he was saluted with, “You son of a b----, don't hold that.” Such expressions tended to show how sympathy manifested itself. It is folly to attempt any more championship games, on public grounds. Brooklyn Eagle August 4, 1865

Source New York Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Boston players in town to learn the points of the game; Massachusetts balls inferior

Date Friday, July 21, 1865
Text

The Lowell Club of Boston...left home, and came hither in search of more knowledge in the game, and, in order to learn all the points of play, they determined on a game with the renowned champions. They did not anticipate anything but a defeat with the Atlantic Club, and of course the result of yesterday's game did not disappoint them. The contrast between the two nines was most marked, the Atlantics being much more muscular. The game so young comparatively in Massachusetts, it required a travel from home to learn the points of the game more fully. Nothing so effectually popularized and improves the game as these friendly visits from club to club, and the effect in the conduct of clubs is clearly discernible. … The games here will not doubt have a very salutary effect on the future play of the visitors, and this visit will prove the most advantageous step they have ever yet taken. They stated that the balls they had in Massachusetts were not at all lively, and so well pleased were they with the Harvey Rose balls, that they instantly ordered a dozen made for their use at home. This is by all odds the best base ball in use, and they wear better than any yet manufactured.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

buttering up the press

Date Friday, August 11, 1865
Text

The Olympic Club, of Philadelphia, have sent complimentary tickets to their grounds, on Jefferson street, for which they will please accept thanks of writer. This is a splendid organization.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

calling balls

Date Saturday, March 25, 1865
Text

In on pitchers, the rule to be observed this season by leading umpires will be as follows: When the game commences, the umpire, after making such allowance for accidental unfair delivery as the circumstances will justify, will without appeal call “ball to the bat,” after which notice should the pitcher fail “repeatedly”, viz., twice or three times to deliver a fair ball, then the umpire will call “one ball;” and if the pitcher persists in such action, that is, delivers one or two unfair balls directly after such warning and calling of one ball, two and three balls are to be called, and the player given his base. Less latitude will be allowed in this matter than was permitted last season, and the practice of taking the opinion of the two nines or their captains as to the degree of latitude to be observed in making allowance for unfair balls is to be entirely done away with, as a custom alike adverse to the interests of the game and proper observance of the rules required by the National Association. There is but one interpretation to be placed upon the rules of the game, and that one is the definition authorized by the committee of rules and regulations; and all who heard the report of the chairman of the committee at the last conventional, are well aware of the fact that they recognized no such power in the hands of the umpire as that usurped last season, by which pitchers were allowed a latitude for unfair fielding [sic] which the rules really prohibited. In fact, the rule this season will be fair pitching, for experience has shown that style of delivery to be alike the most conducive to interesting games to the spectators, and to enjoyable contests to the players. Fair pitching with good fielders to attend to the work that results from it, is the best policy for all clubs to pursue.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

calling strikes and balls; base on balls

Date Monday, August 7, 1865
Text

[Star vs. Enterprise, both of Brooklyn, 8/5/1865] Mr. Galvin acted as Umpire, and made a most excellent man in that position. He did not hesitate to call strikes and balls on both clubs, and in three instances gave bases on balls widely pitched.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Camden grounds enclosed

Date Saturday, April 1, 1865
Text

The Camden Club is in a highly prosperous condition and will be found formidable this season. Their new ground is handsome inclosed, and ornamented by a neat brick Club House.

Source Philadelphia City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chadwick at the Brooklyn Union

Date Sunday, November 12, 1865
Text

[Brooklyn Eagle vs. Brooklyn Union 11/11/1865] [Chadwick played shortstop for the Union]

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

confusion over third strikes and the fly game

Date Saturday, June 17, 1865
Text

[Enterprise vs. Gotham 6/6/1865] In this [the tenth] innings the Enterprise were put out in one, two, three order, the last man being put out on three strikes by the usual bound catch. By many present this was regarded as an illegitimate style of play in the fly game, but the rules admit of the bound catch in this instance, it being regarded in light of a foul ball from striking the ground back of the home base, the sentence in rule 11, which reads, “It shall be considered fair,” referring to the character of the strike and not the ball.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

defining passed balls

Date Saturday, June 17, 1865
Text

“What are passed balls?” A passed ball is one which passes the catcher, in any form, if it is within reasonable stopping distance, upon which a base is made. If a base is run from, and the player is forced to return again to that base, for fear of an out, then it is not a passed ball. If the pitcher delivers a ball so wide that it cannot be reached, then it is not a passed ball, but a “no ball.” If he pitches it over the catcher's head, the catcher is not to be held responsible for a passed ball, but it becomes an “over pitcher,” and the pitcher is to be credited with the poor play.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

don't break the windows

Date Wednesday, May 10, 1865
Text

The Atlantics have passed a resolution forbidding any of their members playing ball anywhere on the Capitoline Grounds, except on the field marked out and designated by the proprietors. This has been rendered necessary, from the vast amount of glass broken, in the club houses, by organizing games in front of the buildings, and the proprietors justly complain of this useless destruction of property.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early baseball in Philadelphia

