Block:English Baseball 1900s

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English Baseball


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English Baseball 1900s (47 entries)

Contents

English Baseball in Berkshire on January 6 1900

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, January 6, 1900
Location Berkshire
Data

He was only playing “base ball” was the excuse given by a boy accused of assaulting a woman in the town of Reading, Berkshire. A newspaper reported on testimony at a court proceeding where “the defendant said he struck the complainant accidentally as he was playing base ball. They had to touch a base and this happened to be close to Mrs Simon's step.” The court rejected the excuse and fined the defendant 10 shillings or 7 days imprisonment.

Sources

Berkshire Chronicle, Jan 6, 1900, p. 3

English Baseball in Hampshire on May 14 1900

Block Game English Baseball
Date Monday, May 14, 1900
Location Hampshire
Data

A newspaper reported that several young men were fined for playing “baseball” on the Isle of Wight. “BASEBALL IN THE STREET. Edward McGabey, Bertie Knapp, Jas. Hayles, Ernest Chiverton and Wm. Taylor, East Cowes apprentices, were each fined 1s. and 4s. costs for playing baseball in Park-street, East Cowes, where windows and street lamps were stated to have been broken.”

Sources

Portsmouth Evening News, May 14, 1900, p. 2

English Baseball in Hampshire on June 11 1900

Block Game English Baseball
Date Monday, June 11, 1900
Location Hampshire
Data

Under the same title “BASEBALL IN THE STREET” as in the above entry, another group of youths were fined for playing baseball, this time in Portsmouth: “Ernest Taylor, 15, Albert Ball, 15, George Smart, 17, and George Eisey, 17, were charged with playing baseball in Willis-road on the 3rd, and were mulcted in a penalty of 1s. each.”

Sources

Portsmouth Evening News, June 11, 1900, p. 3

English Baseball in Shropshire on August 17 1900

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, August 17, 1900
Location Shropshire
Data

“Base-ball” was played by children whose families were inmates or staff of the Ludlow Workhouse in Ludlow, Shropshire, on the occasion of the annual public sale of goods manufactured by the inmates. According to a newspaper report, a tea was provided in the workhouse for attendees, and then “shortly after five the children were brought to the Castle Green under the charge of [the assistant matron], and were soon engaged in cricket, base-ball, tennis and foot racing.”

Notes

Shropshire was not a typical venue for English baseball. It is also true that Ludlow was not far distant from some of the first clubs organized to play American style baseball in England. Yet there is no evidence that children had begun playing the American game this early.

Sources

Shrewsbury Chronicle, Aug. 17, 1900

English Baseball in Surrey on December 7 1900

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, December 7, 1900
Location Surrey
Data

A “base-ball” captain was one of the officers elected at the annual meeting of Monotype Athletic Club of Salfords, Surrey. A newspaper reported that Mr. W. Denning was recipient of this honor, joined by other individuals who were chosen captains for football, cricket, tennis and cycling respectively.

Notes

Given the formality of this election, it is possible the club was playing American-style baseball, notwithstanding that the original English game was still being practiced in Surrey and other southern English counties at the time. The Monotype Athletic Club appears to be have been succeeded long ago by the current Perrywood Sports and Social Club of Salfords.

Sources

Surrey Mirror, Dec. 7, 1900, p. 7

English Baseball in London on July 13 1901

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, July 13, 1901
Location London
Data

“Base ball” was played by boys attending the Sunday School connected to the Working Lads' Institute in the Whitechapel district of east London on an excursion to a retreat in Chingford in northeast London. According to a newspaper story: “Everything was done to help the children to have a happy day. Some were sent for donkey rides, some for brake rides, some put in swings, and such games as football, skipping rope, base ball, and hunt in the Woods were engaged in.”

Notes

American baseball by organized clubs of adult men were already known in London by this date, but these players were young children at my guess is that they were playing the traditional form of the game.

Sources

East London Observer, Muly 13, 1901, p. 5

English Baseball in Norfolk on August 31 1901

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 31, 1901
Location Norfolk
Data

“Base-ball” was enjoyed by members of the church choir of the small market town of Acle, Norfolk, at an event hosted by the rector and his wife. A newspaper reported that “after tea, croquet, tennis, and base-ball were much enjoyed, until darkness set in.”

