Clippings:1881

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Clippings in 1881

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1881Clippings in 1881

Clippings in 1881 (239 entries)

Contents


The pitcher moved back to 50 feet; reducing the number of balls and strikes; eliminating the warning

Date Saturday, January 1, 1881
Text

The most important change [to the rules] made is that of increasing the distance between the pitcher and batsman. For ever twenty years—in fact, from 1857 to 1880—the distance between the front-line of the pitcher's position and the home-base has been forty-five feet. This was a short distance even for the days when Creighton began to make speed a specialty in the delivery of the ball, and it ha practically become less as the speed of the delivery has been increased, until it has now reached the limit of a catcher's power to hold the thrown ball. The distance between the two positions is now fifty feet, instead of forty-five. In cricket the distance between the line of the bowler's position and that of the batsman is sixty odd feet, and yet that is considered quite short by cricket batsmen, and the swiftest bowled ball in cricket is sent in with no greater speed than is the thrown ball from the pitcher's hands in baseball. It was regarded at the League meeting that two objects would be achieved by this change, one being that the batsman would have five feet of length the more to judge the line of the ball from the pitcher's hands, and the other was that the pitcher would be enabled to throw quicker and better to second base in trying to throw out a runner, or in fielding a ball direct from the bat. The main object was to give more freedom to the batting, and this might have been the effect but for the amendment reducing the number of fair balls that the batsman is allowed to let pass him from four to three, while the number of unfair balls the pitcher is permitted to send in was not lessened in proportion, as under the rule of an equal ratio, the unfair balls should have been limited to six instead of seven. It will be seen that the present cramped position of the batsman has not been improved at all; rather otherwise, for he has now less time allowed him to choose a ball than before. He must either hit or strike at the first three balls which come to him from the pitcher, at the height he called for and over the home base, or he will be given out on strikes. It is true that this curtailment of the number of balls to choose from has been offset by a reduction of unfair balls; but the latter is not in proportion to the former, and the batsman suffers from it. Whether the five feet increase will compensate for the loss of the “fair ball” warning has yet to be tried. We think, however, that the effect will be to leave the position of the attack and defense in the game—viz., the pitching and the batting—in the same relative degree as before. New York Clipper January 1, 1881

It will be seen that the reference to the call of “fair ball” or the warning ball has been stricken out. Now the batsman must strike at the first three fair balls sent in to him, or be decided out on strikes. New York Clipper January 8, 1881

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

The effect of the fifty feet distance on curve pitching

Date Saturday, January 1, 1881
Text

The question of the effect of the increased distance of the delivery in regard to the curve has now to be considered. With some pitchers the full effect of the curve bias imparted to the ball does not begin to be apparent until the ball is almost over the plate; while with others its full force does not become apparent until after passing the plate. With a few the curve is seen within a few yards of the plate. Now, the five feet increase will materially benefit the long-distance curve-pitchers, while it will most likely have a reserve effect on the short-distance curvers.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a professional coaching a college team

Date Sunday, January 2, 1881
Text

George W. Bradley, of the Providence Club, has been engaged by the Dartmouth College nine to train them during the winter. “Professor of Leather” is George's new title.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jones's appeal mis-addressed

Date Sunday, January 2, 1881
Text

The reason Jones' case didn't come before the New York League meeting was simply because notice of his appeal did not reach Secretary Young. The lawyer whom Jones engaged to prepare and forward his appeal and statement of facts sent it to Secretary Young, care of the Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York, instead of to Washington, as he should have done. President Hulbert, by one of his strange freaks, changed the meeting from the Fifth Avenue to the St. James, and the appeal, consequently is still lying in the office of the Fifth Avenue. Jones will present this phase of his case to the League at its meeting next month, and hopes to have justice done him. He has some warm friends at work for hi among the League Clubs and players. There is no doubt tat all that he was a victim of the Boston Club's dishonesty. It only remains to be seen whether he is also to be made a victim of the unfair designs of the League.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Worcester Club finances

Date Thursday, January 6, 1881
Text

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Worcester Base Ball Club was held at the Bay State House last evening, the president, Hon. Chas. B. Pratt, in the chair. The report of the treasurer, Freeman Brown, was read and laid on the table. The receipts of the year, including $1558.82, the balance from the previous year, were $20,028.09; expenses, $17,139.51; balance on hand, $2883.58. The directors in their report say that in pursuance of the vote passed at the last annual meeting they made application for membership in the National League of professional base ball clubs; the application was favorably received by that organization, and the club admitted. The action then taken without dubt saved the club from bankruptcy and dissolution. The National association, tow hich we belonged in 1879, had not vitality enough to survive the season of 1880, and had we remained in it, we should have inevitably succumbed to disaster, and base ball would have received a fatal blow in Worcester.

...

Our receipts at home and abroad in 1880 were $4147 more than in 1879, when we played under the 25 cent tariff. Our salary list was $3563 greater in 1880 than in 1879, and our traveling expenses $1300 more, yet the net and inevitable deficiency was only 30 cents more. In 1879 the deficiency was $1617.38; in 1880 it was $1617.68, of which $200 was lost in the professional walking match venture at the skating rink, so that in reality the loss by base ball in 1880 was $200 less than in the previous year. Worcester Daily Spy January 6, 1881

The Worcester Club held its annual meeting Jan. 5, when the old board of officers was unanimously re-elected. The treasurer's report showed that the receipts of the year were $18,454.27 and the expenses $17,130.31. New York Clipper January 15, 1881

Source Worcester Daily Spy
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

broken bats 3

Date Saturday, January 8, 1881
Text

In the thirteen-inning game between the Providence and National Clubs April 10, the former, having broken all of their own bats, borrowed one from their opponents after the eighth inning, and used it in defeated them.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jones' appeal of his expulsion

Date Saturday, January 8, 1881
Text

Charles Jones' appeal to the League, protesting against his expulsion by the Boston Club, was never forwarded to Secretary Young. Jones left the matter in the hands of the attorney, who is conducting his suit against the Bostons for unpaid salary, and the lawyer neglected to send it.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

returning to the base after time is called

Date Saturday, January 8, 1881
Text

In the Providence-Troy game Sept. 25 Connor and Caskins were on first and second, and while they were playing off the bags “Time” was called by the umpire, for some reason or other. When play was called both of them failed to step back and touch the base and Bradley purposely pitched a wide ball to coax them to run. They ran down to second and third, whereupon the ball was promptly fielded to those bases, and it was claimed that both men were out. The umpire, correctly decided that both men were entitled to the bases they had stolen. Hines, however, was decided “out” by the umpire in the Providence-Cleveland game for not touching his base after play was called.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a pitch and a hit while the umpire is not paying attention

Date Saturday, January 8, 1881
Text

An unusual episode happened in a Providence-Buffalo game. Dorgan struck a foul ball, which bounded back and hit him. Some of the keen-eyed spectators concluded the ball was hit fairly, and volunteered the information that the batsman was out. McLean turned around, and wanted to know who was acting as umpire. While his attention was off the game, Dorgan made a safe hit and reached first base. McLean promptly called him back, and made him bat over again when he went out. Ward, the captain of the Providence nine, then announced that the remainder of the game would be played under protest on the ground that the umpire had not called “Time.” As the Providence Club won, the protest was let drop.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

elimination of substitute runners; courtesy runner

Date Saturday, January 8, 1881
Text

Rule 45 is amended so as to prohibit any base-runner form having another player of the nine run for him. If he is too lame—from an injury sustained in the game then being played—to run the bases, he must leave the field altogether, and be subject to Rule 37. If he is only fatigued or partially disabled, then he must run the bases as best he may. This amendment was made to put a stop to the call for base-running substitutes which marked so many League contests last season, and the relieve the captains from the onus of refusing to allow such substitute to run. It is no longer optional with captains to consent to a player running a base for a companion, for no such substitute-running is now permitted.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

automatic return of base runners on foul balls repealed

Date Saturday, January 8, 1881
Text

The section which allowed base-runners on foul bhits to return to bases without being put out has been stricken out. Under the new rule, therefore, if a base-runner be on first base when the batsman hits a foul ball that is not caught on the fly or first bound, he is liable to be put out in returning to the base he had left when the ball was hit, just as he was when the old rules were in vogue, with the exception that the pitcher is not now required to be standing within the lines of his position before the ball—returned to him from the fielder—can be used to put such base-runner out. He can take the ball from the fielder even were he standing on the base the runner was returning to, and then legally put him out. It will be seen by this that not only does the batsman incur a double penalty for hitting a foul ball to that he incurs in hitting a fair one—such balling allowed to be caught on the bound as well as the fly—but the base-runner is unjustly punished for the batsman's poor hitting.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jim White rejects the standard League contract

Date Sunday, January 9, 1881
Text

Jim White refused to sign a League contract, and he signed one of his own make-up. Jim is not quite a serf. Among the non-League agreements of Jim White's Buffalo agreement is one that he shall not be compelled to catch.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Providence salaries

Date Sunday, January 9, 1881
Text

The Providence Journal, authority in that city for base-ball, says the salary lists of the Providence team for the coming season will be nearly $1,000 less than last year, and will include twelve players, two in excess of last year, when the salaries reached upward of $15,000. The official list of salaries is as follows: Ward, $1,700; Gross, $1,500; Start, $1,600; Farrell, $1,400; McClellan, $1,100; Denny, $900; Houck, $700; Hines, $1,400; Gilligan, $875; Matthews, $1,100; Baker, $900. Total, $13,175. The twelfth man has not been secured, but his salary will probably not exceed $900, or thereabouts.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitcher given an assist on strike outs

Date Saturday, January 15, 1881
Text

No change is made [to the rules] in the matter of crediting the pitcher with a fielding assistance whenever the batsman is put out on a third strike, and the result is that it is impossible to judge of a pitcher's fielding skill by the averages which are based on this data. Such assistance belongs solely to the pitcher's score, and cannot be rated as a fielding assistance. By mixing it up with such fielding-assistance records a pitcher becomes credited with an average of fielding which he is not entitled to as a fielder. No fielder should be credited with an assist unless by such assistance he helps another one to put out a batsman or base-runner from a hit ball, whether hit fair or foul. All other assistance, such as that of the pitcher in putting out on strikes, should be recorded in the pitcher's score.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chicago Club groundskeeper

Date Sunday, January 16, 1881
Text

Patrons of the game in this city will regret to learn of the death of William Moore, who has had charge of the grounds of the Chicago Ball Club for the last six years. Mr. Moore died Thursday evening from a severe attach of pneumonia.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a lawsuit for back wages against the Indianapolis Club

Date Friday, January 21, 1881
Text

Suit has been brought against Austin H. Brown and others, directors of the old Indianapolis Base-ball Club, by McKelvey, a member of the Club in 1877 and 1878, for $400 and three years' interest upon the same. He claims that when the organization disbanded in 1878 that the amount of his salary, named above, was due him, and has never been paid. Cincinnati Enquirer January 21, 1881

McKelvey, the centre-fielder of the old Indianapolis club in 1877 and 1878, has sued the directors of that organization to recover $400 and three years' interest, which he claims is due him. Boston Herald January 30, 1881

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Charley Jones opens a laundry

Date Friday, January 21, 1881
Text

Lew Westjohn and Charley Jones, the well-known base-ballist, are about entering into an enterprise of a large steam laundry. Cincinnati Enquirer January 21, 1881

Jones has purchased a half interest in the White Star Laundry, on Race street, and will at once go into business. His partner is Leo Westjohn. They have a three-story building, and have put in entirely new machinery at a cost of several thousand dollars. Cincinnati Enquirer January 30, 1881

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pick-off throws now rare

Date Saturday, January 22, 1881
Text

Throwing to first base to catch a runner napping was a frequent thing in the old days—now it is justly regarded as a play of only exceptional occurrence. Now and then there may be a pitcher who has a rare knack of dodging a runner out by a throw of this kind; but, as a general rule, no strategic pitcher will allow himself to be put out of pitching-form by the efforts of a daring runner to induce him to throw to first base. The rule now is for the pitcher to trust to his strategic delivery to the bat to catch the runner at first base at fault, and this he does by causing the batsman to force him out at second.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pre-modern reminiscences from Canada

Date Saturday, January 22, 1881
Text

An old Canadian ball-tosser, writing from St. Mary's Ontario, on the 10th inst., thus discourses on what regards as advisable improvements in the rules of the game: “I have played baseball nearly forty years, and have been a reader of The Clipper since its first issue. I heartily endorse and approve your efforts to improve the game, although 'the machine' seems to be against you. When I first played we threw the ball, standing twenty yards from the home-base. When the girls' style of tossing or pitching was introduced we went up five yards nearer. Now that we are throwing again let us go back to the original distance and lay aside the present mockery of pretended pitching. It will favor the catcher and bat and improve the whole game. The restriction on running bases on fly-catches should be taken off. The batsman would be out, of course, but let the other base-runners go as they please on every fair hit. I can see no reason why that kind of sacrifice-hit should be barred, and it is more taking and gets the measure of the pitcher better than putting the ball down towards fist base...

Source ” New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cincinnati Club in bankruptcy

Date Sunday, January 23, 1881
Text

The Cincinnati Club have thrown their affairs into court, and asked for the appointment of a receiver. They were compelled to do this from the fact that a few of the minor shareholders refused to pay their pro rata assessments. The improvements on the grounds will be sold at public sale to the highest bidder. A syndicate is forming of five or six prominent Cincinatians, including several of the present heavy stockholders, who will buy in the grounds and reorganize for future operations. These gentlemen will look forward to 1881.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Will White a merchant

Date Sunday, January 23, 1881
Text

Will White had an offer to pitch in Buffalo this year, but declined. Whoop la! Has recently enlarged his tea and coffee store, and is a full-fledged merchant sure enough.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

late talk of an Independent League

Date Sunday, January 23, 1881
Text

Colonel L. A. Harris was in Washington last week, and while there cast around to see what chance there was for the Independent League. He hoped that the Washington people might induce the Metropolitan Club, of New York, to withdraw from the League Alliance and go into the new scheme.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chadwick owned a grist mill

Date Sunday, January 30, 1881
Text

Mr. Hentry Chadwick, of the Clipper, sustained a serious pecuniary loss on the night of Jan. 9 from the almost entire destruction of the grist-mill at Noyac, Long Island, owned by him, the great thaw and rain-storm of that night causing the giving way of the mill-dam and the mill works, entailing a damage of nearly $2,000. Chicago Tribune January 30, 1881

the demise of the Cincinnati Club

When the Cincinnati club was gently bounced from membership in the league at the Rochester meeting last December, a howl of rage went up from the Enquirer. President Hulburt and the league were to be annihilated, a new movement was to be started with plenty of money that would sweep the old crowd into everlasting oblivion. Cincinnati was to take the lead in this matter; the Enquirer had the rules and regulations already framed for adoption, and everything, in the eyes of the movers, was progressing. The result of all this is seen in the following paragraph from the Enquirer: “The Cincinnati club has thrown its affairs into court, and asked for the appointment of a receiver. It was compelled to do this from the fact that a few of the minor shareholders refused to pay their pro rata assessments. The improvements on the grounds will be sold at public sale to the highest bidder. A syndicate is forming of five or six prominent Cincinnatians, including several of the present heavy stockholders, who will buy in the grounds and reorganize for future operations. These gentlemen look forward to 1882.” Boston Herald January 30, 1881

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Cincinnati Club bankrupt

Date Saturday, February 5, 1881
Text

The Cincinnati Club has asked for the appointment of a receiver. It was compelled to do this from the fact that a few of the minor shareholders refused to pay their assessments. The improvements on the ground will be sold at public sale to the highest bidder.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

charges of League games being thrown

Date Sunday, February 6, 1881
Text

Base ball circles in various cities where the sport has become popular and maintains a strong hold, are at present quite unnecessarily agitated over an alleged expose of “crookedness” among league players, published in the Cincinnati Enquirer of last Sunday. The contest of the Enquirer article, which occupied nearly half a page, were known to the managers of the league a year ago, and would probably have never been given to the public had the Cincinnati club remained a member of the league. Having been dropped from the league, however, because their club management thought more of converting its ball grounds into a lager beer garden, and fostering Sunday playing, than of elevating the game of base ball, the Cincinnati people, and notably Mr. O.P. Caylor, base ball editor of the Enquirer, are very indignant, and the latter has published this “boomerang,” which he calls an expose, alleging crookedness on the part of certain league clubs. [A long discussion of the case follows.]

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jones opens a laundry

Date Sunday, February 6, 1881
Text

Jones has opened a laundry in Cincinnati and is competing with Chinese cheap labor. Chicago Tribune February 6, 1881

Charles W. Jones, who was discharged by the Boston Club last season, is now engaged in the laundry business in Cincinnati, O. New York Clipper February 12, 1881

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Polo grounds not under complete control of the Mets

Date Saturday, February 12, 1881
Text

...the Polo Ground looms up as the coming professional baseball field of the metropolis, and the only one, by the way, likely to b at command. This field would have been the home of a League team this coming season but for the fact that the ground could not be entirely controlled by such a club, ans the Polo Association needed the field two days a week for its own matches. But the time may come when the requirements of the grounds, as a mere money-investment, will cause it to be given up entirely to baseball and cricket, and such kindred games as lacrosse and football, to the driving out of the polo-playing; not because that game is not a desirable one, but that the trampling of the horses on its turf in polo prevents it being placed in proper condition for baseball. … four days of each week have been engaged by the Metropolitan Club...

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

George Wright does not have to go west

Date Tuesday, February 22, 1881
Text

The Boston nine was completed to-night [2/19] by the signing of contract by George Wright and Bond. … It is understood that George Wright's contract specifies that he shall not play west of Syracuse during the season, owing to his business here [Boston].

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chicago Club stock for sale

Date Wednesday, February 23, 1881
Text

[classified advertisement] FOR SALE—ONE SHARE IN CHICAGO Base-Ball Association at 75 South Peoria-st., from 9 a.m. To 8 p.m.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

batters adjusting to Bond's delivery

Date Wednesday, February 23, 1881
Text

There has been a difference of opinion—and in some quarters it undoubtedly exists to-day—among base-ball people as to the advisability of reengaging Bond, it being agreed that his days of usefulness are past; that, having been in the field so long as he has, and adhering to the same style of pitching, batsmen have become so familiar with his methods that they batted him easily. We think, however, that , in securing him for another season, the management has acted wisely. True, taking all-in-all, he was less effective last season than ever before, but this was due to the poor support he had behind the bat, and from the apathy displayed by some of the players. As a fielder in the pitcher's position, he has no superior. He still retains that marvelous command of the ball which has made him famous, and, when well supported, he is as capable as ever of filling his chosen position.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

George Wright won't travel west

Date Saturday, March 5, 1881
Text

George Wright will not accompany the Boston Club in its trips out West during the coming championship season, owing to his business in Boston, Mass., requiring his attention.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no players yet signed by the Mets

Date Saturday, March 12, 1881
Text

Up to March 7 not a single man had been signed for the Metroplitan team of 1881, a fact ascertained by an interview with Mr. Day. He is determined that the team he engages shall be composed of reliable men, not only in regard to integrity of character, but also in reference to their daily habits.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cammeyer comes into his inheritance

Date Saturday, March 12, 1881
Text

The old Union Ground, it is said, is not likely to be built upon this season, and Mr. Cammeyer—who since the death of his father has come into property worth $50,000—proposes to let the grounds to some enterprising man for baseball purposes.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

players not allowed to make grievances while on the road

Date Sunday, March 13, 1881
Text

The rule adopted by the league last week at Buffalo, forbidding any player from making complaints or stating any grievances, except when the club who which he belongs is at home, will prevent a recurrence of the Jones affair of last year. It is now rendered impossible for any player, when he is about to depart with his club on a trip, and has made up his mind not to return with it, to leave his club in the lurch on some pretended grievance while he is away from home.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

season tickets in Boston 3

Date Sunday, March 13, 1881
Text

At a meeting of the board of directors of the Boston club, yesterday afternoon, it was decided to place the price of season tickets at $15 each, the tickets to be transferable, and entitling the holder to a seat in the grand stand or stockholders' seats.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the black list to keep salaries down

Date Sunday, March 13, 1881
Text

[reporting on the League special meeting, purportedly quoting Hulbert] There were certain players whose connections with the professional had always been those of disorganizers and degeneraters. These men were always at work trying their best to injure the game. When the time for signing same they showed their teeth. They held off from day to day, at the same time opening negotiations with other cities citing the various sums they had been offered, announcing their fondness for said cities and the great desire they had to play in them. Being men of recognized ability, they succeeded in running their terms up very high. Not content with this mode of procedure, they talk with other players, cautioning them about signing, and telling them that all they wanted to do was to hold off and the Clubs would come to their terms. Every Club in the country had men of this sort, some more than others. Now that there were so many professionals, and their ranks were being yearly increased, the League could afford to dispense with such men. They were the relics of olden times, and should be shelved. He had conversed with some of the delegates, and his plan was to draw up a list of said players and all agree not to hire them for another year. Then they could take a hand at some other calling and earn their dollar or two a day., quoting the Buffalo Express

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the problem of high salaries; League finances; proposed collusion

Date Monday, March 14, 1881
Text

At the League meeting held at Buffalo, the question fo players’ salaries was discussed, with the view of devising some plan by which the expense of the game can be made to bear more equally with the receipts. Chicago is the only city where the receipts are in excess of the expenditures; the other seven clubs lose in the aggregate $20,000 annually. The desire of each club to secure as strong a team as possible causes sharp competition for certain players, and salaries are forced up to a point far beyond the abilities of the club to pay. As a result these players receive a fancy price for their services, say $1800 or $2000 for seven months, while others equally as valuable to a nine receive $900 or $1000. The high priced men are often kickers and disorganizers and keep other members of a team in a state of discontent on account of their smaller salary. Several plans have been suggested to solve the salary problem, and President Hulbert proposed at Buffalo that 8 or 10 of the high priced men, who are known to be grumblers, be shelved by the clubs signing an agreement not to hire such players. The proposition met with the hearty endorsement of six clubs, and would have been adopted had not the two remaining clubs requested that the matter be left over until next fall, when they agreed to join in the agreement. In the meantime President Hulbert is to perfect a plan of arranging salaries, and it is safe to say that it will take definite shape next fall.