Date Saturday, May 20, 1865
Text

It was but a few years ago that base ball was in its infancy in the Quaker City. It was in 1860, we think, that we attended a match game between the Winona and Equity Clubs of Philadelphia, on a field out by the Girard College road, and, at that time, base ball was decidedly in the hands of amateur players, for some of the muffins of the Athletic and Keystone clubs now could have given the clubs in question the odds of six outs and beaten them, at least as far as fielding and their knowledge of points of the game was concerned. The clubs had bases, at that time, a couple of feet in size, and when the batsman hit the ball, he ran to the first or second base, according to the hit made, and leisurely took a seat on the base–for it was a capital stool–until the next striker sent him to another base by his hit. Any one taking a ball on the fly was entitled to a drink, and even bound catches were applauded. Since that time a wonderful change has taken place in the character of the play of the Philadelphia clubs, and also a vast increase in the popularity of the game.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early called strikes

Date Thursday, June 15, 1865
Text

[Athletics vs. Unions of Morrisania 6/14/1865] Frank [Pidgeon, umpire] called strikes when any evidences of “waiting” were shown, and called a “baulk” on each pitcher. That 6th rule wants enforcing a little and it will make the difference of an hour in a game.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

excitement about the Atlantics-Athletics match

Date Tuesday, November 7, 1865
Text

[Atlantics vs. Athletics 11/6/1865] It would appear that the wintry winds of November have no more effect in deterring people from witnessing an exciting game of base ball than the sultry heat of a July sun, though yesterday was tolerably pleasant for the season for those engaged in active movements. For a crowd of spectators standing exposed to a cold northwest breeze it was anything but agreeable, and yet from twelve to fifteen thousand people, by actual count, faced the chilly breeze on the open field of the Capitoline Ball Grounds yesterday to witness the return match between the above named rival clubs of Brooklyn and Philadelphia. Any one visiting Brooklyn yesterday between the hours of twelve and two would have known that something unusual was on foot in the way of exciting events, by the rushing of crowds to the ferryboat to the Fulton avenue cars during those hours, and had the observer gone with the crowd and entered the grounds in question he would have witnessed s sight new even to the out-door-sport-loving masses of the metropolis. Never before, in the history of the game, had such a vast assemblage been seen at a match. The field is nearly a mile round, and on three sides of it the crowd stood eight and ten deep in a perfect mass. New York Herald November 7, 1865

tension between the Athletics and the Atlantics

[Atlantics vs. Athletics 10/30/1865] Nothing occurred to mar the harmony of the occasion, though, of course, there was but little of that kindly feeling exhibited which should mark all games of ball, the manner in which the game had been brought about very naturally preventing any special demonstrations of this kind. New York Leader November 11, 1865

Source New York Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

excitement over a Mutual-Atlantic match

Date Saturday, August 5, 1865
Text

[Atlantic vs. Mutual 8/3/1865] The first game of a home-and-home match between the above two best base-ball clubs in the United States came off on Thursday, Aug. 3d, upon the handsome grounds of the Mutual Club, at the Elysian Fields, Hoboken. The largest assemblage ever yet gathered to witness a base-ball contest, numbering from 18,000 to 20,000, were in attendance.

From 1 to 3 P.M. the Hoboken ferry-boats were loaded down to a dangerous proximity to the water’s edge, with passengers, all of whom were intend upon a visit to the ball grounds. Cars were densely packed; wagons and carts were even at a premium, while thousands tried the pedestrian style from lack of any other means of reaching their destination.

For weeks past this contest has been the principal topic of conversation in base-ball circles throughout the country. The chances of success of the contesting nines, their peculiar attributes as players, and the results of the preliminary games each have played, have been the talk of all who take any interest in the game.

Source New York Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

fan interference

Date Monday, June 26, 1865
Text

[Enterprise vs. Star 6/24/1865] One thing was very observable Saturday, and it made a great difference—the crowd around the foul poles would not give way to the Enterprise players, but seemed to impede their advancement, and the foul flags could scarcely be seen on this account. But this is ever so on public grounds, and is more or less unavoidable.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

feet-first sliding

Date Saturday, June 24, 1865
Text

The system of which I disapprove, and I am confident I will be upheld by the majority of players is,
that on the field we notice the "slide game," or when a player in an effort to gain his base will
throw himself on the ground, feet foremost, sliding for fully a distance of twenty feet.