Sources

Norfolk Chronicle, Aug. 31, 1901, p. 4

English Baseball in Hampshire on June 7 1902

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, June 7, 1902
Location Hampshire
Data

“Base-ball” and rounders were among the games played by school children in the village of Oakley in Hampshire when school was cancelled and a celebration begun after news of peace in the South African war had arrived. A newspaper reported that “a band of ringers were summoned and the Church bells rang out their joyful and rejoicing sounds in honour of the glad event. The school children were engaged in games of cricket, rounders, base-ball, &c., with their teachers for the morning, and at 12 o'clock some very hearty and lusty cheers were raised.”

Notes

Another example of baseball and rounders played side by side. Oakley, near Basingstoke, is less than three miles from Jane Austen's home village of Steventon.

Sources

Hants and Berks Gazette and Middlesex and Surrey Journal, June 7, 1902, p. 8

English Baseball in Suffolk on July 19 1902

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, July 19, 1902
Location Suffolk
Data

“Base-ball” was played at the annual treat for students of the Sunday School connected to the Free Methodist Church of Framlingham, Suffolk. A newspaper reported that “Having met at two o'clock at the School Room, they marched with flags flying up to Hill Farm, where Mr. Brown placed a newly mown meadow at their service. Swinging, cricket, base-ball, up-and-down, trap and bat, racing and scrambling were among the pastimes indulged in.”

Sources

Framlingham Weekly News, July 19, 1902, p. 4

English Baseball in Berkshire on July 23 1902

Block Game English Baseball
Date Wednesday, July 23, 1902
Location Berkshire
Data

The playing of “base-ball” was part of complaint lodged in a letter to the editor of a newspaper written by a citizen who objected to the “indecorous and unseemly behaviour of big boys” in a local park in Maidenhead, Berkshire, on Sunday afternoons and evenings. “The shouting and behaviour generally are most reprehensible,” he wrote, “and should not be tolerated on a Sunday in any well-conducted town. Base-ball, cricket, and football are played as if Sunday were a Bank Holiday, and to those of us who reside within sight of the park it is positively painful and decidedly annoying.”

Sources

Maidenhead Advertiser, July 23, 1902, p 6.

English Baseball in Buckinghamshire on August 12 1902

Block Game English Baseball
Date Tuesday, August 12, 1902
Location Buckinghamshire
Data

“Base ball” was enjoyed at an annual treat for students of the Church Sunday School of Ivinghoe, a village in Buckinghamshire near the borders of Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire. According to a newspaper report, after gathering at the school, “a procession was formed and marched to the Vicarage Field where cricket, base ball, and other games were played until tea was served.”

Sources

Bedford Record, Aug. 12, 1902, p. 4

English Baseball in East Yorkshire on August 12 1902

Block Game English Baseball
Date Tuesday, August 12, 1902
Location East Yorkshire
Data

"Baseball" was named in a news story as possibly contributing to a young woman's death in the town of Hessle, East Yorkshire. Appearing under the heading "Playing at Base Ball" was the following: "The tragic death of Edith Eliza Fennellow (21), 9, John-street, Hull, at the Cliff, Humber-side, Hessle, on Saturday, formed the subject of an inquiry at the Admiral Hawke Hotel, Hessle, on Monday. She had gone for a stroll, and was playing baseball when she fell and expired. Dr. S. H. Johnson testified that death was due to syncope, and a verdict of 'Natural causes' was returned."

Sources

Hull Daily Mail, Aug. 12, 1902, p. 2

English Baseball in Buckinghamshire on April 11 1903

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, April 11, 1903
Location Buckinghamshire
Data

A complaint about “base-ball” was leveled by a councilman in the town of Buckingham, Bucks, as part of his motion to stop the play of various games on Church Hill in the nearby village of Akeley. According to a newspaper report, he proposed that “no football, hockey, cricket, or dangerous games be allowed on the Church Hill.” He argued that these game endangered mothers walking with young children, and the elderly. Regarding the players, “he was not now speaking of the little lads, but of older boys, 14 or 15 years of age, and he was sorry to say that their language was at times very bad. The other day they were playing base-ball at the east entrance to the Hill, and the ball hit the grand east window, and if it had not been for the wire-netting with which it was protected the stained glass would have been broken.”

