Block:English Baseball 1870s

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English Baseball 1870s (73 entries)

Contents

English Baseball in West Sussex on July 26 1870

Block Game English Baseball
Date Tuesday, July 26, 1870
Location West Sussex
Data

“Base ball” was named in a display advertisement as one of the entertainments available to those visiting the Chinese Gardens, a public attraction located in Hurstpierpoint, a village in West Sussex. The ad highlighted a number of amusements for visitors, including boating, fishing, archery, bowls, croquet, skittles, and lawn billiards. Additionally, “Trap, Quoits, Giant's Stride, Base Ball, Boat, Plank and other Swings” were available.”

Sources

Surrey Gazette, July 26, p. 1

English Baseball in Suffolk on August 13 1870

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 13, 1870
Location Suffolk
Data

A newspaper reported that "baseball" was one of the amusements enjoyed at the annual fete of the Mutual Improvement Society in Framlingham, Suffolk: "From the lawn in front of the house is a beautiful slope, studded with trees, and well adapted for fetes and pic-nics, and when enlivened with flags, marquees, and nearly a thousand persons engaged in various sports, of croquet, quoits, baseball, cricket, football, and youngsters swinging under the shady branches of the trees, formed a beautiful picture of English enjoyment on a gala day."

Sources

Ipswich Journal, Aug. 13, 1870, p. 5

English Baseball in London in 1871

Block Game English Baseball
Date 1871
Location London
Data

"Base-ball" was mentioned in a story entitled "Along Fleet Street" that appeared in a children's magazine: "Arthur wanted to know where the old Fleet Prison used to stand, and if it was the veritable place where Mr. Pickwick went to, and if it wasn't where he met Mr. Jingle, and whether people did not play racquet and base-ball there, and pay for their own lodgings, etc."

Notes

This suggestion that baseball is mentioned in The Pickwick Papers is a somewhat creative leap. The text of Dicken's novel mentions that an open area within the Fleet Street prison served as an impromptu 'racket ground', and describes: "…a number of persons…playing at ball with some adventurous throwers outside, others looking on at the racket-players, or watching the boys as they cried the game." The "playing at ball" reference is a bit ambiguous, but more likely was meant to indicate rackets rather than baseball.

Sources

"Along Fleet Street," by "Old Merry," appearing in "Merry & Wise: An Illustrated Monthly Magazine for Young People," London, April, 1871, p. 245

English Baseball in Berkshire, Oxfordshire on March 8 1871

Block Game English Baseball
Date Wednesday, March 8, 1871
Location Berkshire, Oxfordshire
Data

A writer recalled observing "bass-ball" being played a half-century earlier in the Kine Croft Hills near Wallingford, Berkshire, as he described in a newspaper column under the heading “Rambles in Wallingford.” He wrote: "Games also were annually held here on Mayday, and many a comely and buxom girl have I witnessed on such occasions vigorously throwing the bass-ball to a fellow maiden near her, and all were full of frolic. This latter game I have discovered is nearly, if not completely, gone out of fashion now about here which is to be deplored, as I am one who would willingly see a revival of such like harmless sports."

Notes

This column originally appeared in the Abington and Reading Herald (date unknown). The author, William Allnatt, later included the text of this column in a book entitled Rambles in the Neighbourhood of Wallingford, published in Wallingford in 1873 (S. Bradford). The town of Wallingford was transferred from Berkshire to Oxfordshire in 1974.

Sources

Oxfordshire Weekly News (Chipping Norton), March 8, 1871, p. 3

English Baseball in Buckinghamshire on June 24 1871

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, June 24, 1871
Location Buckinghamshire
Data

Games, including “base ball” were enjoyed by children attending the Wesleyan Sunday School of Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, at a summer outing. A newspaper reported that “upwards of 200 children and 30 teachers sat down to as many good things as in 30 minutes satiated, and after, notwithstanding falling showers, every one had (by fatigue in running matches, foot ball, base ball, cricket, twos and threes, French tag, and other games) fully gratified their appetites.”

Sources

Bucks Chronicle and Bucks Gazette, June 24, 1871, p. 3

English Baseball in Kent on July 8 1871

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, July 8, 1871
Location Kent
Data

“Base ball” was one of the games played at the annual “ragged” treat for children attending the the evening and Sunday schools held at Lower Waterside in the town of Dartford, Kent. According to a newspaper report, the children were first treated to a “substantial tea.” This was followed by a procession to a meadow “where balls and other articles connected with juvenile sport were distributed. Soon the meadow became an animated scene of enjoyment, the children, nearly without exception, being dressed in so smart a manner, that one could scarcely realise the fact of a 'ragged' school treat.” Following a pause for a musical program, “toys were plentifully distributed, and cricket, base ball, and other games enjoyed, till between eight and nine o'clock when the fete terminated.”

Sources

Gravesend Reporter, North Kent and South Essex Advertiser, July 8, 1871, p. 5

English Baseball in Norfolk on July 29 1871

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, July 29, 1871
Location Norfolk
Data

“Base” was played at an excursion to Coldham Hall, a grand country house, by workmen in the employ of Mr. Welton, a coach builder in Norwich, Norfolk. A newspaper mentioned that “After spending a most agreeable day at cricket, base, and other sports, they say down to a well-spread table furnished by Mr. Welton.”

Notes

“Base” was almost certainly baseball in this context, as it was a common alternate designation in East Anglia.

Sources

Norfolk News, July 29, 1871, p. 7

English Baseball in Suffolk on August 5 1871

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 5, 1871
Location Suffolk
Data

“Basteball” was identified as one of the amusements offered to students of the Wesleyan Reform Sabbath School of Framlingham, Suffolk, at their annual treat. A newspaper reported that “the afternoon was passed in various outdoor games, viz., cricket, trap-ball, swinging, croquet, up-and-down, basteball, racing, kissing-in-the-ring, &c. &c.”

Sources

Framlingham Weekly News, Aug. 5, 1871, p. 4

English Baseball in Suffolk on September 16 1871

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, September 16, 1871
Location Suffolk
Data

"Basteball" was listed as one of the games played at the annual treat of the Church Day and Sunday Schools of Easton, Suffolk (near Framlingham): "Having mustered, they marched in procession to The Rookery, the residence of Rev. W.W. Wood, the rector, where they passed the time in various games, such as racing, jumping, basteball, &c., the winners being presented with appropriate toys as prizes."

Sources

Framlingham Weekly News, Sept. 16, 1871, p. 4

English Baseball in Hampshire on April 3 1872

Block Game English Baseball
Date Wednesday, April 3, 1872
Location Hampshire
Data

A newspaper reported that "base" was played on the Isle of Wight during the Easter holidays: "…the youthful part of the inhabitants betook themselves to the Recreation Ground, where two or three swings were erected, and cricket, base, trap, &c. were fully enjoyed by scores of youths."