Source Philadelphia Inquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

filling a rain delay

Date Saturday, July 29, 1865
Text

[Keystones vs. Mutuals 7/25/1865] A large assemblage, numbering fully three thousand persons, was in attendance, notwithstanding the threatening appearance of the weather. In fact it did rain, so as to put a temporary stop to the playing, and at this interval the members of the Keystone Club gave a pleasing treat to the assemblage, by their members favoring them with one or two songs, beautifully executed and rendered. The Keystones’ vocal organization is appropriately styled the “Mozart Glee Club,” after the immortal composer, whose name will be forever in the history of song and music.

Source New York Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ground rule for the close in backstop

Date Tuesday, October 31, 1865
Text

[Atlantic vs. Athletic 10/30/1865] The rule in regard to the fence behind the catcher's point, was settled: that any passed ball, striking the fence, when a runner was on the 3d base, he should be entitled to his home base.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

how to get on the first nine

Date Saturday, April 15, 1865
Text

Members of the Athletic are requested to be punctual on practice days. The nine who are to represent the Club on important occasions, will be chosen solely on account of superior play. “Practice makes perfect,” is an old and suggestive adage.

Source Philadelphia City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

improvement to the Mutual grounds

Date Saturday, July 15, 1865
Text

The Mutuals have made another improvement to their fine grounds [in Hoboken], in the erection of additional seats behind the catcher’s position, for the exclusive use of lady visitors and members of the M.C.

Source New York Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

improvements at the Capitoline grounds

Date Thursday, July 6, 1865
Text

The are now completed, and certainly reflect great credit upon Messrs. Weed and Decker, who seem to be animated by a desire to do all they can for the comfort of the ball-players. The grand saloon is a splendid room, and the bar and refreshment rooms have been very materially improved. Instead of the small counter which was formerly used, there are now three, which Messrs. Thomas and James Giddings propose to devote to refreshments generally; so at a match visitors can have all the wishes of the inner man supplied. These gentlemen understand their business thoroughly, and no better guarantee is needed of their willingness to do all that may be reasonably required of them, than their thorough ability as excellent caterers. The club rooms are completed, and right cosey little spots they are. There is abundant closet room, prettily grained, and the floors are covered with cocoa matting. The Enterprise room has a handsome curtain, containing all the “working tools” of the game. The workmanship is skillfully executed, and Tony Elmendorf has received an order from the Directors of the Atlantic Club for two of a similar design. These several improvements, added to the former conveniences, make this the best ground of the kind in the country.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

informing the press

Date Thursday, May 4, 1865
Text

If the Secretaries of the clubs will take the trouble to notify the press generally and impartially of the proposed movements of clubs, matches, etc, it will be a great help to reporters, who through very ubiquitous, and supposed to be omnipresent, may necessarily overlook many important games if not thus furnished with the requisite information.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

is a round arm delivery legal?

Date Saturday, May 27, 1865
Text

[from answers to correspondents] In pitching a ball in base ball, is it fair for a man to deliver it in the same manner as a man bowling a round arm ball in cricket? ... It is doubtful whether a ball delivered as in round arm bowling can be fairly considered as a pitched ball according to the interpretation placed upon the word “pitched” by the National Association. One or two umpires have decided a bowled ball as not a fairly pitched ball. It is a very nice distinction. Until otherwise decided at the next convention we shall consider round arm delivery as out of place in base ball, and therefore decide that the deliver referred to is unfair.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

ladies admitted free

Date Monday, September 4, 1865
Text

Notice to Ladies.--Hereafter ladies will be admitted free of charge, to all matches on the Capitoline grounds. No tickets of admission will be required. This is a good move, and will tend greatly to increase the number of the fair sex at match games. All the ladies want now is that private entrance at the lower end of the platform,--and they will doubtless pour in by the hundred. Such good looking fellows as Weed and Decker at the ladies' gate, and no one knows how they will turn out to matches.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

membership in two clubs; revolvers

Date Saturday, October 28, 1865
Text

[a letter to the editor signed “Fair Play”] Knowing full well the interest you take in Base Ball maters, and your thorough knowledge of the rules of the game, I solicit your interpretation of the rule adopted by the National Convention in regard to members of Clubs belonging to the Convention playing; and claiming membership in more than one Club. My reasons for asking you are obvious. Tuesday, Oct. 17, I had occasion to be in Bedford, I there saw two promiment players of the “Enterprise B.B.C.,” namely, George Cook and B. Edwards, and L. Pike and Kenny of the Atlantics playing in a match between the Active B.B.C. And the Peconic B.B.C., both junior clubs. They all claim to be members of the Active, and make no concealment of it; so far they have played in not only every game the Actives have played this year, but when other junior clubs were deficient in making up a nine, neither of them declined when asked to play them...