Source Worcester Daily Spy
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Charley Fulmer a theatrical manager

Date Saturday, March 19, 1881
Text

Charles Fulmer, the manager and captain of the Athletics of Philadelphia, Pa., and one of the recently appointed League umpires, is now managing the Wellesley and Sterling Dramatic Combination, and was in this city march 14 on business connected with that organization.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Harry Berthrong, artist

Date Saturday, March 19, 1881
Text

H. W. Berthrong, one of the crack players of the old Nationals of Washington, D.C., now resides in Boston, Mass., where he has met with marked success as an artist. Berthrong, prior to his retirement from the baseball field, had the reputation of being the fastest base-runner in the country. He has recently placed on exhibition in Washington, two of his portraits, Abraham Lincoln and General Grant. The one of Lincoln has been warmly praised by the art critics of Boston, and General Grant also highly commends the one taken of him.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

more players under the League ban

Date Saturday, March 19, 1881
Text

Among the players who were mentioned by Hulbert (in a recent interview) as being under the ban of the League are James O'Rourke and James White of the Buffalos, Paul Hines and Joe Start of the Providence Club, John Clapp of the Clevelands, Bond and Morrill of the Bostons; and Corcoran of the Chicagos.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a pointed hint to umpires

Date Saturday, March 19, 1881
Text

[reporting on the NL meting of 3/8/1881] ...the first important business matter attended to was the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas,There is much uncertainty and diversity of ruling by League umpires in determining when in cases of rain it is proper to call “Time,” therefore be it

Resolved, That the secretary of the League shall furnish each League umpire with a book of rules, in which he shall mark each rule referring to rain.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no rain checks 2

Date Saturday, March 19, 1881
Text

[reporting on the NL meting of 3/8/1881] After some little debate it was voted as the opinion of the League that when a game is prevented by rain from being finished the local club shall not refund either tickets or money, it being held that when a person enters a ground he takes the same chances that eh club do of being disappointed by the interposition of nature.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

proposed collusion to keep salaries down

Date Tuesday, March 22, 1881
Text

There are a few men among the league players who place the value of their services at an unreasonably high figure, and then, by shrewd management, succeed in obtaining an offer from some club at the price named or somewhere in that vicinity. This done, they make their boasts to the other players, and thus create a feeling of dissatisfaction with many, and do an incalculable amount of mischief and injury. The league is about to make open war on this class, and the preliminary steps were taken at the recent buffalo meeting. By next October it is probable that a list of players, of the character described, will be prepared, and an agreement signed by all the league clubs not to hire or even negotiate with them unless they descend from their unreasonable position. This is a step in the right direction. Players are not expected to engage themselves at a less than fair price, and, on the other hand, they should not compel clubs, in order to obtain their services, to pay an exorbitant price. Some equitable arrangement can be made, and should be made, before the season of 1882, that will be satisfactory all around.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

lease on the Cincinnati grounds for sale

Date Wednesday, April 6, 1881
Text

The leasehold of the Cincinnati Star Base-Ball Grounds is to be sold at Master Commissioner's sale on the 7th of next month. The lease has three years yet to run, and this interest, together with all the buildings and improvements, has been appraised at $1,500. This would seem to be a first-class opportunity for those interested in base-ball to secure well fitted-u grounds at a very low figure. The lumber alone that went into the buildings now on the Star Grounds cost over $3,000. it is probable that a Syndicate of the old Cincinnati Club will buy the leasehold and prepare for a new start next year.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a high delivery 2

Date Friday, April 8, 1881
Text

[Beacon vs. Boston 4/7/1881] Every one was anxious to see how Whitney, the new pitcher, who had already won an enviable reputation in California, would carry himself, and at the conclusion of the first game all were loud in his praises. He showed himself to be a wonderful manipulator of the sphere. He has a lightning rapidity to his delivery, coupled with a remarkable command of the ball. His curve pitching is about the finest ever seen on the Boston grounds. He raises his arm well up to his shoulder, but, considering that in the past the league has not pretended to live up to the rule as to what shall be termed a legally pitched ball, and has allowed anything and everything to be brought into the game and be termed pitching, this will probably not be objected to. Boston Herald April 8, 1881

[from the Providence correspondent] Some surprise has been manifested here (Providence), during the past five or six days, at the statement circulated broadcast throughout the West and published in nearly all of the base ball papers, to the effect that the Providence management had decided to “kick” because of Whitney's alleged irregular method of pitching. The story, to put it in the plainest language possible, Every one was anxious to see how Whitney, the new pitcher, who had already won an enviable reputation in California, would carry himself, and at the conclusion of the first game all were loud in his praises. He showed himself to be a wonderful manipulator of the sphere. He has a lightning rapidity to his delivery, coupled with a remarkable command of the ball. His curve pitching is about the finest ever seen on the Boston grounds. He raises his arm well up to his shoulder, but, considering that in the past the league has not pretended to live up to the rule as to what shall be termed a legally pitched ball, and has allowed anything and everything to be brought into the game and be termed pitching, this will probably not be objected to. Boston Herald April 8, 1881 is made up of whole cloth. Not the first whisper of an objection to Whitney's delivery has been heard. On the contrary, President Root informed the Herald correspondent that the item was false in every particular. He believed Whitney was a good pitcher, and would be a hard man to hit. Instead of objecting to Whitney, he thought that his presence between the “points” would make the games between Providence and Boston far more interesting than in the past, for the two nines would be more evenly matched, and the question of superiority, instead of being settled in the first two or three games, remain a fact to be brought out later on in the season. The rivalry between Providence and Boston has always been of the very pleasantest nature, and at this late day it will take considerably more than the frivolous scribblings of the would-be base ball authorities of the West to break up the harmonious feelings existing between the base ball associations of Providence and Boston. Boston Herald May 1, 1881

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

stealing second under the new pitching rule

Date Sunday, April 10, 1881
Text

Some experiments have been made in the matter of stealing second base under the new pitching rules. It is found that the added time consumed by the ball in traversing the extra five feet materially increases the chances of a swift runner's making second safely on a steal, and that nothing less than quick and accurate throwing down by catchers will prevent an increase in the number of successful larcenies of bag No. 2. since Chicago has by long odds the best base-running team in the League, the champions should be able to improve this opening more effectively than any of their antagonists.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

adjusting to the increased pitching distance

Date Sunday, April 10, 1881
Text

The two [Chicago] pitchers, Corcoran and Goldsmith, are industriously engaged in acquiring the fifty-foot range, and it is already apparent that harder work will be required of a pitcher this year to maintain his effectiveness at the added distance than ever before. It is noticeable, especially in the case of Goldsmith, that in the effort to give the ball greater speed to carry it the full distance an unusual proportion of wild pitching occurs, though this will, of course, be in a great measure corrected by practice.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the lease on the Cincinnati ground

Date Saturday, April 16, 1881
Text

The leasehold of the baseball ground at Cincinnati, O., is to be disposed of at public sale in that city May 7. The lease has three years yet to run, and this interest, together with all the buildings and improvements, has been appraised at $1,500. A movement is on foot to form a co-operative nine to be selected from Jones, J. Reilly, Will White, Ellick, Booth, Burkalow, Miller, Mitchell, Deagle, Malloy and other local players.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

batting gloves?

Date Monday, April 18, 1881
Text

George Wright will have to put his batting gloves on before the championship season opens, or he will woefully disappoint the expectations of his friends. Perhaps a little practice with the rest of the team, on days when there is no game, might help him. Boston Herald April 18, 1881

[See also, however, Boston vs. Cleveland 6/27/1881] Both clubs had on their batting boots today, and the pitchers were severely punished. Boston Herald June 28 [suggesting a metaphorical use]

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new National Club different from the old one

Date Saturday, April 23, 1881
Text

An exchange holds that the Washington Nationals cannot play with any League or League Alliance club until they pay the Cleveland Club what the National Club of 1880 was charged with owing them. This is a mistake. The existing National Club of Washington is in every respect a new organization, with new officers, laws and players. … ...the new club is no more responsible for the debts of the Nationals of 1880 than a new Cincinnati Club would be for any claims that might be due from its defunct predecessor. This fact is plainly demonstrable. New York Clipper April 23, 1881

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

reserved seats

Date Saturday, April 23, 1881
Text

Every holder of a season ticket will have an opportunity to draw for choice of seats, and that seat will be reserved for them throughout the season. No other seats will be reserved, but will be open to whoever wishes to pay fifteen cents therefor. When a seat is reserved its number and section will be placed upon the season ticket, so that no mistakes can occur.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

training regimen; catcher's mask

Date Saturday, April 23, 1881
Text

the out and in fielders take positions as if a game was in progress, while two others bat balls in rapid succession all over the in and out field, now bounding along the turf; now a daisy cutter that goes like a rifle shot and tries the nerve of the fielders; now a long drive to outfield or a high fly the duty of the fielders is to cover all the ground possible, which gives them great practice in running, to catch all flies, thus learning t “judge” a ball accurately, and in case of safe hits to field it to the bases quickly enough to put out the base runner. With two men batting, this exercise is incessant. … An hour of this work, and then the business part commences. Derby throw off his cardigan jacket and takes the pitcher's position, fifty feet in front of the home plate, while Bennett puts on his mask and goes behind the bat. Manager Bancroft acts as umpire, and a game is commenced with no one to play against. There is a tenth man in the club, however, and he goes to bat, and to give it the perfect semblance of a game, he remains there until put out three times, doing no running, however, the umpire deciding whether he could have reached first base safely, in which case it is scored as a run. When he is put out three times he goes to the field and another players comes to the bat, and so on, until twenty-seven men have been put out. Then Sweeney and Reilly constitute the batter and the same programme is repeated. This gives a fine opportunity to judge of their relative execution, but is terrible hard work for them...

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

change of pace and multiple curves

Date Saturday, April 23, 1881
Text

Derby pitches a very swift ball and changes his pace very cleverly. Sweeney curves his balls in or out at will, and appears to puzzle the batsmen.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Whitney's high delivery

Date Sunday, April 24, 1881
Text

There are signs of a kick about the delivery of Whitney, Boston's new pitcher, who is said to press the limit in the matter of raising his arm. The Providence people are especially exercised about it, and are pretty certain to ask the League to keep down Whitney's arm by sitting down on it. Chicago Tribune April 24, 1881

[from a letter to the editor by “A. D. Tyler”] ...with all the strength he [Whitney] can bring to bear he draws his arm and hand back on a level with his shoulder, and then with a might effort slugs it towards the catcher, unmindful of the striker's whereabouts, and was not in the least disconcerted the past week by knocking the wind out of five Providence players. The League rules clearly define the delivery of the pitcher, and are a mere face if not enforced. Every game Whitney has played in this week should count against the Bostons. Chicago Tribune May 13, 1881

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a late advocacy of the ten men ten inning rule

Date Sunday, April 24, 1881
Text

Boston Sunday Globe: Philadelphia deserves the credit of first bringing base ball into prominence. It was here that the great national game first took root.--{Exchange. Yes, immediately after the visit of the Excelsiors in 1859 [sic], Col. Fitzgerald took the initiative as President of the Athletics, and for six years he gave a great deal of attention to the game. He christened it the National Game, advocated the fly catch, paying the umpire, over-running the bases, and various other improvements. But, one thing remains to make the game perfect—viz.: --Ten Men and Ten Innings. When Col. Fitzgerald retired from B.B. the Athletics stood undisputably at the head for good play and good conduct.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the negotiation leverage of an outside business

Date Thursday, April 28, 1881
Text

Will White yesterday received a dispatch from Manager Bancroft, of the Detroit Club, asking for his terms to pitch four weeks [while Bradley was recovering from illness] for that team. Will, not caring to leave his business, answered by naming a good, round sum. A reply came offering a less sum. White replied: “Will come on no conditions except terms named.” The reply was returned at once, ordering him to report to-morrow so as to get into practice for Monday's game, and he left on the 9:20 train last evening for Detroit.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

judgment against Horace Phillips

Date Saturday, April 30, 1881
Text

H. B. Phillips on April 22, at Philadelphia, Pa., confessed judgment to A. T. Soule of Rochester, N.Y., for $1,463. Phillips managed the professional nine of Rochester up to July 24, 1880, and since that time has been engaged as a hotel clerk in Chicago, Ill.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

manure on the polo grounds

Date Sunday, May 1, 1881
Text

The Secretary of the Providence Club, in writing from New York, says: “The Metropolitan grounds are in poor condition for ball playing, as this morning the polo people were at work spreading stable manure all over the out-field, so that it made hard work to run for a ball, and if it was a ground hit it struck an obstacle and bounded off to one side. The game was stopped at one time to allow a load to be dumped back of the first base, and Joe Start was afraid of slipping down every minute. The ball people say that the polo folks do as they please about the grounds: that they dare not find much fault for fear of being ordered off entirely.

Source ” Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

retrieving foul balls over the fence

Date Wednesday, May 4, 1881
Text

[Cleveland vs. Chicago 5/3/1881] George Shaffer [Cleveland right fielder] incurred the ill-will of the spectators by his mean refusal to go after foul balls batted over the right-field fence. Four times he stood and folded his arms and delayed the game, while Anson and Kelly twice respectively left their seats n the bench to go and hunt the ball. So essentially small a performance as Shaffer was guilty of has never before been seen on the Chicago grounds, and there is probably no other ball-player in the League who would be guilty of such conduct. We happen to know that this sort of thing is not popular with the Cleveland management, which is deservedly noted for courtesy and good manners, and if George Shaffer is wise he will not repeat the offense.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

tripping the runner 2

Date Wednesday, May 4, 1881
Text

[Cleveland vs. Chicago 5/3/1881] The umpire fined McGeary [third baseman] $10 for his attempt to trip up Kelly on the base line. It was a well-deserved rebuke of a dastardly performance.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Whitney's delivery

Date Saturday, May 7, 1881
Text

[Boston vs. Metropolitan 4/28/1881] The rumor about Whitney's illegal delivery proved to be nothing at all, judging by his work in this match. He is a tall man, and naturally the line of the ball from his waist, even, is high. He is, in fact, lower than a majority of the other pitchers. In this case it was simply poor batting against very swift curved-line pitching, and the latter had the best of it.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

baseball reporters

Date Saturday, May 7, 1881
Text

Some of the prominent base-ball editors of the country are: T. Z. Cowles, Chicago Tribune; Frank Davison, Chicago Times; Robert W. Pearce, Cleveland Herald; Mr. Volz, Cleveland Leader; Mr. Cobleight, Cleveland Plain Dealer; C. S. Bullymore, Buffalo Courier; Frank B. Wright, Buffalo Express; Ed. A. Stevens, Boston Herald; Mr. Fowle, Boston Globe; M. C. Day, Providence Journal; C. R. DeFrost, Troy Times; Freeman Brown, Worcester Spy; Henry Chadwick, New York Clipper; W. M. Spink, St. Louis Globe-Democrat.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Ward affected by the new placement of the pitcher

Date Sunday, May 8, 1881
Text

It is evident, in the light of the two games in which Ward has pitched the past week, that the change in the pitcher's position has affected him in his delivery to a very great extent. The difference is so marked from former years as to occasion general comment.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Leary injunction; revolves to Detroit

Date Saturday, May 14, 1881
Text

An injunction on a pitcher.--On May 9 an injunction was served on Leary, debarring him from playing in the Metropolitan nine, the New York team's manager complaining that he had broken his engagement. The case is to be tried this week. This is a novel expedient to retain the services of a player. New York Clipper May 14, 1881

Leary has left the Metropolitans in the lurch, and joined the Detroits. President Thompson of the Detroit Club telegraphed to Nick Young, secretary of the League, May 28, and, finding by a bit of negligence on the part of the Metropolitan management that Leary was not recorded as being under contract to any Leagu3e or League Alliance Club, he immediately had him engaged to play with the Detroits, and his contract was pro0perly recorded with Secretary Young. New York Clipper June 4, 1881

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips settles with Soule

Date Saturday, May 14, 1881
Text

Mr. Phillips writes to the Enquirer from New York to say that he and Mr. Soule have come to an amicable and perfectly satisfactory settlement. Mr. Phillips confessed judgment at Philadelphia for $1,463 in favor of Soule, and gave him an order for the amount on his (Phillips') deceased uncle's estate. Mr. Phillips is now chief clerk at the Burdich Hotel, Chicago, where he is highly appreciated. Cincinnati Enquirer May 14, 1881

The League backs down with the Nationals

A letter from the League head-quarters states: “When the Nationals of Washington, of 1881, either pay or demonstrate that they are not a reorganization of any previous National Club then all disqualifications will be removed. The League neither wishes to rule harshly nor be imposed upon.” -Chicago Tribune.

That is a neat way for the League to back down once from its high horse. The Nationals were put under the League ban, and all the non-League Eastern Clubs solemnly warned under penalty of League displeasure and ostracism not to play the Washington outlaws. To this neither the Washington nor the other members of the Eastern organizations payed a particle of attention. Hence, the small hole through which the Boss and his crowd have crawled. Cincinnati Enquirer May 14, 1881

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Charley Jones sues the Boston Club

Date Sunday, May 15, 1881
Text

Charlie Jones, of Cincinnati, a member of the Boston Club last year, arrived in Cleveland to-day [5/14]and commenced suit in the Common Pleas Court of the county, against the Boston Base-Ball Association to recover $378 due him as salary when he left the Club in this city last fall. In his petition Jones sets forth that he signed a contract with the Association in September, 1878 for three years, playing at $1,500 per year, payable at the rate of $250 per month during the base-ball season. Upon one of its Western trips the Club became in arrears to him in the sum for which suit was commenced, and after repeated demands for his money, he refused to play with the Club. Upon Jones' affidavit an order of garnishment was issued against the Cleveland Association and President Evans, ordering them to hold all money in their possession belonging to the Boston Club. The garnishment was served on President Evans as the game was called this afternoon, and he replied that Boston had no money in the box. It is reported to-night that both Clubs knew that suit was to be commenced, and had arranged money matters for the occasion. Jones was a spectator at the game, and at its close was warmly greeted by the members of the Cleveland and Boston Clubs. Cincinnati Enquirer May 15, 1881

Harry Wright says “that Jones can not recover one cent, as before the Club left Boston, the Directors signed everything over to Mr. Soden, President of the Club, on account of money advanced by him to the Boston Club.” That will hardly hold in law. And were it so, where are the Boston players to look for their salaries. Cincinnati Enquirer May 18, 1881

Harry Wright, of the Boston Club, by his attorney, has filed a demurrer to the petition of C. W. Jones, of Cincinnati, in the Common Pleas Court, for the reason that the petition does not state facts enough to constitute a cause of action in favor of the plaintiff against the defendant. Cincinnati Enquirer June 13, 1881

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jones's lawsuit against the Boston Club

Date Sunday, May 15, 1881
Text

Charlie Jones of Cincinnati, member of the Boston club last year, arrived in Cleveland today [5/14] and commenced suit in the common pleas court of this county against the Boston Base Ball Association to recover $378 due him as salary when he left the club in this city last fall. In his petition, Mr. Jones sets forth that he signed a contract with the association in September, 1878, for three years' playing, at $1500 per year, paying at the rate of $250 per month during the ball season. Upon one of its western trips, the club became in arrears to him in the sum for which suit was commenced, and after repeated demands for his money, he refused to play with the club. Upon Jones' affidavit an order of garnishment was issued against the Cleveland association and President Evans, ordering them to hold all money in their possession belonging to the Boston club. The garnishment was served on President Evans as game was called this afternoon, and he replied that the Bostons had no money in the box. It is reported tonight that both clubs knew that the suit was to be commenced, and had arranged money matters for the occasion. Jones was a spectator at the game, and at its close was warmly greeted by the members of the Cleveland and Boston clubs. Boston Herald May 15, 1881

Charles Jones of Cincinnati commenced a suit against the Boston Club in the Common Pleas Court at Cleveland, O., May 14, to recover $378 back salary, which he claims is due him. Upon Jones' affidavit an order of garnishment was issued against the Cleveland Association and its president, ordering them to hold all money in their possession belonging to the Bostons. His action, however, came to naught, as the money matters had been so arranged between the two clubs that nothing could be attached. New York Clipper May 21, 1881

The Boston Club's baggage was recently attached at Cleveland, O., by Charley Jones, who has a suit against that organization for unpaid salary. Harry Wright made oath that the baggage was his personal property, and the attachment was released. Jones, however, has $270 of the Boston's receipts at Cleveland tied up to await the result of suit. New York Clipper June 4, 1881

The Boston Club have filed a demurrer to the petition of Charles W. Jones in the Common Pleas Court, Cleveland, O., on the ground that the petition does not state facts enough to constitute a cause of action in favor of the plaintiff. New York Clipper June 25, 1881

Charley Jones attached the gate-receipts of the Bostons in their championship game at Cleveland, O., June 24. New York Clipper July 2, 1881

Charles Jones has recently obtained a judgment against the Boston Club. He was expelled, it will be remembered, for refusing to play with the Bostons in 1880, because his salary was not forthcoming. Jones then resorted to the law, and swooped down upon the receipts of the Bostons while they were playing in Cleveland, O. The court at last recognized the justice of Jones' case against the Bostons, and an effort will be made to reinstate him in the League at the December meeting. Hulbert says Jones will never be reinstated by the League because he failed to make his appeal within the time designated. The circumstances of this case, however, are not discreditable to Jones, and do not reflect on his character as a player or as an honorable man. It would be only just for the League to reinstate him. New York Clipper October 22, 1881

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a temporary engagement

Date Sunday, May 15, 1881
Text

Powers has been engaged temporarily by the Troys to fill the catcher's position till Holbert recovers from the injuries received at Worcester. He did some good work for the Bostons last year, and he might as well be employed permanently by the Trojans, as Holbert is the most unlucky catcher in the profession in receiving injuries.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

seeking donations to restore the Oakdale grounds

Date Sunday, May 15, 1881
Text

A re-organization of the Athletics has just been made, and it now looks as if a great deal of the old interest in the game would be revived. The new organization will be under the control of that enterprising gentleman, Mr. H. Phillips, who has managed successfully every club with which he has been connected. Fulmer will be Captain of the nine, which will be strengthened, and include four or five well-known professionals who are at present disengaged. Money has already been secured for the equipment and running of the nine, but the nine will not take the field until the Oakdale Grounds have been properly prepared for play. To effect this, an Improvement Fund will be created, of which Mr. A. J. Reach will be Treasurer. This money will be devoted exclusively to the improvement of the ground. The lovers of the game will be called upon by Messrs. Phillips, Mason and Sharswood [sic]. We hope subscriptions will be prompt and liberal. It is proposed the play the inaugural game on or about the 23d of May, with the famous Metropolitans, of New York.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a description of a delivery

Date Wednesday, May 18, 1881
Text

With the batsman in position, Whitney revolves the ball in his hands several times, then suddenly he curls himself up like a boy attacked with the gripes or a dog retiring for the night, whirls his leg, his right arm shoots straight from the shoulder, and the first thing the sorely-perplexed strike knows the sphere has been discharged and started on its errand. For a few minutes the batter is uncertain whether or not the man has a fit, and two or three balls pass by before he fully realizes the situation. Out of all this hysterical demonstration, Whitney manages to put a great deal of speed in the ball, and to practice considerable deception. But the batter is always in danger, because he doesn't know, neither does Whitney, but what the sphere may land on his ear instead of in Snyder's hands. He struck several of the Buffalos yesterday, and, as he propels the sphere quite swiftly, it did not create the best of feeling within them. Like the untamed steed of the western wilds, he ought to be subdued, broken or driven with a curb-bit. By his wonderful gymnastics he succeeded in effectually mystifying the Buffalos, and six hits represented their batting efforts. Boston Herald May 18, 1881, quoting the Buffalo Express.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Bob Ferguson loses his temper

Date Thursday, May 19, 1881
Text

[Troy vs. Detroit 5/18/1881] Ferguson made four errors at second, and let his temper get the best of him in the second inning, and attempted to slap Houck’s face, for preventing him making a double play. The audience was so indignant that they could not restrain themselves from hissing and shouting to put him out, when Ferguson, to make matters worse, walked up to the grand stand and defied anyone there to come on the field and attempt it–a breach of League rules which will not be winked at by the Detroit directors.