Notes

Possibly American baseball, although there is little evidence it had replaced the original English version in Bucks by that date

Sources

Buckingham Advertiser and Free Press, April 11, 1903, p. 2

English Baseball in Oxfordshire, Warwickshire on July 16 1903

Block Game English Baseball
Date Thursday, July 16, 1903
Location Oxfordshire, Warwickshire
Data

“Base-ball” was played by members and friends of the Wanderers Athletic Club of Banbury, Oxfordshire, on an outing and picnic held at Edge Hill in southern Warwickshire. After arriving at their destination, according to a newspaper report, “At the Tea Gardens a cricket match was played between ladies and gentlemen, the ladies being victorious by three runs. Base-ball and other amusements were also entered into with spirit, and the natural beauties of the historic neighborhood also claimed attention.”

Sources

Banbury Advertiser, July 16, 1903, p. 5

English Baseball in Hampshire on July 25 1903

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, July 25, 1903
Location Hampshire
Data

“Base ball” was among many activities enjoyed by youngsters attending the Children's Festival of the Co-Operative Society of Basingstoke, Hampshire. According to a newspaper account of the festivities, the large party proceeded by foot to the festival site where “arriving at the meadow the tent which had been erected for the disposal of minerals, cakes, sweets, etc., was stormed by thirsty children, and those waiting upon them had a very lively time of it. Games were indulged in for a time, such as cricket, base ball, etc., and there were swings erected for those who were thus inclined.”

Sources

Hants and Berks Gazette and Middlesex and Surrey Journal, July 25, 1903, p. 5

English Baseball in Bedfordshire on June 21 1904

Block Game English Baseball
Date Tuesday, June 21, 1904
Location Bedfordshire
Data

“Base-ball” was played as part of large garden party held in conjunction with the Ladies' Sewing Society associated with the Wesleyan Chapel of Grovebury, a neighborhood of Leighton Buzzard, a town in Bedfordshire. Newspaper coverage noted that “the tennis court was continually occupied by exponents of the popular summer game, whilst bowls and 'bumble puppy,' or 'tether ball' as it is sometimes called, each attracted their moiety of devotees. Tea was provided in the large games room behind the house, a tasty and satisfying meal being enjoyed by all, and at its conclusion an adjournment was made by the young folk to a field near by, where base-ball and other open air games made the hours pass all too swiftly.”

Notes

American baseball is a possibility, although there is no previous evidence it being played at this type of social event in this era.

Sources

Leighton Buzzard Observer and Linslade Gazette, June 21, 1904, p. 5

English Baseball in Hampshire on August 25 1904

Block Game English Baseball
Date Thursday, August 25, 1904
Location Hampshire
Data

“Base-ball” was played at the annual outing of “the employes (sic) of Messrs. J.E. Whittle and Co., cycle and motor engineers” of Portsmouth, held at the village of Rowland's Castle, Hampshire: “After the meal, sides were chosen for football, and the match between G. Whittle's team and F. Whittle's resulted in a draw 2-2. During the evening base-ball and various games were played, whilst some strolled into Rowland's Castle.”

Sources

Portsmouth Evening News, Aug. 25, 1904, p. 5

English Baseball in Surrey, Hampshire on August 9 1905

Block Game English Baseball
Date Wednesday, August 9, 1905
Location Surrey, Hampshire
Data

A game of “base ball” was one of the activities enjoyed by members and friends of the Mizpah Gospel Mission of Southsea (Portsmouth), Hampshire on their annual outing to Haslemere, located some 35 miles away in Surrey. A newspaper reported that after arriving by train, “the party, headed by the Mizpah brass band, marched to the Congregational Lecture Hall where refreshments were provided, after which the party dispersed, some going for a stroll, while a large number made their way to the recreation ground, where various games were indulged in, including a football and cricket match, and also a good game of base ball.”

Sources

Portsmouth Evening News, August 9, 1905, p. 5

English Baseball in Surrey on August 11 1905

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, August 11, 1905
Location Surrey
Data

Two boys were charged with playing “baseball' on a public road in Reigate, Surrey, according to a newspaper report: “Robert Gardiner and Percy Frost, two lads, were summoned for playing baseball on the highway. Inspector Jeffrey said that on the 27th ult. He saw defendants playing baseball with other boys in Holmesdale-road. When spoken to they said they were sorry.--Fined 1s. each or seven days' hard labour.”