Answer—The evil complained of has become too prevalent, and something should be done to put a stop to it. The Atlantic and Enterprise Clubs members are not the only men who do this, as it has become quite common. The “Unknown” Club of Harlem, play Pabor, Ketcham and Ten Eyck. The rule says: “No person shall participate in a match, unless he shall have been a member of that club, and of no other club, in or out of the convention for thirty days previous.” “Fair Play” has done a good thing in thus bringing this matter before the public, and these “revolvers,” should be made to adhere to either one club or the other.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

nearly three hundred clubs in Philadelphia

Date Saturday, October 7, 1865
Text

Western, United States, Curtin, Magnolia, Adelphi, Grant, Arctic, Logan, Congress, Hatter, Ajax, Pawnee, Not-a-way, Advance, Oswego, Penn, Hercules, Olympic Jr., Diligent, Hibernia, Rough-and-Ready, etc. These are only the names of some of the new clubs organized during the past week. We have now nearly three hundred Base Ball clubs in Philadelphia. Verily, the Quaker City has “Base Ball on the brain!

Source Philadelphia City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

outside substitutes to complete a nine

Date Sunday, July 2, 1865
Text

[Resolute of Brooklyn vs. Keystone 6/29/1865] Although short two men, he [the captain of the Resolute] refused to add two as good Philadelphia players, or allow his opponents to withdraw two of their men in order to more equalize the game. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury July 2, 1865

[Resolute of Brooklyn vs. Camden 6/30/1865] The Resolutes did not make their appearance till about 4 o’clock, and with only six men equipped for play, Messrs. Wilkins and C. Gaskill, of the Athletic, and Mulholland, of the Keystone, were selected to make up the “regulation nine,” and play commenced. Philadelphia Sunday Mercury July 2, 1865

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Philadelphia clubs charging admission? should begin games earlier

Date Sunday, July 23, 1865
Text

Gentlemen, you ask a reasonable charge in admitting spectators to your matches, let us ask you to confer a favor on the public who attend your games so freely, “Open the ball” a little earlier; commence punctually at 3 o’clock, and not keep the “plebe” waiting for an hour after time. The days are getting shorter, and the dusk comes on rapidly.

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitching 'drop balls'

Date Tuesday, August 8, 1865
Text

Weddle's slow, twisty “drop” balls were very effective, calling out numerous “sky-rockets.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitching versus throwing

Date Saturday, August 5, 1865
Text

Considerable discussion has been going on in base ball circles of late, as to whether the style of delivering the ball adopted by one of the pitchers of the Mutual Club is a legitimate pitch or an underhand throw. Messrs. Samuel Yates, of the Empire Club, and P. O’Brien, of the Atlantic, both experienced ball players, pronounce the deliver in question a throw, and the former decided it to be so in one match. As the rule governing pitching in base ball simply requires that “the ball shall be pitched, neither thrown nor jerked,” without defining a pitch, it is of course left to the individual opinion of each umpire in a match to define the delivery of the pitches. If he considers it a throw, all he has to do is to call a baulk on every ball he thinks is thrown, and the pitcher will either have to deliver the ball fairly, or in penalty thereof each player making his first base will be sure to secure his run; besides which, as every thrown ball is certainly an unfair ball, every three balls so delivered will entitle the striker to his base; so that it is in the power of the umpire to give the game against the club who has the pitcher who throws instead of pitches, and this power, too, can be legitimately exercised. For instance, the striker comes to the bat and the first ball he receives is from an underhand throw; all the umpire has to do is to first warn the pitcher to pitch the ball fairly; if he does not do so, then let the umpire call balls on him until he does and when the striker reaches his first base on balls, then call baulks until the ball is pitched fairly. This plan will of course have the effect either of changing the pitcher or stopping the throwing. In the next convention a rule ought to be introduced, so worded as to inflict this penalty by the letter of the rule, as it can now be done by its spirit.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

postponing a match due to a player absence

Date Saturday, July 15, 1865
Text

When a match game is regularly announced, should one side break faith because of the absence or indisposition of some individual member? Certainly not. Matches should be played when the time is set, and if a club fail to appear, then let the nine ready to play, claim and case the ball. The season is rapidly advancing, and now is the time when clubs should work off as many games as they can. If one player is absent or unable to perform, do as the Atlantics did yesterday,--put in a substitute. It appears very childish to throw a game over, because one player is away. When games are announced, others' interests are to be looked to as well as the club's. Proprietors of grounds do not desire to be put to an expense for nothing, and should not be.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