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Ferguson's pugnacious reputation

Date Friday, May 20, 1881
Text

Houck accidentally ran against Fergsuon, and the latter dropped the ball. Thereupon Ferguson, who is somewhat notorious for hot temper and fighting propensities, cuffed Houck (a smaller man than himself) on the side of the head., quoting the Detroit Post and Tribune

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Kelly cuts the corner

Date Saturday, May 21, 1881
Text

[Boston vs. Chicago 5/20/1881] It was strongly suspected that Kelly, in his eagerness to reach the plate from second, somehow forgot to go by way of third, but slighted that bag entirely by some ten or fifteen feet, thereby saving much valuable time and distance. The umpire of necessity was fixing his attention upon the play at first base, where Burdock [second baseman] and Deasley [first baseman] were disposing of Anson, and hence that official could not possibly know whether Kelly touched the third bag or not. The umpire was doing his duty, and, since he did not with his own eyes see Kelly skip the base, he could not under the rules give him out. Chicago Tribune May 21, 1881

It is true that in his eagerness to score the deciding tally Kelly forgot to touch third base on his way home from second, and that the umpire, whose attention was centred on a put-out at first base, failed to notice the omission, and allowed the run to be scored. No player, however, should be blamed fro too much zeal in his endeavor to win; that is a fault on the right side, and one easily forgiven, except by the defeated club and the short side in the betting. Chicago Tribune June 19, 1881

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a hidden ball trick 2

Date Saturday, May 21, 1881
Text

[Boston vs. Chicago 5/20/1881] Some sharp work prevented the Bostons tieing the game in the ninth inning. Burdock led off with a two-baser, and the ball was fielded to Williamson at third. He hid the ball, and, when Burdock led off from second, Williamson threw the ball to Quest, and Burdock was put out. He would have scored on Whitney's base hit.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

cutting corners while base running

Date Saturday, May 21, 1881
Text

[Boston vs. Chicago 5/20/1881] [Kelly on second] Anson made a hit to Burdock, and the latter threw it to Deasley, putting him out. While the umpire was watching the play Kelly stole home across the diamond, without going within 20 feet of third, and scored a run which won the game. It was a deliberate steal, but the umpire did not see it. It was no credit to Chicago to win the game in such a manner. Boston Herald May 21, 1881

There is probably but one player in the profession who can run home from the second base while a man is being put out at first, and that man is Kelly of the Chicagos. He does it by skipping across the diamond, with the umpire looking in another direction. It is a feat he feels proud of. Boston Herald May 22, 1881

Any one who read the description of the way in which the Chicago-Boston game of last Friday was lost to the Bostons will recognize at once the system of playing favored and petted by the Chicago management. To get a run honestly if a man can, but get a run, is the policy of that club as laid down by its president. It is not a policy that commends itself to honest people. If a game is not to be won on its merits, but is to be stolen, then base ball will degenerate as it deserves. Boston Herald May 22, 1881

[Chicago vs. Boston 9/16/1881] Anson sent the ball to Burdock, who fielded him out at first by clean work, but in the meantime Kelly ran clean from second base to the home-plate. How he did it was a mystery to those who were not watching him. He did it by simply resorting to his favorite dastardly trick of watching his opportunity when the umpire's attention is turned in another direction, and then running across the diamond and home without touching the third base. Yesterday he did not go within 10 feet of the base, in this case, according to the testimony of scores who were watching him, and of Sutton and Barnes to the writer after the game. The ball was fielded to Sutton, and the umpire's attention was called to Kelly's action, but he refused to give him out on the ground, probably, that he did not see him pass the base. Boston Herald September 17, 1881

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

facilities beneath the grandstand

Date Sunday, May 22, 1881
Text

Admireres of the national game in this city will learn with pleasure that a new grand stand is about to be erected on the Boston grounds, it will be 75 feet wide and 50 feet deep, and will be built on the site now occupied by the stockholders' and reporters' seats. It will be composed almost entirely of new lumber, though where the lumber of the old stand can be used without marring the beauty and strength of the new one, it will be done to lighten the expense. The floor of the auditorium will be on an ascending scale, the same as at a theatre, and w9ill be furnished with chairs for the use of the patrons. In front of the grand stand, immediately in the rear of the catcher, with the floor resting four feet from the ground, will be ample press accommodations, upon each side of which will be seats for the accommodation of the stockholders. A row of seats behind the reporters, and extending the entire width of the grand stand, will also be built for the stockholders. In the large space between the ground floor and the auditorium will be a ladies' retiring room, separate apartments with closets for the local and visiting clubs and an office for the transaction of business and the storage of property. This will still leave a large area where spectators can seek shelter in case of rain. In the rear of the grand stand there will be plenty of standing room for teams, and the entrance to the grounds will be about the same as at present. The new stand will have a seating capacity of about 700. it will be kept in the very best of order, and no smoking or tobacco spitting will be allowed. The ladies can thus be assured that they can patronize the place and not be afraid of soiling their clothes. Everything about the premises will be kept clean, the chairs will be numbered, and a system inaugurated relative to the occupancy of the grand stand that will insure comfort and satisfaction to the patrons. The expense of the new structure is borne entirely by private subscription. The whole amount necessary has already been raised, and the contractors, Messrs. Laming & Drisko, have agreed to have everything in readiness, barring bad weather, for the game on Decoration Day.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Whitney's delivery 2

Date Friday, May 27, 1881
Text

[Whitney's] style is original if not as phenomenal as claimed. He stands erect for a moment, glances around the field, and then appears to be taken with an acute cramp. There is a bending down of the body, a humping up of the back, a shutting up of one leg, a dozen arms seem to be gyrating about the doubled-up mass of humanity, and from some point unseen the ball emerges with great swiftness, passes over the plate, you hear the umpire call: “One strike,” and then you observe that Whitney is standing up again. It is a wonderful contortion act, and frightens the batters so much that they generally strike out the first two or three innings.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Olympics and Athletics at Oakdale; Horace Phillips managing

Date Saturday, May 28, 1881
Text

Baseball in Philadelphia seems to be booming. The Athletics have secured the exclusive use of Oakdale Park for four days in each week, the Olympics practicing every Tuesday and Friday. All communications for the Athletics should be addressed to H. B. Phillips, manager, 258 No. Ninth street, Philadelphia.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an attempt to arrange thrown games

Date Sunday, May 29, 1881
Text

[an exchange of correspondence between one James S. Woodruff and John Clapp, culminating in:] This will introduce Mr. W. A. Pinkerton, referred to in my letter of the 23d. He will make himself known to you before he is done with the interview. Having now introduced my friend, I would like to say a word for myself. All your letters to me were turned over to Mr. Evans, President of our [Cleveland] Club, as soon as received, and by his advice and direction my letter to you of the 23d was written, in the hope that your dishonest schemes might be fully developed and counteracted. As you are well aware, I am a professional ball-player, and have followed this line of business for the past twelve years, and have received for my services a good salary. During this time I have witnessed the downfall of several good ball-0players, caused by just such men as you; they are now suffering, and I am glad of the opportunity to expose such a dishonest character as you have proven yourself to be by offering to bribe me. I am very glad you have selected me as your victim, as I am able to withstand all such temptations. You say you have been “trying for two years to get me.” I am glad you have devoted so much time to me, for had the same amount been expended on others you might have succeeded in injuring some poor fellow, as well as the popular game of base-ball. I would advise you in the future to attend to your legitimate business and give up experimenting with honest ball-players. Mr. Pinkerton will express to you my feeling in the matter more fully than I have done, as I feel myself unable to do the subject justice. John E. Clapp.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

trapping a crooked gambler

Date Saturday, June 4, 1881
Text

A Chicago “crook” named James S. Woodruff has been detected in an attempt to bribe Clapp, captain of the Cleveland Club. Approaches were made to Clapp to arrange for a system of cipher telegrams, whereby Woodruff was to be kept informed as to what pools to buy on games of the Clevlands. Clapp at once consulted Ford Evans, president of the Cleveland Club, and by his advice wrote decoy letters, which on May 28 resulted in Woodruff's identification by Detective Pinkerton. The case will be laid before the Grand Jury of Chicago, Ill., with the view of procuring an indictment against Woodruff for bribery and unlawful conspiracy.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

season ticket prices 2

Date Sunday, June 5, 1881
Text

The Athletic nine have their season tickets, price $10, ready for sale. On and after the next match the pavilion on the ground will be reserved for season tickets holders, admission to transient spectators being 25 cents extra. The money received from season tickets will be devoted to repairing the grounds and enlarging the grand stand.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

balls more uniform quality

Date Saturday, June 11, 1881
Text

For the first time on record, over a quarter of the league season has passed without a single complaint that games had been lost or won on account of an unusually “life” or unusually “dead” ball. As far as seen here this season, the league balls have been remarkably uniform.

Source Chicago Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

no wire backstop screen in Boston

Date Sunday, June 12, 1881
Text

Everybody speaks in praise of the new grant stand on the Boston grounds, but a wire screen would protect the spectators seated therein from foul balls.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Ward's delivery 2

Date Sunday, June 12, 1881
Text

Ward is still in practice, and, when warm weather fairly sets in, will not doubt occupy the pitcher's points. He has lately been pitching a la Dailey, that is, throwing the hand way back and over to the left side, getting a spring similar to that acquired by the use of a spring board, and then pitching the ball in. he has developed a very fast ball by this style of pitching.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Kelly shouts to distract the fielders

Date Sunday, June 12, 1881
Text

Complaint comes from Worcester against the conduct of Kelley of the Chicago team in games in that city the past week—conduct that, if true, as charged, can be ranked as unfair and ungentlemanly, and worthy only of the rowdyism of the prize ring. It is charged that, when Bushong ran for foul balls, Kelley made a practice of shouting at him, in the hope of confusing him, and make him muff it, and also that, when a fly ball was hit to the in-field he would call to the wrong man to take it; as, for instance, if Richmond was going for a ball, Kelley would cry out for Irwin or Creamer. In this way the players would become confused and make misplays; in fact, it so resulted in several instances. If he is known to do this in Boston, it is to e hoped that he will be made to desist, or occupy a seat on the players' bend. He has no right to call out to any of the opposing nine, and, if persisted in, he should not be allowed to aid in captaining his team.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a late appearance of a second nine

Date Wednesday, June 15, 1881
Text

The second nine of the Cass club recently threw down the gauntlet to the first nine, and the game took place yesterday at Recreation Park in the presence of about 200 spectators.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a revived Cincinnati Club

Date Friday, June 24, 1881
Text

Yesterday a syndicate of prominent business men of Cincinnati began to form, with the avowed purpose of paying the price brought at the judicial sale of the grounds some five weeks ago. They intend to rent the grounds during the balance of the year for miscellaneous sports, and will be prepared next season to go into the best that can be had in the way of professional base-ball. The entire buildings and fences on the grounds, with a three years' lease, can be bought for $1,500. over half of this sum, in sums not less than $100 each, were put up in an hour last evening, and the rest will be forthcoming immediately. Within a day or two it is to be hoped that the permanent purchase will be accomplished. It is the intention to have none but men of undoubted financial standing connected with the new movement. It must succeed. June 16, 1881

The Cincinnati Base-ball Grounds were sold yesterday to a Syndicate of four prominent Cincinnati gentlemen, who paid the Special Master Commissioner Bulla $1,600 in cash for them. This sale carries with it the right of the leasehold, running until May, 1884, and also to the lumber, buildings and fences on the grounds. … The new Syndicate is headed by General John E. Price, owner of Price's Hill, who has always been noted as one of the most enthusiastic base-ball admirers in the city. The other three members of the Syndicate do not with prominence in the transaction, but mean business all the time. During the remainder of the year the grounds will be rented to whoever desire their use from time to time. Next year the Syndicate intend to put a first-class professional team in the field and secure a membership in the most prominent Base-ball Association in this country. During the remainder of the year the grounds can be rented for games of any kind, sports, or other purposes, by addressing a note to the Manager of the Cincinnati Base-Ball Grounds, care of the Enquirer office.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jones played against the Louisville

Date Friday, June 24, 1881
Text

The Bostons are advertised for a game in Louisville against the Eclipse Club July 5th. This is the Club that played against Jones a few weeks ago. Jones is an expelled League-player, and therefore, by the League Constitution, all League clubs are forbidden to play the Eclipse team. We respectfully call the attention of President Hulbert to this intended breach of the League laws.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a rules omission

Date Saturday, June 25, 1881
Text

[from answers to correspondents] A new rule was made in 1879 to the effect that after the first inning the first striker in each inning shall be the batsman whose name follows that of the last man who has completed his turn (time) at bat in the preceding inning. This interpretation of the rule seems to have been omitted from the official book during the last two seasons. New York Clipper June 25, 1881 [N.B. The rules made no mention of the order of batting from one inning to the next. This was not inserted until 1888.]

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a planned triple header

Date Saturday, June 25, 1881
Text

Three games in one day are booked to be played between the Athletics of Philadelphia and the Atlantics of Brooklyn on the Fourth of July. The opening one will be at Oakdale Park, Philadelphia, commencing at 8:30 A.M. The two nines will then take a special train to West Chester, pa., where the second game will begin at noon. Returning to Philadelphia, the contestants will commence operations again at 4 P.M. New York Clipper June 25, 1881

The Athletics and Atlantics have decided to drop one of the three games announced for that day, and will play at West Chester in the morning and at Oakdale Park, Philadelphia, in the afternoon. New York Clipper July 2, 1881

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Reach and Shibe enter into partnership

Date Saturday, June 25, 1881
Text

The well-known baseball emporium No. 6 South Eighth street, Philadelphia, will hereafter be conducted by Al. Reach and Ben Shibe, who have recently entered into partnership. Shibe for many years has been known as a leading manufacturer of baseballs, and once managed a club that included in its ranks such excellent players as Williamson of the Chicago, Knight of the Detroits and Richmond of the Bostons.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

stirrings in Cincinnati

Date Saturday, June 25, 1881
Text

A syndicate of prominent business men of Cincinnati, O., has been formed for the purpose of purchasing the buildings and fences on the ball ground in that city, with a three years' lease of the ground. They intend to rent the ground during the remainder of the year for miscellaneous sports, and will be prepared next season to present a strong professional team. New York Clipper June 25, 1881

The Cincinnati Baseball Grounds have been sold to four prominent Cincinnati gentlemen, who paid $1,600 in cash for them. This sale carries with it the right of the leasehold, running until May, 1884, and also to the lumber, buildings and fences on the grounds. During the remainder of the year the grounds will be rented to whoever desires their use. Next year it is intended to put a first-class professional team in the field. New York Clipper July 2, 1881

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Ward’s delivery 2

Date Saturday, June 25, 1881
Text

[Providence vs. Chicago 6/24/1881] ...the Chicagos hit Ward early and often. This pitcher, who used to tie himself in a double-bow knot and face second base, has adopted a new method. He swings his arm backward and around so far that it becomes visible on his left side and then brings it back again with a resounding jerk. The result is that he is very wild and punishing on the catcher, while he is not at all puzzling, as yesterday’s record shows.

Source Chicago Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

playing against an expelled player

Date Sunday, July 3, 1881
Text

The officers of the Eclipse Club, of Louisville, are very much chagrined at the predicament they are placed in through having played in a game in which Jones, expelled last year by the League, took part. The Louisville people had arranged with Boston and Worcester to receive those clubs there this week and next, but by League law neither club can play the Eclipse team. A dispatch of inquiry by the Worcester Secretary to President Hulbert received a reply to the effect that for any League club to play in Louisville would be a rank stulification [sic: probably should be nullification] of the League. Louisville has been made the innocent victim of Cincinnati's despicable meanness in this matter. The management of the Cincinnati team in which Jones played knew perfectly well that Jones was an expelled League player, and that by playing against him Louisville would be placed under the ban. Cincinnati laid the snare with eyes wide open, and Louisville walked into it with eyes fast shut. But the plea of ignorance on the part of Louisville will not and should not avail. Evasions of League law would be constant if the penalties could be thus avoided. League expulsions are matter of public record, and while Louisville is most unfortunate in having unwittingly offended, the League can do no less than enforce its code in the premises.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the holiday crowd; ground rules for block balls

Date Tuesday, July 5, 1881
Text

[Boston vs. Chicago 7/4/1881] Extra seats were put up along the right and left field fences, and charis, three or four rows deep, were placed in front of the grand stand and the east seats. These were all occupied, and the extra multitude spread itself out on the grass, the mass inclining to the left field, there the [illegible] fence cut off the blistering rays of the sun. Chicago Times July 5, 1881

[Boston vs. Chicago 7/4/1881] A crowd of 10,000 people assembled at White Stocking Park yesterday afternoon to witness the game between Boston and Chicago, and so densely packed the grounds as to interfere greatly with the work of the fielders. To obviate this drawback as far as possible a rule was agreed on that but one base be run on any ball hit into the crowd. The result was to equalize the disadvantages of the situation, and also to give credit for safe hits in several instances where but for the crowd the ball would have been caught. Chicago Tribune July 5, 1881

[Worcester vs. Detroit 7/4/1881] ...the managers decided that a hit outside the cordon of spectators should only give two bases to the batsman. The result showed that the rule only worked to the disadvantage of the clubs twice—once each. Detroit Free Press July 5, 1881

Source Chicago Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

complaining about the umpire's strike zone

Date Saturday, July 9, 1881
Text

[Metropolitan vs. Athletic 6/29/1881] In the fourth inning the umpire gave the Athletics bases on balls that, it is claimed by the other side, should have been called strikes. The umpire made Daly mad, and demoralization set in.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Hulbert on the eight club circuit

Date Saturday, July 9, 1881
Text

[from an interview of Hulbert] ...experience had demonstrated the impracticability of writing a schedule for more than eight clubs. Any greater number would make an unwieldy body and one in which the number of clubs at the bottom with no chance tow in must necessarily be increased. Every game with these “tailers” would cost just as much as one with a first-class club, but would yield a much smaller revenue, and as the number of games was necessarily limited, each must be made to pay as well as possible. Another consideration to the same end was the fact that the available first-class ball–playing material of the country was not more than enough to furnish players for eight clubs.

Source Chicago Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a ball to the mask

Date Sunday, July 10, 1881
Text

[Providence vs. Buffalo 7/9/1881] A foul tip struck Gross' mask in the sixth inning, cutting a deep gash over the left eye, but he pluckily played out the game.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an assessment of Nolan; early use of the “box”

Date Sunday, July 10, 1881
Text

[Providence vs. Cleveland 7/7/1881] For some cause McCormick was put in the left field and Nolan in the box. When asked why this was done, the reply came 'that if Nolan gets hit, why, “Mac” can take his place.' This sounds well, but it is not business. Poor pitcher who cannot pitch one game a week without being knocked out of the diamond. McCormick can play no position but that of pitcher, and if he wishes a rest, which he is entitled to, let him lay off. Chicago Tribune July 10, 1881, quoting the Cleveland Leader

cities looking to join the League; the reasons to limit the League to eight clubs; keeping Worcester and Troy

[from an interview of Hulbert] While declining to give to the public the names of the parties, since the communications were, in a sense, private letters, he stated that he had received several inquiries from men of first-class standing in their respective cities stating that they desired admission to the League next year, and offering ample financial guarantees. Some of the were from quarters where it would be desirable to have a League Club. He had no objections to saying that one of the propositions came from New York, with a backing, both pecuniary and social, of unquestioned quality.

The reporter asked what the chance of these contemplated organizations were for admission.