Notes

It is likely that "base" in this instance refers to baseball, as the game of prisoners' base had somewhat faded in popularity by this date. Also, the writer was consistent in not appending the word "ball" to either "base" or "trap."

Sources

Hampshire Advertiser, April 3, 1872, p. 3

English Baseball in Suffolk on August 10 1872

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 10, 1872
Location Suffolk
Data

"Baste ball" was played at another annual treat of the Church Sunday School, presumably of Easton, who this year joined with the "Sir R. Hitcham's Scholars of Framlingham and Saxtead." A newspaper reported that: "The Saxtead scholars, between 40 and 50 in number, were conveyed in waggons (sic) to Framlingham, and the united schools mustered to the number of about 250 on the Rectory Grounds at 2 o'clock, when the boys dispersed for cricket and racing, and the girls for kissing in the ring; baste ball, &c."

Notes

Although this report does not indicate that the church school was located in Easton, it seems likely it is the same as from the above entry.

Sources

Ipswich Journal, Aug. 10, 1872, p. 7

English Baseball in Buckinghamshire on August 17 1872

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 17, 1872
Location Buckinghamshire
Data

“Bass ball” was among the amusements enjoyed by children attending the Congregational Sabbath Schools of Buckingham, Buckinghamshire, at their annual treat. The local newspaper reported that “During the afternoon games consisted of croquet, cricket, foot ball, bass ball, were entered into with great spirit, and at five o'clock the children were regaled with tea current cake, buns, &c. &c.”

Sources

Buckingham Express, Aug. 17, 1872, p. 5

English Baseball in London, Normandy on March 29 1873

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, March 29, 1873
Location London, Normandy
Data

“Baste ball” was included among a list of “Ye anciente sports of Albion” by the writer of a newspaper column entitled “Here and There” who was musing on the reactions of people in the London district of Putney to crews of rowers practicing on the Thames. In an aside, the author wrote: “I remember once seeing a rowing match in Harfleur (a seacoast town in Normandy). There are not many English people who stay at Harfleur, but those who do have innoculated (sic) the natives with Ye anciente sports of Albion. They have taught the Frenchmen to play cricket and even football; they have made the lovers of dominoes leave the café and dance the fandango known as 'baste-ball;' they have educated them into tip-cat, and, in fact, every other game except ring-taw...”

Sources

South London Chronicle, March 29, 1873, p.2

English Baseball in Berkshire on August 16 1873

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 16, 1873
Location Berkshire
Data

“Base ball” was among the games enjoyed by students of the Greenham School of Greenham, Berkshire, together with the Newbury Workhouse children, at their annual treat. According to a regional newspaper “there were amusements consisting of swings, cricket, base ball, bobbing for sweets in flour bags, &c.”

Sources

Reading Observer, Aug. 16, 1873, p. 4

English Baseball in West Yorkshire on August 21 1873

Block Game English Baseball
Date Thursday, August 21, 1873
Location West Yorkshire
Data

That "baseball" was original to England was mentioned in a somewhat condescending newspaper article discussing the prospects of cricket taking hold in the United States: "Wherever an Englishman has 'put his foot down,' either as an abiding colonist or a temporary resident, there has cricket grown up and flourished. Causes not altogether removed from the domain of politics of the White House have militated against the spread of the game amongst the mixed races of the United States. It has been gravely stated by an influential Yankee journalist that cricket, being the pet diversion of an 'effete British aristocracy,' will never do for America! Baseball (the British original of which may be seen in operation on the nearest and most juvenile playground) is in his opinion the most appropriate game for a go-ahead people"

Sources

Huddersfield Chronicle, Aug. 21, 1873

English Baseball in Essex on August 7 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, August 7, 1874
Location Essex
Data

"Baseball" and rounders were both played at the annual picnic of the Epping church and Town Hall choirs, held on the grounds of a manor house in Epping Forest, Essex. At first, the festivities appeared to be at risk because of a heavy thunderstorm, but it soon cleared. "The storm over, the 'call' sounded, and the enjoyments of the party began in earnest, with various sports, such as cricket, rounders, baseball, egg in hat, paper chases, &c., interspersed with songs, 'March of the men of Harlech,' 'Rule Britannia,' 'God bless the Prince of Wales,' &c., concluding with 'God save the Queen.'"

Notes

This is one of the few examples of English baseball and rounders being played side by side, supporting the contention they were two distinct games.

Sources

Chelmsford Chronicle, Aug. 7, 1874, p. 2

English Baseball in London on August 13 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Thursday, August 13, 1874
Location London
Data

Under the heading of "Base-Ball," The Times of London published a letter to the editor from someone identified only as "Grandmother" at the time of the 1874 tour: "Sir,--Some American athletes are trying to introduce to us their game of base-ball, as if it were a novelty; whereas the fact is that it is an ancient English game, long ago discarded in favour of cricket. In a letter of the celebrated Mary Lepel, Lady Hervey, written in 1748, the family of Frederick, Prince of Wales, are described as 'diverting themselves with base-ball, a play all who are or have been schoolboys are well acquainted with'."

Notes

Almost all of the many British newspaper accounts of the 1874 tour of American baseball players stated that the game was an elaborated form of rounders. This is one of the few that recognized baseball as being originally English. "Grandmother," however, was exaggerating a bit about the game being "ancient," and it seems she was unaware that it was still being played.

Sources

The Times (London), Aug. 13, 1874, p. 10

English Baseball in London/Suffolk on August 13 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Thursday, August 13, 1874
Location London/Suffolk
Data

On the same day as above, a letter entitled "The Game of Base Ball" appeared in another London paper: "Sir,--The notoriety recently acquired by our Transatlantic cousins in connection with the above game...(has) led to the belief on the part of many... that the game owes its origin to America...It may inform some and remind others that base ball is thoroughly English, and during the 16th century occupied a foremost place in the list of our national sports. It is alluded to by Shakespeare and other writers as an old rustic game, and was an indispensable accompaniment to the amusements provided for the festive May-day gatherings on village greens during the reign of the Merrie Monarch and...his successors...However, the game of base ball gradually lost its patrons, and is now known to a comparative few. The knowledge of the game...lingers chiefly in our most remote rural districts, including some villages in the county of Suffolk, where, more than thirty years since, it was a common game between the lads and lasses...In Cambridgeshire it is known by the name 'Tut'."