Sources

Surrey Mirror, Aug. 11, 1905, p. 4

English Baseball in East Sussex on December 1 1905

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, December 1, 1905
Location East Sussex
Data

“Baseball” was mentioned in a local council discussion about the cleanliness of the Whitehill School of Crowborough, East Sussex, as reported in a local newspaper. The medical officer, Mr. Stott, complained the school was not being cleaned adequately. Another participant, Mr. Corfe, “said the schools were swept and cleaned every night. When Mr. Stott called there was a little sand in one of the basins, and that was caused by a child washing its hands after playing baseball. He went to the school after Mr. Stott had left, and he denied that there had been any neglect on the part of the caretaker.”

Sources

Kent & Sussex Courier (Tunbridge Wells), Dec. 1, 1905, p. 8

English Baseball in Suffolk on May 25 1906

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, May 25, 1906
Location Suffolk
Data

“Base-ball” was played by members of the Ipswich (Suffolk) Early Closing Cycling and Recreation Club on an outing. According to brief newspaper notice, “[They] cycled to their meadow on Woodbridge Road on Wednesday, for cricket, base-ball, etc.”

Sources

Evening Star (Ipswich), May 26, 1906, p. 4

English Baseball in Hampshire on June 2 1906

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, June 2, 1906
Location Hampshire
Data

A game of “baseball” was played by some of the 200 students of the Council Schools of Basingstoke, Hampshire, as part of their “Summer Ramble,” an annual field trip to the countryside to study nature and play games. A newspaper reporter accompanied the party, and in his ensuing story described how the students took a long nature walk, and then “westward we go, till close to the school, hidden in its clump of trees, we find the much desired spot and soon sides are chosen and cricket and baseball are in full swing.”

Sources

Hants and Berks Gazette and Middlesex and Surrey Journal, June 2, 1906, p. 6

English Baseball in Surrey, South London on June 16 1906

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, June 16, 1906
Location Surrey, South London
Data

“Base ball” was played by men and women of the Whitehorse-road Cycle Club of Croydon in South London while stopping at Burgh Heath near Banstead in Surrey at the midpoint of a day's ride. A brief newspaper notice mentioned that “on the heath, a game of base ball was taken up and good fun was got out of it.”

Sources

Croydon Guardian and Surrey County Gazette, June 16, 1906, p. 8

English Baseball in Hampshire on July 28 1906

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, July 28, 1906
Location Hampshire
Data

“Base ball” was enjoyed by children participating in the annual summer outing connected with the Village United Total Abstinence Band of Hope Society of King's Somborne, a village in Hampshire near Winchester. A newspaper reported that “on arriving at their destination . . . games such as cricket, rings, base ball, and swings were freely indulged in till the call for tea came.”

Sources

Hampshire Chronicle (Winchester), July 28, 1906, p. 10

English Baseball in Hampshire on June 22 1907

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, June 22, 1907
Location Hampshire
Data

For playing “base-ball” in a farmer's field near Basingstoke, Hampshire, six boys pleaded guilty to damaging the grass. According to a newspaper notice, a policeman “found the defendants playing base-ball in the long grass in a field near to the Worting-road allotments.”

Sources

Hampshire Chronicle (Winchester), June 22, 1907, p. 7

English Baseball in Hampshire on July 15 1907

Block Game English Baseball
Date Monday, July 15, 1907
Location Hampshire
Data

“Base-ball” was among the amusements enjoyed by students of the Boys Secondary School of Portsmouth, Hampshire on their annual outing held at the resort of Seaview on the Isle of Wight. A newspaper reported that “the boys and teachers had a very enjoyable time. They boys broke up into parties for cricket, base-ball, swimming, boating, and photography.”

Sources

Portsmouth Evening News, July 15, 1907, p. 5

English Baseball in Surrey on August 9 1907

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, August 9, 1907
Location Surrey
Data

Under the heading “Sunday School Field Day,” a newspaper reported that “baseball” was played in the town of Redhill, Surrey: “In connection with the Redhill Primitive Methodist Sunday School a most enjoyable field day was held on Wednesday in a meadow lent by Mr. E. Burgess. Cricket, baseball, swinging, etc., were heartily indulged in by both old and young, and a large company partook of an excellent and well-arranged tea.”

Sources

Surrey Mirror, Aug. 9, 1907, p. 5

English Baseball in East Sussex on February 8 1908

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, February 8, 1908
Location East Sussex
Data

A reference to “baseball” appeared in a prize essay entitled “Value of Open-Air Games” that was written by Alice West, age 13, of the Iford and Kingston School near Lewes, East Sussex, and that was published in the “Our Little Contributors” column in a local newspaper. One passage read: “Most people, especially children, like to play games, such as football, hockey, cricket and tennis, which are all healthy games. The most favourite game among boys at our school is the game of hockey or soldiers. Our governess and teacher tell us how important health is, for there is nothing more dearer (sic) than our lives. Skipping, baseball, hoops, rounders, fox and hounds, and rings, are the usual games for the girls.”

Sources

Sussex Agricultural Express, Feb. 8, 1908, p. 7

English Baseball in Surrey on June 13 1908

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, June 13, 1908
Location Surrey
Data

“Baseball” was one of the activities enjoyed my members of the Wesleyan Bible and Physical Culture Classes of Farnham, an ancient town in far western Surrey, on a camping experience on the slopes of Hindhead, the hilliest area in Surrey. A newspaper reported that one morning “after breakfast, cricket was indulged in by the campers and other friends from Farnham, and baseball and other games occupied attention during the afternoon.”

Sources

Hants and Berks Gazette and Middlesex and Surrey Journal, June 13, 1908, p. 8

English Baseball in Hampshire on August 1 1908

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 1, 1908
Location Hampshire
Data

“Base ball” was among the recreational choices for students of the United Free Methodist Church Sunday School in the Hampshire village of King's Somborne at their annual summer outing. According to a newspaper report, the children traveled on wagons to a nearby park. “After alighting, the children soon made themselves at home, and games of almost every description were indulged in. Some went for the swings . . ., while others preferred cricket, base ball, &c.”

Sources

Hampshire Chronicle (Winchester), Aug. 1, 1908, p. 8

English Baseball in East Sussex on December 26 1908

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, December 26, 1908
Location East Sussex
Data

The word “base ball” appeared in a criminal case in Battle, East Sussex, where two young men were facing charges from an incident at the Westfield School. According to a news report, a witness stated that “on the day in question, at recreation time, the boys [students of the school] were playing base ball in the playground when a young man and a big boy came along. The ball was knocked down towards the gate and the young man came through the gate, picked up the ball, and kicked it in the playground.” The report went on to say that when the school boys complained, the intruders threw rocks at them, and when the schoolmaster attempted to intervene they threw rocks at him too and also got into a brief scuffle with him. The accused failed to appear in court, but were fined “₤2 each plus costs, or in default, a month's imprisonment with hard labour.”

Sources

Sussex Agricultural Express, Dec. 26, 1908, p. 5

English Baseball in Devonshire on March 16 1909

Block Game English Baseball
Date Tuesday, March 16, 1909
Location Devonshire
Data

"Base-ball" was mentioned in a newspaper column entitled "Christian Endeavor Echoes," which cited one writer's opinion that churches should offer amusements and recreational opportunities for members who might otherwise be tempted to seek them in less wholesome locales: "...he has expressed the hope to see the day when every church will have, as a matter of course, not only its library and social parlour always open to all its members, but also a generous playground, with provision for base-ball, croquet, and lawn-tennis, and games for the younger children."

Notes

A date this late would tend to cast doubt on this being a reference to English baseball. Still, the context of the passage, and the fact that there is little evidence that American baseball was played in the west of England at the time this was written, suggest the possibility that the writer had English baseball in mind. Another possibility is that this referred to Welsh-style baseball as an exhibition match of that form of the game had been played at Teignmouth, Devonshire in 1907.

Sources

Western Times (Exeter), Mar. 16, 1909, p.6

English Baseball in Berkshire on June 2 1909

Block Game English Baseball
Date Wednesday, June 2, 1909
Location Berkshire
Data

“Baseball” was part of the fun for members of the Wesley Institute of Maidenhead, Berkshire, who spent the holiday romping in Maidenhead Thicket, the wooded area west of town. A newspaper reported that “they spent the afternoon until 4 o'clock on such games as baseball and cricket, and at that hour sat down to a much-appreciated tea.”

Notes

It is probable they were playing English baseball as the game had a long history in Maidenhead and environs.

Sources

Maidenhead Advertiser, June 2, 1909, p 5.

English Baseball in Essex on June 2 1909

Block Game English Baseball
Date Wednesday, June 2, 1909
Location Essex
Data

“Base ball” was one of the games chosen by some of the many holiday makers from the Hackney district of London who streamed to the sylvan settings of Epping Forest in Essex to celebrate the Whitsuntide bank holiday. A newspaper reported that “tennis, bowls, cricket and base ball were the favourite pastimes in the parks.”