To this Mr. Hulbert replied that there were various points to be considered in connection with the question. The first was that experience had demonstrated the impracticability of writing a schedule for more than eight clubs. Any greater number would make an unwieldy body, and one in which the number of clubs at the bottom with no chance to win must necessarily be increased. Every game with these “tailers” would cost just as much as one with a first-class club, but would yield a much smaller revenue, and, as the number of games was necessarily limited, each must be made to pay as well as possible. Another consideration to the same end was the fact that the available first-class playing material of the country was not more than enough to furnish players for eight clubs. The point decided that the league would not have more than eight clubs, the important one of honesty and fair dealing toward all the present members must be considered. As one member of the League, he would never consent to any course toward any member of the body, no matter how weak, looking to securing its withdrawal, in order to let in any other organization, however strong, or however much it may promise in the way of patronage of the game. The present members, who had helped to build up and make the League the success that it is, had rights in it, and, as long as they did not see fit to withdraw from it, he would vote to retain them to the exclusion of all others. Whether all the eight would elect to remain in next year he did not know. If one of them, or two of them, should drop out, there would be so many places to be filled from the most available materials at hand; if not, he did not see any chance for outside applications. Cincinnati Enquirer July 11, 1881, quoting the Chicago Times

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a plucky umpire

Date Thursday, July 14, 1881
Text

[Boston vs. Detroit 7/13/1881] ...a foul tip landed on the umpire's [Dick Higham] left temple and cut it to the bone. A surgeon was summoned , the gash sewed up, and the game proceeded after twelve minutes' delay.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early use of “twirl”

Date Wednesday, July 13, 1881
Text

[Providence vs. Buffalo 7/12/1881] Ward did the twirling for the Rhode Islanders...

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the official scorer in Detroit

Date Saturday, July 16, 1881
Text

The “official” record of the Detroit Base Ball Club, to be published by the League Association, will be almost as reliable as the pictorial promises of a circus poster. A young man who possesses no qualification for the position other than parting his hair in the middle and his name on the left hand side, applied for the position of official scorer for the purpose of getting dead-head admission to the games, and obtained both. His “official” report of Saturday's game gives the Detroits three earned runs. No one else could find but one, and even that is rejected by the managers of both clubs. It is upon the “official” reports of this base ball ignoramus that the playing reputation of the Detroit nine is to hang. Poor boys!

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Metropolitans and the Cincinnatis and Athletics apply for League membership

Date Saturday, July 16, 1881
Text

A League Club is talked of to represent this city next season. The management of the Metropolitan Club last week made a formal application for admission into the League, and a stock company will soon be formed to back the venture with $20,000. arrangements are being made to secure the Polo Grounds for next season, and should they fail to perfect these arrangements the club will prepare new grounds. President Hulbert has answered the application in a non-committal manner, saying that he will thoroughly investigate the matter. The chances the Metropolitans have for admission into the League if Hulbert alone is to be consulted, may be deemed rather slim, judging from what he recently informed a Chicago reporter. He said that he would never consent to any course toward any member of the body, no matter how weak, looking to securing its withdrawal, in order to let in any other organization, however strong, or however much it might promise in the way of patronage of the game. The present members, who had helped to build up and make the League the success that it is, has rights in it, and, as long as they did not see fit to withdraw from it he would vote to retain them to the exclusion of all others. Whether all the eight would elect to remain in next year he did not know. If one of them, or two of them, should drop out, there would be so many places to be filled from the most available materials at hand; if not, he did not see any chance for outside applicants. New York Clipper July 16, 1881

Cincinnati made a formal application for League membership July 23, but it is likely that New York City will be admitted instead, a vacancy being caused by the rumored disbandment of an Eastern organization at the close of the present season. New York Clipper July 30, 1881

The Athletics have made formal application for admission to the League in 1882. New York Clipper August 6, 1881 [N.B. None of these applications were formally considered by the League at any meeting.]

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

RBIs revisited

Date Sunday, July 17, 1881
Text

In the tabulated statement below will be found some figures of interest relative to the work done by the different players of the Chicago Club in the twenty-seven games played in this city. In this showing is included an item not commonly found in club records—viz: the number of runs batted in by each player. In making up this column reference has been had to runs resulting from every time at bat, and without regard to the test of perfect fielding on the opposing side.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

turnstile counts not reported in Chicago

Date Sunday, July 17, 1881
Text

Inquiry at the Chicago Club headquarters establishes the fact that the local press have almost invariably underestimated the attendance at the ball games this season. The only exception has been in the case of the big crowds, which have been overestimated. The attendance on the Fourth of July was placed between 9,000 and 10,000, whereas it was between 6,000 and 7,000; but in guessing at every crowd below 2,000 the reporters have placed the figures too low. Turnstile figures are never given to the press in Chicago, but President Hulbert is authority for the above statements.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

balls over the fence a ground rule double in Cleveland

Date Thursday, July 21, 1881
Text

The Cleveland ball grounds...are so small that such a batter as Bennett can readily send the ball flying over the center field fence, and only two bases are allowed on such a hit. There is no place in the inclosure where a ball can be driven for more than two bases, and not even then unless it strikes the fence and bounds off at such an angle that the fielder has to run for it a second time.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

backstop screen

Date Thursday, July 21, 1881
Text

[describing the Cleveland grounds] The stand in the rear of the catcher is guarded with a coarse wire screen, an innovation that would be most acceptable at Recreation Parks. Its meshes are so large that it is no obstruction to the view.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

peanut and lemonade vendors

Date Thursday, July 21, 1881
Text

[describing the Cleveland grounds] Lemonade and peanut fiends are plenty, and are as big a nuisance as the ticket sellers for a circus minstrel show.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Detroit Club finances

Date Sunday, July 24, 1881
Text

The Detroit Club is in a most gratifying condition financially. After paying all expenses to the 15th inst., including $2,500 expended for improvements to the ground, there remained on Friday night a cash balance of $5,500 in the treasury. quoting the Detroit Post and Tribune

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a substitute player umpires until the umpire shows up

Date Wednesday, July 27, 1881
Text

[Boston vs. Worcester 7/26/1881] Smith, the umpire, lost the train, and Corey, Worcester's change pitcher, umpired until he arrived in the second innings.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Kelly called out cutting the corner

Date Saturday, July 30, 1881
Text

[Cleveland vs. Chicago 7/29/1881] ...Anson was at the bat, with Gore on third and Kelly on second, but a fly to left-field was all the big Captain could do. Kelly was guilty of an act of gross folly in this inning in trying to steal across the diamond without touching third base, and was properly declared out by the umpire. The play at such a time was unutterably stupid, and Kelly needs admonishing that that sort of base-running is too much of the cheap-and-nasty description to give satisfaction.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring on a revived foul ball

Date Sunday, July 31, 1881
Text

[Cleveland vs. Chicago 7/30/1881] [Anson at third; Williamson at first; one out] Burns being at bat, Williamson then stole second, and as he ran Burns hit a dump foul close to the plate. Kennedy [catcher] passed the ball to McCormick [pitcher], and he to Phillips[first baseman], so that Williamson was easily put out before he could return to first base. Here came in a point in base-running which was new in Chicago certainly, and very likely was the first of the kind anywhere. As the umpire called foul on Burns' hit, Anson, who had taken the customary ground off third base, quickly returned to and touched the bag. Holding there until Kennedy had passed the ball to McCormick, Anson instantly started for the plate, shrewdly judging that McCormick's sole thought would be to send the ball to first to catch Williamson, who had run on the foul hit. This was precisely what McCormick did, and successfully so far as Williamson was concerned, but before Phillips could pass the ball to Kennedy, Anson had crossed the plate in safety with the run that won the game...

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

calling to confuse the fielders, coaching

Date Sunday, July 31, 1881
Text

[Cleveland vs. Chicago 7/30/1881] In this inning Dunlap and some one else on the bench were guilty of an unwarrantable piece of business: Glasscock popped up a fly back of second, and Burns went for it, supported by Quest. Just as he was about to take it, Dunlap and the other fellow, who was not distinguished, called out “Quest, Quest,” in order to confuse the fielders. Any directions to player on one’s own side, calculated to try the nerve of an opposing fielder, is legitimate, as nerve is one of the points of the game; but to undertake the captaincy of the opposing nine is entirely unwarranted and aside from all legitimate play.

Source Chicago Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Shibe opens a sporting goods store; balls re-covered

Date Sunday, July 31, 1881
Text

J. D. Shibe & Co. will open a new store at 135 North Eighth street, on Wednesday, August 3d. The store will be fitted up in attractive style, and contain a full and complete assortment of the following goods: Cricket and Base Ball goods, Lawn Tennis, Archery, Foot Balls, Dumb Bells, Boxing Gloves, Indian Clubs, etc., etc. The firm of J. D. Shibe is the only one that manufactures and retails its own goods, thus saving the purchaser a large percentage. All their goods are first-class, and their reputations as manufacturers and dealers is second to none.

J. D. Shibe & Co., No. 135 North Eighth street, manufacturers of cricket balls, base ball, hand balls, etc. Balls recovered.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Providence Club finances; nearly disbands

Date Tuesday, August 2, 1881
Text

The stockholders of the Providence Base Ball Association held a special meeting this afternoon [8/1], to discuss the financial condition of the concern. It was found that, after estimating the receipts and expenditures for the remainder of the season, there would be a deficit of $1500. While discussing this topic, talk was had of disbanding at once. It was voted to finish the season, according to the schedule. A vote of confidence in the management was then called for. All the officers, excepting Manager Bullock, tendered their resignations. Mr. Bullock was handled quite severely for not disciplining his men and fining them when they deserved it for being drunk continuously, playing poorly and for lax work generally. The vote of confidence was passed, but not until it was generally understood that fines were to be imposed. The stockholders dropping out, there soon became a lack of a quorum. The question of paying the members was not settled, though the salaries were due today. The disbandment looked more imminent than ever when Director Peckham assured President Root that, if he paid the men from his own resources tomorrow, he would be reimbursed, if the club should disband, at the next pay day, the 15th. Had it not been for Mr. Root's action, it is exceedingly doubtful whether the Troy games would have been played. It is understood that three of the Grays have already been offered engagements for the remainder of the season, in case of disbandment. The Grays, by their own foolish conduct, have brought about the present state of affairs. Boston Herald August 2, 1881

A special meeting of the stockholders of the Providence Base Ball Association is called for Friday. The funds in the treasury are exhausted, and, unless the stockholders volunteer to relieve the treasurer, the club must be disbanded. The stockholders are not liable to assessment, and all that can be done is to ask them to chip in. failing to do this, the game will be given up as a league affair for this city. President Root says he will not ask the men to play without pay. The trouble is “a house divided against itself.” There is a split in the ranks of the stockholders, and the game has got to suffer in consequence. Boston Herald August 11, 1881

A meeting of the stockholders of the Providence Base Ball Association was held this noon [8/12] to consider the financial condition of the association. President Root said he had only the interests of the game at heart, and would not be a stumbling block to the success of the nine, and therefore tendered his resignation as president and treasurer. He said that bills amounting to $900 would have to be paid next Monday. mr. Root's resignation was accepted, and Dr. C. T. Gardner was elected to fill the vacancy. Upon taking the chair the new president asked for subscriptions, which were started with one for $100, and soon $1300 was pledged, $505 being paid on the spot. Mr. Robert Morrow was elected treasurer and secretary, and also manager of the nine, in place of Mr. Bullock, resigned. It was voted to play out the schedule of games, and to start a popular subscription at the newspaper offices. Good feeling and intense enthusiasm prevailed throughout the meeting. The association still lives, and in 1882 the contest for the pennant will be opened with all the vigor which marked the successful season of 1879. Boston Herald August 13, 1881

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catcher playing up on the sixth ball

Date Sunday, August 7, 1881
Text

The catcher goes up under the bat at the sixth called ball—sometimes at the fifth—in order to steady the pitcher, and to prevent more than one base being run on the seventh call, as might be the case if he stood back and the ball should chance to bound into the grand-stand or somewhere else out of reach.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a purported double curve

Date Wednesday, August 10, 1881
Text

In the game on Thursday [8/4/81] Corcoran demonstrated, to the satisfaction of a number of experienced patrons of the game, that he could not only put one curve, but two, on the ball, giving it a king of serpentine motion. This was done not only once, but again and again. Thus, when the batsman discovered that it was an outcurver, and hit it accordingly, it suddenly changed to an incurve. In the seventh inning, for instance, he struck out Brouthers and Richardson in succession on this kind of delivery. Goldsmith has also acquired it, and its effectiveness is shown in the fact that on yesterday Buffalo got only four hits. He struck O'Rourke out on it in the sixth inning. They have been practicing it for some time under instructions from a scientific gentleman, an officer of the regular army, stationed here. He is a great admirer of the game, and, theoretically, demonstrated by the resolution of force that a double curve was possible. Its execution simply depends upon putting another force upon the ball which shall assert itself after that ball has gone a certain distance and has lost some of its speed. It is a very difficult ball to pitch, and it remains to be seen whether the pitchers can stand it. If they can maintain the effectiveness shown in the two games in which it has been tried. Detroit will have a hard time of it in the games to be played here this week., quoting the Chicago Times

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early canvassing for the AA

Date Friday, August 12, 1881
Text

Manager H. B. Phillips and Charles Mason, of the Athletic, leave to-night for the West, to be absent until the 20 0 th. They will visit Buffalo, Detroit, Cleveland, Chicago and Pittsburg on business appertaining to the club both for this and next season.

Source Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

baseball in the surf

Date Saturday, August 13, 1881
Text

A novel contest took place recently in the surf at Nantasket (Mass.) Beach. The contestants were clad in bathing costumes, and the water was just deep enough to considerably impede the progress of attempts at lively base-running. The pitching and batting were quite creditable; but, when a run was attempted, the result was decidedly ludicrous.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a spite fence 2

Date Saturday, August 13, 1881
Text

The Detroit Club management recently go out an injunction against a speculator who had erected elevated seats just outside the right-field fence at the ball ground in Detroit, Mich., but the court postponed giving a decision until the latter part of August. In the meantime the right-field fence has been elevated three or four stories, so that now the view from the outside is complete obscured. Manager Bancroft says he expects to go around to the ground some morning and find that the outside scaffolding has grown during the night two or three stories higher than his fence.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a foul ball screen

Date Sunday, August 14, 1881
Text

A wire screen should be erected in front of the reporters quarters on the grand stand at Oakdale Park. There is entirely too much dodging fouls for comfort.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the revival of the game in Philadelphia

Date Sunday, August 14, 1881
Text

[from a letter to the editor by “W.W.C.”] It is a pleasure renewed to attend a Base Ball match in this city. The old interest is fast reviving, the old time faces and old time crowd can be seen at every game. The game is now played legitimately, and the cry of the pool seller is no more heard in the vicinity.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

baseball in the surf 2

Date Saturday, August 13, 1881
Text

A novel contest took place recently in the surf at Nantasket (Mass.) Beach. The contestants were clad in bathing costumes, and the water was just deep enough to considerably impede the progress of attempts at lively base-running. The pitching and batting were quite creditable; but, when a run was attempted, the result was decidedly ludicrous.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a spite fence 3

Date Saturday, August 13, 1881
Text

The Detroit Club management recently go out an injunction against a speculator who had erected elevated seats just outside the right-field fence at the ball ground in Detroit, Mich., but the court postponed giving a decision until the latter part of August. In the meantime the right-field fence has been elevated three or four stories, so that now the view from the outside is complete obscured. Manager Bancroft says he expects to go around to the ground some morning and find that the outside scaffolding has grown during the night two or three stories higher than his fence.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

George Wright retires

Date Sunday, August 14, 1881
Text

George Wright has asked and obtained his release from the Boston management, and has formally retired from professional base-ball. He will devote himself to his business, and what base-ball playing he does will be with the Beacons, a local amateur club.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

heavy batters frequently strike out

Date Friday, August 19, 1881
Text

Brouthers, the heaviest batter in the league, struck out three times in the game at Chicago Wednesday. It is noticeable that most of the heavy hitters trike out quite frequently.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

shouting to confuse the fielders

Date Saturday, August 20, 1881
Text

Twice on Wednesday when Reilly and Bennett were both running for a foul fly, he [George W. Bradley] shouted for them, at the critical moment: “Look out! You'll run together!” with the clearly evident intention of making both runners stop, so that the ball could safely reach the ground. On Thursday when Bennett and Derby were running for a popped-up fly in front of the plate, at the moment when to hesitate was to lose, Bradley and Shaffer shouted, the one “Bennett!” and the other “Derby! with the intention of confusing them as to which should catcher the ball, the usual result being that there is a collision, and neither secures the sphere. Fortunately Derby and Bennett are too old to be caught with this stale trick.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

antedating “shutout”

Date Sunday, August 28, 1881
Text

[Chicago vs. Detroit 8/27/1881] It looked very like a shut-out at this stage of the game, but Mullane's wild delivery was destined to give the visitors a run.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a suggestion to ban sliding as too dangerous

Date Saturday, September 3, 1881
Text

Sliding to bases is proposed to be put a stop to, as it results in too many accidents. Irwin broke his leg by it, and Gross was disabled by sliding in. By requiring a player to touch a base on the run, the trouble would be stopped.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a complaint about the accommodations at the Polo Grounds

Date Saturday, September 3, 1881
Text

Either the Polo Association or the Metropolitan Club management are responsible for a very loose condition of things at the Polo grounds, which were very apparent to strangers visiting the grounds to see the league games this past week. The grand-stand, instead of being a place a gentleman can take ladies to, is like a beer-garden, the cries of waiters, the calls of news boys, the clouds of smoke from cigars, the passing to and fro of urchins rendering it impossible at times to watch the progress of the game or hear the umpire's decision. The hissing at decisions which do not suit all classes is another annoyance. As for the accommodation for the press-reporters, which is made a special feature on League grounds, there is none at all here. The scribes have either to sit at a table on the field exposed to the sun, and annoyed by talkative players and boys, or they have to get the best seat they can in the beer-garden of the grand-stand. There is a small economy observed, too, in the arrangement of the field, such as allowing the players to have ragged and loose bags for bases, etc., which shows very short-sighted management. We have heard so much complaint recently of all these things from the best patrons fo the game, who have visited the Polo grounds this season, that we deem it worth while to comment on the subject with a view to some improvement for the Fall season.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

talk of a new enclosed ground in Philadelphia

Date Sunday, September 4, 1881
Text

There will be a new base ball ground on the line of the Pennsylvania Railroad, a few miles out of the city, next season. The railroad company will erect pavilions, fence the ground, etc.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a hidden ball trick, A hidden ball trick

Date Error: Invalid time.
Text

[St. Louis vs. Boston 7/21/1875] Perhaps the most extraordinary occurrence of the game was the capture of George Wright by a stale trick. In the first inning George had made a splendid hit for three bases, and the ball was thrown to Hague, who tucked it under his arm unobserved by George, and clapped it on him as he stopped off the base, supposing Bradley had it. It seems that this old truck has not yet outlived its usefulness.

,

Buffalo's big Brouthers played an old but successful trick on Taylor, Cleveland's “fresh” left-fielder. Taylor overran first base, and while returning saw Brouthers apparently throw the ball to Galvin, the pitcher. Galvin faced the batsman, as if to pitch the ball, and Taylor innocently touched first base and stepped off a pace again. Brouther, sho had the ball under his armpit, quietly reached out and touched Taylor. The umpire said “out,” Taylor hung his head and walked home, nine Buffalos “snickered,” and seven hundred Cleveland people said something which doesn't look well in print., quoting the Cleveland Voice

Source New York Sunday Mercury, Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

League managers stretching the recruitment rules; plausible deniability

Date Monday, September 5, 1881
Text

President Soden, of Boston, writes to Manager Brown, of Worcester, as follows, concerning Barnes' attempt to secure Stovey for next year: “I wise to say to you that the action of Barnes was unauthorized by the Boston Association, and I was surprised to learn that Barnes had assumed to talk officially. I am confident that no one in our Association, either as Director, or in any way officially connected, would countenance the action of Barnes. No action has been taken, and no discussion taking place in regard to another year's team, and I do not think Barnes had the least warrant or the most indirect authority for his action. I think I have taken steps that will prevent any recurrence of such action.” Just so. No one claims that Soden or the Board told Barnes to so do. It is an old trick of the alleged cunning lights of the League. They do not authorize, but they hint that such and such things would be very acceptable to them. Harry Wright approached Crowley in Buffalo last year before the season ended. Providence had Ward in Washington a week trying to sign McClellan, Lynch, Morrissey and Snyder. He did sign McClellan and gave him $100 before the time was up. All of the League managers have done the same thing, openly violating the rules, still nothing has been done about it. Jones demanded his salary from a trembling organization to pay his bills, and because they refused him he quit. He was punished. Harry Wright, Ward, Bancroft and the other offenders went scot free.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a non-standard contract

Date Monday, September 5, 1881
Text

Peters says to the Buffalos when they want to release him, “Oh! No,” and then shows them a special contract with them, which prevents them from bouncing him.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

an experimental game in Cincinnati

Date Saturday, September 10, 1881
Text

The first game of base ball seen here for many months was played yesterday afternoon on the Star Grounds between the Athletics, a non-league club, of Philadelphia, and the Buckeyes, of this city. The day was beautiful, and the grounds were in excellent condition, and had the game been properly advertised, or brought to the notice of the public, there would undoubtedly have been a great outpouring of the lovers of this ever popular sport, but as it was, just 181 people were on the grounds. In fact, so poorly was the affair managed that the great base ball enthusiast, and President of the corporation owning the grounds, Mr. Justis Thorner, though engaged in business only two squares from the ball field, had heard nothing of the game, or the intention of the clubs to play, until about the middle of the eighth inning, and only arrived at the grounds as the contest was nearing its close. ...

...

The game was in fact an experiment. The Athletics were on their way from St. Louis, where they had recently played, to Pittsburg to meet the Detroits, and being compelled to stop over here for the day, it was decided to get up a match between them and the Buckeyes, it being further understood that if our base ball lovers manifested any interest in the matter to have them return to this city in two weeks and play a series of games on these same grounds. As it was, the affair was badly managed, or rather not managed at all, as no one could be found on the grounds who would acknowledge himself as the prime mover in the affair. President Thorner has now taken the matter in hand, and in a fortnight the Athletics will return, and several very interesting games may be looked for. The Athletics are a fine looking and manly set of fellows, and aside from their good playing, quickly captivated the spectators by their genteel behavior.

