Difference between revisions of "1833.3"

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|Game=Bat-Ball
 
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|Text=<p>Maxwell, William, <u>The Field Book: or, Sports and Pastimes of the British Islands</u> [London, Effingham Wilson], per David Block, <u>Baseball Before We Knew It</u>, page 195.  In this book's short passage on cricket, Block reports, "the author issues a criticism of theories raised by the historian [was he really one? - LM] Joseph Strutt in <u>Sports and Pastimes of the People of England</u>, published in 1801 [see above - LM].  Maxwell scoffs at Strutt's comments that cricket originated from the ancient game of "club ball," and that the game of trap-ball predated both of these.  Maxwell states that cricket is far older than Strutt acknowledged, and adds: 'The game of club-ball appears to be none other than the present, well-known bat-and-ball, which . . . was doubtless anterior to trap-ball.  The trap, indeed, carries with it an air of refinement in the 'march of mechanism.'  ' Maxwell suggests that a primitive rural game similar to tip-cat was actually the ancestor of cricket, a game that used a single stick for a wicket, another stick for a bat and a short three-inch stick for the ball.  He is probably alluding the game of cat and dog, which other historians have credited as one of cricket's progenitors."  <b>Note:</b> Does Maxwell adduce evidence, or merely assert his views?</p>
 
|Text=<p>Maxwell, William, <u>The Field Book: or, Sports and Pastimes of the British Islands</u> [London, Effingham Wilson], per David Block, <u>Baseball Before We Knew It</u>, page 195.  In this book's short passage on cricket, Block reports, "the author issues a criticism of theories raised by the historian [was he really one? - LM] Joseph Strutt in <u>Sports and Pastimes of the People of England</u>, published in 1801 [see above - LM].  Maxwell scoffs at Strutt's comments that cricket originated from the ancient game of "club ball," and that the game of trap-ball predated both of these.  Maxwell states that cricket is far older than Strutt acknowledged, and adds: 'The game of club-ball appears to be none other than the present, well-known bat-and-ball, which . . . was doubtless anterior to trap-ball.  The trap, indeed, carries with it an air of refinement in the 'march of mechanism.'  ' Maxwell suggests that a primitive rural game similar to tip-cat was actually the ancestor of cricket, a game that used a single stick for a wicket, another stick for a bat and a short three-inch stick for the ball.  He is probably alluding the game of cat and dog, which other historians have credited as one of cricket's progenitors."  <b>Note:</b> Does Maxwell adduce evidence, or merely assert his views?</p>
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|Reviewed=Yes
 
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Creation Wars Begin! English Author Takes on Strutt Theories on the Origins of Cricket and "Bat-and-Ball"

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Maxwell, William, The Field Book: or, Sports and Pastimes of the British Islands [London, Effingham Wilson], per David Block, Baseball Before We Knew It, page 195. In this book's short passage on cricket, Block reports, "the author issues a criticism of theories raised by the historian [was he really one? - LM] Joseph Strutt in Sports and Pastimes of the People of England, published in 1801 [see above - LM]. Maxwell scoffs at Strutt's comments that cricket originated from the ancient game of "club ball," and that the game of trap-ball predated both of these. Maxwell states that cricket is far older than Strutt acknowledged, and adds: 'The game of club-ball appears to be none other than the present, well-known bat-and-ball, which . . . was doubtless anterior to trap-ball. The trap, indeed, carries with it an air of refinement in the 'march of mechanism.' ' Maxwell suggests that a primitive rural game similar to tip-cat was actually the ancestor of cricket, a game that used a single stick for a wicket, another stick for a bat and a short three-inch stick for the ball. He is probably alluding the game of cat and dog, which other historians have credited as one of cricket's progenitors." Note: Does Maxwell adduce evidence, or merely assert his views?

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