preparing the ground

Date Tuesday, August 15, 1865
Text

[Mutual vs. Atlantic 8/14/1865] The Capitoline Grounds never presented so gay and beautiful sight before, as on this occasion, Messrs. Weed and Decker, desirous that all should have a fair chance, prepared the grounds, so that no fault could be found with their management. The grass had been cropped as low as machinery could accomplish it, the sod had been rolled, the bare spots, from pitcher's to catcher's positions, and the circle around the bases had been moistened and rolled, and the home and pitcher's plates, bases and foul lines were distinctly drawn and whitened. A new platform for ladies was erected, and on this occasion was filled with the grace and beauty of Brooklyn. But one other feature of the ground deserves even more marked notice. Over the scorer's stand—hitherto subjected to the burning rays of the sun—was erected a fine cano0py, composed of the American flag, which, with its corresponding canopy on the opposite side, gave the grounds a very picturesque appearance. Never did any grounds present as complete, perfect and regular a ball field, as the Capitoline yesterday.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rescheduling a match to accommodate missing players

Date Monday, June 19, 1865
Text

The match between [the Enterprise and Star clubs] will come off on Saturday next, on the Star ground. It was deferred from last Saturday, on account of the unavoidable absence from town of some of the Enterprise. They did not leave town “to recuperate their strength, for this mat,” as has ungraciously remarked. To tell the truth, they don't need much recuperation for this game. The Enterprise boys have never shirked a game, and when beaten, have submitted like true gentlemen and noble fellows. Of course they do not feel like going into a contest with only half their men, and suffer defeat therefor, and they are right. They would be fully justified in a score of postponements, if they cannot get out a thorough nine without.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scheduling challenges

Date Wednesday, June 14, 1865
Text

At a regular meeting of the Atlantic B.B. Club held last evening, it was

Resolved, That the Atlantic Club receive no challenges from after July 20th, for the season of 1865.

The Secretary was authorized to have the same published in the various papers.

This step had become absolutely necessary, from the fact that only one challenge had been yet received this season—the clubs all nursing their strength till the last of the season, and then all pitching in for the Atlantic. Now challenges must be in by July 20th, or it becomes optional with the Atlantics to play or not.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

spectator interest in pitching

Date Saturday, July 22, 1865
Text

[Empire vs. Resolute 7/19/1865] Considerable interest was demonstrated by the outside crowd to witness Martin’s pitching. They stood over two hours in the rain while the game was being played.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the 'club chest'

Date Saturday, October 14, 1865
Text

[Excelsiors of Brooklyn vs. Nationals of Washington 10/9/1865] The Excelsiors...owing to the non-arrival of their club-chest...had neither shoes, caps or uniform, and therefore were not in trim to win a match.

Source New York Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Athletics ease up on the Olympics

Date Saturday, December 2, 1865
Text

[Athletics vs. Olympics 11/25/1865] McBride pitched but two innings, when he was taken off, to make the contest more equal in its character, Wilkins, short-stop, taking his place. Philadelphia City Item December 2, 1865 [the score was 38-1 after two innings, final score 93-27]

Source Philadelphia City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Athletics' backstop too close

Date Saturday, August 5, 1865
Text

There is one feature connected with the Athletic ground which, though perhaps unavoidable from the peculiar situation of the ground, is certainly objectionable, and depreciates the advantage to any club of having a superior catcher. Scarcely more than fifty feet behind the striker is a high board fence, probably ten feet high, which stops the progress of every ball widely pitched. It is the intention of the Athletic club to remodel their ground next season, and do away with this obstruction. There should be on every ballground a clear passage for all balls that pass the catcher. This insures more care on the part of both pitcher and catcher. A wide delivery by such a swift pitcher as McBride, would, on an ordinary ground, give a runner two bases at least, if not three. But, with the fence up, the widest delivery will limit the runner to one base.

Source New York Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Athletics' new ground

Date Saturday, April 1, 1865
Text

The Athletics have nearly finished their neat Club House, upon their new and beautiful ground at 15th street and Columbia avenue.

Source Philadelphia City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Atlantics and the Athletics play on short notice

Date Saturday, November 4, 1865
Text

[Atlantics vs. Athletics 10/30/1865] On Sunday last, about 4:30 p.m., the President of the Athletics received a telegram from the Atlantics, announcing their intention to run over and play the Athletics next day. As the Atlantics had published a resolution that they would play no more matches this season in consequence of the death of Mr. O’Brien, and as not a line had come to the Athletics reversing the decision, they were somewhat startled by the unceremonious summons; but, after consultation on Monday morning, they resolved to play. It appears that somebody had circulated an absurd report that the Athletics intended to go on their ground on Monday, (which is not their day,) hoist their colors, and claim the Championship of the Union. Such a step would be worthy only of children. The Athletics are gentlemen, and gentlemen never stoop to littleness. However, let that go. The Athletics resolved to meet the Atlantics, and the game (which was witnessed by 10,000 persons,) proved to be the most skillful, the best contested, and the most exciting ever played in Philadelphia.