Source Cincinnati Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Detroit Club finances 2

Date Saturday, September 10, 1881
Text

The Detroit Club is out of debt, has expended nearly $2,500 for grand stands, etc., at the park, and has over $12,000 in the treasury.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a hidden ball trick 3

Date Sunday, September 11, 1881
Text

Buffalo's big Brouthers played an old but successful trick on Taylor, Cleveland's “fresh” left-fielder. Taylor overran first base, and while returning saw Brouthers apparently throw the ball to Galvin, the pitcher. Galvin faced the batsman, as if to pitch the ball, and Taylor innocently touched first base and stepped off a pace again. Brouthe4rs, who had the ball under his armpit, quietly reached out and touched Taylor. The umpire said “out,” Taylor hung his head and walked home, nine Buffalos “snickered,” and 700 Cleveland people said something which doesn't look well in print., quoting the Cleveland Voice

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Boston to disband early, uses a loophole in the League contract

Date Sunday, September 11, 1881
Text

The Boston players have been notified that after Sept. 30 their services will not be required. They signed a seven months' contract, their salary to be paid in seven monthly installments, which would bring them up to Nov. 1. The Boston club has, however, taken advantage of a clause that exists in a league contract, which enables a club to sever the obligations of a contract at any time by giving 20 days' notice. There is naturally a great deal of grumbling among the players at this step, but it is only another instance showing the unfair, contemptible character of the present league contracts, the framers of which took good care that the management should have the greatest share of advantage, and the players themselves very little.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early rumor of the AA

Date Monday, September 12, 1881
Text

Since the death of the International Association in 1879, various efforts have been made to revive the opposition to the League by starting similar organizations. All have so far proved signal failures. The chief cause of this has been in the fact that they were poorly managed and lacked strong backing. Base-ball next year will experience a resuscitation such as it did in 1877, 1878 and 1879. The outlook is very promising. Cities that have been out of the business for years are beginning to show renewed interest in the game, and there is no doubt but the spring of 1882 will see at least a score of new Clubs in the field. Louisville, St. Louis, Philadelphia and New York, among the best supporters of the pastime in its palmy days, and who lost all love for the sport through the grumbling and dishonest actions of local teams, have had the old ardor awakened by the work of semi-professional nines, such as the Eclipse, Brown Stocking, Athletics and Metropolitans, and propose to attempt representation in the diamond once more. As it appears that the League will not drop its dead-weights in the East, like Worcester and Troy, and will not think of newer members, a scheme is on foot to organize a new Association, to include St. Louis, Louisville, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Cincinnati, Pittsburg and New York. Already the proposition has been entertained in St. Louis and Louisville, and a meeting will be held in Pittsburg October 10th to perfect arrangements. All of the cities named are most excellent base-ball cities, and if the idea is well managed it must certainly develop into a successful issue. A careful canvass has been made of several of the cities named, and it is safe to say that if the necessary number of Clubs capable of exhibiting a strong financial basis can be obtained, there will be a “Richmond” in the field next season that Mr. Hulbert and his associates will not look upon with scorn. J. A. Williams, of Columbus, is to be the Secretary, and the details for the Association are to be carefully arranged.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

players drinking

Date Monday, September 12, 1881
Text

The Detroit Post and Tribune sermonizes to the extent of a half column on . Possible, you unfortunate Wolverine, that you have just ascertained that ball-players drink? Show the professional that does not is as rare as an honest ward politician. They all do it, and you can never stop them. You elevate men who have been in the habit of earning $1.50 a day, and who have not had the advantage even of a common school education, to the dignity of a $1,500 salary, and it is too much for them. Their work each day is confined to three hours, while the rest is devoted to loafing. Rich young men become enthusiasts in the game, like to associate with the players, and for the privilege of talking to them buy wine, beer, suppers, &c. President Hulbert has tried every possible plan to make men out of those who belong to his team. He locked them up on the grounds during the whole day, giving them papers and other necessary material to pass away the time, and still his team contains nine of the greatest drunkards in the League. To keep the average ball-player away from drink is like striving to separate the bucolic and his gingerbread.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the finances and condition of the Worcester Club; staying in another year

Date Tuesday, September 13, 1881
Text

The stockholders of the Worcester Base-bal Club were summoned to a special meeting to be held this evening [9/12] to get an expression of the feeling of the backers of the Club in rgard to the team for next season. Last year the Directors did not see fit to in any way consult the wishes of the stockholders in the matter, but went forward, as they were empowered under their charter of organization, and selected a team to suit themselves. It is needless to say that failure has been the result; every body knows it, and none feel more keenly the position of the team than the Directors. Hence the desire for consultation, and perhaps a change in management. Some of the directors said they were anxious to throw off the cares of looking after a ball nine, and threatened to resign. Their term of office does not expire until the annual meeting in January, but if they are to resign at all now is the time tha5 their successors may have a voice in selecting the team for next year. Of course, no one seriously talks of throwing up the sponge because the present team holds last place in the race. On the contrary, the opinion was to raise more money than in any previous year and to engage a nine as strong as money will hire. Not that the policy of fancy salaries is to be inaugurated, but of the new blood to be infused into the team, it was decided to secure reliable players and to pay accordingly.

While the playing season as regards position in the championship race is concerned has been a dead failure, financially the Club will do better than last year, when it sunk $1,600. This year the loss will be inside of that amount, judging from the present condition of the treasury and the prospective profits of the games to be played, twelve in number, and all with the Western Clubs that have not been here for three months. At the meeting there was a full and free expression of opinion. It was largely attended, and voted unanimously to have the best team next year that money can hire. The entire Board of Directors tendered their resignations, but the meeting refused to accept them, and the matter goes over for another week, when it is probable the Board will be reorganized, with some new block in it. President Pratt voiced the sentiment of the stockholders when he said he would never give up while at the tail of the race, but would contribute liberally for a winning nine. The players were given twenty days' notice to-day that they would not be wanted after October 1st.

The team is doing so poorly that the players will be released October 1st. Several of them have grievously abused the confidence of the management, and if they get left for a month's salary it will be serving them right. No games have been arranged for October, and as the Western Clubs have secured all the dates in New York and Philadelphia for the first twenty days in the month, there seems nothing left the Eastern Clubs but to wind up or play among themselves, and that wouldn't pay. Cincinnati Enquirer September 13, 1881

At a meeting of the stockholders of the Worcester Club to-night [9/19] the resignations of the old Board of Directors were accepted and a new Board, consisting of Hon. Charles B. Pratt, W. H. Crawford, Freeman Brown, J. P. Masona nd Fred Simester, was elected. Pratt and Crawford were on the old Board. Eight hundred dollars' worth of new stock was subscribed on the spot, and the Directors will infuse new life into the affairs. Cincinnati Enquirer September 21, 1881

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Worcester Club finances; disbanding early

Date Tuesday, September 13, 1881
Text

At the stockholders' meeting of the Worcester Base Ball Club, tonight [9/12], it was unanimously voted to run a nine next year. The treasurer's report showed $2700 cash in the treasury, with all bills paid. The directors, owing to the ill-success of the present nine, all resigned, but their resignations were laid on the table for one week. Two or three changes in the board are probable. The members of the nine have been given 20 days' notice, and will be discharged Oct. 1.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early uses of “twirl”

Date Wednesday, September 14, 1881
Text

A TWIRICAL CONTEST. Providence, September 13.--Ward and Derby did some superb pitching to-day, and light batting was the result. Cincinnati Enquirer September 14, 1881

As far as Will White is concerned, his capabilities as a twirical deceiver are undeniably great. Cincinnati Enquirer November 6, 1881

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early rumor of the AA 2

Date Saturday, September 17, 1881
Text

A new baseball association is talked of for next season, which shall have as one of its rules that the price of admission to all games shall be twenty-five cents. The project is meeting with great favor in St. Louis, Pittsburg, Louisville and Cincinnati, and a meeting is to be held in Pittsburg Oct. 10 to consider the formation of the new association. Philadelphia, Boston, and this city have been invited to cooperating in the plan, and the proposition it is believed will be favorably received. New York Clipper September 17, 1881

The formation of a new association entirely distinct from the League meets with considerable favor. The Item Philadelphia September 18, 1881

The new association will hold a meeting Oct. 16 in Pittsburg. Clubs who intend sending representatives will please communicate with H. B. Phillips, Great Western Hotel, Philadelphia, Pa. New York Clipper September 24, 1881

Fulmer and Mason will represent the Athletics of Philadelphia at the proposed meeting of the new baseball association to be held Oct. 10 in Pittsburg, Pa. Louisville, St. Louis, Pittsburg, and this city will also be represented. New York Clipper October 1, 1881

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Tommy Bond sues the Boston Club

Date Saturday, September 17, 1881
Text

Thomas Bond, the well-known pitcher, formerly of the Bostons, has commenced a suit against that organization to recover $450, an amount he claims to be due him under his original contract, which did not provide for the deduction of the cost of uniforms and traveling expenses.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

revival of the Allegheny Club

Date Sunday, September 18, 1881
Text

In Allegheny, subscriptions to the amount of [illegible] have been raised for the purpose of reorganizing the old Allegheny nine. Al. Pratt, the club's old pitcher, is at the head of the movement. The Item Philadelphia September 18, 1881

Al. Pratt, once well known as a pitcher, is at the head of a movement to organize a first-class professional club in Pittsburg, Pa., for 1882,n and it is said that over two thousand dollars have already been subscribed for that purpose. New York Clipper October 1, 1881

The Allegheny Club of Pittsburg, Pa., was organized Oct. 15 by the election of the following officers: President, H. D. McKnight, secretary, Ed. C. Hetzel; corresponding secretary, Charles Seidell. New York Clipper October 29, 1881

Source Item Philadelphia
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

rumored playing down to avoid being reserved

Date Sunday, September 18, 1881
Text

It is hinted that one reason why the Detroits have taken such a tumble the past month is because some of the players are indifferent in their playing, the cause therefor being a desire not to be “reserved” for that city next season.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a broken mask 3

Date Thursday, September 22, 1881
Text

[Chicago vs. Providence 9/21/1881] Gilligan was cut badly by a broken wire of his mask, caused by a foul tip.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Troy Club finances

Date Thursday, September 22, 1881
Text

The [Troy] club made money in the first part of the season, but owing to the poor attendance at the games on the last Eastern trip the club will wind up with the receipts about equaling the expenses. This is better than it ever did before, however.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the status of the Worcester Club

Date Saturday, September 24, 1881
Text

The Worcesters want to remain in the League, but it is doubtful whether they will not be thrown overboard. The directors and stockholders are now talking of having the best team that money can hire, but players cannot be persuaded to go to a town where the outlook for next season is so precarious. The players of the present team were given twenty days' notice on Sept. 12 that they would not be wanted after O ct. 1, and consequently each will get left for a months' salary.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpires behind the catcher

Date Saturday, September 24, 1881
Text

Umpires have to look out sharply while occupying their positions to avoid being hit by wild, swift, curved pitchers. Pearce suffered considerably in games here, and Higham has been severely hit several times. It's no light matter to umpire a game nowadays, independent of the abuse a man gets from kicking players.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

management of Philadelphia clubs next year

Date Saturday, September 24, 1881
Text

It has been settled that Manager Phillips will run a first-class club in the Quaker City next season, backed by a number of influential citizens and supporters of the national game, including the veteran Al Reach. Subscription-papers for the purpose of raising the requisite $5,000 are to be circulated this wee. New York Clipper September 24, 1881

The Athletic club next season will be under the management of Messrs. Mason, Sharsig and Fulmer, who are three of the most ardent admirers and genuine promoters of the game as can be found in this country. These gentlemen will furnish all the capital that will be necessary to run the club, and each player will be paid a salary instead of playing on the commonwealth plan as at present. The present nine will be entirely reconstructed, and several new players now prominent in League clubs will be added. Oakdale Park has been leased for the season, which will commence in April and end in November. The ground is to be plowed up and leveled, a new grand stand to accommodate 1,000 persons will be built and additional shaded stands for spectators will be erected along the side of the field. The gentlemanly managers will leave nothing undone to make the game attractive in this city, and give it its old-time prestige in base-ball by having one of the best clubs in the country. The Item Philadelphia October 2, 1881

H. B. Phillips will act as manager and Al Reach as treasurer of a new club now being organized in Philadelphia, Pa., to play on the ground at Twenty-fourth street and Ridge avenue next season. New York Clipper October 8, 1881

Baseball in Philadelphia is experiencing a revival, and the campaign of 1882 in that city promises to be an exceedingly interesting one. Two first-class clubs are promised, each claiming the name of Athletic, and the rivalry between them will tend to awaken the old-time interest that has been lying dormant for several seasons. New York Clipper October 15, 1881

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

revived attendance in Philadelphia

Date Sunday, September 25, 1881
Text

Eight thousand people passed in the gates at Oakdale Park on Monday, and fully as many were on the outside catching stray glances of the game between the Chicago and Athletic clubs, which proved to be the best played and most exciting game of the season.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

umpire detects foul tips by sound

Date Wednesday, September 28, 1881
Text

[Buffalo vs. Boston 8/27/1881] [The umpire] must have caught cold, and had his hearing affected, for he failed to hear two foul tips that were plainly heard in the spectators' seats.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the creation of the black list; subject to abuse

Date Friday, September 30, 1881
Text

At the special meeting of the base ball league tonight [9/29] a resolution was adopted agreeing not to hire or to play against any other club which employs or presents as player, manager or umpire certain players who were placed upon a black list for dissipation and general insubordination. It was decided not to make the list public at present. A number of players were named. Boston Herald September 30, 1881

The League has for a number of years been considering a plan of black-listing certain players against whom the charge of general dissipation and insubordination has been repeatedly made, and the talk today resolved itself into this action. It was decided that a list of such players should be presented whenever there was any cause for so doing, and that no league club should play against any club employing as manager, umpire or player any of such proscribed players. The following list was adopted at this meeting, and it will be increased at the annual meeting in December: M. J. Dorgan, L. P. Dickerson, E. M. Gross, Lipman Pike, S. P. Houck, Edward Nolan, William Crowley, J. Fox and L. P. Brown. These players can only be reinstated by unanimous vote of the league at an annual meeting. Other legislation of an important nature relative to the management and conduct of players was enacted, and it was determined that any means in the power of the league should be employed to week out of the profession dissipated and insubordinate players... Boston Herald October 1, 1881

The plan of black-listing players for dissolute habits and insubordination is a long step in the right direction, but, in enforcing it, the league clubs will have to exercise care that no injustice is done to any player. It will go hard if any player should have the misfortune to have his directors entertain ill-feelings against him, for it gives them an opportunity to trump up trivial charges. Every case presented for the black list should be thoroughly and impartially investigated before the decision is made. No player should be black-listed unless the strongest proof is presented that he has so conducted himself as to bring dishonor and disgrace on the league. The object of the project is a good one, and it should not be abused. Boston Herald October 2, 1881

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the black list

Date Saturday, October 1, 1881
Text

Secrecy on the outlaw-list was raised, and the list includes Houck, and Dorgan, of Detroit; Crowley and Fox, of the Boston; Dickerson, of the Worcesters; Gross and Brown, of the Providence, and Nolan, of the Clevelands. None of these men can play in League Clubs, nor will League clubs play any outside Clubs presenting or employing them. They are on the same footing as expelled players, excepting that they can be reinstated by unanimous consent of the League, while in case of expulsion no application for reinstatement will be received.

Clapp, of the Clevelands, is not to be engaged by any league Club, but no objection is made to his playing in non-League Clubs.

The action of the League in this matter was unanimous, and was the inevitable result of the many known cases of disgraceful drunkenness and open insubordination that have occurred this season. Four of the best known and most skillful players in the country in their respective positions narrowly escaped being proscribed. They will be given a chance to redeem themselves. If any further complaints are made their names will be added to the list by direction of the League.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

plans for the Athletics for next season

Date Sunday, October 2, 1881
Text

The Athletic club next season will be under the management of Messrs. Mason, Sharsig and Fulmer, who are three of the most ardent admirers and genuine promoters of the game as can be found in this country. These gentlemen will furnish all the capital that will be necessary to run the club, and each player will be paid a salary instead of playing on the commonwealth plan as at present. The present nine will be entirely reconstructed, and several new players now prominent in League clubs will be added. Oakdale Park has been leased for the season, which will commence in April and end in November. The ground is to be plowed up and leveled, a new grand stand to accommodate 1200 persons will be built and additional shaded stands for spectators will be erected along the side of the field. The gentlemanly managers will leave nothing undone to make the game attractive in this city, and give it its old-time prestige in base ball by having one of the best clubs in the country.

There will be two clubs here next season—the Athletic, under the management of Messrs. Sharsig, Fulmer and Mason, and the second under Phillips' direction. Philadelphia Item October 2, 1881

Horace Phillips credited with the idea for the AA; the success of and dissension within the Athletics

The idea of this league originated with Manager Horace B. Phillips, of the Athletic. After a good deal of hard work he has got the different cities interested and the coming convention is the result. The success of the Athletic this season is due to Mr. Phillips. Just here it might be stated that one or two members of the present team, who have become fired with a desire to run an organization on a plan of their own, are doing considerable underhand work for the purpose of affecting the coming convention, but it is hardly possible that this will amount to much. Steps were taken yesterday to insure one of the best teams in the country for this city for next season, under the management of Mr. Phillips, and a majority of the charter members of the old Athletic Club have given permission for the use of the name. Philadelphia Times October 2, 1881

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Lew Simmons at play

Date Sunday, October 2, 1881
Text

[see for Athletics vs. Thatchers Minstrels, Simmons captain and first base.]

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Houck and Dorgan blacklisted

Date Sunday, October 2, 1881
Text

Among the base ball players who were expelled from the league at the special meeting on Friday, at Saratoga, are “Sadie” Houck and M. J. Dorgan, members of the Detroit Club at the present time... Houck is one of the best short stops in the country and a thorough ball player. Were his habits good, he could command $250 or $300 per month during the season, but he is addicted to drink, and is not, therefore, entirely trustworthy. He was warned of his fate two months ago.

Dorgan's expulsion has nothing to do with the Detroit Club. It is the result of acts committed before he came here—troubles with Richmond, pitcher for the Worcesters. He is an intractable player, hence his expulsion. He has long been recognized as one of the best general players in the country, being a good catcher, a reliable first baseman, and an excellent out-fielder. He will be greatly missed, and it is to be regretted that a man possessing such excellent judgment as a player, should exercise such poor judgment in other matters. Detroit Free Press October 2, 1881

Houck was not black-listed on account of intemperance, but because of his evil associates. It will be seen that he occupied but a medium rank as a batter, and fell below that as a fielder. His place has not been filled as yet, but can be at any time. Detroit Free Press November 27, 1881

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Horace Phillips gone from the Athletics; cushioned chairs

Date Sunday, October 9, 1881
Text

H. B. Phillips is no longer connected with the Athletic club. Messrs. Sharsig and Mason are now the business managers, and Mr. Chas. Fulmer manager of the nine. These gentlemen have leased Oakdale Park for next season, and have already contracted for numerous improvements, among the latter being a new grand stand that will accommodate over [illegible], seated with numbered and cushioned chairs.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a preliminary AA organizational meeting

Date Monday, October 10, 1881
Text

The Board of Managers who control the Cincinnati base-ball grounds held a meeting to-day [10/8] and decided to send a delegation to the meeting in Pittsburg Monday, which is called by delegates from New York and Philadelphia for the purpose of organizing an independent league. New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Pittsburg, St. Louis and Louisville have promised to send delegates to the meeting, and now they are joined by Cincinnati. It is understood here that the reports regarding the probable policy of the new league are mere speculation. The probability is, however, that liberal rules will govern the concern, and that each club will be permitted to regulate its own affairs. Base ball matters have been at a low ebb in this city [Cincinnati] for some time on account of the difficulty different factions had in getting along with each other. The feeling of other years is wearing away, however, and should a new league be formed Cincinnati will in all probability joint and put forward a strong club. It is thought that the question whether a new league shall be formed or not will depend on New York, Philadelphia, and Pittsburg. Chicago Inter Ocean October 10, 1881

An informal meeting of representatives of the Independent League of base ball clubs was held here this afternoon [Pittsburgh 10/10/81]. After a short discussion it was decided to go no further at the present time than to elect temporary officers, appoint a Committee on Constitution and By-laws, and call an immediate second meeting. Thereupon the following temporary officers were chosen, to act for the association until the election of permanent officers: President, M. F. Day [sic], Metropolitan Club, New York; Vice President, Christ. Van Derahe [sic], St. Louis; Recording Secretary and Treasurer, James J. Williams, Columbus, O.; Corresponding Secretary, H. D. McKnight, Pittsburg.

Messrs. Thorner, of Cincinnati; Charles Fulmer, of Philadelphia, and a delegate to be appointed by the Louisville Club were named a committee to draft and present to the next meeting a constitution and bylaws to govern the association.

This committee are to meet the day preceding the regular meeting for permanent organization, which will be held at the Gibson House, Cincinnati, on Wednesday morning, November 2, at 10 o’clock. Cincinnati Gazette October 11, 1881

At least a start has been made in the matter of organizing an independent League, and to-day [10/10] in this city [Pittsburgh] representatives from several cities held an informal meeting. Proxies were received from other cities, which settled the future of the organization, and establishes the fact that it is to be a success. After a short discussion it was decided to proceed no further at the present time than to select temporary officers... Cincinnati Enquirer October 11, 1881

Source Chicago Inter Ocean
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jones obtains a judgment against the Bostons

Date Tuesday, October 11, 1881
Text

Jones, of the Bostons, who was expelled by that club in 1880 for refusing to play until his salary was paid up, has secured judgment for $300 in the courts.

Source Boston Journal
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a loophole to allow liquor sales in Detroit

Date Thursday, October 13, 1881
Text

There is some talk of Cincinnati entering a complaint against the Detroit club for disposing of intoxicating liquors on its ground after the close of a league game.