Notes

Another rare recognition that baseball was originally English. Likely the writer was wrong about English baseball dating from the 16th century—confusing it with prisoner's base as have many since—but was unusually well informed in knowing that the game was still being played in rural districts, including Suffolk. This letter is also the only known historical source to equate English baseball and tut-ball, and by locating the latter game in Cambridgeshire expands southward the territory where it was known to be played. Interestingly, the day after this letter was published, a short article appeared in a Yorkshire newspaper, the Bradford Observer, in which the writer appeared to have merged the contents of this letter with the letter in The Times from “Grandmother.” The Yorkshire article lifted whole phrases from this letter, such as the stuff about the 16th century and the Merrie Monarch, as well as the Lady Hervey quotation from The Times' letter.

Sources

Daily News (London), Aug. 13, 1874, p. 3

English Baseball in North Yorkshire on August 18 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Tuesday, August 18, 1874
Location North Yorkshire
Data

"Base-ball," according to a newspaper article, was a traditional Yorkshire game. "Base-ball, which the American's claim to be their national sport, is known to every inhabitant of the North Riding of Yorkshire and to most of the North of England as a game in which both sexes enjoyed on the old holidays---Easter Monday, Shrove Tuesday, and others. Some of the rules are slightly altered, the most important is the striker; the originals strike the ball with the hands, the Americans with a mallet. As regards the Bases which give the American name to the game the Yorkshire people call them the holds, signifying the stoping (sic) places, what the American's (sic) call their bowler, was called by us the potcher (sic), who stood nearer to the striker than the American's (sic) do, doing the American's (sic) wicket keeper part also. The Yorkshire party was all out with the first person, the American's (sic) with the third. All the other rules are the same."

Notes

Among the several newspaper notices at the time of the American players' tour claiming baseball to be English in origin, this one is unique in asserting the game to be a product of Yorkshire and other northern counties. It is also distinctive in comparing rule differences between the English and American versions of baseball, and provides additional evidence that English baseball batters struck the ball with their bare hands.

Sources

The York Herald, Aug. 18, 1874, p. 8

English Baseball in Buckinghamshire on August 22 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 22, 1874
Location Buckinghamshire
Data

A newspaper reported "base ball" being played at the annual treat of the Church Sunday Schools of West Wycombe, Buckinghamshire: "The…children…, forming in procession to the number of 120…, proceeded round the hill and through the village to the vicarage grounds, where they soon dispersed: the boys to cricket, and the girls to swinging, base ball, and other amusements."

Sources

Bucks Herald, Aug. 22, 1874, p. 6

English Baseball in London on August 22 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 22, 1874
Location London
Data

“Base-ball” was played in the 16th century according to the writer of a letter published in a London-based sporting newspaper who was taking exception to the viewpoint that the game currently being showed off by visiting American players was something original. Under the heading “The Game of Base-ball,” the writer, Mr. J.C. Reed, expressed the following: “The notoriety recently acquired by our Transatlantic cousins in connection with the above game...[has] led to the belief on the part of many... that the game owes its origin to America...It may inform some and remind others that base ball is thoroughly English, and during the 16th century occupied a foremost place in the list of our national sports. It is alluded to by Shakespeare and other(s) as an old rustic game, and was an indispensable accompaniment to the amusements provided for the festive May-day gatherings on village greens during the reign of the Merrie Monarch and...his successors...However, the game of base ball gradually lost its patrons, and is now known to a comparative few. The knowledge of the game...lingers chiefly in our most remote rural districts, including some villages in the county of Suffolk, where, more than thirty years since, it was a common game between the lads and lasses...I have no desire to depreciate the ability and skill of the Americans in playing this game, being only anxious to remove the prevailing impression that it is an importation from another country.”

Notes

Mr. Reed was incorrect in placing baseball in the 16th century and in claiming Shakespeare alluded to it. He most likely was confusing baseball with prisoners base.

Sources

Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News, Aug. 22, 1874, p. 23

English Baseball in London on August 22 1874 (2)

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 22, 1874
Location London
Data

Water "base ball" was highlighted in a London front-page newspaper advertisement promoting an upcoming swimming competition: "CRYSTAL PALACE.-- Great Swimming Fete and Competition, Monday next, Aug. 24 at four o'clock. Swimming Races 100, 200, 400 yards, and one mile. Aquatic Steeple-chases. Water Base Ball. Pole Walking. Exhibitions of Ornamental Swimming by Professor Beckwith and others."

Sources

Morning Post (London), Aug. 22, 1874, p. 1

English Baseball in Buckinghamshire on August 29 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 29, 1874
Location Buckinghamshire
Data

“Base ball” was the subject of a brief news squib in the Barnsley (Yorkshire) Independent, in which the paper reported that “English ladies have taken to playing the American base ball game. Eleven ladies of the parish of Nash, Buckinghamshire, have beaten a similar team from Great Harwood, by 115 against 86 runs and an innings to spare.”

Notes

This curious report undoubtedly reflects the writer's confusion, but also may reveal important details. It is improbable that a group of women in Bucks would be playing American-style baseball in 1874, even taking into account that the English tour of American professional ball players had just concluded. Bucks was among the English counties associated with the indigenous form of the game. The author mentioning eleven players to a side, and use of the term “runs” as a measure of scoring, are significant indicators about the game in that place at that time, assuming the writer wasn't confused about those as well.

Sources

Barnsley Independent, Aug. 29, 1874, p. 6

English Baseball in London/Suffolk on August 29 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 29, 1874
Location London/Suffolk
Data

"Base ball" was lampooned in Punch Magazine in the form of a mock letter, purportedly written by a Suffolk villager, that derides Londoners for gullibly accepting American baseball as a novelty, and not recognizing it as a traditional Suffolk game. The letter is written in a highly exaggerated country dialect: "I'm night furty year oad, and I ha' plaed base ball, man and boy, for more un thirty-five year, as any o' yar folks up there could hev sen if tha'd ha come to our village--or fur the matter o' that, to furty other villages hereabouts--any evenin' a summer time." It goes on to explain how the game was played in Suffolk, an account that is, in some aspects, plausible.

Notes

Given the energetic effort to make fun of both the touring American baseball players and the way Londoners received them, it is hard to know how much credence to give Punch's description of Suffolk baseball. It may be that the writer, who was undoubtedly a London-based contributor to Punch, if not a staff person, had some knowledge of Suffolk baseball, although it is also possible that he simply invented a rustic version of the American game. The description makes no mention of soaking, which would have been part of Suffolk baseball, but does suggest that the striker could use a bare hand. This, coupled with the unusual awareness that English baseball was still played in Suffolk, gives the piece a touch of credibility.

