Chronology:Statistics

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1853.16 Kelly Deserves Credit for Originating Shorthand Scoring System

Tags:

Statistics

Game:

Base Ball

Credit for the shorthand scoring system belongs not to Chadwick but to Michael J. Kelly of the Herald. The box score — beyond the recording of outs and runs—may be Kelly's invention as well, but cricket had supplied the model."

Sources:

John Thorn, "Pots and Pans and Bats and Balls," posted January 23, 2008 at

http://thornpricks.blogspot.com/2008/01/pots-pans-and-bats-balls.html

Year
1853
Item
1853.16
Edit

1859.59 Clear Score

Tags:

Statistics

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"Leggett batted beautifully throughout, his score being the highest and only clear one of the match."

Sources:

New York Clipper, Aug.13, 1859

Comment:

Henry Chadwick, the father of baseball statistics, primarily measured runs and outs in his early work. One of his few additions was the clear score, which counted the number of games where a batter made his base every time he batted, and made no outs, either as a batter or a base runner.

Year
1859
Item
1859.59
Edit

1860.19 Second Annual Chadwick Guide Prints Season Stats for the Year

Tags:

Statistics

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

This second annual guide printed 1860 statistics for players and teams and contains rule revisions.

Sources:

Chadwick, Henry, Beadle's Dime Base-Ball Player for 1861 [New York, Ross and Tousey],  per David Block, Baseball Before We Knew It, page 222. 

Year
1860
Item
1860.19
Edit

1860.22 Educatin' the Readers

Tags:

Newspaper Coverage, Statistics

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "BALL PLAY. A CORRECT SCORE OF A BASE BALL MATCH.-- We give the following score of the contest between the Atlantic and Star Club, as a sample of how the scores of all first-class matches should be kept, in order that a complete analysis of the player's play may be obtained at the close of the year...We trust that the National Association will present to the next convention some plan of scoring that can be generally adopted, like that of the cricket clubs, which is a complete system...Next season we shall give more space to base ball...In the meantime, we shall present to our readers many interesting articles in reference to the game..."

[B] Between February and April, 1860, the Clipper followed uo with a series of six articles on various aspects of the game, from starting a club to playing the positions.

[C] Later in the year: "NEW SCORE BOOK.-- We have recently been shown an improved score book for the game of base ball, just published by Messrs. Richardson and McLeod, 106 Maiden-lane. It is a vast improvement on the old score book, and must commend itself to general adoption by base ball clubs, as it contains the rules and regulations of the game as adopted by the National Association of Base Ball Clubs (sic), with admirably arranged columns . The score book is sufficient for one hundred games, at the low price of two dollars."

 

Sources:

[A] New York Clipper, Jan. 14, 1860

[B] New York Clipper, Feb. 18, 1860 - April 7, 1860

[C] Wilkes' Spirit of the Times, June 9, 1860.

Comment:

The Clipper's effort was part of Henry Chadwick's push to encourage the formation of clubs and make base ball a more "scientific" game, by publishing instructions and collecting statistics. 

Richardson and McLeod ran a restaurant at 106 Maiden Lane that catered to base ballists. See 1859.66

The instructional material mirrored the "X" Letters published in Porter's Spirit of the Times in 1857-1858. See 1857.42

Year
1860
Item
1860.22
Edit

1866.8 Earned Runs Concept Advanced

Tags:

Statistics

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"Taking a fair average of the Eureka pitching, by deducting the additional runs in the first inning from the four miscatches, and allowing the one run only which the Athletics first earned in that inning, we find a total of 17 runs in three innings charged to Ford’s pitching, to offset which there was but one miscatch, and but 16 runs charged to Faitoute in six innings, an average of over two to one in his favor.  These figures tell the story.  We refer to this matter in order to do justice to Faitoute; many laying the defeats sustained in the two matches mainly to his pitching, whereas the fault lay in the errors in the field and in the lack of skill displayed at the bat, the superior of play on the part of their adversaries of course having a great deal to do with the result."

Sources:

New York Sunday Mercury, September 2, 1866, per 19cbb post by Richard Hershberger, Sep. 4, 2012

Comment:

This is remarkably advanced analysis.  It doesn't take the final step of calculating the earned run average per nine innings, but it is otherwise identical to the modern ERA stat.  It then argues that the true abilities of the players are better shown through statistical analysis than by superficial judgments.  Gentlemen, we have a sabermetrician here!

Year
1866
Item
1866.8
Edit


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