I have not heard of the Cincinnati part of it, but I hear that the intoxicating liquors were sold on the grounds as you stated. I have inquired into the matter and find that the Detroit club leased its grounds from the Recreation Park Company, and that after the close of a game the base ball management had no control. Therefore I do not think that the Detroit people are guilty of violating the rule., quoting an interview of Hulbert in the Cleveland Leader

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

prospects of the AA; conciliatory toward the NL

Date Sunday, October 16, 1881
Text

The men who have hold of the new [association] propose to go slow and sure, and to studiously avoid any thing that shall partake of the nature of belligerency or opposition to the old League. They are fully cognizant of the fact that all attacks on that body would be highly ridiculous, rebounding upon their heads. The experience of the old organization is certainly great, and the result of its six years' struggle to elevate base-ball, represented in its legislative enactments are such as to command the admiration of all, none more so than the backers of the new body. There is no doubt but that this last Association will begin at the point which the League has reached, adopting the greater part of its rules and laws.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

scoring base hits and errors; range factor

Date Tuesday, October 18, 1881
Text

The question of base hits is a knotty one, and probably no definite rules can be framed for it. The sharp bounder between first and second base, that Gerhardt or Dunlap would field in a majority of cases, would be a safe hit were some other player on second base. The question then arises whether it is justice to Gerhardt or Dunlap to charge them with an error when they fail to stop such balls, while a lazy or indifferent second baseman allowed them to be scored as base hits by making no effort to stop them. The same is true of every other in-field position. A hard hit grounder past third base may, by the exercise of great agility, be stopped and thrown to first base in time to retire the batsman. The fielder gets credit for an assist only, no matter though he make the brilliant play a half dozen consecutive times. The seventh time he fails and is charged with an error, while a less agile baseman would fail to make an error, even, and the seven batsmen would score base hits. This is a manifest injustice. Base hits should depend upon the merits of the batsman; not upon the demerits of the fielder. If the league managers can frame any rule to rectify this error, they should do so.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the failings of official scorers; homerism

Date Tuesday, October 18, 1881
Text

Some action should be taken in regard to official scorers. They are appointed by the club managers, and are generally, no doubt, moral young men, who want to secure a dead-head ticket to the games; but when one of them scores a home run on a muffed fly and two wild throws, declares that no error can be made off a foul ball, and charges a player with an “at bat” when he is given a base on called balls, it is safe to say that “official” scoring is not one of the exact sciences. One of these youths figures up the batting average of all the players but two in the home club at over .300, the other two falling but slightly below that decimal, and the fielding averages of all but three above .900, while his totals show that the batting average of the entire club was but .275 and the fielding average .847. In plain words, official scorers are liable to stretch their elastic consciences in favor of their home club, and will continue to do so until there are some fixed and definite rules for their guidance.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

standardized business management practices

Date Wednesday, October 19, 1881
Text

The league has greatly simplified the work of the business managers of clubs. It arranges all the details of transportation, hotels, etc., so that the directors of a club can tell to a dollar the expense that will attend any proposed trip. These expenses are all provided for by the treasurer, who receives from the secretary of each club a statement of the actual attendance at games, and a remittance of the proportion of the home club. There remains, then, nothing for the manager to do but attend to the condition of the players, enforce discipline, and direct matters upon the diamond. Experience teaches that all this can best be done by a playing captain. In fact, the captain must direct the play, for it is against league rules for a non-playing manager to even speak to his men during the progress of a game.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new League contract

Date Saturday, October 22, 1881
Text

The new League contract, arranged at the Saratoga meeting, appears to be quite an iron-clad document. It has been rewritten I consequence of the legal action taken in this State in regard to the case of the Metropolitan Club vs. Leary. The new document places the period of engagement from April 1 to Oct. 31. In the working of it—it is a printed contract—the player under contract concedes the right to the manager or captain to assign him to any position; that the Association has a right to establish rules for governing him, at home and abroad, and that these powers shall not be limited to cases of dishonest play or open insubordination, but for carelessness, indifference, or such conduct as may be regarded as prejudicial in its interests in any respect; the player assumes all risk of accident or injury, in play or otherwise, and of illness from whatever cause, and of the effect of all accidents, injuries or illness occurring to him during the period of his employment; the Association has the right to suspend him by reason of any illness or injury incurred, or by reason of any insubordination or deterioration of skill on his part, and he must submit himself to medical examination and treatment by a regular physician or surgeon in good standing, to be selected by the association, and such examination and treatment being at the expense of the player; and suspension from play which may result from disqualification from playing with the requisite skill, without regard to the result of the medical examination, can be made by the association, and the player shall have no claim for wages during the period of suspension; the Association agrees to give a player twenty days' notice of its option and intention to terminate the contract, at the expiration of which time all liability and obligations shall at once cease and terminate.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Metropolitans neglect to notify the League of a signing

Date Saturday, October 22, 1881
Text

Professional players and those engaging them should study the contract rules of the League before they sign documents either for service to a club or for the engagement of a player. Here is a case in point: Muldoon of the Metropolitans signed a contract to play with the Metropolitan Club, and received advance-money, for which he gave a written receipt. But the management failed to notify Secretary Young as required by the law, and consequently when the Cleveland manager found this out he secured Muldoon and notified the secretary in time. The law, as applicable to League Alliance clubs as well as the regular clubs of the League, is as follows: “Each club that is a party hereto shall, upon making a contract with a player, immediately notify the Secretary of the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, such notice to be in writing and signed by the contracting club and the player; and, in the absence of such notice to such officer, the player shall be deemed to be free from such contract obligation.

Source ” New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

support for reinstating Devlin

Date Sunday, October 23, 1881
Text

It is about time that Jimmy Devlin should have the disability imposed upon him removed. He has been sufficiently punished.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

late support for ten men ten innings

Date Sunday, October 23, 1881
Text

Ten men and ten innings would add new interest to the game. The new association should adopt that rule.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

base on balls should count as an error on the pitcher

Date Sunday, October 23, 1881
Text

There is no reason why a base on called balls should not be put down as an error on the pitcher.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new League contract 2

Date Sunday, October 23, 1881
Text

The League have rearranged the players' contract, making it even stiffer than it was before. In the wording of it the player under contract concedes the right to the manager or captain to assign him to any position; that the Association has a right to establish rules for governing him, at home and abroad, and that these powers shall not be limited to case of dishonest play or open insubordination, but for carelessness, indifference, or such conduct as may be regarded as prejudicial to its interests in any respect; the player assumes all risk of accident or injury, in play or otherwise, and of illness from whatever cause, and of the effects of all accidents, injuries or illness occurring to him during the period of his employment; the Association has the right to suspend him by reason of any illness or injury incurred, or by reason of any insubordination or deterioration of skill on his part, and he must submit himself to medical examination and treatment by a regular physician or surgeon in good standing, to be selected by the Association, and such examination and treatment being at the expense of the player; and suspension from play which may result from disqualification from playing with the requisite skill, without regard to the result of the medical examination, can be made by the Association, and the player shall have no claim for wages during the period of suspension; that the Association agrees to give a player twenty days' notice of its option and the intention to terminate the contract, at the expiration of which time all liabilities and obligations shall at once cease and terminate.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chadwick changes is mind about the admission fee

Date Sunday, October 30, 1881
Text

And just here comes in a special point I wish to refer to, and that is the experience of our local season in regard to the twenty-five cent admission fee, and the sale of beer, &c., on the grounds. I have hitherto been a strong advocate of the quarter of a dollar admission fee to professional grounds, but my experience under this rule at the Polo Grounds this year, has been such as to make me no longer its advocate. I am free to confess that the League rule is the best for the interests of reputable exhibitions of professional ball-playing. As for beer-selling, it has proved to be a perfect nuisance, and it will no longer be tolerated at the Polo Grounds after this year. I am fully satisfied that it is better to have an orderly assemblage of five hundred people at half a dollar than a rough, uncontrollable crowd of a thousand, or even twelve hundred, at twenty-five cents., quoting a letter from Henry Chadwick dated October 28, 1881

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA model permits of exhibition games

Date Saturday, October 29, 1881
Text

[discussing the prospective AA] A proposition will be submitted to make each club self-supporting, or, in other words, to let each reap the benefits of its own patronage. Under this system it would matter little to the visiting club whether the home club played every day in the week, inasmuch as the home club had the right to the entire receipts of its own ground.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA should not use the word “League”

Date Saturday, October 29, 1881
Text

[discussing the prospective AA] The prospects for the formation of this new association appear to be bright, and the project meets with general favor. It would be well, however, not to have the word “League” appear in the name of the new organization, as other words are just as expressive, and that one has already been appropriated.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

dissatisfaction with the rule making a runner liable on a foul ball

Date Sunday, October 30, 1881
Text

About the only change of consequence in the playing rules likely to be made will be the abolition of the penalty for running on a foul-hit ball. This penalty was restored after several seasons of disuse, but it has not worked satisfactorily. It opened the door to aggravating complications growing out of the umpire's failure to promptly rule a ball to be foul, and it also hampered free batting to a noticeable extend, as the batsman, though desiring to help a runner who has started to steal a base, had constantly before him the danger of putting him out by hitting a foul close to the line. The runner should be entitled to return to his base, on a foul, as was the case previous to last season.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a barnstorming team goes south

Date Sunday, October 30, 1881
Text

The picked nine of league players organized to play in Southern cities is now in St. Louis. The aggregation calls itself the Chicago Champions, but is operating wholly outside the control of the Chicago Club. The Chicagos contribute Corcoran, Flint, Kelly, Quest, Williamson, Gore, and Dalrymple, and Cleveland is represented by McCormick and Dunlap. Chicago Tribune October 30, 1881

“The Combination” is the title of the team which is now playing in Southern cities under Frank Flint's management. They were at first advertised as the Chicagos, but President Hulbert telegraphed to Flint forbidding the use of that name. The players are not subject to the control of the Chicago Club, and should not be known as such. Chicago Tribune November 6, 1881

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Mutrie neglects to notify the League of a contract

Date Sunday, October 30, 1881
Text

Muldoon, of the Metropolitans, signed a contract to play with the Metropolitan Club, and received advance money, for which he gave a written receipt. But the management failed to notify Secretary Young, as required by the law, and consequently when the Cleveland manager found this out he secured Muldoon and notified the Secretary in time., quoting the New York Clipper

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Pank of the Louisville club a malter

Date Wednesday, November 2, 1881
Text

[Mr. Pank] is Secretary and Treasurer of the Kentucky Malting Company, a mammoth institution at Louisville, and is a very enthusiastic admirer of the game.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

AA and expelled and black listed and reserved players

Date Friday, November 4, 1881
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting] The matter of expelled players and members of the black list was not taken up. It will be made the order of the session for today. The members are nearly of one opinion in this matter. They believe that the regulations passed and the action taken by the League in reference to such should be recognized, and their endeavors to enhance the game commended. They will not hire men expelled or placed upon the black-list by said League. On the other hand, they believe that the League should do the same for them. Again, it is probable that the Association will not accept the right of the League to hold or expel players by the five reservation plan. If a player has not signed with a League Club, they say that settles him. Otherwise, reserved or not, the Association will support their Clubs in hiring such. They do no wish to be belligerent toward their more experienced opponent, and are perfectly willing to extend the right hand of fellowship to it. Cincinnati Enquirer November 3,.1881

The first matter that came up was the subject of expelled players. The enactments of the old League in this matter were read, and the representatives one and all thought that they covered all the ground. As the elder organization had had experience with these characters, and had done much to week them out, it was wisely agreed to adopt its regulations in toto. While affirming the action of the League, the Association decided to add a protective amendment. This was to the effect that while they would always refuse to hire players expelled by the League for drunkenness, dishonesty or any venal offense, and believed that the body should similarly act toward their black sheet, the Association would not recognize the former's right to expel players because they refused to sign because they were reserved. It was argued that no body had the power, or should have it, to compel men to sign a contract when they did not wish to. Cincinnati Enquirer November 4, 1881

The Association took action in the case of Charlie Jones, deciding to stand by him, and recommended the League that they should reinstate him. This was just. Charley was wrongfully expelled, and as the Courts righted him in the matter the League can do no more just act than to remove his disabilities. Cincinnati Enquirer November 4, 1881

The Directors [of the Cincinnati Club] began the work of hiring a team quite energetically yesterday. Charlie Jones was signed in the morning and Will White in the afternoon. Cincinnatians will, undoubtedly, be pleased to hear that these two most excellent players have been secured, and that the remainder of the team will be just as strong. Jones left last evening for the East to secure several players, and the result of his journey will be heard from in a few days. Cincinnati Enquirer November 5, 1881

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

more on the AA

Date Saturday, November 5, 1881
Text

A letter from that veteran in organizing national associations, J. A. Williams of Columbus, O., states that the new association is a fixed fact, and that the meeting in Cincinnati on Nov. 2 will see the new craft successfully launched. He adds:

Clubs in St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati and Pittsburg are substantial institutions, with good, reliable financial backing, are going into the matter in earnest, and will form an association themselves if there are no others to go in, but would rather have clubs from new York and Philadelphia. We already have two applicants from Philadelphia, one represented by Fulmer and the other by Phillips, between which we will have to decide. The Metropolitans are anxious to be allowed to compete for our championship, but claim that they are afraid to join the association, as they hold all of their players under League contracts, and fear they would lose them by the change.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Metropolitans back out of the AA

Date Sunday, November 6, 1881
Text

Messrs. Appleton and Mutrie, of the Metropolitans of New York, arrived in Chicago yesterday morning from St. Louis, and spent several hours in conference with President Hulbert, departing for New York on the 5:15 evening train. The result of this conference was, as might be expected, a decision that the Metropolitans will not enter the American Association, the new body organized on Friday last at Cincinnati. While in Cincinnati Mr. Appleton declined to take a seat in the convention as a member, or to count his club either for or against the new Association, preferring to wait and see what its relations would be toward the old league, with which he was determined the Metropolitan Club should be on friendly terms. The conference with President Hulbert settled the questions. It was evident that harmony and cooperation between the league and the new association were impossible in view of the action of the association in the case of Jones, and of the immediate engagement of that player by the Cincinnati Club. Jones stands expelled from the league, and, according to President Hulbert, that body will refuse to entertain any proposition looking to his reinstatement coming from a club which has already disregarded the league penalty by employing Jones. The long and short of it is that the league policy, as foreshadowed by President Hulbert, will be to altogether ignore the new association, or, if occasion shall require, to declare war to the knife. With this understanding, Mr. Appleton was not long in making up his mind to have nothing to do with the new association, but to continue the Metropolitan Club as a member of the existing League Alliance, which is to be strengthened and remodeled at the December meeting of the league so as to be prepared for all emergencies. Chicago Tribune November 6, 1881

[reporting on the AA meeting] Messrs. Appleton and Mutrie, representing the Metropolitans, did not enter the meeting, as they did not wish to bind themselves until they saw what would be the policy of the new organization. They thought the idea an excellent one, and supported it cordially. They say that they have $27,000 in the treasury, and that if they go in the Association they will also start a team in Newark, New Jersey. They are opposed to all belligerency to the League, and say that the country is large enough for both, and that they should live together quietly and peacefully. Cincinnati Enquirer November 3, 1881

Messrs. Appleton and Mutrie, of the Metropolitans, continued to keep out of the Association yesterday, assigning as their reason for so acting the fact that they would not enter until the policy of the body was fully defined and another constitution adopted. Mr. Appleton, who is of the firm of D. Appleton & Co., of New York, said that his Club could not afford to antagonize the League. They had derived a great deal of money from the contests with League Clubs, and they would not commit themselves to any opposition to the League. He did not believe in a great many regulations of the League, such as admission, &c., but the people placed more confidence in that body, and he could not unite with this new undertaking if it was to be warlike in its attitude. The Metropolitans were going to start a nine in Newark, N.J., and desired to put both in the Association, provided its action was satisfactory. Cincinnati Enquirer November 4, 1881

The delegates left for home last evening, Messrs. Appleton and Mutrie, of New York, going to St. Louis for a pleasure trip. Cincinnati Enquirer November 4, 1881

Messrs. Appleton and Mutrie, of the Metropolitans of New York, arrived here [Chicago] this morning [11/5] from St. Louis, and spent several hours in conference with President Hulbert, taking their departure for home on the 5:15 train this evening. The result of the conference is, as might be expected, a decision that the Metropolitans will not enter the new Association organized at Cincinnati. While at Cincinnati Mr. Appleton declined to commit his Club either for or against the Association, preferring to wait and see what its relations were to be toward the old League, with which he was determined the Metropolitan Club should be on friendly terms. The conference with President Hulbert settled the question. It was evident that harmonious co-operation between the League and the American Association was an impossibility after the action of the Association in the case of Jones, and the engagement of that player by the Cincinnati Club. Jones stands expelled from the League, and, according to Mr. Hulbert, that body will refuse to entertain any proposition looking to his reinstatement coming from a Club which has already disregarded the League penalty by employing him. The long and short of it is that the League policy, as foreshadowed by Mr. Hulbert, will be to ignore the American Association altogether, or, if necessary, to declare war to the knife.

With this understanding, Mr. Appleton was not long in making up his mind to have nothing to do with the new Association, but to continue the Metropolitans as members of the existing League Alliance, which is to be strengthened and remodeled at the December meeting of the League, so as to be prepared for all emergencies. Cincinnati Enquirer November 6, 1881

Mr. Day, of New York, says that there will be no nine in Newark, New Jersey, as reported, as sufficient players of good standing can not be secured to make a team. Cincinnati Enquirer December 7, 1881

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the status of Jones' judgment against the Bostons

Date Sunday, November 6, 1881
Text

Mr. Hulbert stated that there is a misapprehension as to the legal status of the Jones case. Jones obtained judgment in a Cleveland court through the failure of the Boston Club to put in an appearance and defend, not having been served with a summons. The judgment will, therefore, be reversed on appeal, and Jones will have to begin over again. Meanwhile the money attached remains in the custody of the Cleveland Club pending the final disposition of the case.

Source Chicago Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Providence Club finances; an appeal to the public

Date Saturday, November 5, 1881
Text

The stockholders of the Providence Base Ball Association held a meeting tonight, one-quarter of the stock being represented. The indebtedness up to Nov. 1 was reported to be $1391.36. Of this amount $650 was owed players for salaries. It was voted to call on the stockholders for voluntary subscriptions of $10 each, which will settle the salary claims. All other bills go over to the next season. It was decided to have a league team in 1882, but nothing was done or said about securing outfielders of a short stop. Boston Herald November 5, 1881

[an open letter from the Providence Club president dated 12/1/81] To the stockholders of the Providence Base Ball Association, and to the patrons of base ball generally, the board of directors of the Providence Base Ball Association desire to make the following statement: At the close of the last playing season, the association found itself in arrears for unpaid salaries and incidental expenses in the sum of $1000. To meet the deficit, it was voted that a subscription of $10 be solicited from each stockholder, and this, if generally paid, would have relieved the present embarrassment, and insured the engagement of a nine of the ensuing year. The result has been, however, that, while about one-half of the stockholders have cheerfully responded to the call made upon them reducing the amount to $650, the remainder have absolutely refused to make further contributions. It cannot be expected that the directors will assume this indebtedness, nor will they devote further time to the thankless task of personal solicitations. In order, however, that it may not be said that the directors have willfully allowed the association to die when helping hands were ready to restore it to life and activity, notice is hereby given that all persons interested in the maintenance of base ball in this city may, on or before Saturday, Dec. 3, send to the treasurer, Mr. Robert Morrow, a statement of the amount they are willing to subscribe toward the furtherance of the above object, and, if such subscriptions shall be sufficient to liquidate the present indebtedness, delegates will be forthwith sent to attend the annual meeting of the league, which takes place on the 7th inst. If, however, by the evening of Saturday, Dec. 3, it shall be found that enough has not bee subscribed to meet the present indebtedness, the president is directed to forthwith forward to Chicago by telegraph the withdrawal of the Providence association from the league. Boston Herald December 1, 1881

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the necessity of notifying the secretary of a contract

Date Sunday, November 6, 1881
Text

Although a contract with John Reilly to play first base for the “Mets” was secured by Mr. Appleton while in Cincinnnati, the latter had neglected the important precaution of protecting that contract by filing notice with Secretary Young at Washington. At Mr. Hulbert's suggestion the necessary notice was mailed to-day from this city [11/5, from Chicago], and the Reilly contract will, therefore, be under the protection of the League. It was a similar neglect in the case of Muldoon that left the bars down and enabled Cleveland to gobble him up.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

maintaining the desired scoring level

Date Sunday, November 6, 1881
Text

The average of runs to the game for 1881 was 10.16, which is regarded as about the right thing, and it is safe to predict that at the annual meeting of the League this winter the pitching range of fifty feet will be retained.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

foul ball dead balls

Date Sunday, November 6, 1881
Text

About the only change of consequence in the playing rules likely to be made will be the abolition of the penalty for running on a foul-hit ball. This penalty was restored after several seasons of disuse, but it has not worked satisfactorily. It opened the door to aggravating complications growing out of the Umpire's failure to promptly rule a ball to be foul, and it also hampered free batting to a noticeable extent, as the batsman, though desiring to help a runner who has started to steal a base, had constantly before him the danger of putting him out by hitting a foul close to the line. The runner should be entitled to return to his base on a foul, as was the case previous to last season. Cincinnati Enquirer November 6, 1881

[reporting on the amended rules] The rule requiring base runners to get back to their bases at the risk of being put out in the case of a foul ball was rescinded. This will destroy many a double play which had previously been made by quick throws of catchers to first basemen on foul tips, as players as a rule will stand a short distance from a base, and are not liable to hear all tip. Cincinnati Enquirer December 9, 1881

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

abuse of the reserve system

Date Sunday, November 6, 1881
Text

When the five-man reserve rule was adopted by the league, it was predicted that the power conferred by it would be abused by certain clubs. Such was the case two years ago with George Wright, and such is the case at the present time with Irwin and the Worcester club. Several days before the close of the last season Irwin received a full and honorable release from the Worcester club. It had no more claim on his services than on any other player not under contract to it. He showed his release to President Hulbert and was told it was sufficient as far as preventing the Worcester club from controlling him. And yet, the Worcester management neglected to notify Secretary Young of Irwin's release, and at the recent league meeting the latter was placed on the reserved list by Worcester, and all the clubs agreed not to hire him or approach him till Worcester released him again. Irwin does not desire to play in Worcester. Moreover he will not play there, but will work at his trade rather than do so. To force him to play in Worcester, or not at all in the league, is an abuse of power not in the least creditable to the league. Mr. Irwin has had several good offers to play, but cannot accept any. One thing he has settled in his mind, viz., not to play in Worcester.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Metropolitans stay out of the AA; Hulbert's opinion of the AA

Date Sunday, November 6, 1881
Text

Chicago, November 5.--Messrs. Appleton and Mutrie, of the Metropolitans of New York, arrived here this morning from St. Louis, and spent several hours in conference with President Hulburt, taking their departure for home on the 5:15 train this evening. The result of the conference is, as might be expected, a decision that the Metroplitans will not enter the new Association organized at Cincinnati. While at Cincinnati Mr. Appleton declined to commit his Club either for or against the Association, preferring to wait and see what its relations were to be toward the old League, with which he was determined the Metropolitan Club should be on friendly terms. The conference with President Hulburt settled the question. It was evident that harmonious co-operation between the League and the American Association was an impossibility after the action of the Association in the case of Jones, and the engagement of that player by the Cincinnati Club. Jones stands expelled from the League, and, according to Mr. Hulburt, that body will refuse to entertain any proposition looking to his reinstatement coming from a Club which has already disregarded the League penalty by employing him. The long and short of it is that the League policy, as foreshadowed by Mr. Hulburt, will be to ignore the American Association altogether, or, if necessary, to declare war to the knife.