Source Philadelphia City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Atlantics don't practice

Date Thursday, June 22, 1865
Text

The first appearance of the champion nine in a match game this year naturally drew together a large crowd of visitors to Hoboken yesterday. … the Atlantic nine was precisely the same as last year, and considering the fact of their having had no practice, they played remarkably well.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Atlantics' lively ball

Date Saturday, August 19, 1865
Text

[Atlantics vs. Eureka in Newark 8/18/1865] The Atlantics did not have one of the lively bounding balls they play with on their own grounds in this game, and hence they were placed more on an equality with their opponents, the game being more of a trial of skill in the fielding department than usual. The convention next winter will have to regulate the composition of a ball, so as to keep them from being made so lively, otherwise the strongest batting nine will always have it in their power to win. [the Atlantics won 21-20]

Source New York Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Excelsiors renounce championship games

Date Thursday, April 27, 1865
Text

The Excelsior club...do not lay claim to being match players, and merely meet for practice and sociability. They may play several match games during the season, it is true, but “champion” games they never believed in, and discarding this idea, it is earnestly hoped some friendly games may be played between them and the Atlantics. Brooklyn Eagle April 27, 1865

The [Excelsior] Club is composed of members who meet, mainly for practice and recreation. They are not desirous of fame merely as crack players, nor will they engage in “Champion” matches. Sedentary business habits demand some exercise, which will remove the injury caused by too much and constant business application, and hence on practice days, relaxation from labor and healthful recreation are the main incentives which carry members to the ball field. Brooklyn Eagle May 10, 1865

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Knickerbockers to return to match play

Date Saturday, April 15, 1865
Text

Now that the fly game was become the established rule of base ball, the veteran Knickerbockers intend once again to enter the list as contestants in match games with their brethren of Hoboken and elsewhere. They are getting up a tip-top nine, and it is reported that A. Branard, of the Excelsior Club, is going to be their pitcher.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Mutual first nine and amateurs to have separate fields

Date Saturday, May 13, 1865
Text

A drawback to the thorough practicing of [the Mutuals’] first nine together, as whole, hitherto, has been that the nine, as members of the club, had to yield to the remainder of the playing members in their right to the use of the field on practice days, and on this account neither of the parties benefitted by practice, the nine seldom having a good field opposed to them, and the amateurs having no chance against the leading players. This year this objectionable state of things is to be done away with, thanks to a few of the energetic members, who appear to have a pretty correct notion of the best way of promoting the welfare of the club. These parties have been busy the past two weeks recently superintending improvements made on the North field of the Hoboken ball grounds, the field occupied by the Mutual Gotham and Active Clubs. The whole space, from the hotel to the railroad, has been rented by the Mutual Club for the season for Mondays and Thursdays, the upper field–the old ball ground–being devoted to the use of the first and second nine players, and the lower ground–last season used by the Manhattan Cricket Club–set apart for the amateurs and “muffins” of the club. The latter will therefore have a ground and club room to themselves, and this portion of the fields will, no doubt, see the most fun of the season’s play, for the “muffs” intend having gay old times there. A quoit ground is to be laid out, and among the materials for recreation are to be a foot ball, and cricket bats and stumps, so as to give all a chance to enjoy the sport they like best. By means of this excellent arrangement the first nine will have an opportunity to practice regularly as a nine, each man in his regular position. It is only by practice like this that a nine can ever excel as a whole. ... Permanent seats are to be placed on the boundary line set apart for spectators, and henceforth no difficulty will be experienced in keeping the crowd from interfering with the players around the catcher’s and first and third base player’s positions.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Olympic grounds

Date Thursday, August 10, 1865
Text

The spacious lot of ground of the Olympic Club is located at Twenty-fifth and Jefferson streets, north of the Spring Garden Water-Works basin. The surrounding scenery is handsome and picturesque. The surface of the spacious lot is level, and the grass short, thus presenting a very pretty green velvet carpet of nature. Towards the southern part of the enclosure the headquarters of the club are located, beneath the grateful shade of a row of buttonwood trees. In the rear of the quarters a pump was sunk about two weeks since, by which arrangement cool, wholesome, soft spring water may be drawn in any quantity. The ground yesterday afternoon was the scene of considerable excitement of a pleasant character. Quite a large number of spectators were there, beautified by the presence of ladies, who seem to take as much delight in the game as the other sex. We observed, also, several distinguished gentlemen attracted to the scene. The greatest order prevailed, and everything passed off in the most excellent style. True, the “Olympics” were beaten, but they took the defeat good naturedly, while the “Actives,” at the conclusion of the game, gave three cheers and a “tiger,” with a hearty good-will.