Sources

Punch (London), Aug. 29, 1874, p. 86

English Baseball in Essex on September 11 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, September 11, 1874
Location Essex
Data

A newspaper reported that "base ball" was one of the amusements engaged in at a festival celebrating the 15th anniversary of the Brentwood Court of Unity of the Ancient Order of Foresters held at Brentwood in Essex: "…the members then formed in front of Town Hall and marched in procession to a field at the rear of the Lion and Lamb, lent by the landlord, where, joined by their wives, sweethearts, and friends, they engaged in cricket, quoits, base ball, Aunt Sally, kiss-in-the-ring, and other amusements..."

Sources

Chelmsford Chronicle, Sept. 11, 1874, p. 6

English Baseball in Suffolk on September 12 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, September 12, 1874
Location Suffolk
Data

“Base-ball” was one of the games played at the annual treat for children and teachers of the Sabbath School connected with the Wesleyan Methodists of Framlington, Suffolk. According to a newspaper report, after waiting out a rainstorm “the afternoon was then uninterruptedly spent in various games of cricket, base-ball, racing, scrambling, &c., but swinging was the favourite amusement.”

Sources

Framlingham Weekly News, Sept. 12, 1874, p. 4

English Baseball in West Yorkshire on September 15 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Tuesday, September 15, 1874
Location West Yorkshire
Data

A "game of base ball" was identified in a newspaper account as one of the events competed for at a swimming fete held at the Dewsbury Corporation Baths in Dewsbury, West Yorkshire. Little more was written about it except to provide the name of the winner (an individual), and to describe it as "a game of base ball in the water."

Notes

The precise nature of this "base ball" is far from clear, especially given that the winner was identified as an individual and not a team.

Sources

Huddersfield Chronicle, Sept. 15, 1874

English Baseball in Liverpool on September 21 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Monday, September 21, 1874
Location Liverpool
Data

A report in a newspaper advised that "base-ball" would be one of the many entertainments offered at the coming week's Stanley Hospital Fete, a major fundraising event to be held in conjunction with a royal visit to Liverpool: "There are to be balloon ascents every day by the noted aeronauts Messrs. Yonens and Son; dramatic performances by the cream of local theatrical companies; the inevitable Richardson's Show; athletic sports; old English sports; base-ball and polo matches; pony hurdle races; a bazaar on a large scale; pyrotechnic displays, &c., &c."

Notes

It is not certain whether the base-ball matches planned for the fete were to be English baseball, as the game was not known to be played in Merseyside and the touring American players had visited the area seven weeks earlier.

Sources

Liverpool Mercury, Sept. 21, 1874, p. 6

English Baseball in London/Brussels on September 22 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Tuesday, September 22, 1874
Location London/Brussels
Data

"Base-ball," according to a newspaper report, was apparently one of the amusements scheduled to be played in Brussels at the Belgian National Fetes, a huge celebration of that nation's 44th anniversary of independence: "The Royal Museum of Painting, Armoury, and Natural History, and Wiertx Gallery, the Agricultural and Horticultural Exhibition, and the Exhibition of the Linnaean Society of Brussels, will be open gratuitously; whilst the communal administration have organised meetings for archery, crossbows, base-ball, nine pins, and quoits, open to all the world."

Notes

It is quite unexpected that baseball of any sort would be played at a Belgian festival at such an early date; it is at least as likely that this would be English baseball as American.

Sources

London Standard, Sept. 22, 1874

English Baseball in London on October 24 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, October 24, 1874
Location London
Data

"Base-ball" was mentioned in a long newspaper article discussing the impact of a decision by the directors of the Midland Railway Company to eliminate certain classes of rail travel. The article delved into the social impact of such a change, how rich people and poor people would be compelled to seat together, and lamented how rail travel, though practical, lacked the aesthetics of the open road and made it more difficult for travelers to seek exercise: "It is useless, however, to sigh after the departed past, and the only thing that can be done is to bring manly amusements more within the reach of the people of great cities...No one will walk from London to Newcastle to practise his trade there, and gather knowledge of life and manliness of character on the way, when he can go third class. There seems no reason, however, why such pastimes as are popular in certain parts of England--cricket in Yorkshire and Notts, and base-ball in some of the southern counties--should be beyond the reach of young men in our large towns."

Notes

The words "from the Daily News" appear at the top of the article, but further down, in an open space between paragraphs, appears the seemingly contradictory words: "from the Saturday Review." Both of these newspapers were based in London. I tried to determine which of these statements was true, but could not locate the article in either one of the papers. Also of note, this article suggests that English base-ball was a manly sport for young men, which is not how it was typically portrayed.

Sources

Alnwick Mercury (Northumberland), Oct. 24, 1874, p. 3

English Baseball in London on November 20 1874

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, November 20, 1874
Location London
Data

The subject of "base-ball" came up in a London newspaper article that discussed how certain words that are assumed be Americanisms were actually derived from other languages, or were imported English provincialisms: "These terms flourish on American soil, till their use is taken for a sign of American nationality, just as the old English game of base-ball met us this summer with a new face as a native Transatlantic institution."

Notes

One more of the few examples of a Briton pointing out that baseball--in the wake of the tour of American players--was originally English.

Sources

Daily News (London), Nov. 20, 1874, p. 5

English Baseball in London in 1875

Block Game English Baseball
Date 1875
Location London
Data

A children's book, Jolly Games for Happy Homes, includes two separate game descriptions, one of "base ball" (two words), and one of "base-ball" (hyphenated). The first, on page 110, begins: "This is a healthy exercise and a never-tiring game." After explaining how to choose which team is "in" and which "out," it continues: "The party who is "out" throws the ball, which the one who is "in" receives "in" her hand as if it were a bat, bats it away and starts for the first base, or station. The garden or field has previously been divided into bases or stations, duly marked at convenient distances. The business of the followers of the leader who is "out" is to...catch up the ball...and hit the runner with it as she passes from base to base. If she is so hit she is "out." The second description, of "base-ball," on pages 247-248, appears to be modeled on the rounders page from The Boy's Own Book of 1828, but also makes clear that the players are girls and that the ball is struck by hand.

Notes

The book's publication date is not indicated, but its title was mentioned in an article on "gift books" that appeared in the London Standard newspaper dated Jan. 7, 1876, suggesting that it was likely in print prior to the end of 1875. It is unknown why the author chose to include two separate descriptions of baseball. The two are clearly the work of different writers, but agree on most particulars. They are the only two known descriptions of English baseball other than the German one published in 1796 by Gutsmuths.