With this understanding Mr. Appleton was not long in making up his mind to have nothing to do with the new Association, but to continue the Metropolitans as members of the existing League Alliance, which is to be strengthened and remodeled at the December meeting of the League, so as to be prepared for all emergencies. It is proposed, among other things, to alter the League Alliance system so as to provide for the admission of but one club from any city, to establish more rigid rules as to eligibility in the matter of financial backing, &c. In addition to the Metropolitans and the new Club to be organized in Newark, N.J., there will be a League Alliance Club in Philadelphia, arrangements having already been perfected for the leasing and fitting up of grounds and the engagement of players. The new Philadelphia Club will be a totally distinct organization from either of the other existing Clubs in that city, and will be backed by wealthy and responsible men. With two or three other Clubs in close proximity to New York as competitors for the League Alliance championship, together with the games that can be secured with the Eastern members of the League and with the Western Clubs when upon their Eastern trips, Mr. Appleton calculates that he can furnish the patrons of base-ball in New York far better sport than could be done with the Metropolitans as members of the new Association and in an attitude of hostility toward the National League. During the season of 1881 the Metropolitans had fifty-nine games on their own grounds with league Clubs, which was a larger number than any League Club had on its own grounds.

Mr. Hulburt offered Mr. Appleton liberal terms to bring the Metropolitans West for a series of six games in the latter part of next April, two in Cleveland and four in Chicago, but did not strongly advise the trip, as Chicago weather in April is treacherous, and the Metropolitans could probably do better to receive the Eastern League Clubs on the New York Grounds during that month. Although a contract with John Reilly to play first base for the “Mets” was secured by Mr. Appleton while in Cincinnati, the latter had neglected the important precaution of protecting that contract by filing notice with Secretary Young at Washington. At Mr. Hulbert's suggestion the necessary notice was mailed to-day from this city, and the Reilly contract will, therefore, be under the protection of the League. It was a similar neglect in the case of Muldoon that left the bars down and enabled Cleveland to gobble him up.

In a general way, President Hulburt expresses contempt for the new Association and its plan of organizing. He regards the guarantee policy a mistake, and calls attention to the fact that in the last three games played by the Chicagos in Cincinnati in September, 1880, the visiting Club's share was exactly $60,10 per game, which is less than the $65 guarantee adopted by the new Association. He predicts that this obligation to pay $65 to the visiting Club will be a heavy tax on some of the home Clubs toward the close of the season, when they are hopelessly beaten in the race and the attendance fallen to almost nothing, while the visiting Club only realizes enough to pay traveling expenses, with nothing left for salary account. Hulburt things the Association made a blunder in not first joining the League Alliance and then going on with its legislation. This course, he says, would have forced the League to open the warfare and discuss the whole question as a matter of League policy. As the case stands now, the new Association stands in contempt of the League, and has, by its action, precipitated hostilities.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

League players in a Sunday game

Date Saturday, November 12, 1881
Text

The League constitution says that the membership of any League club shall be forfeited if they fail to immediately expel any person under contract with it who shall at any time during the term of his service take part as player, umpire or scorer in any game of ball on Sunday. The question now arises whether Chicago, Cleveland and Buffalo have not forfeited their membership in the League by failing to expel Flint, Corcoran, Williamson, Gore, Kelly, McCormick and Foley, all of whom are said to have participated in a baseball game played Sunday, Oct. 30, in St. Louis, Mo.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Providence Club finances 3

Date Saturday, November 12, 1881
Text

The stockholders of the Providence Club held a special meeting Nov. 4 in Providence, R,.I.. The indebtedness up to Nov. 1 was reported to be $1.391.30. Of this amount $650 was due players for salaries. It was voted to call on the stockholders for voluntary subscriptions of $10 each, which will settle the salary claims, and let all other bills go over to next season. It was decided to have a League n nine in 1882, but nothing was done or said about securing players.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

abuse of the reserve

Date Saturday, November 12, 1881
Text

The Worcester management released Irwin several days before the close of the past season, and yet neglected to notify Secretary Young of Irwin's release, and at the recent League meeting the latter was placed on the reserved list by Worcester, and all the clubs agreed not to hire him till Worcester released him again. Irwin says he will not play with the Worcesters, and is obliged to decline several good offers from other clubs.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

choosing between the two Philadelphia clubs

Date Saturday, November 12, 1881
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting of 11/2/1881] Philadelphia was represented by two clubs, and both asserted that their financial support was excellent. It was announced at the meeting that they would make an effort to consolidate, and Fulmer telegraphed to Philadelphia to ascertain if such a plan would be acceptable, and received an answer saying that consolidation could not be thought of. After due deliberation it was decided to admit Chas. Fulmer as the representative of the Athletics of Philadelphia, and not recognize H. B. Philips club.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

early word of the Metropolitans' Newark club

Date Saturday, November 12, 1881
Text

[reporting on the AA meeting of 11/2/1881] The delegates from the Metropolitan Club of New York City could not, without exceeding the authority given them, bind their club to the new association, but they say that it will be only a matter of time and form for them to officially apply for admission. It is expected that they will bring with them into the association a strong professional club hailing from Newark, N.J. This will make the whole number of clubs eight, equally divided between the East and the West.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA standard contract

Date Saturday, November 12, 1881
Text

The following is the form of contract issued by Secretary Williams, of the American Association:

Contract Under the Rules of the American Association of Base-Ball Clubs.

This agreement, made and entered into by and between –, of –, a member of the American Association of Base-Ball Clubs, party of the first part, and –, of –, party of the second part, witnesseth:

That, whereas, In consideration of the covenants hereinafter mentioned, the party of the first part hereby covenants and agrees to employ, and pay to the party of the second part the sum of – dollars ($--), for services hereinafter specified, said sum to be paid in – installments.

That the party of the second part hereby covenants and agrees, in consideration of the covenants of the party of the first part, that he will play base-ball, or perform such other service in connection therewith as may be required of him by the party of the first part, from the – day of –, 188--, to the – day of –, 188--.

That said second party further agrees to subject himself to all the rules and requirements of the Constitution and playing rules of the said American Association of Base-Ball Clubs; also, all such rules as may be adopted from time to time by said party of the first part for the government of its employees.

That said party further agrees that he will willingly and cheerfully, at all times, give his best services to said party of the first part, and will abstain from all dissipations or practices that will so affect his physical condition as to prevent his doing the same.

That each party agrees with the other, that5 this contract shall cease and determine if either fail or refuse to comply with its provisions; provided, that the party of the first part shall not be required to pay any installment of said compensation should the same become due while the Club of first party is away from home.

` {Witness our signatures and seals hereto attached.}

As will be seen this is peculiarly concise and to the point. There are no long-winded lectures to players.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the AA standard contract 2

Date Saturday, November 12, 1881
Text

The following is the form of contract issued by Secretary Williams, of the American Association:

CONTRACT UNDER THE RULES OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF BASE-BALL CLUBS

This agreements, made and entered into by and between –, of –, a member of the American Association of Base-Ball Clubs, party of the first part, and –, of –, party of the second part, witnesseth:

That, whereas, In consideration of the covenants hereinafter mentioned, the party of the first part hereby covenants and agrees to employ, and pay to the party of the second part the sum of – dollars ($--), for services hereinafter specified, siad sum to be paid in – installments.

That the party of the second part hereby covenants and agrees, in consideration of the covenants of the party of the fisrt part, that he will play base-ball, or perform such other service in connection therewith as may be required of him by the party of the first part, from the – day of –, 188-, to the – day of –, 188-.

That said second party further agrees to subject himself to all the rules and requirements of the Constitution and playing rules of the said American Association of Base-Ball Clubs; also, all such rules as may be adopted from time to time by said party of the first part for the government of its employees.

That said party further agrees that he will willingly and cheerfully, at all times, give his best services to said party of the first part, and will abstain from all dissipations or practices that will so affect his physical condition as to prevent his doing the same.

That each party agrees with the other, that this contract shall cease and determine if either fail or refuse to comply with its provisions; provided, that the party of the first part shall not be required to pay any installment of said compensation should the same become due while the club of first party is away from home.

(Witnesseth our signatures and seals hereto attached.)

As will be seen this is peculiarly concise and to the point. There are no long-winded lectures to players.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the American Association a disgrace to the profession

Date Sunday, November 13, 1881
Text

The newly organized American Base Ball Association is doomed to be short-lived. By engaging Jones, an expelled player from the Boston club, it has incurred the antagonism of the league. Its financial policy is a weak one, and, by adopting rules allowing games to be played on Sunday and the sale of beer of the grounds of the various clubs, it has forfeited all claim for the support of respectable people, and, as long as it retains these rules, the association will be a disgrace to the base ball profession.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the Cincinnati Club officers

Date Thursday, November 17, 1881
Text

A meeting of the Cincinnati Club was held yesterday afternoon, and the following Board of Directors was elected: Justus Thorner, George Herancourt, Louis Kramer, Rees McDufie and Victor H. Long.

The new Board then met and chose the following officers: President, Justus Thorner; Vice-President, Victor H. Long; Secretary and Treasurer, George Herancourt.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the new Philadelphia Club

Date Saturday, November 19, 1881
Text

The new nine now being organized in Philadelphia, Pa., by H. B. Phillips and Al Reach will be known as the Philadelphia Club. It was refused admission to the American Association, but it is said that Phillips and Reach will try their fortunes with the League Alliance, in the hope to have the monopoly of games in Philadelphia with the League clubs.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cincinnati signs a reserved player; sour grapes

Date Sunday, November 27, 1881
Text

Snyder has signed to play next season with the Cincinnati club. This will not be a very great disappointment to the Boston club, for, although he was on the reserved list, the management had not made beyond that the slightest approach to hiring him for 1882. he was reserved simply to protect the club in having a second catcher. Where Snyder was formerly so popular as he was in Boston, it is singular that not a voice has been heard in favor of reengaging him. His playing last season was far below the average, and Deasley proved himself, on more than one occasion, the more effective man behind the bat.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

improvement plans for Oakdale Park; early use of “general admission”

Date Sunday, November 27, 1881
Text

The grounds of the Athletic Club, at Oakdale Park, are to be enlarged, a handsome new grand stand erected and general admission stands placed under cover.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

arbitrary black listing

Date Sunday, November 27, 1881
Text

The plain facts of the case are that a general impression prevails that the club Presidents, at their Saratoga meeting, October 1, acted hastily and with lack of discrimination. Players were placed upon the black list for faults that were condoned in their fellow players. In short, it apparently made all the difference in the world whether the offender was a first-class player or a second-class player. Detroit Free Press November 27, 1881

[reporting on the NL meeting 12/7/81] In the article on membership, provision is made for a black list. The name of any umpire, manager or player, can be placed upon the list by a vote of five league clubs, and any person so placed will be ineligible for connection with any club, until such inabilities are removed by the unanimous vote of the league. Boston Herald December 8, 1881

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Louisville pays a dividend

Date Sunday, November 27, 1881
Text

The Directors of the Eclipse Base-ball Club held a meeting last night [11/25], and matters of considerable importance were transacted. A dividend of 38 per cent. was declared, which is a very good showing for the Club as a paying institution.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jones' petition for reinstatement ignored

Date Thursday, December 8, 1881
Text

[reporting on the NL directors meeting] Voluminous documents accompanied [Jones's] petition showing that he had not signed with the Cincinnati Club, and the Common Pleas Court of Cleveland had given him a judgment against the Boston Club, which expelled him. The Board refused to reopen the case, or to have any thing to do with it. … Mr. Hurlbert says that the board had no other way left for it; that Jones, in failing to present his appeal papers to the annual meeting of 1880, lost his standing and that his case was now outlawed.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

a provision to suspend a player

Date Thursday, December 8, 1881
Text

[reporting on the NL meeting 12/7/81] If a player is suspended his club has a right to limit the period of such suspension.

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Jones has no standing to seek reinstatement

Date Thursday, December 8, 1881
Text

[reporting on the NL Directors' meeting of 12/7/1881] A … communication was submitted from Charles W. Jones, whose case has been so freely commented upon by the press throughout the country. Voluminous documents accompanied his petition showing that he had not signed with the Cincinnati Club, and the Common Pleas Court of Cleveland had given him a judgment against the Boston Club, which expelled him. The Board refused to reopen the case, or to have any thing to do with it. Therefore Jones remains an expelled player. This action was rather unexpected. It had been believed that a two-years' retirement would be sufficient punishment for that player for any offense (if his action could be termed so) he had committed. Mr. Hurlbert [sic] says that the Board had no other way left for it; that Jones, in failing to present his appeal papers to the annual meeting of 1880, lost his standing, and that his case was now outlawed. So much for Mr. Hurlbert. On the other hand, it is understood by those who know, that had not the American Association decided to reinstate Jones, and thereby have excited the wrath of the esteemed President of the League, Charles would have been all right. Cincinnati Enquirer December 8, 1881 [N.B. The constitution was amended later that day requiring appeals from suspension or expulsion be made within thirty days. “In the old article no time was mentioned for the filing of any petition...”]

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the black list 2

Date Thursday, December 8, 1881
Text

[reporting the NL meeting of 12/7/1881] A number of amendments, some of them of considerable importance, were then read and discussed, and, together with certain alterations, were adopted. Preparation was first made for the Black List, which had been agreed upon at the late Saratoga meeting. The section that shall hereafter govern the increasing of the thus blackened players provides that by an affirmative vote of five League Clubs, any person may be declared unworthy of serving in the League as umpire, manager or player, and any one named in such list is disqualified for further services until his disabilities are removed by a unanimous vote of all the clubs. This practically settles the present flock of black sheep. In fact, not [sic: should be 'but'] one of the list was heard from, that being Crowley, late of the Bostons. A letter was received from him pleading for a removal of his name, but no attention whatever was paid to the pleading epistle. The matter of enlarging the list was not taken up, but it is understood that several names will be placed upon it.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

using players without contracts; twenty day rule for released players

Date Thursday, December 8, 1881
Text

[reporting the NL meeting of 12/7/1881; constitution amendments] The article covering the rights and duties of Clubs was amended by the addition of provisions that a player not under a League contract may be employed in five championship games instead of five consecutive days; that a player peremptorily released without expulsion may engage with another Club in twenty day,s but can not in the mean time play with the Club releasing him; that if he be released on twenty days' notice he is entitled to play and the Club can employ him in any capacity, except as a player...

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

invigorating the League Alliance

Date Friday, December 9, 1881
Text

[reporting the NL meeting of 12/7/1881] The feasibility of changing the Constitution governing the League Alliance, by which the League means to strike a death-blow to the American Association by making the former more attractive to outside Clubs than the latter, was considerably agitated during the day, and but little action was taken in this matter, and the matter was put over until this morning's session. Among other changes to be made is one to the effect that but one club will be admitted from each city. Another is that application for membership will be subjected to the ballot of all the League Clubs and those already admitted to the League Alliance, and more than two votes will reject it. … Mr. Hulbert says that the only way any independent organization can live is by joining the League Alliance and then branching out for itself Cincinnati Enquirer December 8, 1881

[reporting the NL meeting of 12/8/1881] In revising the League alliance constitution the meeting has so arranged matters as to place the clubs in that sort of a second-fiddle Association nearly upon a level with themselves, whereas the non-League or American teams must bend their knee in obeisance to the dictations of the League, and esteem it a most wondrous concession if a Club belonging to the latter designs to play with them even at most exorbitant rates. In other words, the League has taken this stand that either all Clubs not member of their organization must enter the League alliance or be forever and ever more utterly damned. If will not brook any assumption of independence on the part of an outside body, and all must come like sinful pilgrims to the shrine and ask for a not of approval from this truly monarchical Association. The entire forenoon of to-day was consumed in the dissection of the old League Alliance's regulations. They were so changed, enlarged and reclothed as to be scarcely recognizable. Now, in order to become a member an applicant must be elected by a joint vote of the League and League Alliance Clubs, two adverse votes rejecting. Only one Club from a city is entitled to admission. The League will adjudicate all of the disputes of its proteges, and the Secretary will notify the League and League Alliance Clubs of their contra cts, suspension and expulsions, all of which must be respected by the two bodies alike. The Alliance Clubs can be represented by two delegates at the annual meeting, and will have the privilege of taking part on topics affecting their interest. If the Clubs desire a championship contest, the League will arrange it, and declare the winner. From this point out the League showed its teeth to the American Association Clubs. First an article was adopted making a distinction in the distribution of the receipts of games between league Clubs and League alliance and non-League Clubs. The last-named must give to League clubs a guarantee of $100; and if the gross receipts exceed $200, then the latter shall receive one half. Gross receipts are defined to mean all moneys taking for all kinds of admissions and special privileges, such as bars, &c. On the other hand, the infants over whom the League keeps such a watchful eye, and who belong to the League alliance, pay a guarantee of $100, or half of the gross receipts or gate receipts, as may be agreed upon before the game. The definition of gate receipts, according to the League dictionary, includes all funds secured from admittance fees to the grounds, but does not cover extra remunerations for grand stand seats or the special privileges. This latter clause was added to satisfy the Metropolitans, whose President, Mr. Day, was in attendance. One or two of the Eastern Clubs would be unable to live but for the kind interference of the generous New Yorkers who believe they are aiding a noble cause when they pay liberally for going out to the Polo grounds in their city, and witnessing the Troys or some other League nine mop the ground with a League team day after day. The New Yorkers being so self-sacrificing, and their money being so needful to keep certain Clubs' heads floating, this constitution clap on the back was passed; and decidedly the most direct drive at the American was in the following new section: No games shall be played between any League and any non-League Club in any city in which a League-Alliance Club is located, except with such League Alliance Club. This will especially operate in Philadelphia, where the Athletics belong to the American Association, and the Philadelphias to the League-Alliance. As the former as the strongest team, it is very liable to secure the most patronage, and the League nine have gained little by such an enactment.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

definition of block balls added to the rules

Date Friday, December 9, 1881
Text

[reporting on the rules changes] Under the chapter of definitions the term “block” was added, which, defined, means a batted for thrown ball stopped or handled by any one not in the game. Previously such a ball would have been terms as “dead,” and all runners sent back to their bases if they had left them. [N.B. This is incorrect.] Under the new arrangement a base-runner can go as far as he can before the ball is thrown to the pitcher, who must be in his position. Again, if the ball is stopped, held or thrown out of the way by an outsider with the evident intention of helping a base-runner, then the umpire shall declare to what base the runner is entitled.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

flopping

Date Friday, December 9, 1881
Text

[reporting on the rules changes] In case of accident to players, the umpire is forbidden (especially if the injured person be one of the fielding nine) to call time until the ball is returned to the pitcher and he is in his position. This is to meet occasions when smart players are suddenly attacked by an unknown disease on seeing a rival batsman hit the ball safely with the bases full.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

base runners and foul balls

Date Friday, December 9, 1881
Text

[reporting on the rules changes] The rule requiring base runners to get back to their bases at the risk of being put out in the case of a foul ball was rescinded. This will destroy many a double play which had previously been made by quick throws of catcher to first basemen on foul tips, as players as a rule will stand a short distance from a base, and are not liable to hear all tips.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

deeking the fielding team by calling out the wrong fielder

Date Friday, December 9, 1881
Text

[reporting on the rules changes] [The umpire] was empowered to fine players who...try to disconcert a fielder by calling the name of a man other than the one designated by the Captain. This refers to such fellows as Burdock, who had a habit when a fly is batted, say to the right field, of shouting out for the center-fielder to go for it, when the Captain has called the right fielders.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the players’ bench

Date Friday, December 9, 1881
Text

[reporting on the NL rules] A players’ bench must be furnished by the home club and fastened to the ground. At each end a bat rack must be placed (one for each club) with room for twenty bats. Bats not in use must be kept in these racks and players of the side at the bat must remain on the bench except when batsman, runner, captain or assistant.