Source Philadelphia Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Ross ball

Date Friday, June 23, 1865
Text

A letter addressed to Harvey Ross, of the Atlantic Club, will secure the best base ball made. … A poor base ball is a mean affair, and to get one that will retain its elasticity and life during a game, always get the best.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Star Club grounds

Date Monday, June 26, 1865
Text

...on the Star grounds, opposite Carroll Park,--if grounds they can be called. A vacant lot with cobble-stone paved streets on three sides, and the lot a stony and sterile waste, forms what are here called ball grounds.--and no man can be expected to make much headway with spikes, on pavements. But this is the best ground South Brooklyn affords, and of course players must make allowances for that.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the antiquity of the junior Minerva Club of Philadelphia

Date Sunday, May 28, 1865
Text

[from a letter from the Athletic Jr. Club] Two years ago the Minerva Base Ball Club held the championship of the State for four consecutive years, when the Athletic, Jr., organized, and played them a match... Philadelphia Sunday Mercury May 28, 1865

[from a letter to the editor] The Minerva have been champions for eight years–that is of “gentlemanly” clubs... Philadelphia Sunday Mercury June 18, 1865

Source Philadelphia Sunday Mercury
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the attitude among the country clubs about scoring levels

Date Saturday, November 25, 1865
Text

[Junipers of Norfolk, Va., vs. Unions of the Thirty-ninth Illinois Regiment 11/24/1865] The play commenced about half-past two o'clock, and the wind being fresh and keen from the north-east, the position of the field was such that the strikers stood dead to leeward of the pitcher, consequently this was exceedingly unfavorable, for it was knocking the ball dead against the wind. Nine innings were played, which occupied about two hours. The score stood at the end of the game forty-four runs in the nine innings for the Unions, and thirty for the Junipers. … The game was well played, and the score will compare favorably with any match played under the unfavorable circumstances of batting against such a fresh breeze as we had yesterday.

Source Norfolk Post
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the catcher playing close behind the bat

Date Saturday, July 22, 1865
Text

[Excelsior of Brooklyn vs. Union of Morrisania 7/15/1865] Leggett was in splendid play, and caught behind, close up to the bat, quite in his old effective and unequaled style, putting out no less than ten players on foul balls, two of them from fly tips, besides keeping down the score of passed balls to a couple only.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the cost of the new Athletic grounds

Date Thursday, March 23, 1865
Text

[reporting on the Athletic Club annual meeting] The Athletic will play this season at Fifteenth street and Columbia avenue, where they have taken a new ground, which they will fit up at an expense of about $1,200, which will include a new and tasteful house.

Source Philadelphia Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the neighbor keeps the ball

Date Friday, August 11, 1865
Text

[Actives vs. Athletics 8/10/1865] Here we may say a word about a petty piece of meanness—to call it by no harsher name—which we were made cognizant of yesterday. In the rear of the grounds of the Athletics Professor Wagner, of the Scientific Institute, has his property. One of the balls, in the early part of the game, went over into his lot. He had it seized, and conveyed to his residence, where he retained it. The opinions of those present were thereupon very freely expressed, and we are sure they were in no way complimentary to the Professor. Philadelphia Press August 11, 1865

[Actives vs. Athletics 8/10/1865] Two prominent members of the Athletic were absent through indisposition, and a favorite ball used by the club was lost at an early period of the game and while the scores were nearly equal. It is stated that this circumstance affected the playing of the Athletics. This ball was knocked over the fence that separates the Athletic play ground from the premises of the Wagner Free Institute of Science. The Principal of that Institution secured the ball and resolutely declined to give it up to the owners, a circumstance which created considerable indignation, and which it is stated has been done on a number of similar occasions. Philadelphia Inquirer August 11, 1865

[Actives vs. Athletics 8/10/1865] During the game the ball by accident bounced into a pasture lot belonging to Prof. Wagner, well known as having presented an “institute” to the city, when a policeman picked it up and handed it to the said Wagner, who refused to return it to the club. We should like to know if the said policeman was attending to his duty by being in said pasture lot, or if, by accident, a gentleman's hat had blown over the fence, whether the said officious policeman would have done the same with that as he did with the ball. This might be ended seriously for the Professor had it not been for the members of the Athletic club, who prevented those persons who saw the action from rescuing the ball from him. Philadelphia Sunday Dispatch August 13, 1865

Source Philadelphia Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new high fence at the Union grounds

Date Saturday, October 14, 1865
Text

Hitherto the outside crowd have been the most numerous at matches on these grounds, the facilities for viewing the proceedings being equally as great outside as in. Now, however, the “free, gratis, for nothing” class of spectators have been left out in the cold by means of a high fence erected on the bank, thus putting a stop to a sight of the game anywhere but inside the inclosure.

