Clipping:Mullane's offenses

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Date Sunday, November 30, 1884
Text

Great stress has been laid on the fact that Mullane has violated no base-ball law, as regulated by the American Association rules, and in consequence he can not be regularly blacklisted. Now, the Eastern as well as Western clubs, and in fact any person endowed with even ordinary intelligence, will admit both of these facts. They know just as well as does the more or less scrupulous Secretary of the Cincinnati Club, the wide difference between a lie and a prevarication, and a theft and a breach of trust. They recognize equally as clearly as the Secretary of the Cincinnati Club how some crimes come within the pale of the law, and how others that in their course wreck far greater evil fail to fall under the hand of justice. Mullane has broken none of the stereotypes rules of the American Association, but he has done far worse. He has broken his work, even his oath, not once, but repeatedly.

He has proved himself treacherous, unscrupulous and untrustworthy o more than one occasion, and finally he has done more to cast suspicion on base-ball as a game, and his association in particular, than any player ever in its lists—not excepting drunkards, game throwers and gamblers. The association very properly feel that he has worked sufficient harm to warrant his removal, but he won't be black-listed. Up to this point the more or less significant secretary of the Cincinnati Club is perfectly correct. What they w ill do will be to circulate a petition, setting forth the details of the crooked transaction and declaring Mullane as ineligible to play with or against any club in that association, and binding each other never to hire the said Mullane. This can be done, and from present outlook sufficient signatures will be obtained to force the Cincinnati Club to give up its ill-gotten gains—all protestations of its more or less immaculate secretary notwithstanding.

Source Cincinnati Enquirer
Submitted by Richard Hershberger
Origin Initial Hershberger Clippings

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