Sources

Jolly Games for Happy Homes, by Georgiana C. Clark, London, 1875 (est.), Dean & Son., pp. 110, 247-248

English Baseball in Hampshire on June 21 1875

Block Game English Baseball
Date Monday, June 21, 1875
Location Hampshire
Data

“Base ball” was named in a newspaper story submitted by a London journalist visiting the British Army training base at Aldershot in Hampshire. The article delved into the daily routine of the militiamen who were bivouacked there, and lauded their high level of fitness. “They would achieve a march of twenty miles, if called upon, without difficulty; their litheness after a long drill tells you of their strength; they are ready to furbish their arms, boil their camp-kettle, or play at base-ball—a favourite game in camp—after they have been for two or three hours under arms and in constant movement, as though they had done nothing at all during the day, and play was their only employment.”

Notes

Identifying baseball as a “favourite game” of the soldiers raises a question of whether this would be the original Engish game or the American version, although there are no specific indicators pointing to the latter.

Sources

Daily Telegraph (London), June 21, 1875

English Baseball in London on June 26 1875

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, June 26, 1875
Location London
Data

A "base-ball" game was part of the program at the opening of the new Brixton and Clapham Swimming Bath in London. Following an exhibition by Captain Boynton of "the lifesaving suit in which he braves alike Channel waves or the stormy Atlantic,…the rest of the programme comprised displays of swimming, racing and diving...Harry Parker (swimming master to the establishment) and his youthful sister went through their wonderful feats, and much amusement was created by a game of base-ball between members of the North London Club."

Notes

This baseball game almost certainly was played in the water.

Sources

Bell's Life in London and Sporting Chronicle, June 26, 1875, p.3

English Baseball in Hertfordshire on July 3 1875

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, July 3, 1875
Location Hertfordshire
Data

A “base-ball” and a horse were at the heart of a violent dispute between two women whose respective children, a boy and a girl, had themselves gotten into a physical argument. One of the mothers took the other to court, and according to a newspaper report on the proceedings, the complainant said “that her child and the defendant's were playing at base-ball together, when the ball got under a horse's foot and was burst.” The girl then struck the boy, claiming he had thrown the ball under the horse deliberately, the boy complained to his mother, and both mothers then got into a violent fight.

Sources

Herts Advertiser, July 3, 1875, p. 6

English Baseball in Norfolk on July 10 1875

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, July 10, 1875
Location Norfolk
Data

The game of “base” (almost certainly baseball) was among the pastimes enjoyed by the City Norwich Lodge of the Independent Order of Good Templars on outing to celebrate its second anniversary. After boating down a river in a steam boat, the group landed in Whitlingham and, according to a newspaper report, “enjoyed themselves at cricket, trap-ball, base and other amusements.”

Sources

Norwich Mercury, July 10, 1875, p. 5

English Baseball in Buckinghamshire on July 31 1875

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, July 31, 1875
Location Buckinghamshire
Data

“Bass ball” was among a selection of games played at the annual Parochial Schools Festival held in the town of Chesham, Buckinghamshire. According to a newspaper report, “a great variety of amusements had been provided for the children, and also for the public, including pony and donkey riding, a merry-go-round, toy stalls, swings, and various races, both for boys and girls, the successful competitors receiving a number of useful articles.” In the evening “there were groups engaged at bass ball, drop glove, bat and trap, cricket, and many other similar sports.”

Sources

Bucks Herald, July 31, 1875, p. 6

English Baseball in Cambridgeshire on August 7 1875

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 7, 1875
Location Cambridgeshire
Data

“Baseball” was among the entertainments enjoyed by children attending the Trinity Church Sunday School of Huntingdon (Cambridgeshire) and those from other schools in surrounding villages at a Sunday School Festival. A newspaper reported that “they dispersed to indulge in the games that had been provided for them in such variety; croquet and baseball parties in one place, cricketing in another, football, bat-and-trap, and swings such as delighted the hearts of the younger children, and not a few of the older ones.”

Sources

Cambridge Independent Press, Aug. 7, 1875, p. 4

English Baseball in Cambridgeshire on August 14 1875

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 14, 1875
Location Cambridgeshire
Data

“Base ball” was among the amusements enjoyed by children attending the Church Schools Festival in the town of St. Neots, Cambridgeshire. A newspaper reported that “after partaking of tea, etc., the youngsters dispersed themselves over the grounds, where every provision had been made for their enjoyment in the shape of swings, base ball, &c., which were patronized with the utmost zest.”

Sources

St. Neots Chronicle and Advertiser, Aug. 14, 1875, p. 1

English Baseball in Herts/Bedfordshire on August 21 1875

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 21, 1875
Location Herts/Bedfordshire
Data

A newspaper reported that "base ball" was one of the games played at the annual outing of the Lea Lodge of Good Templars. The lodge was located in Luton, Bedfordshire, but the outing took place in a small village called Aubray that can no longer be located, but was in the vicinity of Ashridge House in Hertfordshire: "After tea, various games, including croquet, base-ball, &c., were indulged in, and the excursionists left Aubray for their return home at 8 o'clock."

Sources

Luton Times and Advertiser, Aug. 21, 1875, p. 4

English Baseball in Essex, London on September 8 1875

Block Game English Baseball
Date Wednesday, September 8, 1875
Location Essex, London
Data

“Base-ball” was among the games played at the annual treat of the Congregational Church Sunday School of Little Ilford, Essex: “Upwards of 100 children were regaled with a substantial tea. During the afternoon and evening a variety of amusing games were indulged in, including cricket, base-ball, swinging croquet, football, &c.”

Notes

At various times located in the administrative districts of West Ham and East Ham, which at the time were incorporated into Essex, Little Ilford is now considered part of Greater London.

Sources

Stratford Times and Bow and Bromley News, Sept. 8, 1875, p. 8

English Baseball in Worcestershire, Monmouthshire on September 25 1875

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, September 25, 1875
Location Worcestershire, Monmouthshire
Data

“Base-ball” was among the games played by family, friends and members of the Hanbury Volunteer Corps. of Hanbury, Worcestershire during their daylong excursion to historic Raglan Castle, located some 63 miles distant in Monmouthshire, Wales. After the party arrived at the castle and the nearby village, a newspaper reported that “some went to inspect and admire the ruins, others to play at foot-ball and enjoy themselves in a variety of ways, such as base-ball, fencing, &c.”

Sources

Pontypool Free Press and Herald of the Hills (Monmouthshire, Wales), Sept. 25, 1875, p. 4

English Baseball in London on March 25 1876

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, March 25, 1876
Location London
Data

It was announced that a "base ball" match would comprise part of the season-opening entertainment at another London swimming pool, this time the Paddington Public Baths, Queens-Road, Bayswater. According to a newspaper notice, a series of swimming races would be held for prizes, and "Professor Whyte and Son will give their unrivaled exhibition. Diving for plates, Siamese twin race, Base Ball Match by members of the North London Swimming Club," and other attractions would complete the program.

Notes

Again, this would have been a water baseball game.

Sources

Bell's Life in London and Sporting Chronicle, March 25, 1876, p.5

English Baseball in London on July 7 1876

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, July 7, 1876
Location London
Data

"Base ball" was mentioned by a newspaper gossip columnist who was protesting the threatened enclosure of Plumstead Common located in the Royal Borough of Greenwich in South London. The writer was describing some of the features of the common and the people who frequent it: "Then come the apple, nut and gingerbread women, who sit out the whole day long, insensible to wind and weather, careless of who wins or who loses at quoits, cricket or base ball, every one of which games are being briskly pursued around, so long as the players need the refreshment their little stalls can offer."

Notes

This column was a reprint. It is entitled "London Gossip," and was attributed to "the Lady Correspondent of the Evening Telegraph." At the time, the only newspaper in the British Isles bearing the name “Evening Telegraph” was also published in Dublin.

Sources

Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin), July 7, 1876, p. 7

English Baseball in Buckinghamshire on July 15 1876

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, July 15, 1876
Location Buckinghamshire
Data

It was reported that "bass ball" was one of the pastimes offered at the annual festival of the Sunday Schools belonging to the Nonconforming bodies of Chesham, Buckinghamshire, a gathering of 900 children in all. "The weather was delightfully fine, and in the evening the number of visitors continued to increase. Games at cricket, bass ball, pony riding, swings, and the various other pastimes usual on such occasions were kept up with spirit till the shades of evening compelled them to relinquish them."

Sources

Bucks Herald, July 15, 1876, p. 6

English Baseball in Herts on July 22 1876

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, July 22, 1876
Location Herts
Data

“Base-ball” was among the enjoyments offered to the older children attending the Church Sunday School of Boxmoor, Hertfordshire, at their annual treat held on the grounds of the nearby stately home of Ashridge Park. A newspaper reported that the students traveled to the estate by wagon, and a tea was provided to them at four o'clock. “The amusements of the day were swinging, base-ball, bat and trap, cricket, French tag, etc., but the chief attraction was ascending the monument.”

Notes

The monument referred to is a tower on the estate built in 1832 in memory of Francis Egerton, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. It is 108 feet tall, with 172 steps inside.

Sources

Hemel Hempstead Gazette and West Herts Advertiser, July 22, 1876, p. 4

English Baseball in East Sussex on July 22 1876

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, July 22, 1876
Location East Sussex
Data

"Base-ball" was one of the pastimes enjoyed by members of the Wellington Square Chapel choir of Hastings, East Sussex, at their annual outing held at Little Park Farm in Battle, East Sussex. Battle is so named because it was the site of the Battle of Hastings. "A capital meat tea was provided, and was partaken in real pic-nic style on the grass. After tea various games were indulged in---cricket, base-ball, French-tag, &c."

Sources

Hastings and St Leonards Observer, July 22, 1876, p.5

English Baseball in Buckinghamshire on August 26 1876

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 26, 1876
Location Buckinghamshire
Data

"Base ball" was among the games played at the annual fete for the benefit of the Literary Institute held in West Wycombe Park, Buckinghamshire. The newspaper reporter writing about the event was not impressed: "Except for a cricket match between the employees in Messrs. North's factory, West Wycombe, and Messrs. Hutchinson's, High Wycombe, in which the former were victorious, with five wickets to fall, and the usual rural games of base ball, swinging, kiss-in-the-ring, &c., there was nothing provided to attract visitors. The day also turned out showery, which kept many away."

Sources

Bucks Herald, Aug. 26, 1876, p. 8

English Baseball in Suffolk on October 7 1876

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, October 7, 1876
Location Suffolk
Data

“Basteball” was among the amusements enjoyed by children of the Free Methodist Sabbath School of Framlingham, Suffolk, at their annual treat. A local newspaper reported that “the afternoon was happily passed in swinging, cricket, basteball, racing, trap-ball, and other sports.”

Sources

Framlingham Weekly News, Oct. 7, 1876, p. 4

English Baseball in Berkshire on January 31 1877

Block Game English Baseball
Date Wednesday, January 31, 1877
Location Berkshire
Data

A location called the “Base-ball Pit” in the village of Cookham, Berkshire, was where a man named William Brothers hanged himself from a tree. A newspaper reported that the body was found suspended by a cord from the branch of a tree by a ploughboy named Harry Willis. Apparently, the deceased had been recently depressed.

Notes

It is not clear how the “Base-ball Pit” got its name.

Sources

Maidenhead Advertiser, Jan. 31, 1877, p. 3

English Baseball in Hampshire on April 4 1877

Block Game English Baseball
Date Wednesday, April 4, 1877
Location Hampshire
Data

"Base" was identified as one of the amusements enjoyed by people vacationing on the Isle of Wight on the Easter Monday bank holiday: "The attractions here, except the natural beauty of the place, are, however, not many. Some preferred the Green, with the beautiful beach at its foot. Others, beat on what they considered merrier scenes, visited the recreation ground, where cricket, base, trap, rounders, swings, and the varied paraphernalia of the now almost forgotten fairs, were in existence to the enjoyment of hundreds, some of whom wended their way up to the ground at a very early hour.”

Notes

This mention of "base" was almost certainly a reference to baseball, as was a similar mention five years earlier in the same locale on the same holiday. Also, the appearance of English baseball and rounders side-by-side is unusual, but confirms they were two separate games.

Sources

Hampshire Advertiser, April 4, 1877, p. 3

English Baseball in East Sussex on July 10 1877

Block Game English Baseball
Date Tuesday, July 10, 1877
Location East Sussex
Data

“Base-ball” was the principal game played by students of the Rural Deanery of Hurstpierpoint gathered for their annual prize-giving celebration in the hamlet of Westmeston, East Sussex. A church service and several speeches preceded the awarding of prizes, followed by a substantial tea. According to a newspaper “after the tea had been heartily enjoyed, the children amused themselves (and the older persons present joined in the games) by base-ball, &c.”

Sources

Sussex Agricultural Express, July 10, 1877, P. 3

English Baseball in Berkshire on July 26 1877

Block Game English Baseball
Date Thursday, July 26, 1877
Location Berkshire
Data

“Base-ball” was among the games offered to children of the Union Workhouse of Newbury, Berkshire, at a special treat on the rectory grounds sponsored by the Rector of Newbury. According to newspaper coverage, “A bountiful tea was provided, to which the little folks did ample justice; when swinging, base-ball, merry-go-rounds, and other amusements were indulged in.”