Source New York Leader
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the pennant

Date Thursday, June 22, 1865
Text

A member of the Atlantic Club, on behalf of Miss Emma Jean Boerum, presented to the Atlantic Base Ball Club a streamer 150 feet long. The [hosting] Empire Club ran it up on their flag staff and it will henceforth wave as an emblem of championship until some Club shall take it away. Such gifts are held in high esteem by the Atlantic boys, coming from the fair sex and so unexpectedly.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the police force for crowd control

Date Saturday, August 26, 1865
Text

[Mutual vs. Atlantic 8/14/1865] Good order was kept by one hundred and twenty-five officers and men of the police force of Brooklyn, under the command of the redoubtable Superintendent Folk himself.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the qualities of a pitcher; coaching from inside the lines?

Date Saturday, August 5, 1865
Text

Cope their [the Keystones] regular pitcher is an excellent player for the position. He is plucky up to the backbone to begin with, and his good humor is a qualification that alone makes him a desirable member of a club, and he can pitch for hours without apparently feeling fatigue. He watches the bases closely and pitches a good ball, and when well backed up in the field will prove a troublesome opponent in the position. We would, however, suggest to him to drop that habit of his of following players when running their bases. It is not the right thing to do by any means. In fact, a strict construction of the rules should lead an umpire to prohibit it on the grounds of hindering the fielders from a full performance of their duties.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the rising stature of baseball

Date Saturday, August 5, 1865
Text

Base ball has undoubtedly become an institution of the country. We, of the sporting community, have long since realized the fact, of course, but now the old fogies are beginning to open their eyes to the importance... Politicians are commencing to curry favor with the fraternity of ball players, as a class of “our fellow citizens” worthy [of] the attentions of “our influential men, you know.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the rule in the death of a club member

Date Saturday, October 28, 1865
Text

The rule in the case of the death of a member of a base ball club in good standing with his club is to suspend fielding for thirty days...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the runner out on a foul tip

Date Saturday, October 7, 1865
Text

[Eckford vs. Mutual 9/28/1865] Wansley was...disposed of, ... it being the finest foul fly catch direct from the bat we ever saw. When Wansley struck, Hunt [at first base] left for the 2d, but before he could return the ball had been passed from catcher to pitcher and thence to 1st base, the result being a handsome double play...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the state of the fly game

Date Saturday, June 17, 1865
Text

If we mistake not, this season will be one of the most noteworthy in the annals of base ball. In the first place there is but little doubt of the fly-game being fully established in popular estimation as the permanent rule of play. Even at thsi early period of the season it has gained ground in public favor, and, by the close of the season, it will so far be in advance of the old style of play as to elicit an almost unanimous vote in its favor next season. About a dozen matches have already been played, and the average time occupied in a game is far less than that of the last season, when some of the quickest bound games ever played took place.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the superior qualities of two clubs

Date Saturday, September 2, 1865
Text

The Nationals [of Washington] and Pastimes [of Baltimore] will visit Philadelphia during September. Both are superior organizations, composed of gentlemen of education, character, position and influence, and they will receive a greeting from the clubs of Philadelphia–the Athletics, Camdens, Keystones, and Olympics–which will do their hearts and stomachs good.

Source Philadelphia City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the umpire calling how many outs

Date Saturday, October 7, 1865
Text

[Eckford vs. Mutual 9/28/1865] Wansley was next, and had a life given him by C. Mills, who failed to hold one of those sharp tips from the bat; another chance, offered on a high foul, was accepted on the bound–the fly being missed–and “Two out,” was the call from the umpire.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

twenty-five cent admission

Date Thursday, October 26, 1865
Text

A grand match between the Athletics and Camdens, in aid of the Solders' and Sailor's Fair, has been arranged to take place on Wednesday next, Nov. 1 st, on the Athletic ground, at Fifteenth street and Columbia avenue. Ont his interesting and impressive occasion, every one, except the eighteen players, will pay twenty-five cents for admission. Five thousand tickets have been printed, and it is hoped all will be sold. It is understood that the Athetics will shortly play a nine picked from all Philadelphia, in aid of the same noble charity. Such an encounter would attract twenty thousand spectators. Philadelphia Press October 26, 1865

[Atlantic vs. Athletic 10/30/1865] The return game will be played next Monday, on the Capitoline grounds, at half-past one o'clock. Another large crowd is looked for. Admission ten cents—ladies free,--not 25 cts, as in Philadelphia. Brooklyn Eagle October 31, 1865

Source Philadelphia Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire calls balls and strikes

Date Monday, June 26, 1865
Text

[Enterprise vs. Star 6/24/1865] Charlie Smith made a most acceptable Umpire, and was very strict in calling strikes or balls. But for the correct and proper enforcement of the 6th rule, the game would have been much longer.

Source Brooklyn Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger