Chronology:United States

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1862.61 Confederate POWs in Indianapolis play base ball

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

United States

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Confederate army POWs at Camp Morton, Indianapolis, played baseball in 1862, according to  a letter from a POW, and a report by a Union general. See James R. Hall, "Den of Misery. Indiana's Civil War Prison" p. 39, 71.

Camp Morton was situated on the old state fairgrounds, and was used as a baseball field postwar.

Sources:

James R. Hall, "Den of Misery. Indiana's Civil War Prison" p. 39, 71.

Year
1862
Item
1862.61
Edit

1864c.56 Confederate Prisoners Play Ball in Chicago

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

United States

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

At Camp Douglas, a prisoner of war camp in Chicago, the Confederate army prisoners played "the old-fashioned game of ball--with a ball and bats--but no base ball" (because to the prisoner, base ball meant you had to dress up in uniforms.

Copley, "A Sketch of the Battle of Franklin...." p. 172. He was taken prisoner in late 1864, thus the ballplaying he witnessed occurred in late 1864 or early 1865.

There are mentions in other books of POWs playing base ball at Camp Douglas.

For example, the Chicago Tribune, March 25, 1862 reports that the Camp Douglas POWs played " a game of ball.... giving full play to the arms, legs and lungs."

Sources:

Copley, "A Sketch of the Battle of Franklin...." p. 172

Circa
1864
Item
1864c.56
Edit

1864.57 Union Army Parolees Play Baseball in Camp

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

United States

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Cox, "Civil War Maryland" says Union army parolees played baseball in 1864 at Camp Parole, Annapolis, Maryland.

"Parole" was a system of POW exchange whereby the soldier, after surrender, took an oath not to serve again until properly exchanged, and was then released. Union parolees went to the parole camp near Annapolis that the Federal government established, to wait (in friendly territory) until notified that they'd been exchanged for a Confederate parolee. So this is another example of Union army POWs playing baseball.

Sources:

Cox, "Civil War Maryland"

Year
1864
Item
1864.57
Edit

1865.28 Union Guards at Elmira Prison Play Baseball with Confederate POWs

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

United States

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Baseball play was part of the Elmira POW Camp throughout the war.

The Chemung Union played against some Elmira POWs in 1865, according to James E. Hare, "Elmira," p. 75.

Janowski, "The Elmira Prison Camp" p. 360 says that in 1864 "The teams of the different [Confederate] states used to play baseball for the edification of the guards," quoting  a soldier who was in the 54th NY guarding the POWs.

Horrigan, "Elmira: Death Camp of the North" says that on 9-3-64 two guards regiments, the 54th and 56th NY Infantry, played baseball against each other outside the camp.

Sources:

James E. Hare, "Elmira," p. 75

Year
1865
Item
1865.28
Edit

1865.29 Ballplaying at Appomattox surrender?

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

United States

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

There's long been a story that when Robert E. Lee's Confederate army surrendered at Appomattox, April 9, 1865, the Union victors played baseball games with the Confederate POWs. According to Pat Schroeder, who works for the NPS at Appomattox, that is not true--the Union and Confederate soldiers did indeed play baseball that week, but they played in their own camps, not against each other.

Year
1865
Item
1865.29
Edit


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