Notes

This may seem a trifle late for English baseball, but this report is very similar to one about a Whitsuntide celebration in Epping Forest, published on May 18, 1880, and it may be that the traditional form of the game was part of the customary observation of the holiday.

Sources

Hackney and Kingsland Gazette, June 2, 1909,, p. 3

English Baseball in London on August 6 1909

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, August 6, 1909
Location London
Data

“Base-ball” was among the games played at the annual outing for choir members of the Christian Endeavour Society of West Hendon in northwest London. After traveling to the far west London village of Harmondsworth, a newspaper reported that “here cricket, base-ball and many other games were entered upon till tea time, when a splendid spread was placed before them.”

Sources

Hendon & Finchley Times, Aug. 6, 1909, p. 7

English Baseball in East Sussex on June 10 1910

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, June 10, 1910
Location East Sussex
Data

“Baseball” was played at the first annual outing of the “Newhaven Fort” Lodge of Good Templars of Newhaven, East Sussex, that was held in the small milling village of Barcombe Mills. A newspaper reported that: “arriving at their destination, cricket, baseball and other games were indulged in.”

Sources

Sussex Agricultural Express, June 10, 1910, p. 3

English Baseball in West Sussex East Sussex on July 8 1910

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, July 8, 1910
Location West Sussex East Sussex
Data

“Base ball” was enjoyed by students of the Newhaven Baptist Sunday School Bible Class of Newhaven, East Sussex, at their annual outing to Victoria Gardens in Burgess Hill, a town in West Sussex that borders on East Sussex. The children traveled by train, and, according to the newspaper article, “upon their arrival at Victoria Gardens games, cricket, base ball, &c., were indulged in, and the large lake came in for its share of their enjoyment.”

Sources

Sussex Agricultural Express, July 8th, 1910, p. 6

English Baseball in West Sussex on June 27 1912

Block Game English Baseball
Date Thursday, June 27, 1912
Location West Sussex
Data

“Baseball” was one of the activities offered at an amusement park in the seaside village of Littlehampton in West Sussex, that a neighbor complained about in a letter to the editor of a local newspaper. Under the headline “Fair or Unfair,” the neighbor wrote: “Dear Sir.--A rifle range open, swing boats in full swing, baseball, bowls (tournament at 7:30 p.m., prizes for the highest score), a large tent filled with 'Penny in the slot' machines, a crowd of young people, a miniature fair; this is what I am obliged to look out upon as I sit in my rooms in Empress Maud-road, Liottlehampton, this (Sunday) evening.” The writer went on to protest how the noise of the attraction was disturbing the peace of the otherwise quiet village, and that it was especially scandalous that its hours were not limited and that it was open on Sundays.

Notes

Although we cannot know what type of baseball was offered at this fair, it more than likely did not resemble formal American baseball.

Sources

West Sussex Gazette (Arundel), June 27, 1912, p. 3

English Baseball in London on August 9 1913

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 9, 1913
Location London
Data

“Base ball” was played by children attending the Wesleyan Sunday School of Uxbridge, West London, at their annual treat. According to a newspaper report, about 130 students and adults spent “a happy time,” adding “throughout the day the scholars enjoyed themselves at cricket, base ball, and other games, and races were also indulged in.”

Notes

From the setting and location, this would appear to be traditional English baseball.

Sources

Uxbridge & W. Drayton Gazette. Aug. 9, 1913, p. 8

English Baseball in Hampshire on July 31 1914

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, July 31, 1914
Location Hampshire
Data

“Baseball” was one of the amusements enjoyed by 200 children and friends attached to the Portsmouth and Gosport Seamen's Mission who went to their annual outing at a farm in coastal Hill Head. The newspaper article about the event reported that “after tea, the Sports Committee entertained the children with swings, cricket and baseball, and various races, in which every scholar secured a prize.”

Sources

Hampshire Telegraph, July 31, 1914, p. 6

English Baseball in West Sussex on July 8 1915

Block Game English Baseball
Date Thursday, July 8, 1915
Location West Sussex
Data

“Base-ball” was one of the amusements enjoyed at an outing for residents of Woodcote, a neighborhood in Graffham, a village in West Sussex. A newspaper reported that: “The inhabitants of Woodcote and neighbourhood spent yet another very pleasant time at Fairacre on Wednesday last week by the kind invitation of Mr. and Mrs. D. Guillond. Tea was served in the grounds, followed by bowls, base-ball, &c., for which prizes were given.”