Sources

Newbury Weekly News and General Advertiser, July 26, 1877, p. 4

English Baseball in Suffolk on September 1 1877

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, September 1, 1877
Location Suffolk
Data

“Basteball” was one of the amusements offered at the annual treat for children of the Sabbath School connected with the Congregational Chapel of the town of Framlingham in Suffolk.The local newspaper reported that “the afternoon was passed in various games, such as cricket, swinging, basteball, croquet, scrambling for apples, pears, nuts and sweets.”

Sources

Framlingham Weekly News, Sept. 1, 1877, p. 4

English Baseball in East Sussex on September 1 1877

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, September 1, 1877
Location East Sussex
Data

A newspaper reported that "base-ball" was among the pastimes played by students of the Silverdale School of Hastings, East Sussex, at a treat. After leaving the school and marching "with banners flying" to a meadow, "they were distributed, according to their classes, in detachments, and delighted themselves with all sorts of amusements, such as racing, jumping, base-ball, &c."

Sources

Hastings and St Leonards Observer, Sept. 1, 1877, p.5

English Baseball in Berkshire on May 25 1878

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, May 25, 1878
Location Berkshire
Data

That they were playing "baseball" was the alibi offered by four boys who were accused of damaging a fence in the village of Greenam, Berkshire. A police constable testified, according to a newspaper report of their court hearing, that he caught the defendants running through the fence "where about 20 boys and girls had been pulling down the boughs of trees and shrubs, and getting flowers. Each denied damaging the fence, alleging that it was done by some girls several days before. They themselves were playing baseball." The magistrate said they were among the group that caused the damage and fined them 5 shillings each.

Sources

Reading Mercury, Oxford Gazette, Newbury Herald, and Berks County Paper, may 25, 1878, p. 4

English Baseball in London on June 25 1878

Block Game English Baseball
Date Tuesday, June 25, 1878
Location London
Data

The game of "base-ball" was cited in a London newspaper article discussing the origin of tennis. The author mentioned the theory that the character Nausicaa in Homer's Odyssey was the originator of tennis, but pointed out that Chapman claimed the game she played was stool-ball. The author continued: "The sober critic will admit that Nausicaa played neither tennis, nor stool-ball, but rounders, or base-ball, and that she threw at, and missed, an opponent who was running between bases."

Notes

It would seem the base-ball referred to here was English baseball, given that the ball was being thrown at a runner between bases (soaking), a feature that would not be associated with American baseball by a British writer of the period.

Sources

London Daily News, June 25, 1878, p. 4

English Baseball in London on July 13 1878

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, July 13, 1878
Location London
Data

“Base ball” on horseback was reported to be one of the outdoor amusements contested by members of the Ranelagh Club of southwest London at a club gathering. According to an article in a sporting newspaper, “The members of the Renelagh Club on Tuesday last enjoyed some outdoor sports, consisting of tilting at the ring on polo ponies, base ball on horseback, and military pastimes. The principal competition was tilting at the ring for the ladies' prize, when thirteen members contended the prize, a beautiful silver cup... The base ball was a most interesting feature, especially as the generality of the competitors were renowned horsemen.”

Notes

The Ranelagh Club was formed in 1878 as a split-off from the Hurlingham Club, and by 1894 had become the largest polo club in the world. It is not clear what sort of baseball this horseback game was modeled upon, although the American version was still little known in Britain at that time.

Sources

Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News, July 13, 1878, p. 411

English Baseball in Somerset on August 26 1878

Block Game English Baseball
Date Monday, August 26, 1878
Location Somerset
Data

It was reported that "baseball" was one of the amusements at the annual treat of the parish schools of Clevedon in Somerset: "On arriving at the Vicarage several games were indulged in. About 500 sat down to a substantial tea...The children entered with spirit into the games, consisting of swings, cricket, football, baseball, running, jumping, &c., until evening, when they were marched to the front of the Vicarage-house to receive a bun each from Mrs. Marson."

Sources

Bristol Mercury and Daily Post, Aug. 26, 1878, p. 6

English Baseball in Berkshire on September 12 1878

Block Game English Baseball
Date Thursday, September 12, 1878
Location Berkshire
Data

“Base ball” was one of the amusements enjoyed by teachers, children and friends of the Temperance Hall Baptist Sunday School of Newbury, Berkshire, at their annual outing, a “water party” that commenced with a two-mile barge ride down a canal. After landing at a meadow they were provided a tea, and then, according to a newspaper account, “The cake, &c., formed an industrial occupation for about a half-an-hour, after which the usual formalities of cricket, base ball, boating, &c., were entered into with great zest by old and young.”

Sources

English Baseball in Kent, London in 1879

Block Game English Baseball
Date 1879
Location Kent, London
Data

“Base-ball” was mentioned in a Victorian novel of the type that conveyed moral lessons to its young adult readers. In one scene a young woman was reading a poem to some of the children in her care: “She had just finished, when one of the servants appeared to relieve her of her charge, and the children, repaying her with eager thanks and kisses, rushed off to the fresh delights of a game of base-ball, leaving Margaret free to follow her own inclinations.”

Notes

The novel appears to be set in a small fictitious village along the southern coast of Kent.

Sources

Some of Life's Lessons, by Mary Jefferis, London, 1879, Remington & Co., pp. 134-135

English Baseball in Berkshire on March 13 1879

Block Game English Baseball
Date Thursday, March 13, 1879
Location Berkshire
Data

A game of “ base-ball” in the small village of Crookham, Berkshire, was at the center of a legal complaint that was heard at the County Petty Sessions in Newbury. A newspaper summary read as follows: “Charles Pocock, a young man described a haybinder, was charged with using threatening language towards Andrew Webb, at Crookham, on the 2nd of March. Mr. Charles Lucas appeared for complainant, and stated that his client lived on Crookham Common. It was the practice of defendant and his companions to assemble near Webb's house on Sunday afternoons, and, much to the latter's annoyance, indulge in various games, such as 'base-ball,' &c. On Sunday they were busy with their usual diversions, when, upon complainant remonstrating with them, defendant offered to fight, and used serious threats toward him.” Verdict, guilty, and defendant was fined ₤5.