Source Cleveland Plain Dealer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the black list reaffirmed

Date Saturday, December 10, 1881
Text

[reporting the NL meeting of 12/9/1881] The subject of the “black list” was then brought up on motion by Mr. Winship, of Providence. He stated that his Club had felt very sore over the placing of Gross upon that list, and were particularly anxious about securing his removal. That player had shown evidence intention of reforming along in the month of June last season, and it was very unjust to thus handicap him. Then followed a most heated discussion, which lasted for some time. Mr. Winship was considerably enlightened as to the actions of Gross, and greatly to his surprise ascertained that the case had been most carefully covered up by the players and others interested. The delegates insisted that if one mas was placed on [sic: probably should be 'removed from'] the black list they all should be, and if that was done, why the reform intended to have been wrought by the enactment would have been lost. Finally it was unanimously decided to reaffirm the action of the Saratoga meeting, leaving the list the same.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Buffalo Club finances 3

Date Saturday, December 10, 1881
Text

The annual election of the Buffalo Club, held Dec. 1, resulting in the unanimous selection fo the following directors for 1882... The treasurer's report showed the receipts from home games to be $15,876.95, and from foreign games $7,788.85, while $4,823.05 were paid to visiting clubs, and the salary-list amounted to $13,851.10.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the legal status of the Polo Grounds

Date Friday, December 9, 1881
Text

Mr. Fodringham, of the Polo Association, states that the announcement that Mr. Day, of the Metropolitan Club, has secured a lease of the Polo Grounds for 1882 is premature. Why is there so much secrecy about this business? The land on which the Polo Ground is located belongs party to the city, as two streets, One Hundred and Eleventh and One Hundred and Twelfth—are to be cut through it, as also an avenue. The Polo Association hold a lease of the property, and the opening of the the streets is kept back through the influence of the association. The Polo Association have three things to do in this base ball business: Either to run a team themselves, share gate receipts with a club manager, or lease the ground for a year. The question is: Which is the court they have adopted or will adopt? It is difficult to suppose that any man would engage a team without having a ground secured on which to play them. But this is what Mr. Day has done, according to Mr. Fodringham's statement. Brooklyn Daily Eagle December 9, 1881

The Polo Grounds have been leased for the season of 1882 by the Metropolitan Club, and hereafter all the athletic meetings for pedestrianism, bicycling, etc., and all the lacrosse and football matches hitherto held under the control of the Polo Association, will be held under the auspices of the Metropolitan Club. New York Clipper December 17, 1881

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

block ball rule

Date Saturday, December 10, 1881
Text

In the section on definitions, the new term, “block,” is defined to be a batted or thrown ball stopped or handled by anyone not engaged in the game. This has been variously ruled on by umpires. The new rule provides that in case of a “block” base-runners may run at will, and that the ball shall be returned to the pitcher in his position before a runner can be put out. In the article on umpires, it is made the duty of the umpire, if an outsider in such case willfully delays the return of the ball, to designate the base to which the runner is entitled.

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

uncertainty of Providence Club finances

Date Saturday, December 17, 1881
Text

[reporting the NL meeting of 12/7/1881] Mr. Winship went to the meeting in doubt as to whether he would take part in the proceedings, but he received notice in time that the necessary funds to pay off the club indebtedness were at command, and so he entered the convention.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

runners return to base on uncaught foul balls

Date Sunday, December 18, 1881
Text

[reporting on the NL rules] The barrier to base running in '81 was removed by the readoption of the former rule of allowing base-runners to return to bases on foul balls not caught on the fly, without being put out.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

block balls

Date Sunday, December 18, 1881
Text

[reporting on the NL rules] Balls stopped by anyone not engaged in the game are now termed “block” balls, and on all such balls runners are at liberty to make all the bases they can while the ball is dead, which it is until returned to the pitcher and held by him while in his position.

The willful delay by an outsider in returning a “block” ball empowers the umpire to decide what base the runner could have made by a legitimate return of the ball.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

runners deliberately missing the base

Date Sunday, December 18, 1881
Text

[reporting on the NL rules] The trick of running home without touching third base, when the umpire's attention is engaged at some other pint, has been checkmated by requiring such violator of the rules to return to the base he had left when the hit was made, and allowing him to be put out as in the case of being forced out.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

League teams supported by Chicago

Date Sunday, December 18, 1881
Text

The burly Hurlburt was forced to loan two of the League clubs money to keep them alive this season. Hurlburt's money, as well as his cheek, will soon give out.

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the NL-AA war opens; prospects in Washington; the notorious Phillips

Date Sunday, December 18, 1881
Text

[from a letter from J. A. Williams to H. D. McKnight dated 12/16/1881] The war is at last opened. I have this day received a letter from Simmons, manager of the Athletics, stating that John Troy informs him that he has signed with the Detroits after having signed and received advance money from him. He wanted to know what redress he had. I referred him to second 4 of Act VI of our Constitution, which seems to require his expulsion by the Athletics, and under section 12 of the same article no Club of this Association could play any Club that would employ him, or any Club that did play such Club. This would seem to me to cut off all intercourse with the League at once, and this, in my opinion, is just what the League has meant to do by this action, and I further believe it to be a put up job. They found that we were not disposed to hire any of their expelled players and thus lay ourselves open to attack under their rules, so they thought to force us into this action under our own. I did not advise Simmons to take any action, but simply referred him to the law in the case, and told him that I would refer the matter to the President of the Association, who would advise him what course to pursue. He applies.…

The question, is, should we allow it to continue, or would it not be better to make an example of Troy by expelling him at once. He may play in the League awhile, but if he should get out of an engagement with them his occupation would be gone, as no American Club could employ him.

The League has declared war on us and already opened hostilities. Shall we submit or fight them? If we submit we have nothing to gain, as they have declared they will have nothing to do with our Clubs, and as an instance of their intentions are already endeavoring to get up a League Alliance Club in Philadelphia under the notorious Phillips, whom they claimed they would have nothing to do with. They already have a League Alliance Club in the Metropolitans of New York, and are endeavoring to provide one for Newark, N.J., thus doing all in their power to kill our Eastern Clubs.

They have declared war against us for no reason whatever. We have done nothing to injure their organizations or the game. We don't interfere with them in any way. The theater managers of their cities might as well declare war against the managers of our cities. There would be just as much reason in it. We did dare to adopt a mode for doing our business that was not exactly in accordance with their policy, and hence we must be attacked through the press as though we were a lot of disreputable people, who were banded together to break down the game.

In support of the theory of retaliation, I would say that I am in receipt of a letter from Mr. M. J. Scanlan, of Washington, D.C., one of the best-posted base-ball men in the country, and one who has been at the head of the Club in that city for several years, in answer to a letter asking him to get up a Club for our Association in the coming season. He says that the only way we can succeed is to fight the League from the word go; that they are bound to injure us all they can. He also claims that we can get along without them, and that if we do this Washington will raise a Club for us in 1883. He further urges that we ought to have their expelled men—such as Jones, Houck, Baker and Crowley, who were not expelled for any crookedness—claiming that we would be more successful by making our Clubs as strong as possible. He 6thinks the public will uphold us in hiring such men. Players who only drink ought not to be put in the same list with the rascals and thieves who sell games. Of course, these are matters for differences of opinion, and I give them the opinion of one of the shrewdest base-ball men in the country. Cincinnati Enquirer December 18, 1881

[commenting on Williams' letter] The spirit of Mr. Williams' letter is highly commendatory, although certain parts of it, in which recommendations are made, are equally as foolish. That the League is bound to antagonize the American Association there is now no doubt. At the same time, if hostilities must be declared, it is highly improper for the latter organization to take such steps a would surely lead to its ruin. The League is the stronger in that it has the confidence of the people. Therefore, if the American wishes to secure that which its older rival has such a hold on, it should not undo the work by which the latter has obtained this strength.

Mr. Scanlan may be a shrewd base-ball man, but he certainly errs when he asserts that it is for the best interests of the American to take up the expelled players of the League. The same gentleman, to begin with, has a spite against the later, for the reason that it refused to admit the Nationals, of Washington, as a member in 1881. Therefore, many of his utterances can be accounted for. When he states that players addicted to drink should not be placed on the same list with thieves and rascals, he exhibits a lack of knowledge, inasmuch as they are not classed—nevertheless, there is no dodging the fact that these players can not drink whisky and play ball, and Clubs can not afford to make inebriate asylums out of themselves. Messrs. Crowley and Houck are well-known topers. Both have been released on that account, nad are of no use to the Clubs in the new Association. It would be highly ridiculous to reinstate Baker, who was expelled by the League for the same reason that the Secretary recommends the expulsion of Troy. If the black-listed men are hired then the object for which they were practically suspended will fail. Provided players know that if, when placed on this list by the League, they will be received with open arms by the American, then will all efforts to week out the whisky suckers prove fruitless. Therefore it is sincerely to be hoped that the new organization will not make such a suicidal move as to remove the disability of the League's black sheep.

As far as Troy is concern, he should be promplty xpelled. This if he recognizes his contract with the Detroit, well and good; it will be placed in a true light before the people. Troy having beenn expelled by the American is equally as much ostracised as Baker, expelled by the League, for signing two contracts—one with an outside Club. If the latter body refused to recognize this action of the American it settles all thoughts of amity between the two Associations, and debars the younger from playing with the older. It is much better for the latter to have taken this step than for the former. The people can then see whether or not the League is true to its announced principle of being interested only in the advancement of the pastime. … Troy should be expelled at once, but Mr. Scanlon's insane idea about Houck, Crowley and Baker should not for a moment be entertained. Cincinnati Enquirer December 18, 1881

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Boston Club finances 5

Date Thursday, December 22, 1881
Text

The annual meeting of the Boston Base Ball Association was held last evening, President A. H. Soden in the chair. Mr. W. R. Smart was chosen clerk pro tem. Mr. A. J. Chase, treasurer of the association, submitted his report, from which it appeared that the receipts from the season tickets were $630; fines, $176.67; gate receipts, $19,686/01; donations, $758. The total receipts amounted to $21,647.42. The principal expenses were: For traveling, $3559.22; salaries, $11,672.95; sundry expenses, $1178.62. the cash on hand is $75.08. The total expenses of the club were $21,572.34. President Soden submitted the report of the board of directors, showing that the liabilities of the club have been reduced about $2700 the past year. The cost of the new grand stand was $1400; the revenue during the past season was $618.75, a gain over the year before of $449.50. ... the number of shares voted on being 77...

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

the end of the Harry Wright era in Boston

Date Thursday, December 22, 1881
Text

[from the president's report at the Boston Club annual meeting] The cause of the low standing of the club in the championship contest last year is due, the directors state, to the combined influence of late hours, dissipation, lax discipline, and bickerings on the part of some of the players, a state of things that must be remedied in the future. Boston Herald December 22, 1881

Harry Wright goes to Providence next season, followed by the best wishes for his prosperity of the thousands of warm friends made during the years he has led the Boston club. Boston Herald December 25, 1881

Source Boston Herald
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

fallout from the Charley Jones case

Date Saturday, December 24, 1881
Text

President Soden of the Bostons has commenced a suit against the Cleveland Club to recover $568.55, the amount attached by Charley Jones and granted him by judgment of a Cleveland Court.

Source New York Clipper
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Cincinnati Club ownership

Date Sunday, December 25, 1881
Text

As a good exhibition of the estimation in which the new Cincinnati Base-ball Club is held, we recite a recent transaction in the stock of that organization. Among the stockholders of that body was the late John Price, of Price's Hill. After his death his widow was appointed administratrix of the estate, including his interest in the Club. She transferred the latter to Mr. Justus Thorner, who a few days ago sold it to Mr. A. Stern, of Newburgh, Stern, Lauer & Co., the well-known clothiers, at an advance of $200 over the purchase money. Mr. Thorner states that he was flooded with offers for the stock before and after the sale, and he feels highly elated over the respect with which the people look upon the new Club. Yesterday Mr. Stern was elected a Director of the Club.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Hulbert on the Troy expulsion

Date Sunday, December 25, 1881
Text

With a view of ascertaining the probable attitude of the League in the event of the American Association expelling Troy, who first signed with the Athletics of Philadelphia, and then broke his contract and joined the Detroit team, the Enquirer correspondent to-day hunted up President Hulbert, and asked him what would be done in the premises. He replied: “I am not aware of the necessity of doing any thing, for I have no information on the subject other than newspaper reports, which, as you know, are not always to be relied on in the matter of private business affairs. I have no knowledge, officially, of the engagement of Troy any where but by the Detroit Club. The League does not recognize the existence of any Association of ball clubs excepting itself and the League Alliance. If the Athletic Club should expel Troy for alleged breach of contract, I don't see what the League would have to do with it. The only question the League has to consider in regard to players is their relations to the Clubs of the League and those entitled to the League's protection by virtue of their membership in the League Alliance. The Athletic Club not being a member of the Alliance, has no claims on the League. Cincinnati Enquirer December 25, 1881

[McKnight describing correspondence from Hulbert] Upon receipt of the telegram from Hulbert about the Troy matter, quoted above, I wrote him that Troy would have to be expelled under our rules, and reminding him of the pledge just quoted [that the NL would respect AA expulsions], said “I could hardly believe he intended to break it so completely.” He answered, “For years the League has proferred the use of its machinery for the recording and enforcement of players' contract to any and all Ball Clubs that chose to avail themselves of the conditions offered. Annually we have published in our book the form of agreement to be signed by Clubs that desired to avail themselves of the privilege. Not the slightest trouble has ever arisen between any League Club and League Alliance Club. … John Troy, by all our laws, is a player under contract with the Detroit Club, and no Club on earth can inflict any penalty on John Troy that the Chicago or any other Club in the League will recognize except it be inflicted by the Detroit Club or by the League. You don't treat me fairly in your quotations from a letter of mine to you. Troy was not an expelled player when contracted with by Detroit. If you should now expel Troy, would my remarked apply? I mean, remarks about Leagues, not employing the players disqualified by the American Association. Not much.” &c. Cincinnati Enquirer January 1, 1882

[McKnight's commentary on the NL action] I suppose the League expected to aggravate us so by this Troy outrage that we would commence hiring their black-listed and expelled players for revenge, and thus get the press and public down on us. We will do nothing of the kind. We can get plenty of good players, and we propose to be governed by honorable rules, if others are not. I shall not make the stereotyped “appeal to the public,” for I suppose the sympathy of the people in League cities will remain with that organization. The average attendant of base-ball games does not care whether the President of his Club is a man whom he would not trust with his pocket-book... Cincinnati Enquirer January 1, 1882

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Boston sues Cleveland in aftermath of the Jones case

Date Sunday, December 25, 1881
Text

A Boston paper says: “President Soden, of the Bostons, has commenced a suit against the Cleveland Club to recover $568.55, the amount attached by Charley Jones and granted him by judgment of a Cleveland Court.” Mr. Soden will require numerous such suits to make good his losses in base-ball.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

dismissing the AA as amateur clubs

Date Thursday, December 29, 1881
Text

The American League, as represented by the Cincinnati Enquirer, is in a terrible to-do about John Troy, Detroit's short-stop for next season, and all because he has left the Athletic Club of Philadelphia and joined the league. This is the first instance of a player being criticised for leaving an amateur club and joining a professional one. Scores of players did this last season. … The professional clubs have always drawn from the amateur ranks, and will necessarily continue to do so in the future. It will be rough on Troy, and the others who have already, or may in the future, better their condition, if after having deserted the American or lager beer league, it should expel him, as it threatens to do. Detroit Free Press December 29, 1881

Harry Wright ousted from Boston

An effort was made at the recent annual meeting of the Boston Club to make a change in the directors in favor of the friends of Harry Wright. The move, however, was a failure. Harry will be compelled to look to some new pasture for a position. Detroit Free Press December 29, 1881

Source Detroit Free Press
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Chadwick's career

Date Thursday, March 3, 1881
Text

This coming Summer will complete a quarter of a century since Mr. Henry Chadwick, the present base ball and cricket editor of the New York Clipper, began reporting for that old established sporting journal, as he commenced writing for the Clipper in August, 1857. the first noteworthy base ball matches he reported for the Clipper were the contests between picked nines of New York and Brooklyn, which were played on the old Fahsi9on Course, Long Island, in 1858. From 1857 to 1867 he was regularly on the Clipper. He then left it to edit the American Chronicle, but returned to the Clipper in 1869, and has been on the paper ever since. A wonderful change was taken place in the playing of base ball since the days of those Fashion Course matches. The best picked nine of that period would not be able to score a single run in a game against the champion professional team of 1881.

Source Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

invective against George Bradley

Date Sunday, April 17, 1881
Text

[Cleveland vs. Cincinnati 4/15/1882] [regarding Cleveland pitcher George Washington Bradley] Did you ever see a great, overgrown, uncouth, ungainly, semi-idiotic country lout pitch onto a small boy scarcely to his knee, especially when he knew there was nobody in hailing distance to prevent him? Such was the case yesterday of Bradley, the pitcher of the Clevelands, who disgraces the name of the Father of our country by having it in front of his own. It is just such plug uglies, such bullies, such overbearing, ignorant whelps as Bradley, who never knew the difference between decency and blackguardism, and who is no more fit to be on a ball field in the presence of a crowd than a bowery bum at a Murray Hill German, that renders the national game so objectionable to the genteel lovers of fine sport. He seemed especially anxious to distinguish himself as a loafer, and he succeeded beyond his most sanguine expectations. In fact, he was the truest type of that eyesore to all ranks of humanity that has aired himself in Cincinnati in years. Perfectly aware that the umpire had no power to interfere or fine him, he strove in every mean and contemptible way to take advantage of this fact. He delayed the game in mere boyish trifles, acted like a ten year old lad who cries and snarls every time another one gets a little the start of him. He argued with the umpire, and otherwise made himself obnoxious. The height of his ruffianism occurred in the seventh inning, when he deliberately threw himself in front of Fulmer, and prevented him from scoring a home run. Then he strutted back, as proud of the achievement as a big bully would be after doing some similar act. It was equal to just such a dime novel rough as he is. It was the only thing that occurred to mar the attractiveness of the game, and it was a pity that he could not have been arrested as a tramp, and removed to this proper apartments., quoting the Cincinnati Enquirer

Source Cincinnati Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

Fleet Walker meets the color line in Louisville

Date Monday, August 22, 1881
Text

[Cleveland White Stockings vs. Louisville Eclipse 8/21/1881] Quite a row was created at the base ball match to-day at Eclipse Park when it was discovered that Walker, of the Cleveland White Stockings, was a mulatto. The rich blood of the chivalrous Eclipse club couldn't brook the imputation of playing against a nine with him in it. A private policeman named Chas. Fuller, urged on by the Eclipse nine, was in the act of expelling Walker from the ground when the sentiment of the crowd in his favor became so manifest as to deter him, and Walker was permitted to remain as a spectator of a game wherein he was to have been a participant.

Source Cleveland Gazette
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

catcher’s gloves, catchers’ gloves

Date Error: Invalid time.
Text

Reach is making a new catcher’s glove that is excellent. The left hand covering is a full one, the right or throwing hand being covered with a half glove to aid throwing. The palm and joint padding is of felt. Reading Times March 31, 1884

A Cincinnati firm is making a new catcher’s glove that is said to be excellent. The left hand covering is a full one, the right or throwing hand being covered with a half glove to aid throwing. The palm and joint padding is of felt. Cleveland Leader April 2, 1884

The catchers at the game yesterday [Cleveland regulars vs. reserves] worked without gloves and consequently could not stand close to the bat. It was, of course, easy to steal bases, which accounts in a measure for the large score [10-9]. Cleveland Leader April 4, 1884

A new style of left-hand glove for catchers has been brought out. The fingers are stiff cowhide, jointed at the bottom with buckskin. The finger-ends are stout enough to withstand the severest blow, thus preventing the breaking of joints, from which men behind the bat have so long suffered. Cleveland Leader April 4, 1884

Source Cincinnati Commercial Tribune, Reading Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

pitching delivery, Pitching delivery

Date Error: Invalid time.
Text

[reporting on the new rules from the NAPBBP convention] Sec. 2, Rule 4.–Delivery of the ball by the pitcher; no part of his person must be outside the lines of position while delivering the ball, and the delivery must be perpendicular, and not by a round swing, or throw from the wrist.

{This is an important amendment, as it rules out nearly all our pitchers, only one or two of whom pitch perpendicularly, that is to say, with a straight movement of the arm. If the rule is strictly observed, it will cause a radical change in the style of pitching, and do away with a large number of “dodges” resorted to by pitcher to increase the speed and effectiveness of their delivery.}

,

[See PT August 29, 1886 for unusually precisely described deliveries with engravings from instantaneous photographs.]

Source Philadelphia All-Day City Item, Philadelphia Times
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

fielders’ gloves, fielders gloves

Date Error: Invalid time.
Text

[reporting on the baseball tournament in Detroit] We have noticed in all the matches played thus far that the use of gloves by the players was to some degree a customary practice, which, we think, cannot be too highly condemned, and are of the opinion that the Custers would have shown a better score, if there had been less buckskin on their hands.

,

In NY Giants vs. Philadelphia game - "All the New York players wore gloves except pitcher Mattimore, and he probably would too, except that he would not have been able to pitch if he had.  Someone has suggested that the New York players are getting their hands white and soft for their appearance in society next winter."  Close play at 3B where third baseman Ewing appeared to tag out Farrar, "in spite of Ewing's deliberate movements with his heavily gloved hands." New York Tribune June 15, 1887 [from David Aricidiacono]

Source Detroit Free Press, New York Tribune
Submitted by Richard Hershberger

cutting the ball, Cutting the ball

Date Error: Invalid time.
Text

The Providence players allege that one of the Clevelands cut the ball in a recent game, so as to get a new one, thinking thereby to hit Bradley easier, as the latter can do more with a soft ball than a hard one. The Clevelands stoutly deny this, and say the ball was cut by their opponents.

,

When Holbert was last in town he told a story...about Tom Deasley, the truth of which is been gravely suspected. Here it is in Holbert's own words: “In 1886, you know, when Deasley was with New York he would catch a game occasionally. It has noticed that a new ball would have to be put in play after every half inning that Tom would catch. The old ball would be completely torn to pieces. It would be as soft as jelly and the covering would be torn up and ripped and full of holes. The thing got to be very expensive you know that they began to look into it and in one game the umpires, (I don't remember who he was) got an idea that he would look at Tom's glove. When he went to get the glove it was nowhere to be found. The next time New York went out he stopped play and examined Deasley's glove, but it was the regulation mitten and all right. Well nobody could account for the way the ball got beaten up and finally the umpire noticed in a later inning that Deasley always kept the palm of his hand away and he walked up to him and made him show up the glove. This he did after some talk and what do you think the glove was? Can't imagine, eh? Well, sir, it had a piece of sheet lead on it for a palm, with dull-pointed steel spikes on it that Tome had put on it—what, don't you believe it? Well, ask Tom.” St.

Source New York Clipper, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Submitted by Richard Hershberger
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