Difference between revisions of "Curb Ball"

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{{Game
 
{{Game
|Term=Curb-Ball
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|Term=Curb Ball
 
|Game Family=Fungo
 
|Game Family=Fungo
|Description=<p>Gregory Christiano describes this as a non-running game in which a player threw a spaldeen against a curb so that it lofted into the field of play. A caught fly was and out, and otherwise the number of bounces determined base advancement, wilth four bounces counting as a home run.</p>
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|Location=New York
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|Game Regions=US
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|Game Eras=Derivative
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|Invented Game=No
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|Description=<p>&nbsp;</p>
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<p><strong>"Curb ball</strong> - no baserunning - played with 1 -3 players per team on a side street directly under my (Bronx) bedroom window [which allowed me to participate whenever i wished because i could always hear the game organizing] - a 1 1/2 lane street separated the hitting curb from a 3 1/2 foot chain link fence beyond which was a 2 lane street beyond which was a small grassy rise - spaldeen was thrown against the curb - balls that missed the point of the curb and bounced off the building wall [~10 feet away] were foul balls but if caught on the fly were outs - balls that were thrown below the curb point were in play [but usually weakly hit]; balls hitting the point often went very far[or fast]&nbsp; - caught fly balls or caught grounders were outs, unfielded ground balls were singles - balls off the first fence were singles - balls over the first fence [where 2nd and 3rd players could be positioned] were doubles if not caught on the fly - balls on the rise were triples, balls over the walls were homers - major hazards were moving cars and mothers yelling out their windows for us to quiet down."</p>
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<p>(Email from Raphael Kasper, February 3, 2020.)</p>
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<p>&nbsp;</p>
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<p>Gregory Christiano describes curb ball as a game he played in the Bronx in the mid-1950s:</p>
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<p>CURB BALL: Hit the 'spaldeen' against the sharp edge of the curb causing it to fly up as high as possible. The fielder must catch it on the fly to get an out...otherwise the number of bounces determines if it was a single, double, triple. Four bounces is a homer. There were no actual bases to run. The players would take turns when the inning was over. A regular nine-inning game was played.</p>
 
|Sources=<p><a href="http://www.myrecollection.com/christianog/games.html">http://www.myrecollection.com/christianog/games.html</a></p>
 
|Sources=<p><a href="http://www.myrecollection.com/christianog/games.html">http://www.myrecollection.com/christianog/games.html</a></p>
|Game Eras=Derivative
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|Has Supplemental Text=No
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 09:04, 4 February 2020

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Game Curb Ball
Game Family Fungo Fungo
Location New York
Regions US
Eras Derivative
Invented No
Description

 

"Curb ball - no baserunning - played with 1 -3 players per team on a side street directly under my (Bronx) bedroom window [which allowed me to participate whenever i wished because i could always hear the game organizing] - a 1 1/2 lane street separated the hitting curb from a 3 1/2 foot chain link fence beyond which was a 2 lane street beyond which was a small grassy rise - spaldeen was thrown against the curb - balls that missed the point of the curb and bounced off the building wall [~10 feet away] were foul balls but if caught on the fly were outs - balls that were thrown below the curb point were in play [but usually weakly hit]; balls hitting the point often went very far[or fast]  - caught fly balls or caught grounders were outs, unfielded ground balls were singles - balls off the first fence were singles - balls over the first fence [where 2nd and 3rd players could be positioned] were doubles if not caught on the fly - balls on the rise were triples, balls over the walls were homers - major hazards were moving cars and mothers yelling out their windows for us to quiet down."

(Email from Raphael Kasper, February 3, 2020.)

 

Gregory Christiano describes curb ball as a game he played in the Bronx in the mid-1950s:

CURB BALL: Hit the 'spaldeen' against the sharp edge of the curb causing it to fly up as high as possible. The fielder must catch it on the fly to get an out...otherwise the number of bounces determines if it was a single, double, triple. Four bounces is a homer. There were no actual bases to run. The players would take turns when the inning was over. A regular nine-inning game was played.

Sources

http://www.myrecollection.com/christianog/games.html

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