Sources

Newbury Weekly News and General Advertiser, March 13, 1879, p. 7

English Baseball in Norfolk on May 3 1879

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, May 3, 1879
Location Norfolk
Data

“Base-ball” was among the usual street games enjoyed by boys in the Norfolk coastal town of Yarmouth before being chased away and pursued by a policeman who appeared to have gone insane. The tale was related in a newspaper article headlined “A Mad Policeman” that reported: “The most convincing proof that he had 'gone wrong' was the unwonted energy that he displayed in the attempt to capture a number of boys who were playing about the streets, and who as a rule are allowed to enjoy their games of whip-top, base-ball, and other pastimes in the middle of the public streets unmolested by 'Mr. Bobby.' [The policeman], however, had apparently conceived an idea that this normal state of things should be stopped, and he at once put in practice his conviction by 'running in' several boys who playing about the streets.” It was suspected that something was wrong with him, and following a police surgeon's examination he was declared insane.

Sources

Yarmouth Independent, May 3, 1879, p. 5

English Baseball in Hampshire on May 13 1879

Block Game English Baseball
Date Tuesday, May 13, 1879
Location Hampshire
Data

Readying the grounds for “base ball” was reported by a newspaper to be among the new improvements being made to a park in Portsmouth, Hampshire: “The Play-Ground in the Park.--Very great improvements are now being made by the Park Committee in the portion of the ground allotted to the children. The rough stones have all been removed to make room for fine gravel which is now being rolled in. Orders have also been given for fixing some stones to act as bases for the games of rounders and base ball.”

Notes

It is notable that “base ball” and rounders are mentioned side-by-side, re-confirming they were separate games.

Sources

Portsmouth Evening News, May 13, 1879, p. 2

English Baseball in Hampshire on May 15 1879

Block Game English Baseball
Date Thursday, May 15, 1879
Location Hampshire
Data

Entitled “Ball Throwing Nuisance,” a complaint about “baseball” play in the Landport district of Portsmouth was the subject of a letter to the editor of a local newspaper: “SIR,--By the medium of your paper, I should like to ask how much longer the inhabitants of Landport are to be subject to the above nuisance which in some places has become unbearable? Take Central-street or Church-path for instance. Every evening for the past two months or more, from about half past six, a party of youths from sixteen to twenty years of age, make it a practice to indulge in a game of baseball until it is too dark for them to see. If you escape being knocked down by them or struck by the ball you cannot close your ears to the disgusting and obscene language which they make use of at the same time, and until the police make their appearance. Unless the ringleaders are made an example of we cannot hope that it will be much better. Hoping it will not be very long before something is done. I remain yours truly, A RESIDENT.”

Sources

Portsmouth Evening News, May 15, 1879, p. 3

English Baseball in Buckinghamshire on August 30 1879

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 30, 1879
Location Buckinghamshire
Data

"Bass ball" was played at an outing of the choir, teachers, district visitors and other church workers of St. Mary's Parish Church in Chesham, Buckinghamshire. Following a cricket match, and games of tug of war, "the remainder of the day was devoted to bass ball, croquet, thread the needle and other games, til the shades of evening fell."

Sources

Bucks Herald, Aug. 30, 1879, p. 8

English Baseball in Suffolk on September 6 1879

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, September 6, 1879
Location Suffolk
Data

“Baste” (ball) was played by girl members of the Framlingham, Suffolk, Band of Hope at their annual treat. The newspaper covering the event reported that “girls without any delay betook themselves to swings, croquet, baste and trap ball; and the boys to swinging and cricket, and thus the afternoon was passed on the green sward with a splendid summer sun shining upon them.”

Sources

Framlingham Weekly News, Sept. 6, 1879, p. 4

English Baseball in London on September 8 1879

Block Game English Baseball
Date Monday, September 8, 1879
Location London
Data

“Base ball” was featured twice in a schedule of upcoming swimming fixtures that was published in a London sporting newspaper. It reported that the West London Club would hold a “base ball competition” on the 9th of September, and that the final heat of the competition would be held on Sept. 16th.

Notes

There was no information provided about precisely how these water baseball competitions were to be played.

Sources

The Sportsman (London), Sept. 8, 1879, p. 1

English Baseball in Scottish Borders on September 11 1879

Block Game English Baseball
Date Thursday, September 11, 1879
Location Scottish Borders
Data

“Base ball” was among the the games played at a Saturday picnic for students of the Free Church Sunday School in the village of Innerleithen in the Scottish Borders council area of Scotland. A newspaper reported that “the weather being exceptionally fine, there was a large turn-out of children, teachers, and friends. Football, cricket, base ball, races, leaping, swings, skipping, and number of other games were gone into with great spirit.”

Notes

It is a bit unusual to find English baseball played in Scotland

Sources

Southern Reporter (Selkirk, Scottish Borders), Sept. 11, 1879, p. 3

English Baseball in Buckinghamshire on September 13 1879

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, September 13, 1879
Location Buckinghamshire
Data

A newspaper reported that "base ball" was one of the games played at the annual treat for 90 students of the British School of Princes Risborough, Buckinghamshire: "Among the sports were cricket, base ball, races, and scrambles, the latter for a good stock of sweets and biscuits."

Sources

Bucks Herald, Sept 13, 1879, p. 7

English Baseball in Suffolk on September 13 1879

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, September 13, 1879
Location Suffolk
Data

“Baste-ball” was one of the games offered at the annual treat for students of the Free Methodist Sunday School of Framlingham, Suffolk. According to the local newspaper, the youngsters marched from the school to a nearby meadow “Where the afternoon was passed in swinging, cricket, trap ball, racking, baste-ball, &c.”

Sources

Framlingham Weekly News, Sept. 13, 1879, p. 4

English Baseball in Somerset on September 17 1879

Block Game English Baseball
Date Wednesday, September 17, 1879
Location Somerset
Data

A suggestion that a game similar to “baseball” would be played on horseback was made in a gossip column appearing in a Somerset newspaper. It read: “Polo has had its innings, its sensations, and, I regret to add, a heavy score of victims. A new sort of joust or tournament ả cheval is, I hear, about to be started soon. It will not be unlike the old school-boy game of baseball but a hurdle or two will be introduced into the enceinte.”

Sources

Weston-super-Mare Gazette and General Advertiser, Sept. 17, 1879, p. 4

English Baseball in Cumbria on November 15 1879

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, November 15, 1879
Location Cumbria
Data

“Base ball” was mentioned when an apprentice and his employer traded accusations in the course of a court hearing in the Cumbrian coastal town of Whitehaven a dispute over wages. The employer accused the apprentice of neglecting his work and employing his time instead playing marbles. According to a newspaper, the apprentice “denied playing marbles except during meal times and after the legitimate hours of work. He also alleged that his master had often played marbles and base ball during working hours, and had encouraged [the apprentice] to play with him.”

Sources

Carlisle Express and Examiner, Nov. 15, 1879, p. 2