Notes

Appears to have been traditional English baseball.

Sources

West Sussex Gazette (Arundel), July 8, 1915, p. 9

English Baseball in Norfolk on July 30 1915

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, July 30, 1915
Location Norfolk
Data

“Base ball” and rounders were both played at a summer treat for students representing several church schools and bible classes in the town of Diss, Norfolk. According to a newspaper report, the children first enjoyed a tea, and then the boys “indulged in cricket, rounders, base ball, jumping contests, &c., while the girls amused themselves in various ways under the supervision of the lady teachers.”

Sources

Diss (Norfolk) Express, July 30, 1915, p. 4

English Baseball in Hampshire on July 28 1916

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, July 28, 1916
Location Hampshire
Data

“Base-ball” was among the games enjoyed by boys and girls of the Portsmouth Royal Seamen and Marines Orphan Home at a summer outing to Hambledon Downs. A newspaper reported that the scene did the accompanying naval men “a real amount of good to see the little ones enjoy themselves in their games of cricket, base-ball, etc.”

Sources

Hampshire Telegraph, July 28, 1916, p. 2

English Baseball in Bedfordshire on August 30 1921

Block Game English Baseball
Date Tuesday, August 30, 1921
Location Bedfordshire
Data

“Baseball” was played by ladies alone, or possibly with men as well, at a half day's outing of officers and teachers of Park-street Baptist Sunday School of Luton, Bedordshire. A newspaper report, that was not altogether clear, stated that various games were played, including a remarkable football match, which was responsible for many stiff limbs on Sunday morning for those unaccustomed to such strenuous exercise. The ladies, meanwhile, contented themselves with the less boisterous game of baseball, but when sports in which both sexes could take part came on the fun waxed furious indeed, and it was whispered that the tremendous atmospheric vibration set up brought great showers of autumn leaves from the stately old trees that looked down on the revels.”

Notes

It's not clear to me whether “sports in which both sexes could take part” included baseball, or whether the ladies played it without men. This is late for English baseball but it seems more likely than American style, given the context.

Sources

Beds and Herts Pictorial, Aug. 30, 1921, p. 2

English Baseball in Buckinghamshire on June 30 1922

Block Game English Baseball
Date Friday, June 30, 1922
Location Buckinghamshire
Data

“Baseball” was one of the games taken up by lady members of the Amersham (Buckinghamshire) Traders Association to the nearby hamlet of Mop End. While the men were engaged in a spirited match of cricket, a newspaper reported that “the lady members had been indulging in tennis, cricket and baseball.”

Notes

Late, but possibly English baseball because the players were women.

Sources

Buckinghamshire Examiner, June 30, 1922, p. 4

English Baseball in Hampshire on July 16 1923

Block Game English Baseball
Date Monday, July 16, 1923
Location Hampshire
Data

Water “base ball” was among the attractions at an aquatics competition staged by the Gosport Athletic Swimming Club of the southern Hampshire town of Gosport, held at nearby Stokes Bay. A newspaper report of the event revealed “there was much enthusiasm over a six a-side water base ball match, in which both ladies and gentlemen took part. The ladies were very keen, Miss Bell getting two rounders in easy style.”

Notes

This is a very late example of the mysterious English phenomenon of water baseball. That scores were called “rounders” suggests the game was modeled after English baseball, rather than American.

Sources

Portsmouth Evening News, July 16, 1923, p. 5

English Baseball in Suffolk on August 30 1924

Block Game English Baseball
Date Saturday, August 30, 1924
Location Suffolk
Data

“Base ball” was among the amusements enjoyed by young cadets of the Sons of Temperance from the town of Hadleigh, Suffolk, who were treated to a day and evening's outing on an estate in the nearby village of Layham. According to a newspaper report, “during the evening, amusements of various kinds, viz., cricket, skipping, base ball, and racing for money, were freely indulged in, the hunting for hidden treasures causing much fun.”

Notes

Given the late date, it might seem unlikely that these children were playing English-style baseball. Yet the setting in rural Suffolk, the two-word spelling of the word baseball, and the familiar motif of a church-affiliated children's group playing the game on a country outing, all support the possibility that this could be a rare surviving example of an otherwise extinct form of baseball.

Sources

Bury Free Press, Aug. 30, 1924, p. 9